• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 List of Illustrations
 The elephant
 The lion and the tiger
 The kangaroo
 Eagles
 The hunting-dog of South Afric...
 The chimpansee
 The argali and the big-horn
 Aurochs and lynx
 The sea eagle
 The orang-outan
 The fallow-deer
 The glutton or wolverene
 Grizzly bear and bisons
 The kingfisher and the pelican
 The polar bear
 The leopard
 The condor
 Wild boar and crocodile
 The jaguar
 Tasmanian wolves and emeu
 The hyaena
 Whale and dolphins
 Hedgehog and adder
 The meal in the desert
 Owls
 African elephant and rhinocero...
 The wapiti and the yak
 The gorilla
 Wild cat and squirrels
 The hippopotamus
 The strike of butcher-bird
 Back Cover






Title: Jumbo's picture book of natural history
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00053188/00001
 Material Information
Title: Jumbo's picture book of natural history
Physical Description: 64 p. : ill. ; 37 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Specht, Friedrich, 1839-1909 ( Illustrator )
George Routledge and Sons ( Publisher )
Dalziel Brothers ( Engraver )
Publisher: George Routledge and Sons
Place of Publication: London
New York
Publication Date: 1883
 Subjects
Subject: Natural history -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1883   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1883
Genre: Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: with full-page illustrations by F. Specht.
General Note: Illustrations engraved by Dalziel.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements on back cover.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00053188
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223484
notis - ALG3733
oclc - 63260187

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Half Title
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
    List of Illustrations
        Page 4
    The elephant
        Page 5
    The lion and the tiger
        Page 6
        Page 7
    The kangaroo
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Eagles
        Page 10
        Page 11
    The hunting-dog of South Africa
        Page 12
        Page 13
    The chimpansee
        Page 14
        Page 15
    The argali and the big-horn
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Aurochs and lynx
        Page 18
        Page 19
    The sea eagle
        Page 20
        Page 21
    The orang-outan
        Page 22
        Page 23
    The fallow-deer
        Page 24
        Page 25
    The glutton or wolverene
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Grizzly bear and bisons
        Page 28
        Page 29
    The kingfisher and the pelican
        Page 30
        Page 31
    The polar bear
        Page 32
        Page 33
    The leopard
        Page 34
        Page 35
    The condor
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Wild boar and crocodile
        Page 38
        Page 39
    The jaguar
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Tasmanian wolves and emeu
        Page 42
        Page 43
    The hyaena
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Whale and dolphins
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Hedgehog and adder
        Page 48
        Page 49
    The meal in the desert
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Owls
        Page 52
        Page 53
    African elephant and rhinoceros
        Page 54
        Page 55
    The wapiti and the yak
        Page 56
        Page 57
    The gorilla
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Wild cat and squirrels
        Page 60
        Page 61
    The hippopotamus
        Page 62
        Page 63
    The strike of butcher-bird
        Page 64
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
Full Text
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JUMBO'S PICTURE BOOK
OF
NATURAL HISTORY













































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A RIDE ON JUMBO IN THE ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS.





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JUMBO'S PICTURE BOOK

OF


NATURAL HISTORY

































WITH FULL-PAGE ILLUSTRATIONS BY F. SPECHT





LONDON
GEORGE ROUTLEDGE AND SONS
BROADWAY, LUDGATE HILL
NEW YORK: 9 LAFAYETTE PLACE
1883



























LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



A RIDE ON JUMBO IN THE ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS. Fronlispicce.
(From a Phtotg, ra/ph by Messrs. Brigs &, Son, Hzi/-i Street, Camduen Town, London).

LARGE ILLUSTRATIONS BY F. SPECHT
PAGE "- PAGE
"LION AND TIGER 7 CONDOR AND LLAMA 37
KANGAROOS 9 WILD BOAR AND CROCODILE 39
EAGLES AND CHAMOIS JAGUAR AND TAPIR 41
HUNTING-DOGS AND GEMS-BOK 3 TASMANIAN WOLVES AND EMEU 43
ORANG-OUTAN ANI CHIMPANSEES 15 HYENAS AND MARABOU 45
THE BIGHORN. .7 WHALE AND DOLPHINS 47
AUROCHS AND LYNX 19 HEDGEHOG AND ADDER 49
SEA EAGLE AND WILD SWANS. 21 THE MEAL IN THE DESERT 51
ORANG-OUTANS AND SERPENT. 23 OWLS 53
FALLOW DEER AND WILD CAT. 25 AFRICAN ELEPHANT AND RHINOCEROS 55
WOLVERENE AND MUSK-DEER. 27 THE WAPITI 56
GRIZZLY BEAR AND BISONS 29 THE YAK 57
THE KINGFISHER 30 THE GORILLA. 59
PELICANS AND PURPLE HERONS 31 WILD CAT AND SQUIRRELS .6
POLAR BEAR AND SEA LION .33 HUNTING THE HIPPOPOTAMUS 63
AN UNEQUAL CONTEST 35 SHRIKE AND FIELD-MOUSE 64















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JUMBO'S PICTURE BOOK
OF

NATURAL HISTORY.

--. -. -; --











SON






THE ELEPHANT.
T HERE are two kinds of Elephant, which are found in different
countries-one in Asia, the other in Africa. Your old friend
Jumbo is an African Elephant; but it is the Asian Elephant, which
you see in the picture above, that is best known as a servant and
friend of man. In ancient times the African Elephant was also
trained for service, but now he is mostly prized for his great ivory
tusks. Although the two animals are very much alike, they may easily
be known by the difference in the head and ears. In the Asian
Elephant the head is long, and the forehead somewhat hollow, with
ears of usual size; while the head of his African brother is much
shorter, the forehead is round, and the ears are so large that they nearly
meet on the back of the head, and hang down below the neck.
5






THE LION AND THE TIGER.



















T HE Lion is pretty much the same wherever he is found, so
that it is thought there is really only one kind of this noble
animal. The best known is the South African Lion, which is found
in nearly all parts of South Africa, except where he has been driven
away by man. The colour of the Lion is a tawny yellow. He has a
tuft of black hair at the tip of his tail, which serves to mark him out
from any other member of the Cat tribe. The male Lion is known
by his thick shaggy mane of long hair, which falls from the neck and
shoulders. The Lioness has no mane. A full-grown Lion measures
about four feet high, at the shoulder, and eleven feet long. The
Lioness is smaller than her mate, but is quite as much to be dreaded,
especially when she has a family of cubs to protect. The Lion has
long enjoyed a name for courage and generosity, but he is now said by
some travellers to be a sneak and a coward. Perhaps he is not quite
so bad as this, although certainly not so brave and kingly as he was
once thought. As a rule he is no open foe, but creeps towards his
prey, hiding behind every tree and bush he can find. He is so strong
that he can crush any of the smaller animals with a single blow of
his paw; and his roar is so terrible as to frighten all the beasts who
hear it at night-time, and make them an easy prey.
In Africa the Lion reigns supreme, but in Asia his claims are
disputed by the Tiger, which equals him in size and strength, and
certainly excels him in beauty and grace.
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THE KANGAROO.
















