• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Childhood
 quot;You can't come in;quot
 Children
 Hunting the rainbow
 Home for the holidays
 The bird's message
 The little girl who made faces
 The story of a rose tree
 True beauty
 The cookey tree
 Teddy's fishing
 Tiz-a-ring
 Brownie
 A cartful of kings
 The adventures of Pippin and...
 The pumpkin
 Picking oranges
 The young fisherman
 Liszt and his pupil
 Always learning
 The voyage
 A nice little family
 Little things
 Out in the snow
 The grateful children
 True politeness
 The brook
 Daisy
 Helen's bird
 Little chicks
 Dick's dream
 My dollies
 Boys' leisure hours
 Hammock song
 Alphabetical advice
 Rosie and the pigs
 Outwitted
 Spring
 Summer
 The silent academy
 Evening
 Chinese story
 Little Winnie Bright
 Three English children
 Tall oaks
 Mother's umbrella
 A cure for discontent
 Our Jenny
 A cure for discontent
 Smut's rescue
 A funny fact
 A queer musician
 Georgie's fawn
 The river
 Why and wherefore
 True happiness
 Getting up
 Little boy blue
 The dog in the manger
 Winter rhymes
 Peace and war
 Spoiling a quarrel
 Little sunshine
 The rooster
 Better whistle than whine
 The precious little plant
 "No!"
 A saucy visitor
 The mastiff and the bun
 The smoke-house
 Summer
 A lesson in flying
 Our dumb teachers
 Sunrise
 Ebony and Lucy
 A song of sixpence
 Blueyberrying
 Back Cover






Group Title: Sunshine for little children : with illustrations by eminent artists.
Title: Sunshine for little children
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00053187/00001
 Material Information
Title: Sunshine for little children with illustrations by eminent artists
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. (some col.) ; 36 cm.
Language: English
Creator: A. T. Zeising and Company
Sunshine Publishing Company
Publisher: A.T. Zeising and Company
Sunshine Publishing Company
Place of Publication: Philadelphia
Publication Date: 1883
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1883   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1883   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1883   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1883
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
 Notes
General Note: Frontispiece and title page printed in colors.
General Note: Contains prose and verse.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements on back cover.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00053187
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223572
notis - ALG3822
oclc - 63260184

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Plate
    Title Page
        Title 1
        Title 2
    Childhood
        Page 1
    quot;You can't come in;quot
        Page 1
    Children
        Page 2
    Hunting the rainbow
        Page 2
    Home for the holidays
        Page 2
    The bird's message
        Page 3
    The little girl who made faces
        Page 3
    The story of a rose tree
        Page 4
    True beauty
        Page 4
    The cookey tree
        Page 5
    Teddy's fishing
        Page 5
    Tiz-a-ring
        Page 6
    Brownie
        Page 6
    A cartful of kings
        Page 6
    The adventures of Pippin and Doffin
        Page 7
        Page 8
    The pumpkin
        Page 9
    Picking oranges
        Page 9
    The young fisherman
        Page 9
    Liszt and his pupil
        Page 10
    Always learning
        Page 10
    The voyage
        Page 11
    A nice little family
        Page 11
    Little things
        Page 11
    Out in the snow
        Page 12
    The grateful children
        Page 12
    True politeness
        Page 12
    The brook
        Page 13
    Daisy
        Page 13
    Helen's bird
        Page 13
    Little chicks
        Page 14
    Dick's dream
        Page 14
    My dollies
        Page 15
    Boys' leisure hours
        Page 15
    Hammock song
        Page 16
    Alphabetical advice
        Page 16
    Rosie and the pigs
        Page 16
    Outwitted
        Page 16
    Spring
        Page 17
    Summer
        Page 17
    The silent academy
        Page 17
    Evening
        Page 17
    Chinese story
        Page 17
    Little Winnie Bright
        Page 18
    Three English children
        Page 18
    Tall oaks
        Page 18
    Mother's umbrella
        Page 19
    A cure for discontent
        Page 20
    Our Jenny
        Page 20
    A cure for discontent
        Page 20
    Smut's rescue
        Page 21
        Page 22
    A funny fact
        Page 23
    A queer musician
        Page 23
    Georgie's fawn
        Page 23
    The river
        Page 24
    Why and wherefore
        Page 24
    True happiness
        Page 24
    Getting up
        Page 25
    Little boy blue
        Page 25
    The dog in the manger
        Page 25
    Winter rhymes
        The snow-fairies
            Page 26
    Peace and war
        Page 27
    Spoiling a quarrel
        Page 27
    Little sunshine
        Page 28
    The rooster
        Page 28
    Better whistle than whine
        Page 28
    The precious little plant
        Page 28
    "No!"
        Page 29
    A saucy visitor
        Page 29
    The mastiff and the bun
        Page 29
    The smoke-house
        Page 29
    Summer
        Page 30
    A lesson in flying
        Page 30
    Our dumb teachers
        Page 30
    Sunrise
        Page 31
    Ebony and Lucy
        Page 31
    A song of sixpence
        Page 31
    Blueyberrying
        Page 32
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
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SUNSHINE







