Told in the twilight

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Material Information

Title:
Told in the twilight
Physical Description:
64 p. : col. ill. ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Weatherly, Frederic Edward, 1848-1929
Edwards, Mary Ellen, 1839-ca. 1910 ( Illustrator )
Staples, John C ( Illustrator )
Hildesheimer and Faulkner ( Publisher )
Publisher:
Hildesheimer and Faulkner
Place of Publication:
London
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1885   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1885
Genre:
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by F.E. Weatherly ; illustrated by M. Ellen Edwards & John C. Staples.
General Note:
Some illustrations are printed in full colors, and others and text are in tones of brown.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002225231
notis - ALG5503
oclc - 06418761
System ID:
UF00053196:00001

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LONDON
HILDESHEIMER AND FAULKNER
41 JEWIN STREET EC






























"The old iorld owl. ades from w, .
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nd all is range and all is dne%,
"2 For ths, r this is T light -lan d.
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I-IHF day is. done, the day is doune.a
: ~ nd all thle trouble ofr the dtiv
iThe long lat crilms':ln of the un
Is nicltiii. intu silver gray.
The old ,:rhlJ .,lowlh fades from view, ''"
\\ithin another world we stand,
And all is strange and all is new,
: For this, for this is Twilight-land.

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THE TWILIGHT HOUR.

CHILDREN, who read these little rhymes,
Out of the Twilight-land sent clear,
There's many a one in these hurrying times,
Has not the time, like you, to hear.


But, children, this is your hour indeed;
And this is its ,eauty, this its power,
That all you love and that all you need
Comes to your hearts in the twilight hour.


This is the hour when dreams come true,
And life has never a tear or care,
When those you have lost come back to you,
And all your castles are strong and fair.


Then, children,who read, and I a h.r a e,---
Shall we not pray with all our i. :) er .
That whatever we lose of the world' delight, i
We lose not the peace of the t,ilight hour"





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CONTENTS.

TITLE PAGE, I.
TITI'AG THE MISGUIDED LAMB, 21, 23.





THE OLD PICTURE BOOK, 48.
TIlE POET AND THE PRINTER, 32, 33.



BE L'SDRE4M, Io, II, 14, IS. 4
TItE I'OET AND TIHE
PRtINTER 333. 23




BELL'S DREAM, I o, I1, 14, 5
MINNIE'S CALCULATIONS, 27.




LONDON lIVER, 17.
DREAMS, 28.





'IM THEL ABBEY S ALLOWS, 19.
SORROWTS, 31.




THE MISGUIDED LAMB, 21, 23.
ZHARRYIS SOLILOQUY 3 .












CON TEN TS.

THE DEAD RABBIT, 37.
NO TIZHAAW YOU, TOM, 53.





THiE UtVAPPREC'JATIfU KITTEA, 39.
A BU,\C'IIOFt'FLOWERS, 55.






TIfE DONKEY AAY) TIE CHILD (ficturi), 40.
TILE CHILRE-A'S SONG, 58.




SUUMMER TIME (Pic/ure), 41. 5
jCHR'JT AS (',' .'.., 57.-










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(' -.. ELL'S DREAM..k

Ir %% as the little Isabel,
SUp-on the ;and she lay.
4 .. 1. ,'T lie summer sun struck hotlh dJ:o n,
l F 1''! And she \.a tired oftplay,
'. And down she sank into the sea.
Though L.-.w, Ilie coul..l no.t i.-


S : "he storo. with a dr,.ai'l court
SBeneath the rnlling tide,
There sate a sturgeon as a judge,
Two lubjters at her side;
She had a sort of% ague ilea
That she was being tried. '


And then the juirymen came in,
And, as the click truck k ten, .
Rose Sergeant Shark and hitcl ,:-d li- .iir n,
And trifled with a pen,
". "Ahem- rnav't please ,iLuir I.i.rdhliip, .": t :
And gentle jiirytmen:


"The counts against the plris..ner
PHeflre yjom, are that le
"Has eaten salmon once at least, .
And sules most cronjtantlv, r ...
? Likewise devoured one hundred shrimpi- .,
"At Marg.te ,ith her tea.". '


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"Call witnesses "-An oyster rcse,.
He spoke in plaintive tone,
"Last week her mother bought a fish,"
(He scarce could check a moan,)-
"He was a dear dear friend of mine,
His weight was half a stone"


"No oysters, ma'am?" the fishman said,
"No, not to-day!" said she;
"My child is fond of salmon, but
Oysters do not agree 1"
The fishman wiped a salt salt tear,
"And murmured "Certaiil '


* "Ahem-but," interposed the jaI-ge,
"How do you know," said he,
"That she did really eat the fish?"
"My Lud, it so must be,
Because the oysters, I submit,
.' .; With her did not agreed"


"Besides, besides," the oyster cried
Half in an injured way,
"The oysters in that fishman's shop
My relatives were they:
Sl'hev heard i I all tll-cY %roit to me,
; .' ''h letter caine .'-diy!