T HE Kangaroo is a native of Australia. It is a very curious animal,
and like nearly all the others found in that country, it has a
strange kind of pouch or pocket, in which it carries its young until old
enough to run alone. The Kangaroo is the largest of this kind of
animal. It is very hardy, and will thrive well in England and other
countries. Its eye is round and soft like the Gazelle's, which makes
up for the savage look of its white gleaming teeth. But Kangaroos
can be savage sometimes when they are hunted, or quarrel and fight,
as you see in the picture.
A full-grown male, or Boomer, as it is called, generally measures
about seven feet six inches from the nose to the tip of the tail; the
head and body exceed four feet, and the tail is rather more than three
feet long. When it sits upright in its curious way, on its hind-legs
and tail, it is more than fifty inches high; but when it wishes to survey
the country and stands erect upon its toes, it is higher than a man.
The female is much smaller than the male. As the Kangaroo is very
valuable, not only for its skin, but also for its flesh, it is eagerly hunted,
both by the settlers and the natives, and affords good sport on account
of its speed, its vigour, and its wariness. The native hunter, who trusts
chiefly to his own cunning and skill, finds in the Kangaroo an animal
which will test all his powers before he can steal upon him and strike
him dead with his spear.
The white hunters breed a peculiar kind of hounds called Kangaroo
Dogs, which hunt by sight like the greyhound. These dogs are long,
large, and powerful, but with all this are no match for a full-grown
Boomer when he chooses to turn to bay and defy them.
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EAGLES.


















THE Eagles form the first group of the great Falcon family, which
includes the Eagles, the Falcons, and the Hawks. All these
birds have strong hooked beaks and are very destructive, as they
live chiefly by the chase, and seldom feed on carrion, except
when very hungry, or when the animal has been lately killed-like
the poor chamois in the picture. Eagles are not cruel birds, for they
mostly kill their prey at a single blow, swooping down on it with such
swiftness, and striking it so fiercely, that the victim is often killed before
it can become aware of its danger. When an Eagle strikes a large
bird on the wing, the mere shock of its body is almost always enough
to kill it, and the bird falls dead upon the earth without a wound.
Small birds are carried off and killed with a grip of its powerful claws,
for the Eagle never uses its beak for this purpose.
One of the finest of these grand birds is the famous Golden Eagle,
which is spread over a large part of the world, being found in the
British Isles, and in various parts of Europe, Asia, Africa, and
America. The female is larger than the male, and a full-grown one
will measure about three feet six inches in length, and nine feet in
spread of wing. In England the Golden Eagle is extinct, but it is
still found in the highlands of Scotland and Ireland. Its nest is
always built upon some very high spot, mostly upon a ledge of rock,
and is made of sticks, which look as if they were thrown together
just anyhow, so long as they will hold the eggs and young.
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EAGLES AND CHAMOIS.







iTHE HUNTIVG-DOG OF SOUTH AFRICA.


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T HE Hunting-Dog is a kind of link between the dog and the
hyena. Indeed it is so much like the hyana that it has often
been mistaken for it. It has been called by many names, such as the
Painted Hyaena, and the Hyena Dog. Its title of Hunting-Dog is
earned by its habit of hunting its prey by fair chase, and joining
together in packs for that purpose. As is the case with most beasts
of prey, it prefers the night, but will often set out for a hunt in the
day-time. It is well fitted for the chase, as it has long agile limbs, and
can endure great fatigue.
It has-been said that the hunting powers of this animal excel those
of the foxhound; for while the fox will often escape from its pursuers,
a pack of Hunting-Dogs will very seldom let their prey get away,
although they have no huntsmen to help them. It seems, indeed, as
if, to have the true hunting spirit, an animal must be free, as no beast
can be trained to hunt with half the zest which it shows in its native
state. But, although fond of hunting, the Hunting-Dog often prefers
the more easy task of attacking a sheepfold or a cattle-pen, in which
case it will do terrible damage in a single night. Hunting-Dogs are
always very cautious in dealing with oxen, horses, or other powerful
animals, but will rush boldly at a flock of timid sheep; so that they
are rather cowardly after all. They have, too, a nasty habit of biting
off the tails of oxen, which causes great suffering to the poor beasts,
on account of the flies, which they cannot then whisk away. In the
picture, a pack of these hungry animals is chasing a gems-bok, which
is a handsome kind of African antelope. The poor creature seems
quite worn out, and almost ready to drop.
12
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IJUNTIlNG-DOGS AND GEMS-BOK (South Africa).






THE CHIMPi ANSEE.

























H ERE is a group of the four-handed animals, which are known
by the titles of Apes, Baboons, and Monkeys. Except for some
of the smler kinds, these animals are not very pretty to look at. In
the large pic e opposite you see a huge Orang-outan watching with
great delight the gambols of two Chimpansees. Although these
animals are much alike, they come from different countries, the
Chimpansee being a native of Western Africa like the Gorilla, while
the Orang-outan inhabits only a small part of Asia. Both these great
Apes are very strong, and have arms much larger than one would
expect, judging from their height.
The Chimpansee lives mostly on the ground, and not among the
branches of trees. He is, indeed, so strong, and a number of them
acting together is so formidable, that he is able to dwell anywhere
unharmed, even by the Lion and Leopard. Chimpansees live almost
entirely upon vegetable food, such as rice, bananas, or plantains, and
are, therefore, very bad neighbours for a planter.
14












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ORANG-OUTAN AND CHIMPANSEES IN THE BERLIN AQUARIUM. i
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THE ARGALI AND THE BIG-HORN.,
















"T HE largest sheep in the world are the Mouflons, which are the
I giants of their race. These animals are found in many parts
of the world, but the Argali of Siberia is, perhaps, the most striking.
This huge sheep is almost as large as an ox, being four feet high at
the shoulders, while the horns are nearly four feet in length and nine
inches round at the base. These great horns spring from the forehead,
and after rising straight a little way, curve downwards below the chin,
and then twist up again and come to a point. Although these terrible
weapons are fixed so firmly in the head, they are sometimes snapped
right off in the fierce battles which their owners wage with each other.
The Argali is found on the highest grounds of Siberia and the
mountains of Central Asia. Its power of limb and sureness of foot
are wonderful for its great size.
The Big-horn, or Rocky Mountain Sheep of California, is another
of the Mouflons. This animal is common enough in its'native land,
where it may be found living on the most steep and craggy rocks.
From these secure posts the sheep never wander, being content to
find their food upon the little knolls of herbage that are sprinkled
among the heights, without being tempted by the broad green plains
below. At one time they were very fearless, and would peer curiously
at those who came near their lofty dwelling places; but, now, as soon
as they catch sight of a man, they blow their warning whistle, and
take refuge in the rocks. When full-grown, a Big-horn measures about
three feet six inches in height at the shoulders, and the horns are
about the same length, like the Argali's. Like the Argali, too, the
Big-horn often fights, as you see in the picture.
16