FOR LITTLE CHILDREN






WITH7 ILLUSTRATIONS

BY


EMINENT ARTISTS


















PHILADELPHIA '
A. T. ZEISING AND COMPANY
402-404-4o6 Race Street
THE SUNSHINE PUBLISHING COMPANY
1883
.
PHLDLHA'B









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The Sunshine Press, P Electrotyped and Printed by A. T. Zeising & Co.



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SUNSHINE PUBLISHING COMPANY,) PHILADELPHIA Subscription Price,
402-404-406 Race Street. P H LA L C. H I I$2.50 per copy.

CHILDHOOD. "Then you may come in," said Mary, letting him open the door.
CHILDHOOD.
"Now, I'll tell you what we'll do," said Frank. "There's a drum on the
Baby-faith, reach down and help us, since we floor, and there's a tin trumpet. We'll get up a procession in honor of the doll;
cannot reach to you! not of your poor rag-doll, Mary, but of the fine lady-doll that belongs to Jane.
Touch us with the light of Heaven that is nearer Where is she, Jane?"
to your view: "She is in the next room in her little carriage," said Jane. "I will drag
So our love shall rest serenely in your childhood her in."
strong and true! So when the lady-doll was brought in, Frank roused up Trip, the dog, and
harnessed him to the carriage. Then Frank took the rag-doll, whose name was
I-i- Polly, and he tied her so that she sat upright on the dog's back.
:li i L SI'i"Sitop, sir, stop," said Frank, as Trip tried to run away. "You must not start
S: B li^ i I'I ,I I ,-l till the procession is ready. We must now get some flags."
Si SI o they got two broomsticks, and tied ribbons to them, and hung them with
"IIL i ., .,j 1 "pictures.
li l M'' 'i Mary carried one of the broomsticks, and Jane the other. Then Frank got his

I, I i Then he took the trumpet and the drum, and said, "Now, Mary, you shall see
] --~s_ what a procession is. I am the band of music, and I go first. Then you shall
SI follow with the flag; then Jane shall come; and, last of all, Old Trip shall come
S' with the rag-doll on his back and the lady-doll in the carriage. Now form in
i I I --_ line, and when I sound the trumpet we will begin to march."
S- ___ So they formed in a line, and Frank blew the trumpet and beat the drum.
l HW hat a noise he made! Trip at the same time began to bark.
L First they marched all around the room, three or four times. Then they
S- i marched from corner to corner. Then they ran. Then they walked slow; and at
BI j 1 I* last they stopped, and gave three cheers.
I I This made Trip bark all the more. lie did not know what it all meant. But
"K .the dolls behaved well.
It was a famous procession; but I am sorry to say that it was so noisy that the
d II I mother of the children came in to see what was the matter.
l As soon as the door was opened, Trip broke loose from the carriage, and ran
down stairs, and hid in the cellar. And so the great procession came to an end.

.--- ... -= fi .MASTER GEORGE takes a drive with six superb black horses.
l \The forward horses get restive. George shouts to them through
-- his hand. It is not an easy thing to drive six-in-hand.