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"'Tis only hearsay evidence,"
The judge remarked, and smiled,
"But it will do in such a case,
With such a murd'rous child.-
Call the next witness" for he saw
The jury getting wild.


And then uprose a little shrimp:
"I am the last," said he,
"Of what was once, as you all know,
A happy famileel
Without a care we leapt and danced
All in the merry -ea!"


Alack! the cruel Ishlci ii n. '
He caught them all bult me. '
"The pirk'ner clalipped her h.inds and clied- '.
I heard her-iShriinm for tea'" '
.\rd then \\ent home and ate tlinm .ill
.\k l*at a-; lfas could lie pi .


The fureinan of the juir row..
.All h.e ,jr l has t ed, i .
"-There 1, n,, further need n, i, d,
Of" witnesses.' lie said; i ,
TliThe verdict uf us one and 11
I.; Gi!t'j r'n each head.

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"Guilty," his Lordship said, and sighed,
"A verdict sad but true:
To pass the sentence of the court
Is all I have to do;
It is, that as you've fed on us,
Why, we must feed on you!"


She tried to speak; she could not speak;
She tried to run, but no
The lobsters seized and hurried her
Off to the cells below,
And each pulled out a carving knife,
And waved it to and fro.



But hark! there comes a voice she knows,
S And some one takes her hand;
She finds herself at home again
Upon the yellow sand;
But how she got there safe and sound,
She cannot understand.


And many a morning afterwards,
Whene'er she sees the tide,
The still retains that vague idea
".That she is being trcil.
And seems to see the Rulg.rn ju.rl-n -
And the lobsters at her side.







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Just like ife wit tly ri5e qqyd fal.;

5 hrtps a te arf i) ty car forever,
r eace aLd re5t at te eyd of a.




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LONDON RIVER.

ALL day long in the scorching weather,
All day long in the winter gloom,
Brother and sister stand together,
She with her flowers and he with his broom.


And the folks go on over London river,
Poor and wealthy, busy and wise,
Will nobody see those white lips quiver:
Will nobody stop for those pleading eyes?

The-old bridge echoes the ceaseless thunder
Of crowds that gather and stream along,
An.I the tr.an..ei child shrinks back in wonder,
SSle cannot -in, in that hurrying throng.

qlhie think :, her home across the ocean,
S\\ir it ; deep blue ;, and its in.-, ir.i1, green;
'L' I :ult ; hi A illI t1eed, in that wild commotion,
ZI The '.iltiul sound of her tambourine?

Flow! flow 0 London river,
S"' Carry thy ships from the migthy town,
: Smiles and tears in thy heart for ever,
"Smiles and tears as thou hurriest down!


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THE ABBEY SWALLOWS. '.
4J 4 t
THE year was late, the days were cold, .-,
The swallows long had gone, .
Two only by the Abbey door
Still doubting lingered on.
They hovered, wheeling round and round,
Beside the porch in fear, t-
And as they lighted on the ground
A little child drew near.


Close to her feet the swallows came,
And twittered gay and glad,
-Ie Ilr..kc- her little crust for them- -
It was the last she had.
Then blithe and gay they flew away,
She to her corner crept;
There was no one now in the world to care
\ letlher lie smiled or wept.


With summer back the swallows came, '.
Flew to the Abbey door,
But no one stood to watch for them, ._-
S The child was there no more.
She had gone away on the angels' wings,
S- No more in the world to roam,
; )' .r I r the love that she gave those helpless things,
She has found in her Heavenly Home.


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MJAZNIE'S CALCULATIONS.

SAID Minnie with pride,
As she counted her chicks,
"* "When they're grown a bit bigger,
I'll sell all the six.
",'i' And as each ought to fetch .. ,
" ->,fi "' At the least half a crown,
I can quite well afford me
I A new Sunday gown."


r Alas for our castles!
|How soon they all slip!
I The cat ate one chicken,
And one got the pip;
S' - And while mourning their brother
And sister, the four
S"' Were crushed by the carter-boy
Slamming the door.


i', i. I. Don't reckon your chickens

A 3Before they are hatched,
S, , Is a proverb some fancy
". ? Can never be matched.
SBut I think that this other
'Ni, Deserves to be told:- ,
S ". Don't count on their value
SUntil they are sold.