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B ISONS are often called Buffaloes, and Buffaloes Bisons; but this
is quite wrong, as the two animals are not at all alike. All the
true Bisons may be known by the short crisp woolly hair which hangs
in heavy masses over the head and shoulders.
The Aurochs, which is a Bison, is now almost only to be found in
a forest in Lithuania, a spot that is especially suited to its habits on
account of the large marshy places with which it abounds. In order
that this splendid animal may not die out, it is protected by very strict
forest laws. The Aurochs gives forth a strange and powerful odour,
which is not unpleasant, being something like musk and violet. It is
a good swimmer, and is fond of dabbling in water, so is mostly found
in thickets which border upon marshy land or streams. In spite of
its heavy awkward look it is active and swift enough, and can run
with some speed for a short time, but cannot keep it up for many
miles. Although not so large as some of the ox tribe, it is strong
and muscular, and is a terrible foe. It has no fear of beasts of prey,
and a single Aurochs is said to be more than a match for several
hungry wolves. It is shy, and fearful of the presence of man; but if
wounded or angered, it will fight daringly, using its short sharp horns
with fearful effect. In the picture, a Lynx has tried to seize a young
Bison calf, but has been caught in the act by the old Aurochs, who
has been too quick for him, and has neatly pinned him to a tree before
he could escape.
The Lynx is known as the type of a quick-sighted animal, and is
familiar to us all by name and look. It is spread over a great part
of Europe, and is found in the more northern forests of Asia.




















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THE SEA EAGLE.


















T HE Sea Eagle is by far the most common of the larger British
Falcons, being met with much oftener than the Golden Eagle.
It is sometimes called the White-tailed Eagle, on account of its white
rounded tail. It is found in all parts of Europe; but is not known to
visit America. As it is a great lover of fish, it is almost as clever at
fishing as the Osprey, and is therefore mostly found on the sea coast.
It is, however, not very particular in its appetite, and will often make
journeys inland in search of young lambs, fawns,, hares, or anything
else it can seize upon. On the shores the Sea Eagle seems to have
regular hunting-grounds, and to make its rounds at a certain spot at
the same hour every day, keeping a sharp eye on the sea and water
fowl, as they hover about their nests and young. The Sea Eagle in
the picture has made a daring descent among some wild swans, and
has seized one of these handsome birds with his strong talons. It is
very fierce, as you may judge, and has a strange lowering look in its
eyes. When wounded it fights most fiercely. It is so bad a neighbour
to the farmer and others that in Norway a trap is built, in which a
man sits, watching for the Eagle. Like the other Eagles, it makes
its nest of sticks, loosely thrown together.
A tamed Sea Eagle that was kept at Oxford, one day managed to
eat a hedgehog. You would have thought that the prickles would
have disagreed with him, but nothing of the kind! After this he
wasted a lot of time in trying to eat a tortoise.

























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THE ORANG-OUTAN.






















The arms of this Ape are so long that, when it stands upright, they
nearly touch the ground; and they are so strong that it is chiefly by
their means that it travels among the boughs of the trees on which it
lives, swinging itself from branch to branch. So powerful are these
arms, that a female Orang-outan has been known to snap in two a
strong spear after she had been badly wounded. In attack, the
Orang-outan also makes use of its strong teeth, which are fitted for
gnawing through, and tearing off, the rough case of the cocoa-nut.
The hind-legs are not of much use not of much use in walking, for the Orang-outan
cannot place the soles or palms flat upon the ground. So he shuffles
along by the help of his arms, placing on the ground the knuckles,
and not the palm, of the hand. But among the trees the Orang-
outan is quite at home, and traverses the boughs with the greatest
ease and freedom. Although docile when tamed, in his native state
the Orang-outan is sullen and ferocious. In the picture you see a
couple of these fierce Apes grinning at a large serpent, which might
have been able to seize and crush one of them, but is no match for
the two. If, indeed, they can only manage to reach it with their long
arms, it will have but little chance with them.
22










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ORAG-OTAN AN SRPN. 23






THE FALL WDE ER.
















T HE Fallow-Deer is a very graceful animal, and adds much to the
beauty of a park. There is hardly a prettier sight than a herd
of Fallow-Deer tripping along the sward with its leaders at its head;
the old and sober members, with their light but stately trot, and the
young fawns playing all sorts of strange gambols. There is always
one master Deer among them, who often couches in state, apart
from the common herd," attended only by a few chosen ones that
he honours with his favour. If he is away, the herd is led by some of
the young bucks, but whenever the master chooses to appear again
amongst his subjects, he is always proclaimed by a general movement,
the young bucks quietly moving aside and making way for him.
Sometimes, however, a saucy young buck will try to keep his post at
the head of the herd, when a warning shake of the head is often
enough to make him move off; but if this fails he is scornfully
swept aside by a blow from the horns of the master Deer. The
Fallow-Deer feeds chiefly on grass, but is very fond of bread, biscuits,
and other dainties. It can be easily tamed, and becomes friendly with
strangers in a very short time, even so as to eat out of their hands.
The colour of the Fallow-Deer is generally of a reddish-brown,
with pretty white spots, and two or three white lines on the body.
But there is another kind which scarcely shows any white spots, and
is of a deep blackish-brown. This is the kind which you see in the:
picture, where a fawn has been attacked and wounded by a fierce
wild cat. But the parent deer have come to the rescue, and while
the doe consoles the poor little fawn by licking the wounded place,
--- ,,
































the buck tosses its enemy into the air.
24






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FALLOW DEER AND WILD CAT. 25






THE GL UTTON OR WOL VERENE.






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T H E Wolverene or Glutton has earned a world-wide name for
ferocity, and, as is often the case, many strange tales have been
told, which make him out fiercer than he really is.
The Glutton feeds largely on the smaller animals, and is a dreadful
foe to the beaver in the summer months. In the winter it has not
much chance of catching beavers, as those clever little animals are
snugly sheltered in their homes, and their houses are made so strong
by the cold that the Glutton is unable to break through the ice-bound
walls. The Wolverene inhabits North America, Siberia, and a great
part of Northern Europe. It was once thought that the Glutton and
the Wolverene were distinct animals, but it is now found that they
belong to the same species.
The general look of the animal is not unlike that of a young bear.
Its colour is chiefly a brownish black, the muzzle being black as far
as the eyebrows. The paws are quite black, and the contrast between
their jetty fur and the ivory whiteness of the claws is very curious.
The paws are very large for its size, and this enables it to pass safely
over the surface of the snow; indeed, its feet are so large that the
marks it leaves are often mistaken for those of a bear. When very
hungry, it is said that the Glutton will wait for and fall upon larger
animals, such as the musk-deer, as you see in the picture. When the
animal it kills is too large for a meal, the Wolverene will carry off
the remains and hide them in some safe place ready for a second
meal. The Wolverene is hated by the hunters, as it will follow them
on their rounds and steal the baits from their traps.
26
























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VLXERN AND+ MUSKDEE. 27-
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GRIZZLY BEAR AND BISONS.