"YOU CAN'T COME IN."
Once there were two little girls whose names were Jane and Mary. Jane was .
seven years old, and Mary was four. They had a brother whose name was Frank. r
He was a year older than Jane. I -
S Mary and Jane used to have good times in the play-room, but Frank would --
sometimes come and tease them. So one day, when Jane heard him coming, she
pushed with both hands against the door, and said, "You can't come in."
"Is tea ready?" said Frank; for he saw the doll's tea-things on the doll's little
table. But Jane knew that he came to make fun of her and Mary and the doll;
and so Jane said once more, "You can't come in."
"Oh!. but I must come in," said Frank. "It is raining out of doors, so that
.1 cannot fly my kite; so I must come and play with you and the dog.-
"Will you promise to be good, and not plague us, if I let you in?" said Jane.
""Yes; I will be very good," said Frank.






















SUNSHINE PUBLISHING COMPANY,) PHILADELPHIA Subscription Price,
402-404-406 Race Street. P H LA L C. H I I$2.50 per copy.

CHILDHOOD. "Then you may come in," said Mary, letting him open the door.
CHILDHOOD.
"Now, I'll tell you what we'll do," said Frank. "There's a drum on the
Baby-faith, reach down and help us, since we floor, and there's a tin trumpet. We'll get up a procession in honor of the doll;
cannot reach to you! not of your poor rag-doll, Mary, but of the fine lady-doll that belongs to Jane.
Touch us with the light of Heaven that is nearer Where is she, Jane?"
to your view: "She is in the next room in her little carriage," said Jane. "I will drag
So our love shall rest serenely in your childhood her in."
strong and true! So when the lady-doll was brought in, Frank roused up Trip, the dog, and
harnessed him to the carriage. Then Frank took the rag-doll, whose name was
I-i- Polly, and he tied her so that she sat upright on the dog's back.
:li i L SI'i"Sitop, sir, stop," said Frank, as Trip tried to run away. "You must not start
S: B li^ i I'I ,I I ,-l till the procession is ready. We must now get some flags."
Si SI o they got two broomsticks, and tied ribbons to them, and hung them with
"IIL i ., .,j 1 "pictures.
li l M'' 'i Mary carried one of the broomsticks, and Jane the other. Then Frank got his

I, I i Then he took the trumpet and the drum, and said, "Now, Mary, you shall see
] --~s_ what a procession is. I am the band of music, and I go first. Then you shall
SI follow with the flag; then Jane shall come; and, last of all, Old Trip shall come
S' with the rag-doll on his back and the lady-doll in the carriage. Now form in
i I I --_ line, and when I sound the trumpet we will begin to march."
S- ___ So they formed in a line, and Frank blew the trumpet and beat the drum.
l HW hat a noise he made! Trip at the same time began to bark.
L First they marched all around the room, three or four times. Then they
S- i marched from corner to corner. Then they ran. Then they walked slow; and at
BI j 1 I* last they stopped, and gave three cheers.
I I This made Trip bark all the more. lie did not know what it all meant. But
"K .the dolls behaved well.
It was a famous procession; but I am sorry to say that it was so noisy that the
d II I mother of the children came in to see what was the matter.
l As soon as the door was opened, Trip broke loose from the carriage, and ran
down stairs, and hid in the cellar. And so the great procession came to an end.

.--- ... -= fi .MASTER GEORGE takes a drive with six superb black horses.
l \The forward horses get restive. George shouts to them through
-- his hand. It is not an easy thing to drive six-in-hand.

"YOU CAN'T COME IN."
Once there were two little girls whose names were Jane and Mary. Jane was .
seven years old, and Mary was four. They had a brother whose name was Frank. r
He was a year older than Jane. I -
S Mary and Jane used to have good times in the play-room, but Frank would --
sometimes come and tease them. So one day, when Jane heard him coming, she
pushed with both hands against the door, and said, "You can't come in."
"Is tea ready?" said Frank; for he saw the doll's tea-things on the doll's little
table. But Jane knew that he came to make fun of her and Mary and the doll;
and so Jane said once more, "You can't come in."
"Oh!. but I must come in," said Frank. "It is raining out of doors, so that
.1 cannot fly my kite; so I must come and play with you and the dog.-
"Will you promise to be good, and not plague us, if I let you in?" said Jane.
""Yes; I will be very good," said Frank.