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,, DREAMS.


-/ !SOMETIMES, beneath the brightest skies, _,-'

With parted lips and earnest eyes '
Y,:, In silence looking far away. '
We may not know, we cannot see a
"1. -N The wonder-world whereon they ga.'
.-. Hea en grant, whatever their dreams r. -. I *
They find them true in after days
i)reaming sit the children,
', Pausing in their play,
) reaming of what is, ahi so sweet,
Because, because so far away.



,r' 'l."'" And Wc 100 have our dreams, our own,
S Amid the rush and toil of life, .
Our drearm- orf da.. Ind things long t1, nii s i;
That li, e like I|cace comes, after strife. .\ ', '- '
Old hands we feel, old eyes we see, ''
Within our ears old voices ring;
They are l'tlt dre.m... maybe, maybe,
But ohl the bl..sin- that they bring. .\
Dreaming like the children,
We dream from day to day,
Dreaming of what is, ah! so sweet, i,
Because, 1e,: lt'.,- 1.., f.ir away.






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"SORROWS.


*.-' -_ 1 T H i. are sorrows, little children,
-.- Tlh.it you cannot understand,
SAs vuU watch our tears in wonder,
.. .s you take us by the hand.
.-, lere are sorrows, little children,
. ^., .. \'uu cannot bear them yet,
But you nestle close beside us,
And you help us to forget.
You, .nm:f t us, my darlings,
And yet you know not how;
You .h,:, u. Heaven is near us,
Though tiur tears may blind us now.



There a :e tle ,.,nes in Heaven,
(..ne a little he hle Lefire,
And thit :Iland, to watch us c,.mnnj.'
,- .. .. 4 1%....4
Beside the L,..Iden d.-or.
There ail little i.ne, in Heaven, -.-
Th,-, :Lie calling y Au and me,' :
\\hen ,.ur hearts have g.iwn I'rgetfui.il.
And oiur feet :,uildl wayward he.
\e can hear them, if ,e listen.
\\e ma\ neet them all one da\,
\\hen ojur tears shall lall no longer, ,
And the shadows tlee awayl !





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THE POET AND 71HE P'A: .\,'

Two little girls-I met them on,-,.
"But quite forget their name, --'
You'll find them on page twenit .....ur,
The printer it to blaie
T he [pI Ct re ,u lt i i.:. lh; ..rl ,,
Bui there! it's all the -i.ini.


T Io, little iirlrs, as I rcinarked,
They lelt their s ul.- able,
P.,eca.t.nuse tlh \ ilth.l .ht their iinnl r Iin-i
Taste l.ctter .:.1 the ru,..il,
l .i I. rk; and sl,..i n and talli, I.tll ,
The, really inc..nlinode


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The ditch i' far, far lrle ,n L -I
T'lan any high-backed hai 4
I'm sure yuLu -,ill agree iiIl ith ..-n
If you'll observe them there.
.nd dhen they'd lini;hedl, ..nf th ', trudc ',-
-4 t.. .1..c,
All throw' the summer r. .

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At last ile\ e chiel a bridge hc i e -.' '
1uti'll -see on t ei el n ifi. I \ -" _-
And in the bridge tli:ie little irl, ''
Are hanging all alive: ;
It' mnar.ellius h1ow han,in. -
\\ill ake sume children thrive!



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They i.':'pndered hii.:h a, best, t-. I.e
Up'ln thel bridge u.r under,
And what thei 'd d,:I ;ui.I:c: tle Iri'ge
\ ere ju1t1 i. -.phlit a-unJ ,-r,
S- B.ut as tile', c i..ull n t -ettle ti.ar
-- 1Theu .e it uip in \,nder


0 ''" -- N ,, h I-i il e4 'lild rcn .inn.,i l .t -h_. ,,:-,
SI think I mni e',.laiin,
S n r sllc ld. !U .I c*c, tl tlie,' I 1'. re
aA't .\i dinner in the I.-nc
f' 'rnlce w-ihen tlii li.i.d din.-d it li tir
.'e d dined Oit liere a ain.