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F EW animals are so much dreaded as the Grizzly Bear of North
America, which is master of every animal it meets. Unlike
other Bears, the Grizzly, or Ephraim," as the hunters call him, does
not stop at human beings, but shows himself ready, as soon as he sees
a man, to attack him. Yet he will not dare to follow up his track, and
if he comes across his scent he will make off as fast as he can. But
when made angry by a wound he cares for nothing, and rushes furiously
at his foe, dealing the most fearful blows with his huge paws, and
getting his strong teeth ready for action. This causes him to be much
respected by the natives and the settlers, so that to kill a Grizzly in
fair fight is a great honour. It was once thought that the Grizzly
Bear could not climb a tree, but it is now found that he is very clever
at this, especially if he wants a good feed of acorns, when he will
climb an oak, and give the boughs such blows and shakes that the
acorns shower down like hail, on which Master Bruin quietly descends
and eats them at his leisure.
The colour of the Grizzly Bear is sometimes of a dull brown and
sometimes of a beautiful steel grey; but it is always flecked with the
striking grizzled hairs which give the animal its name. Its head is
large, but its tail is so short that the Indians often have a bit of fun
with strangers by telling them that you can easily lift a Grizzly Bear
if you take him by the tail. Its fore-legs are very strong, and are armed
with.claws five inches long, which it has the power of using separately.
Even the Bison falls a victim to the Grizzly Bear, which will spring
upon a member of the herd and dash it to the ground, as you see in
the picture opposite.
28























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GRIZZLY 1BEAR ATTACKING A HERD OF BISONS (North America). -29






THE KINGFISHER AND THE PELICAN.

























T HERE are many kinds of Kingfishers, but the pretty bird
above is the common Kingfisher of England. Compared with
the birds on the opposite page, he is drawn rather large, as he is only
seven inches long; but we have put him here because he gets his
living by catching fish like they do. His plumage is very lovely, and
vies with many of the gaily coloured birds of the tropics.
In the large picture, two birds of the Heron tribe are struggling for
a fish, while two Ibises look on. The great birds just above are
Pelicans, and the scene is in Africa. The Pelican is nearly six feet
in length. Its wings are long and powerful, and its flight very bold
and graceful. Its pouch will hold two gallons of water, and is used
by the bird as a fish-basket. As it feeds its young by turning the fish
out of this pouch into their mouths, and in so doing presses its red-
tipped bill against its breast, it was thought in ancient times that the
Pelican fed her young with her own blood.
30








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PELICAS AND URPLE ERONS






THE POLAR BEAR.



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I N those ice-bound and cheerless regions, where so many brave
sailors have perished, lives the Polar Bear. Perhaps, because of
the extreme cold, his food is nearly all animal, and consists of seals
and fish. Most Bears are good swimmers, but the Polar, or White
Bear, as he is sometimes called on account of his silvery fur, is espe-
cially fitted for passing his life among the seas and icebergs of the
North. To capture the fish in their own element, or to make prey of
the active and wary seals, the White Bear is gifted with great powers
of body and sense. Its scent, indeed, is extremely fine, for it will find
out, by that sense alone, the little breathing-holes which the seals have
made through the ice, even when the frozen plain and the holes are
covered with a regular coating of snow.
So active is this Bear, and so great are its powers of moving in the
water, that it has been known to plunge in after a salmon, and return
to the surface with the fish in its mouth. Its endurance is very great,
for it has been seen swimming steadily across a strait some forty miles
wide. If it sees a seal, it will mark the spot where it lies, and dive
under the water till it reaches it, when the seal is doomed; for if it
drops into the water it falls into the clutches of the Bear at once, and
if it tries to escape by land, its swift-footed foe soon overtakes it.
Even the large and powerful walrus is said to fall a prey to the Polar
Bear. But though it is so hungry after flesh in its native state, its
appetite takes a milder form in warmer climates. In England the
Polar Bear has been kept on bread alone, and every one who has been
to the Zoological Gardens knows how fond he is of cakes and buns.
When the She-Bear has cubs she becomes very hungry and savage.
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THE LEOPARD.
















T HE Leopard is one of the most graceful of the Cat tribe, for
although smaller than the tiger, it rivals him in the beautiful
markings of its fur and the ease of its movements. The Leopard is
found in Africa as well as in Asia. In Africa it is well known and
much dreaded, for it has a crafty brain as well as an agile body and
sharp teeth and claws. It makes sad havock among the flocks and
herds, and will even lay in a stock of food for a rainy day." A larder
belonging to a Leopard was once found in the forked branches of a
tree, some ten feet or so from the ground, in which several pieces of
meat were stowed away, and hidden from sight by a mass of leaves.
In the large picture you see a very unequal contest. A Leopard
has attacked a young Koodoo, and the old one, coming to its aid, has
struck down the Leopard with its powerful -horns. But a second
Leopard comes on the scene, and springs on the poor Koodoo in the
moment of triumph. The Koodoo is the most striking and handsome
of all the South African antelopes.
A Dutch settler once came upon a clump of rocks, from which
leaped no fewer than seven leopards. In the hurry of the moment
he foolishly fired off his gun, but, luckily, the leopards, instead of
springing upon him, only started at the report, and one or two of
them, leaping on their hind-legs, clawed at the air as if they were
trying to catch the ball as it whizzed past. When attacked, the Leopard
will generally try to slink off and escape; but if it is wounded and
cannot get away, it becomes furious, and charges at its pursuers with
such rage as to do fearful damage before it is killed.
34























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AN U U C E










Li t.









































AN UNEQUAL CONTEST. 35





THE CONDOR.




















T H E Condor is a large Vulture which inhabits the Andes Mountains,
and is noted not only for its great size and strength, but for its
'love of the highest spots. When in its native state it is seldom found
lower than where the snow always lies, and only seeks lower and
warmer regions when driven by hunger to seek for prey. Although
it likes carrion better than the flesh of animals lately killed, the
Condor is a terrible pest to the cattle-keeper, for it will often join
with others in an attack on a cow or bull, and worry it so that it is at
last forced to give in. Two of these birds will attack a deer, a llama,
or even the puma, and as they aim chiefly at the eyes, they soon blind
their victim, which then quickly falls under the terrible blows of their
beaks. The Condor has long been famed as a giant among birds,
and its strength is very great indeed, for a strong man is no match for
a wounded and tied-up bird. When the Indians want to catch the
Condor, they kill a cow or a horse, and throw the body on one side, so
that it is exposed to the open air. In a short time the Condors gather
round and begin to feed hungrily upon it. As soon as they have
gorged themselves to the full, the Indians rush in upon them, armed
with lassos, and easily capture the finest birds.
The flight of the Condor is very grand and beautiful, and seems to
be gained by the movement of the head and neck rather than by that
of the wings. It lays its eggs on a ledge of the bare rock.
36







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CODO AND LLAM (uhAeia.t 37






WILD .BOAR AND CROCODILE.