SUNSIEINTE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

CHILDREN. continued, "the rainbow has gone! the rain has washed boy who had been sheltering under some fir-trees had
Come to me, 0 ye children, it away, and the sky is dark." advanced, and was kneeling before them.
And whisper in my ear Then all at once the rain ceased as suddenly as it hat are you looking at?" said he.
What the birds and the winds are singing had begun, the sun shone out, and another rainbow, "At the rainbow," said Hilary; "we are going to
In your sunny atmosphere. brighter and clearer than the last, appeared; but it look for the crock of gold."
The boy laughed loudly.
For what are all our contrivings, was farther off, and the bow did not fall in the same The ofabl-an
And the wisdom of our books, place. old nursery tale," said he.
When compared to your caresses, "The crock must be farther off," said Hilary, wisely.Where the rainbow strikes the ground
And the gladness of your looks? "The rainbow is trying to show us where it is." Shall a crock of gold be found,"
You are better than all the ballads .. repeated Hilary dreamily; "we
That ever were sung or said: _________ shall try to find it."
"For ye are living poems, "' We think we can find the
And all the rest are dead. exact place where it touches,"
__ ..... added Christine; "will you go
S -with us ?"
HUNTING THE RAINBOW. "Not I," said the boy; I've
An April morning-half show- s no time for looking after shadows;
ers, halfsunshine. Three children I must go home to dinner, which
were standing together, and look- is better than looking after what
ing over the garden palings at a isnot to befound." And then
rainbow. the boy rose up and went away.
Then said Hilary: aH e turned once to look back at.
"Where the rainbow strikes the ground them, calling out :
Shall a crock of gold be found" "Good fortune to you and your
"Do you believe it?" asked shadows. Keep a piece of gold
"her twin-sister Christine. f-hr rm n v..i find 'the crock,'" said he; and he
"Why not? Yes, I think I do, if one could only laughed a merry laugh as he sped away.
"get to the exact spot; we might try and find it." e must make haste," returned Christine; "it is Then Hilary and Christine and Silvy wandered on;
"I could find it," answered Christine. "It is just two fields off now, and Silvy will be tired." but the nearer they came to where the rainbow seemed
by the brook where that lamb is standing." "Silvy not tired; me go away if you say so," said to touch the ground the farther it went from them;
"Their little brother Silvy opened his eyes wide; he the little boy, who was now so delighted with the and so they never found the crock of gold.
did not understand what his sisters were talking about; grass, and the flowers, and the birds. Then the double rainbow grew fainter and dimmer,
but then Silvy was only three, and Hilary and Chris- But again the rainbow faded, and the rain poured and as the children watched it it disappeared s alto-
tine were certainly five and a half. Butwhen he down, and the children thought themselves fortunate either.
found they were going into the field where the lamb in getting into a shed in one corner of the field. "Has it gone to the angels?" asked little Silvy,
was he was much pleased. He would like to stroke it. "It is a rainbow day said Hilary, when the April who remembered what his sister had said.
The children scrambled over the palings, tearing shower was over, and she pointed to a double rainbow "Perhaps that is where the crock of gold is," said
their frocks and tumbling into the long grass on the spanning the skies. If we could only see well enough Christine; "so we can't gt it."
other side. I dare say we should find fairies playing about the "I believe," said Hilary, meditatively, "that it be-
"Oh I" cried Christine. beautiful arch." longs to the fairies, and the reason that we can't find
What is the matter ? asked Hilary. "Or perhaps angels," whispered Christine. it is because not one of us was born on Christmas Day."
The dearest little rabbit-I thought I had it; but Perhaps so," said Hilary dreamily; but the thought Christine opened her eyes very widely.
it's gone, and I've scratched my fingers." did not chime in with the crock of gold, and her "Yes," said HIilary, nodding her head decisively,
"Oh!" said Silvy. "Silvy's shoe off." mind was just now full of the treasures that might be "I believe that is it. You know our old Irish nurse
Hilary dived into the grass for it, and she, too, ex- in the firy crock, and of the numbers of things she used to tell us of how children born on Christmas Day
"claimed Oh for the nettles she had not seen had could buy, and of the money she could give to all the could see the fairies-not always, but only sometimes,
stung her sharply. She rubbed her hand with some poor children who wanted any. She was so much when the fairies wish to help them. How funny to
cool dock-leaves to take away the prickly pain. absorbed in her plans that she did not notice that a see the little green men and the fairies in gossamer
"A swallow, a swallow, and dewdrops."
Let us follow," Do you really believe it, ilary ? asked Christine.
suddenly said Hilary, forgetting the sting. And the But ilary made no answer-she was gazing up
swallow darted towards the brook, skimming lightly into the clouds.
"on the surface of the water as it went. What are you looking at ?" asked Silvy ; "there
"Perhaps he knows about the crock," half whis- is no rainbow."
pered Christine, "for he has just come from among Hilary did not answer directly, but at last she said,
the clouds, and must have been close to the rainbow." I know there.isn't; but I was thinking that a rain-
"Perhaps," answered Hilary, thoughtfully. "All bow is one of the most beautiful things in the world,
things tell something, only we don't know what it is." even if one cannot find the crock of gold."
"Hop, hop, how quickly he runs. Oh I the beauty!
What a bushy tail !" HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS.
"A squirrel a squirrel I" cried Silvy, clapping his
hands. "-Here I am, mother "
"He's going towards the brook, too; he knows The cry is a cry of joy,
As, bounding up to the door of home,
about hollow trees and holes; perhaps he can say Counding up toes the six months' banished boy.
something about the crock of gold," said Christine. C Here I am, mother "
Patter! patter! patter! Down fell the shining rain, He knows he has done his best;
with the sunlight on it. And mother will like to hear it all,
"And we have no hats on," said Hilary; "we must And he will be glad to rest.
get under the hedgerow till it is over." "Here I am, mother !"
So the children crouched under the hedge, little On the bright, young school-boy face
Silvy being put in the middle to keep him from get- The earnest now of a day to come
I fain at those words would trace:
ting wet. "Here I am, mother!"
"The rain certainly knows about the rainbow, andhen a ood life's work is past,
'When a ood life's work is past,
perhaps about the crock of gold," began HI-ilary. Then May he bound to her with a cry as glad
she stopped suddenly. "Oh, dear I oh, dear! she At the dear Home door at last.