S. And had the bridge been never built
I think it must appear
These children ne'er had found it, tl,,uu hi
S They'd sought from year to year;
...b.- > '"i Ic l. t ll, !l' h.i\ce inI l. ,in '. --
Sni cxi'tly clea

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.\nd lIaj I :zaid. '.vh-cn I %a i; :l:ei. '
S' I cann.-i irln, in wintItrr,
S*.: rLin ic thlircat agacinr it a ,l,.,,..r
.\nrd s._ilr:d it % ith a i.lner, '-
[ .'ul h-a'.e Iui tihe ar i;t, uit.,
And inmu'h ann,.uyed the printer!









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f.-R "'S SOLL (') U.

" I'tlii.i" rne'er a kiLttv o sweet and so: lpreutt. .
There's ne'er suc:h a kitti I've ;sin in min l!;fe
"I'm certain." said Harry, "ifl eer I marry.
I shall only want kitty, a house, and a wife."


"This dear old barrow is nice, though it's narrow,
It will do very well to take us about;
For my income of course is too small to keep horses,
But that doesn't matter, we'll manage without."


But alas I for the dreams of the barrow and kitten,
His father's old pointer came back from the wo -d; .'.' '
And the poor little pussy with terror was smitten,
And scampered away as fast as she could.


And the gardener returned from his evening ablution,
And trundled the Ilarrow straigil ot" to: the ;ied;
And Mary arri ed, and ith stern I cs:'lution
Just l:ar ied ofl Harry and put him to bed.











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THE DEAD R.-1.,' T

WEEP onl he has a happier Iate' ,
Than many such as he, '
To lie there in the gentle -n..i', r
And die so quietly:
To feel your warm tears .i l u.n hiim. '. ''.
To feel your tender hand,.
You know he feels as well as \.u. 'f.. :
You know he understand '

He might have now been dying
Shot by a cruel gun;
With panting heart and glazing eye
For life he might have run.
E'en now he might be hanging
Above your larder shelves,
And you, you might, indeed you might,
H-ive eaten him yourselvec

\\ ci% e 11 .n LI \ v '. ll n.1 t IrLtter it;
I'r chlan.e the .,riT l'-; lJ a,
F.,r rnm n ill hiint an.d 'o lr-e and sl ...
T h,:,u._.h ,,,ti .h. luld ,:[,p k'r .l ...' -


'i. *'-...ii I! ,.,.,n in I l fter ears. .,i'.
S.. That i J ', O'IS, .''s, irt n t thie C r i:r.l
Are better fo.r tour teari. .





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THE UNAAPPRECIATIVE KITTEN

':. "DID e'er you see a flow'r like that,
-' '^' 9 So exquisitely pretty?"
S Said Mabel to her Kitty-cat;
S' But not a word said Kitty.


Perhaps it was in her delight
Mabel contrived to squeeze her,
S For though Kit stared with all her might,
The sunflow'r did not please her.

"Well, well, why don't you answer me?
Why don't you say it's pretty?"
But still she could or would not see,-
She was perverse, was Kitty.

"Sweet mistress, pray restrain your ire,"
Said Kit in trepidation;
"Why must I say that I admire,
\\ hen I '.c n:o :diirrati,:,n

"[l. n't a. k me that, yO'iu Sti id 'at
Said MI lIel in a i iN l..n;
'Y.u i -i. II ou .l l ill lll ir-e,- ICrAl n-. e,
E ccaLiie it is tli- la.lhiin!"



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THE CA7YS \'L// L'C ,

AN open cage, some feaitl ir, I'air. -
Two little maiden, r r ing,
And Pussy seated on a chair,
The mournful scene espying.


Tear after tear rolls down each cheek,
Sob after sob arises,
While Puss, as well as she can speak,
Calmly soliloquises


"If they would keep a bird in cage,
Th,:\ -hiuld not leave it undone; '
l-, r th.u 4 tihe tale in every jail
F1r.m Panama to London.


Tlicir dacks and chicks they pet and feed,
And yet I've often noted,
They eat the very birds indeed
To which they're most devoted.


Then wherefore look so cross and sour,
Why make this sad commotion?
Why should not I a bIird de mir
For whom I've ic, dei-.tiun!'