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H UNTING the Wild Boar was once a favourite sport in England,
and in several countries of Europe it is still carried on.
In South Africa there are several strange kinds of wild swine. The
Bosch Vark is a very dangerous looking animal, with its strong tusks,
its heavy, lowering aspect, and its strangely swollen cheeks; and it
is just as savage and sullen as it looks. The Kaffirs do not care to
attack a herd of these wild hogs, as they are apt to give, with their
tusks, dangerous wounds; which, they say, will not soon heal. But
they are very much annoyed by them, as they will force a way through
their fences and root up the seeds or destroy the pumpkins in the
gardens. So they lay pits for them, and show great delight when
they fall in. The Vlacke Vark is more savage even than the Bosch
Vark, and has been known to cut a dog nearly in two with a single
stroke. Then there is the Halluf, or African Wild Boar, which you
see in the picture.
All animals will fight in defence of their young. These little pigs
have been playing too near the stream, and a sly old Crocodile has
managed to seize one. The old sow, hearing its cries, has rushed
forward to rescue it from the monster's terrible jaws; while the
monkeys scamper off or look on half-scared, although they are out of
reach.
The terrible and much dreaded Crocodile swarms in the rivers of
Africa, and is a dangerous foe to cattle and other beasts that come to
the riverside to drink. Human beings have a great dread of this
famous reptile.
38

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THE JAGUAR.

















T HE Jaguar is a very fierce and strong animal, something like a
leopard. It is a native of America, and plays much the same
part there that the leopard does in the old world, ranging the thick
forests in search of its prey. It feeds upon all kinds of animals-
horses, deer, monkeys, tapirs, birds, turtles, lizards, and fish. It seems
strange that the Jaguar should be able to kill and carry off so large
an animal as a horse; yet he has even been known to swim across a
river, kill one, swim back with it and drag it into a wood to eat it.
Birds are struck down by a single blow, and fish swept out of the
stream with a jerk of its nimble paw. But the Jaguar likes monkeys
best of all when he can catch them, which it is not easy to do. Some-
times, however, he will surprise a party of monkeys asleep, or steal
among them unawares, when he will dash them to the ground with a
few strokes of his terrible paw, and then descend to feast on them aT
his ease. The fierce hoarse roar of the Jaguar and the yells of fear
of the monkeys are heard far and wide, and tell of the deadly work
that is going on among the trees. The Jaguar is also very fond of
turtles, which it will manage to catch, kill, and eat, in spite of their
strong snapping jaws and hard shell.
The Tapir, although a large animal nearly four feet high, also falls
a victim to the Jaguar. It is said that when the Jaguar leaps on the
Tapirs back, which is his usual method of pouncing on his prey, the
frightened animal rushes through the brushwood in hopes of shaking
him off; and if so lucky as to gain the bank of a river, will plunge
in and force the Jaguar, who is no diver, to let go his hold.
40







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JAGUAR AND AMERICAN TAPIR.






TA SMAN/IA N WOL VES A ND EME U.
















"T HE Tasmanian or Zebra Wolf is not a very large animal, but it
is so strong and fierce that it well deserves the name of Wolf.
It plays the same part in its native land that the true wolves do in
other countries. Its natural food consists of the smaller animals, shell-
fish, insects, and such other things as it can manage to pick up. It is
in the habit of prowling along the sea-shore in search of various odds
and ends that the waves wash up at every tide, and the mussels and
other shell-fish that cling to the rocks form a favourite diet of the
Tasmanian Wolf, which is sometimes lucky enough to find upon the
beach the remains of dead seals and fish, and can easily make a meal
on the shore crabs which are left as the tide goes out. Though
not a very swift or even a quick animal, it manages to kill such agile
prey as the bush kangaroo and the Emeu. The Tasmanian Wok,
made sad havoc among the sheep-flocks and hen-roosts of the early
settlers, but by degrees it was driven away from its old haunts, and
being forced to live in copses and jungles,came to play the part of
a hyena as well as of a wolf.
The -Emeu is not unlike the ostrich, which it resembles in many of
its habits as well as in look. It is very swift of foot, but can be run
down by horses and dogs. The dogs are taught to hold back until
the bird is quite tired out and then spring upon the throat in. such a
way as to escape the kicks which the Emeu deals fiercely right and
left, and which are quite strong enough to disable them. The Emeu
feeds on grass and various fruits. Its voice is a strange hollow
booming or drumming kind of note.
42








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scavenger, and clears the earth of the decaying carcasses which
poison the air. After the lion has eaten the choice parts of a dead
animal, and the vulture those which the lion cannot eat, the Hyaena
comes and finishes hide, bones, and other scraps that have proved
too tough for the others. There are several kinds of Hyaenas, such
as the Striped Hyaena, the Brown Hyaena, and the Tiger Wolf or
Spotted Hyaena. But they are all very much alike, and have the
same awkward shuffling walk, caused by their fore-legs, which are
used for digging, being much longer than the hinder ones. This
shambling gait gives the beast a sneaking, cowardly look, which it
quite justifies, for it will not openly face even a tame ox, but will try
to startle it and make it take to flight before it will venture to attack
it. When it wishes to alarm cattle, it creeps up to them as close as it
can, and then suddenly springs up just under their eyes. If they should
turn to flee, the Hyaena will attack and destroy them; but if they
should turn to bay, it will not dare to come any nearer. And in chasing
an animal, the Hyarna takes good care to keep out of reach of its horns
or hoofs,-so never springs boldly at its neck, but hangs on to its flanks
until it is worn out and brought to the ground.
You see on the opposite page a group of these savage animals at
work on the carcass of a young buffalo. On the stump above stands
a Marabou, a large bird like the Adjutant of India, from which
beautiful feathers are obtained. The Marabou wants his share of
the spoil, which the Hyaenas do not seem inclined to let him take.
44
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HYAE~NAS AND MARABOU (Africa). 45






WHALE AND DOLPHINS.















AS the Whale lives entirely in the water, and is very fish-like in
form, he is generally thought of and spoken of as a fish. But
he is not really a fish, for he has no gills, and if he were to be kept too
long beneath the water, so that he could get no air to breathe, he
would be drowned. When a Whale wants air it is forced to rise
to the surface of the sea and there take a number of huge breaths
called spoutings, because a column of vapour and water is thrown out
from its nostrils or blow-holes, and spouts upwards to a great height,
sometimes as much as twenty feet. These spoutings make a great
noise, which can be heard some distance off. As the blow-holes are
placed in the upper part of the head, the Whale is able to come up
to breathe without exposing itself too much, so that when it is reposing
on the surface of the sea there is very little of its huge body to be
seen. Whales can descend to very great depths without the water
getting into their ears and nostrils, because these organs have a kind
of valve or lid which is so formed that the deeper the Whale dives the
closer it shuts. The tail of the Whale is so powerful that the largest:
Whales, about eighty feet long, can whisk themselves clean out of the
water with it, like little fish leaping after flies; and the sound which its.
body makes when it comes down again flop into the water can be heard
for several miles. From Whales we get whalebone and oil. The
ships which go to take the Whale are called whalers, and the animal
is killed with a kind of spear, called a harpoon, tied to a long rope.
The Dolphin is of the same nature as the Whale, but not nearly so
large. One kind of Dolphin is said to be the deadly foe of the Whale,
which it fiercely attacks.
46







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-2in"



WHLEAN DLPIN_4
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~HL ..D D P-NS .. --_--.--_-






HEDGEHOG AND ADDER.