SUNSIEINTE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

CHILDREN. continued, "the rainbow has gone! the rain has washed boy who had been sheltering under some fir-trees had
Come to me, 0 ye children, it away, and the sky is dark." advanced, and was kneeling before them.
And whisper in my ear Then all at once the rain ceased as suddenly as it hat are you looking at?" said he.
What the birds and the winds are singing had begun, the sun shone out, and another rainbow, "At the rainbow," said Hilary; "we are going to
In your sunny atmosphere. brighter and clearer than the last, appeared; but it look for the crock of gold."
The boy laughed loudly.
For what are all our contrivings, was farther off, and the bow did not fall in the same The ofabl-an
And the wisdom of our books, place. old nursery tale," said he.
When compared to your caresses, "The crock must be farther off," said Hilary, wisely.Where the rainbow strikes the ground
And the gladness of your looks? "The rainbow is trying to show us where it is." Shall a crock of gold be found,"
You are better than all the ballads .. repeated Hilary dreamily; "we
That ever were sung or said: _________ shall try to find it."
"For ye are living poems, "' We think we can find the
And all the rest are dead. exact place where it touches,"
__ ..... added Christine; "will you go
S -with us ?"
HUNTING THE RAINBOW. "Not I," said the boy; I've
An April morning-half show- s no time for looking after shadows;
ers, halfsunshine. Three children I must go home to dinner, which
were standing together, and look- is better than looking after what
ing over the garden palings at a isnot to befound." And then
rainbow. the boy rose up and went away.
Then said Hilary: aH e turned once to look back at.
"Where the rainbow strikes the ground them, calling out :
Shall a crock of gold be found" "Good fortune to you and your
"Do you believe it?" asked shadows. Keep a piece of gold
"her twin-sister Christine. f-hr rm n v..i find 'the crock,'" said he; and he
"Why not? Yes, I think I do, if one could only laughed a merry laugh as he sped away.
"get to the exact spot; we might try and find it." e must make haste," returned Christine; "it is Then Hilary and Christine and Silvy wandered on;
"I could find it," answered Christine. "It is just two fields off now, and Silvy will be tired." but the nearer they came to where the rainbow seemed
by the brook where that lamb is standing." "Silvy not tired; me go away if you say so," said to touch the ground the farther it went from them;
"Their little brother Silvy opened his eyes wide; he the little boy, who was now so delighted with the and so they never found the crock of gold.
did not understand what his sisters were talking about; grass, and the flowers, and the birds. Then the double rainbow grew fainter and dimmer,
but then Silvy was only three, and Hilary and Chris- But again the rainbow faded, and the rain poured and as the children watched it it disappeared s alto-
tine were certainly five and a half. Butwhen he down, and the children thought themselves fortunate either.
found they were going into the field where the lamb in getting into a shed in one corner of the field. "Has it gone to the angels?" asked little Silvy,
was he was much pleased. He would like to stroke it. "It is a rainbow day said Hilary, when the April who remembered what his sister had said.
The children scrambled over the palings, tearing shower was over, and she pointed to a double rainbow "Perhaps that is where the crock of gold is," said