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IOBI'S LESSO. ,

A was the Alphabet Trol. must a., r
B was the Birch that iniale hinibe ob 1 "
C was the Collar he wure to explain,
D the Disgrace he had got in again,
E was the Evening when Toby was gay, -.
F was the Fate that befell him next day,
..; iG was the Grave look on ,Muriel'*. face,
H was the Hist'ry of Toby's disgrace:-
I was the Ink that he spilt on the floor,
J was his Jump to get out of the door, '
F- K was the Kick that he got as he past,
L was the Lesson-alas! not the last,
M was the Milk that he stole from the cat, X
N was the N.I that he took after that,
0 was the Owl that gave him a fright,i
P was the Poaching he went for at night, i. ',
' Q was his Queer look all dirty and worn,
R his Return somewhat early next morn,
% wa" his im ile th.u ...ull i, ,t .i'. .l,
i ,a the I i,_h of In, i tE riiLd tail,
I -Und,::riand ne' he triLe ti. a- 'r[,
h his Vain .fi;,rt hll .ite tc-. a i.e t.
\ the "\ hip, v. which he sa.% leld .-.n li-h,
X, the Xp'resCson that r.:,e in his e. e,
V v..as his Yap when at last the whiip fll,, '41
Z like his kfelingsi I'll leave you to tell.






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SELINA'S DESTINY.

SELINA SOPHONISBA ANN .,.
Had a soul above a frying-pan,
And, when her mother to cook l'Lg1n, .
She took to her heels and away she ran. *,..
..: .. .

Selina Sophonisba, she"-
'' stood all day long neathh the apple tree,
-- I ill she became most dreadfullee
\\hat is commonly called hungaree!

Selina Sophonisba Ann
About her dinner to think began,
But the voice of a little Fairy-man
Said, "Don't go back to the frying pan,

"tay here beneath the apple tree.


.*'.' .,A\ .,rim -e ,'or:in g ,,I hi.ih de- ree,
h, will 1nike \,,1i queen cO his I..ir i'...'ll1rte



A \And li tho:.ug hts t.- -uppl-er ir-, turn began,
i..; SeI'n sjhjnisL' A nn

I \ \ ent g ,ladie bLck to the if ring-pan.


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-. THE OLD PIC7 A' '-! OK.

l.i :s an old old Iicture. .....k.
,*'.. -- J. '' ,
SFull I...f the merriest tales
ii. mar-1i ids fair with golden hair,
SA,\nd ,hips with silver sails;
I !'.iri light who danced at night,
S'" goblins on the stair,
S n.. A many a knight in armour bright
"l ho fought for ladies fair.
It was only a battered picture-book,
But 'twas worth its weight in gold,
For it spoke to the children's tender hearts,
And its tales were never old.



"" I ii an old old picture-book,
2 "-/ Battered, and torn, and brown; '
But why does the mother sit and sigh?
"Why do her tears run down?
SShe listens through the long long eve;,. .
She waits for the opening door, '
S, But the little hands that turned the. :. ".
Will turn them again no more.
It is only a battered picture-book,
But she cannot lay it by,
SF r heart? ma\ :ih.nce, but Ia n other' 1.. c
Is a l:vc that cannot die!



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"Your ignorance," the lobster said "'
"Is natural, I fear,
Such scandal is a shame," he sobl .-d. '
"It is not true, my dearly"
And with his pocket-handkerchiel '
He wiped away a tear.


So out she put her little hand,
As though she feared him not,
When some one grabbed him suddenly
And put him in a pot,
With water which I think he found
Uncomfortably hot.


It may have been the water made
The blood flow to his head,
It may have been that dreadful fib
Lay on his soul like lead:
This much is true,-he went in gray, ,
1 kA nd i. e f ._'ut *.cr red












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NO THANK YOU, TOJ,' ..

THEY met, when they were girl and i.,,
Going to school one day,
And "Wont you take my peg-top, dear"
Was all that he could say.
She bit her little pinafore,
Close to his side she came,
She whispered "Nol no, thank you T. in ,
But took it all the same.

They met one day the selfsame way,
When ten swift years had flown;
He said, "I've nothing but my heart,
S But that is yours alone."
S'And won't you take my heart?" he said,
And called her by her name;
.. ' ,>'. -,l- blushed and said "No, thank you, Tonm,
S' '.--. But took it all the same.

y And twenty, thirty, forty years
Have brought them care and joy,
"ihe has the little peg-top still
He gave her when a boy.
"I've had no wealth, sweet wife," says he,
"I've never 'r .,i..lt you fame:"
i,-, whispers "Noi! no, thank you, Tom!
"I '''.? I-veil men all the ..ame"






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- .. A BUNCH OF FLOWERS.