THE Viper, or Adder, is the only poisonous reptile to be found in
England. It can easily be told from the common grass snake,
which is harmless, by the chain of dark spots that runs along its back.
It is very timid, and only bites when provoked.
The first thing that strikes you on looking at a Hedgehog is the
array of bristling spines with which its back is covered. These spines
form a defence of sharp spikes, like a row of fixed bayonets, against
any foe that may come to attack it. The Hedgehog also has the
power of rolling itself up like a ball, and in this state it is safe from
almost any animal. When in this curious attitude it cannot be unrolled
so long as any life remains in its body.
The common Hedgehog is very well known, and is found in every
part of Great Britain where it can find food and shelter. The hard
round spines which cover the upper part of its body are about an inch
long, and are useful to the Hedgehog for other purposes than defence
against a foe. Protected by these spikes the Hedgehog is able to
throw itself from places of some height, curl itself into a ball as it
drops, and reach the ground without suffering any harm from its fall.
One Hedgehog was often seen to throw itself from a wall twelve
or fourteen feet high without being at all upset by its tumble. On
reaching the ground it would unroll itself, and coolly trot off as if
nothing had happened. Marching safely under its spiky armour, the
Hedgehog cares little for any foe save man. Dogs, foxes, and cats
can indeed kill and eat it; but dogs are seldom out at night when the
Hedgehog is mostly abroad, and the fox is too knowing to waste his
time in pricking his nose until he can worry the Hedgehog into
unrolling himself.
The Hedgehog finds its proper food among the insect tribe, but
will steal eggs, kill all sorts of game, and is a great destroyer of
snakes, frogs, and other animals. It therefore does some good, for it
will attack a Viper as soon as it will a grass snake, and seems to be
quite proof against the poison of its fangs.
48































"Aw






























HEDGEHOG AND ADDER. 4






THE MEAL IN 7HE DESERT.



















ON a journey the Arab will sometimes cook his dinner as he
goes along, seated on the back of his camel, and so take his
Meal in the Desert. In the large picture we see another kind of meal,
also in the desert, which the vultures, the ravens, and other birds of
prey are making off the body of a poor camel, while the jackals look on.
You all know the Camel, with his strange hump and his large splay
feet. He is called the Ship of the Desert, because he is of so much
use in hot countries, where he can carry with ease a heavy load across
the plains of loose dry sand, and pass several days without water.
To fit him for this, the toes of his feet are very broad, with soft wide
cushions, which give them a firm hold of the sand; and part of his
stomach is of such a nature that he can store in it water for future
use, so that he can go a long time without wanting to drink. Some-
times, when theater has failed for many days, and the fountains of
the desert are dried up, the Camel dies to save his master's life, yielding
up the water which is stored in the cells of his stomach.
The Vulture is a large bird, some kinds being nearly four feet long,
with immense flapping wings. Most Vultures have the head nearly
bare, with a ruff of feathers round the lower part of the neck. By a
curious instinct the Vulture knows where to find its food when a long
distance off, and no sooner does a poor camel sink down and die than
a speck is seen on the horizon, which gets bigger and bigger, till it
turns out to be a flock of vultures.
50
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THE MEAL IN THE DESERT. 5







OWLS.










Y OU may easily know an Owl by his round puffy head, his little
hooked beak just peeping through the downy plumage around
it, and his large eyes set in great feathery funnels. Almost all Owls
are night birds, and their eyes are so made as to take in every ray of
light, and are so sensitive that they cannot bear broad day. Nearly
every kind of Owl, when brought into full daylight, becomes quite
stupid with the glare, and sits winking and blinking in a most pitiable
manner. But woe to the poor little bird or mouse that finds those
same eyes staring at it in the night-time! The Great or Eagle Owl
inhabits chiefly the Northern parts of Europe. Its length is rather
more than two feet, and it looks very splendid when its wings are
spread. Its cry is deep and doleful, sounding very mournful in the
depth of the lonely forests at night. Its food consists of grouse, par-
tridges, hares, and other game. The Long-Eared Owl, which you see
at the top of the page, is found in all parts of England, and in portions
of Asia, Africa, and America. It is only fourteen or fifteen inches long,
but is very rapacious, and catches finches and other small birds as if
it were a hawk. The best known of the British Owls is the White,
Barn, or Screech Owl. It is mostly found near farmyards, where it
loves to dwell, not for the sake of stealing chickens, but of eating the
various mice which do so much harm in the ricks, fields, and barns.
Here is a picture of one, which has just caught a mouse.









52
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OWS 53_LJ ~~_ Ca~~~~






AFRICAN ELEPHANT AND RHINOCEROS.
















THE African Elephant is a very large and powerful animal; but it
is so watchful, and has such a wonderful way of moving through
the thick forests without making a noise or rustling the leaves, that it
is one of the least seen of forest beasts; and, in spite of its huge size, a
herd of Elephants, eight or nine feet high, may stand within a few yards
of a hunter without being detected, even though he may know they are
near. The only sure way of finding out that they are at hand is by
listening for one sound, which they cannot help making. This noise is
like the bubbling of wine being poured from a bottle, and is caused by
the large quantity of water which is stored in their insides. The African
Elephant is hunted for his beautiful tusks. When wounded he is very
dangerous, and crashes through the heavy forest as if the trees were
but stubble. In such a case the best thing the hunter can do is to
trust to his dogs, which bay round the angry beast and soon take off
his attention from their master; for, strange as it may seem, the attack
of a dog so confuses the Elephant that he does not seem to know
what he is doing. The death of a large Elephant is great matter of
rejoicing among the natives, as they eat many parts, and make use of
the rest, even the skin, which they form into vessels for water.
The Rhinoceros is known by the strange horn which rises from his
snout. His skin is of very great thickness and strength, and will even
resist bullets, except those which are made for the express purpose of
killing him. The skin of the well-known Indian Rhilceros hangs
in heavy folds over his body. There are four kinds of African
Rhinoceros, two of which are white, and two black.
54









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AFRICAN ELEPHANT AND RHINOCEROS. 55
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AFRCA "LPHN '.D "HNCRS "i






THE WAPITI AND THE YAK.



























T HE Wapiti is one of the largest of the Deer tribe. It is a native
M-7

















THE Wapiti is one of the largest of the Deer tribe. It is a native
of North America, and lives in herds, some of which contain ten
or twenty, while others number three or four hundred. These herds
are always under the command of one tried old buck.
The Yak, or Grunting Ox, takes its name from its very curious voice,
which sounds much like the grunt of a pig. The Yak is a native of
Thibet, and inhabits all the loftiest table-lands of High Asia.
56








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THE GORILLA.
