their frocks and tumbling into the long grass on the spanning the skies. If we could only see well enough Christine; "so we can't gt it."
other side. I dare say we should find fairies playing about the "I believe," said Hilary, meditatively, "that it be-
"Oh I" cried Christine. beautiful arch." longs to the fairies, and the reason that we can't find
What is the matter ? asked Hilary. "Or perhaps angels," whispered Christine. it is because not one of us was born on Christmas Day."
The dearest little rabbit-I thought I had it; but Perhaps so," said Hilary dreamily; but the thought Christine opened her eyes very widely.
it's gone, and I've scratched my fingers." did not chime in with the crock of gold, and her "Yes," said HIilary, nodding her head decisively,
"Oh!" said Silvy. "Silvy's shoe off." mind was just now full of the treasures that might be "I believe that is it. You know our old Irish nurse
Hilary dived into the grass for it, and she, too, ex- in the firy crock, and of the numbers of things she used to tell us of how children born on Christmas Day
"claimed Oh for the nettles she had not seen had could buy, and of the money she could give to all the could see the fairies-not always, but only sometimes,
stung her sharply. She rubbed her hand with some poor children who wanted any. She was so much when the fairies wish to help them. How funny to
cool dock-leaves to take away the prickly pain. absorbed in her plans that she did not notice that a see the little green men and the fairies in gossamer
"A swallow, a swallow, and dewdrops."
Let us follow," Do you really believe it, ilary ? asked Christine.
suddenly said Hilary, forgetting the sting. And the But ilary made no answer-she was gazing up
swallow darted towards the brook, skimming lightly into the clouds.
"on the surface of the water as it went. What are you looking at ?" asked Silvy ; "there
"Perhaps he knows about the crock," half whis- is no rainbow."
pered Christine, "for he has just come from among Hilary did not answer directly, but at last she said,
the clouds, and must have been close to the rainbow." I know there.isn't; but I was thinking that a rain-
"Perhaps," answered Hilary, thoughtfully. "All bow is one of the most beautiful things in the world,
things tell something, only we don't know what it is." even if one cannot find the crock of gold."
"Hop, hop, how quickly he runs. Oh I the beauty!
What a bushy tail !" HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS.
"A squirrel a squirrel I" cried Silvy, clapping his
hands. "-Here I am, mother "
"He's going towards the brook, too; he knows The cry is a cry of joy,
As, bounding up to the door of home,
about hollow trees and holes; perhaps he can say Counding up toes the six months' banished boy.
something about the crock of gold," said Christine. C Here I am, mother "
Patter! patter! patter! Down fell the shining rain, He knows he has done his best;
with the sunlight on it. And mother will like to hear it all,
"And we have no hats on," said Hilary; "we must And he will be glad to rest.
get under the hedgerow till it is over." "Here I am, mother !"
So the children crouched under the hedge, little On the bright, young school-boy face
Silvy being put in the middle to keep him from get- The earnest now of a day to come
I fain at those words would trace:
ting wet. "Here I am, mother!"
"The rain certainly knows about the rainbow, andhen a ood life's work is past,
'When a ood life's work is past,
perhaps about the crock of gold," began HI-ilary. Then May he bound to her with a cry as glad
she stopped suddenly. "Oh, dear I oh, dear! she At the dear Home door at last.