'. ."' IIT was only a bunch of flow'rets wild,
G.aheiled by children one morning fair;
And it % ent away in the twilight gray
.I .- Ti. the nighlty city's din and glare.
'' nd the great grand flow'rs in the market smiled
\ At the little bunch of flow'rets wild;
S. And the cr...'.,ling passers had but a care
X F, .r the nian flowers that were rich and rare.

': A m.,ther st:opt in the market place,
I Slle saw the flow'rets shining there, '
j And she th, ought of her child, with his wan, thin face,..
Pining all day in the London square.
She lel't those lordly, blazing flow'rs,
S'he thl:tught of her far-off childhood hours,
J she took that bunch of flow'rets wild-
SHer dearest gift to her crippled child. .' '* .

And she spoke to him of the thousand ones '
Who toiled in the city hour by hour, : ,\ -
Who never had seen the country sun;, ,"
And never had plucked a country ;l, ,
And a new light shone in his mournful e cs
He hushed his sad, complaining cries;
For that little bunch of flow'rets wild- -
Had changed the life of the crippled child. ( 1





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THE CHILDREN'S SONG

WHAT is the song the children hear,
0 pealing bells, 0 Christmas bells,
Echoing high and low,
When skies are dark and winds are drear,
What is the song the children hem -"
Across the winter snow?
Christ is born (the joy-bells rinL
Christ is born to be year A\mg,
Christ has come from Hea:z' to br:i -e, -.
Peace to earth b'h/o. -. '


What is the song the children sin.,
A carol sweet all hearts to greet.
Good news for high and i-" -
What is the news the children bring,
What is the song the children sing
As through the streets they L.:
r. vist is born (the children sing),
C rist is born to be our King,
A M, r t..,
fI .,C. _. c rist has come from Heaven to bring
SPeace to earth below.



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He ". atI.led the happl.y fiik, go by,
H,: ;..k led ti 'te tholli ;lad,
And then a little inai.l ire.' nigh,
A !.,!.1-, I...u h .sihe ha.]
She lill. Iher I.leiadling I'n.e t.o him,
She *.,: in a.'.-ents .1 11
"\ hat is it iv, akcs Im. e, .. i. ,.cr ., dim ?
Why dlu.. he .aill the child?-


He sl.l,-e t' c. S ie i- In Ithi lu e ,
A I l...i u i di y .ar

And i, I,,ll b 'I.h I,, ktn l r t, pla-c : i
T ..,n her *rave ,,l ,',,.. .! .,
He :].t,:n..- tu the Ch( i itn.ir lHlls, ^. '..i '
E,. Ifeit their meanin_ til,.n- t t ",
Peace '.i a n earth, and tn ii heart ::' '
Peace and g,:d-... Ill to menl -'F ; '

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7HE END.

THE old milestone is reached at last,
And night will be upon us soon;
The western light is changing fast,
And slowly climbs the crescent moon.

The path that we have trod erewhile
Stretches behind us, growing gray,
And here we stand beside the stile
That ends our journey for to-day,

Our twilight talks have gone so fast,
Like all thin-- glad, it so must be;
The old milestone is reached at last,
That means good-bye for you and me.
.f _.. .".:-. -
But we will have no mournful chimes, .


SF .r whilee \"LI I|Iten t., m\ i im es.
S. '- .:0,, cann,.,t e' r lea.- e nm heart'.

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HILDESHEIMER AND FAULKNE1
S41.JEWII ST E C.





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But when they drew a pail for him, ,. '
(You really scarce might think it,) .,
He wagged his tail and winked his eye, .
And simply wouldn't drink it.

It chanced one day they went to pay
Their morning salutation,
But though they called, he never came,
Much to their consternation.

They sought him high, they sought him low,
But nol they could not find him,
They said "He will, he must come back,
And bring his tail behind him."

They sought him up the windy < Im,
And down the ferny hollow,
And still they said "He can't be lost!"
And still their feet did follow.



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THE MISGUIDED LAMB.

THERE were two little girls who had
A fond devoted Mammy,
But spent their warm affections on
A most ungrateful lamb-y,


For spite of all the care of Ruth,
And all the love of Mary,
This lamb was a misguided youth,
Most crooked and contrary.


On Sunday, when they went to church,
And wished to be without him,
He used to wander up the aisle,
And stop and stare about him.


And when the parson and the clerk
Looked stern at Ruth and Mary,
They wished they did not own a lamb
So crooked and contrary.


He used to bleat most piteously
When they came up the mountain,
As if to say "I am so dry,
SI' like to, drink the fountain!"

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