M ANY hundred years ago the people of Carthage sent a captain
named Hanno to explore the coast of Africa. In his report
he speaks of some strange creatures which he seems to have taken
for the savage natives of the country. He says that on pursuing them
the males all escaped with wonderful quickness and threw stones at
them; but they took three females, who, however, proved so savage
that they were obliged to kill them, and bring only their stuffed skins
to Carthage. The interpreters called these creatures Gorillas.
For two thousand years after this nothing was heard of the Gorilla,
except for certain doubtful stories of woods haunted by wild men.
But at length the truth came out; separate bones were found and
sent to Europe, and at last the complete animal was seen.
At present we know very little of the Gorilla in its wild state, as a
knowledge of the habits of animals is only to be gained by living near
them, and by long study. And in the case of the Gorilla this is not
easy, as it is only to be found in the thickest jungles of the Gaboon,
far away from man and his abodes. Then it is wary, like all apes, and
is said to be so fierce that if it sees a man it at once attacks him, so
that there would be very little time for learning anything of the
creature's habits, even if the explorer escaped with his life. The
natives are so terrified at the Gorilla that they have never dared
to take one alive. Even the chase of the animal is a task of great s
hardship and danger to them, as they have no firearms, and so have
to seek it in its own haunts, and attack it at close quarters with their
spears. Young specimens have been caught and brought to Europe,
but have never lived long.
58












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THE~ t GORLLA






WILD CA7 AND SQUIRRELS.












LOOK at that sly old Wild Cat! With what longing eyes he
glances upwards at the two pretty Squirrels! Master Puss was
just ready for a spring, but the nimble little animals were wide awake,
and have been too quick for him.
The Wild Cat is found nearly over the whole of Europe, and has
been seen in Northern Asia and Nepaul.
In England the Wild Cat is almost extinct. It now very seldom
happens that a real Wild Cat is found even in an English forest, for
it seems to be driven northwards by degrees, finding its last refuge
among the bleak Scottish hills. And in Scotland it is fast dying out,
so that..the time is not far off when the Wild Cat will be quite as
extinct in Britain as the wolf. It is true that many so-called Wild
Cats are found in the snares which the keepers set to protect the hares
and pheasants; but in most cases these thieves are only tame pussies.
which have run off and taken to bad ways. Even petted cats have
been known to take to poaching, and bring in a nice plump partridge
now and then; indeed, there are few worse foes to game than the
domestic cat, and the Wild Cat gets all the blame of its bad deeds.
But the Wild Cat is very different from these. Its tail is shorter and
more bushy, and does not come to a point at the tip, and its head is
rounder and coarser than Pussy's. Although so scarce now, the Wild
Cat was once so common in England as to be a perfect pest; for the
havoc which one of these creatures will cause is surprising. The Wild
Cat takes up its abode in rocky and wooded country, making its home
in the cleft of a rock or some old tree, from which it issues on its
marauding excursions. A full-grown male Wild Cat is about three
feet long, of which the tail is nearly a foot. Its strength and fierceness
when hemmed in or hard pressed are quite wonderful. The colour of
the Wild Cat is a yellowish or sandy-grey, streaked over the body and
limbs in such a way that the animal has been called the British Tiger.
60














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WILD CAT NDSQIRRLS 6
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WILD AT AN SQIRL. 6t






71HE HIPPOPOTA MUS.















THE Hippopotamus or River Horse is a native of Africa, and is
always found in or near the water. He likes fresh water best,
but does not object to the sea, and sometimes prefers it. He is not
very high for his size, as his legs are so short, but the actual bulk of
his body is very great indeed. The mouth is enormous, with an array
of white gleaming tusks that have a terrible look, but are solely meant
for cutting grassland other herbage, and are seldom used as weapons.
With these teeth, one of which will sometimes weigh five pounds, the
Hippopotamus can cut the tall grass as neatly as if it were mown
with a scythe, and is able to sever, as if with shears, a stout stem. So,
as he has an enormous appetite, and a stomach that will hold five or
six bushels, he is a dreadful pest to the riverside farmers and planters;
and the worst of it is he is so awkward that he destroys more than he
eats, as he comes tramping through the standing crops. It is therefore
no wonder that the Hippopotamus is trapped and hunted, especially
as he is very valuable for his teeth, which make very fine ivory. Pit-
falls are dug for him wherever he is found, and in some places a trap
is set, which consists of a heavy log, with a poisoned spear at the
end, hung over a tree by a slight cord, in such a way as to fall on the
poor animal as he passes beneath. But in other places he is fairly
chased and killed with a harpoon, composed of a shaft ten or twelve
feet long, and a barbed iron point which fits loosely into the head.
To the other end of the shaft a strong line is attached, which is
fastened in its turn to a rope or buoy. This kind of chase is very
exciting, as the angry beast will often turn on his foes, and stave in or
upset a canoe with one blow of his huge head.
62












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ttUNTIN'G THE: HIPPOP'OTAM1\US. 6






YIHE SHRIIKE OR B UTCHER-BIRD.





































T FHE Shrike or Butcher-bird is quite as greedy and savage as any
of the Hawk tribe, and, for its size, much more destructive. It
feeds upon various small animals, and will eat mice, shrews, young
- - -D





































birds, frogs, lizards, beetles, and many other creatures. It has a
-


































curious habit of hanging its food upon some handy spot, such as a
forked branch, a thorn, or a sharp broken bough, and will sometimes
leave its prey fixed like this for some length of time.
64
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HE~~~~- Shik or Btche-bid s. q~~a~"~us~st;"~itasredansvaesay
of th Haw trie, ad, fr it siz, much more destructive. I
feeds~~~~~~~~~~~~= upon. vaiu ml nmladwl a ie hes on

birds, frogs, lizards, bee~~~-tleadmn ohrcetre.I a
curios hait o hangng is fod upo som hany spt, uc a










64






















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3 I "A -

V sSRS. GE6RGE ROUTLEDGE AND SpONS'


"NEW BOOKS AND NEW EDI IONS.


Pan-pptp : A Book of Old Son;:.- aId Ditties. Decorated by Rasselas, Paul and Virginia, .nd the Vicar of W. -e-
\\'AL rFi CN. AN i-.i ned l\ .\rAn nge. i'.t imii p m ianin nts, by Tmio. field, i One \l o'n:. With IIIniatins 3 6d.
1% .RZiAL;. Printed in (.dlour., ly KL I.v U ii Ell x\ .,
MrA. Priied i,., ot, ., Er. ,. The Fables of Esop. \\ik 114 Illustrations by H$RjION
Randolph Caldecott's "Graphic" Pictures. A Clic- C, ,,,
iain ofl M r. Cl I I... r Co niitril:li)n toi / e,,1t,' 1 'iiiil: in | '
S Cuoinur, .i Fr...i FL.... -.,.'.. Drawing Room Amusements and Evenimng-Prty
E ntertainments I'rofes.or H-..FFMAN, .uttior of "1 odwrn
Sir Johd -jilhert's Shakespeare. .li:. by HOl%\RD MA:;ic." \\ih ., 1. u.HJcus. New and Cheaper Edition. s.i
*A NION. \L th tl '.i. .u n. iuiit l i .W.. Iann I; JIa.IN ( G I.L T,.
K:.A. ,,. P,. ndiLih 4,1, rio', ,I:. op- 7,. ", .\,i n.l board, '.he Mountain Sprite's Kingdonm, and other Stoeii
cloth back, u I ne, il Igilt HIIn I. H KNAIn. A RIt, i-Hi GES.fN (Lord Brt oui tE.,,
.. \ idl, Illi if.Li ',) 1.. I r -'i I 1',-I '. 6A /. '
The Microscope Its Hitrv Constrict iin. and .pili'icatnion. i.
By IA.LZ H,.... 1 F L.., F. R.K. it in.ic tl i .o t- .. inrg anI Lord rtabournlc s I H. K i" TC[i''.LL-H UGESISEN) S
Coioured Illult[a'ln->n, \ New R. l ..I r flliin ... -r Coi dren n. a rl I lh.er lEdiu.ns, \ith the Original l
tral, i .
Routledge's Eve.ry Boy's Annual for 1883. Edited b Qu..er Foik. c' ton I Crakers for Chri
Ur.It.iNII R, i ILF.rI:, F.R ( < IKi lill ni' iI',l-, and 'l ic ll-pag,
(coloume.J lates. ,.' .., i ,1 ,.. t ..... .... ) ,. Gas.parr, the G lue' .. By Caltai -M vYNE- REID. W it..
1 .11 3 r.3
Boutledg's Every Girl's Annual for 1883 Elit.,I I
A'.,.. iA AMi Li.ir WVh i lth Illirri..si. :,ndl I t i-i.: 'latn -- re4.f:le i At i-O eC. By Dr. AIL.I:, and MI rs. '.IARB rL ... ; 4
Ipilnu,' I ri' C IonlrUrs (I. ',,n tan,',r t ':,..',,n/',.) ,.. _r N .a i.lin 'iai bo illutration, by (.;ORDON BROWNE, and CailoutId.
l,'.. ; .. c. ,'
1 4U nr Wide-Awake for 1883. By Mrs. S.l IF. ,I.... E N
With I,_ C..,lue-l illuitl.tl.uio, IIy 1M .: Krr 1 m m airy T les. An Entirely New Edition, tiii'i.abo ,l jtI
FR, A',ER. F 1 .: i-. I, IR..w H' .u \\' >.- I % lu. i. I '..N, \F 'I L, :i i l .and s Coloured Plates-. 3s. 6d.
HOP1MN-, :l.i .A. L Ri I'. Cl., ilt Cdg tI (.\nd i I 0n.i.I, 1 -!!A '-
4-. -. I. ,.ie Little GosP.).g,'. cy St.- COOLIDGE, O
"" I' Mt:cie I a h Fight il straiolis. 3 .
", 1a rriQ K inm Cr ii.R: C i .\,-.2-. ,,. tRIl..RICK rii. G.* M,.1 C ,, i n r
i BLany L .,N .,. \ .'. o,.s w.dcut, andi rull pie IPitc -. r 'eati-% ed al Prur-Footed FrioDds. By M rs
1.1 tK LV l'tilu;,:lge PIlasrs Ib J. B. ZWECKERl td
Si eel r's Nr;wB Book -- Lu.e A n.r. 'Vi'i l r :iirn (..n. in boards,.s Si.) ..-
S .WuN, L' ,,,., ., .. ,., ,., :, _rm's Fip:- ia.les A.ndqrr.a's Fatiy .ji i
j S' "ilThe A. !' t ... ts. I a. V'r'um-r. With s8
"* *-i \ '*. .*\ N in ,l t ie..'i L ii. ..i i .. hn \ ,.. i- I y I'.. H. i i .-_ l, ir- tL:;.- a'l.:. i j itu, cloth. 3t6 4 A
,,ua I ;IS, i ', r '
a '.male Phillt .sphy in Fa.rn.Fes,.. .;i,1ii, Lobinri CrUFO-, I n SwS ,a y
:.1-tA... i-. --.. .n,: ,r in I.-.a. tn it-.nf L .. 'a .;tord mtd M e1':o: 1 (re .tlumr #
1- .nJ w.-I i.l (. AtetV4)elt. ioi .4t
l .i ,th Csn et.,, a, .I, .non :,:. sir I. i. ;.i. ; I I. '. I -. 1 te i s
o r*I.. .f
..E i i ,., u -..i. i.. j,.' ,n.... .',> .A '. -!i,',...,I. 1D n Quixote, Gu.iver's Ti avel3, and iapti
Voyages. ., : ,u ,,i, ,', mor, e t,ti 1 st
J l, i.O ', nt-F i R ,. , i apid others. D ir t
SDisasters at 3e-'.. rI H G. i .\l in bards, -2. 0, ) "
ith IIo Illuostr-tion Nre. net '.n .< r ..iition %
"t t e..... ,A w, liTn n a ,, Ltttlo Child. By Mrs. SALF. BARKER. '3
l.. ."t4.. V i KN I lUiL -Hli. l.-i. : ni-F'. l.,.nl lh nAi, ,. \Vi Ul. .
atritaons i E -t R. ,r ,>.. The Child's Picture FabLe, Book. Wirdh 'c. F-tp
-trtions by H \i.is %, r'1 .rm. flinc) boards. nc ords 6.
t..ile, and its Principal Captives. .. -
.A'h^M^owr. with Illut..r.,. in.i.i i C'.,rs I, K:NHiLm The CObild's Picture .C-ok of Animal- Sa
n, f.ll-.pale li!, traior- ') H.,RRIoN WF, Fancy } u d .
4 Pfe k.ok ,of Natural History. ith My Friends: A Novl Birthday Bonk. By
ii liusi.at.n l. i l i S rimi .- on high[. l inislnii C o.. I IN. Cloth. il d (A in cloth l p, .
'd t JI .7.Io Hi:'in n 5 \in< i. I ,L. n ,- .. M gi l ( \'na In -i i f G y,*
tthe 7r;ilIag'e. L ..v Rus.L :,T i.
"- j T."", .sio U J. ;.,. 4 i kTER JACK SERIES- evi olu

-'. \ Chills S tr'- fLChildren. B- Mrs. Little Lays for Little folks WVith 2"00 lllis rations.
-Ainbhor of" l -'- tie. i r .-% ... N- \ith i 2 liuutratiois Those Boys. W ith 4r0 ripge Illustrations. is. 6/.
Story of the Huguenots. By the : Those Girls. With 40 page Illustrations. 6d. .
"t Thc i., ca.ln,,' I r ..g, th, \\a. r." x. \\. :i harles Ross's bMeiry Conceits. Printed iia o:
tions h F. .1. iEIS'R .r ,,' It.D.MUND IF'.' n. Cloth gilt, is 6,i.
By Mrs. O'REIL.L, .\ithor of Girls of th- And in boards, is. each. "
Sith Si': Illustr *n.n Iln A. Cit .. \_i '. ( On miiI., 3s. 6./. -'--1_
S that Jack Built. B \N U' LKate Greenaway's Almanack for: l883 L8 '.
4r.: "1 it S "x" il l- i F "t ii' / Colours by EtmiUND EVA.NS. iS.
'Tles: A Book of M .r\ls. -the Rev. H. C. __
M0 A. With 2 Illustrationsi. A Ai ( 3 6 'h
Svi H c A CALDECOTT8' TC' BOOKS-New
1Vz fu-page. PFlimtrations 3N. 1wnt
h and Piraibal Seizure of H.M.S. The Milki.aid. 'Wherc are you Going, my Pretty Mkid
". "'I BR -.J. .m u:: utes. ,s. 6d Hey Diddle Diddle and Bye Baby Bunting. is

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