SUNSIEINTE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

CHILDREN. continued, "the rainbow has gone! the rain has washed boy who had been sheltering under some fir-trees had
Come to me, 0 ye children, it away, and the sky is dark." advanced, and was kneeling before them.
And whisper in my ear Then all at once the rain ceased as suddenly as it hat are you looking at?" said he.
What the birds and the winds are singing had begun, the sun shone out, and another rainbow, "At the rainbow," said Hilary; "we are going to
In your sunny atmosphere. brighter and clearer than the last, appeared; but it look for the crock of gold."
The boy laughed loudly.
For what are all our contrivings, was farther off, and the bow did not fall in the same The ofabl-an
And the wisdom of our books, place. old nursery tale," said he.
When compared to your caresses, "The crock must be farther off," said Hilary, wisely.Where the rainbow strikes the ground
And the gladness of your looks? "The rainbow is trying to show us where it is." Shall a crock of gold be found,"
You are better than all the ballads .. repeated Hilary dreamily; "we
That ever were sung or said: _________ shall try to find it."
"For ye are living poems, "' We think we can find the
And all the rest are dead. exact place where it touches,"
__ ..... added Christine; "will you go
S -with us ?"
HUNTING THE RAINBOW. "Not I," said the boy; I've
An April morning-half show- s no time for looking after shadows;
ers, halfsunshine. Three children I must go home to dinner, which
were standing together, and look- is better than looking after what
ing over the garden palings at a isnot to befound." And then
rainbow. the boy rose up and went away.
Then said Hilary: aH e turned once to look back at.
"Where the rainbow strikes the ground them, calling out :
Shall a crock of gold be found" "Good fortune to you and your
"Do you believe it?" asked shadows. Keep a piece of gold
"her twin-sister Christine. f-hr rm n v..i find 'the crock,'" said he; and he
"Why not? Yes, I think I do, if one could only laughed a merry laugh as he sped away.
"get to the exact spot; we might try and find it." e must make haste," returned Christine; "it is Then Hilary and Christine and Silvy wandered on;
"I could find it," answered Christine. "It is just two fields off now, and Silvy will be tired." but the nearer they came to where the rainbow seemed
by the brook where that lamb is standing." "Silvy not tired; me go away if you say so," said to touch the ground the farther it went from them;
"Their little brother Silvy opened his eyes wide; he the little boy, who was now so delighted with the and so they never found the crock of gold.
did not understand what his sisters were talking about; grass, and the flowers, and the birds. Then the double rainbow grew fainter and dimmer,
but then Silvy was only three, and Hilary and Chris- But again the rainbow faded, and the rain poured and as the children watched it it disappeared s alto-
tine were certainly five and a half. Butwhen he down, and the children thought themselves fortunate either.
found they were going into the field where the lamb in getting into a shed in one corner of the field. "Has it gone to the angels?" asked little Silvy,
was he was much pleased. He would like to stroke it. "It is a rainbow day said Hilary, when the April who remembered what his sister had said.
The children scrambled over the palings, tearing shower was over, and she pointed to a double rainbow "Perhaps that is where the crock of gold is," said
their frocks and tumbling into the long grass on the spanning the skies. If we could only see well enough Christine; "so we can't gt it."
other side. I dare say we should find fairies playing about the "I believe," said Hilary, meditatively, "that it be-
"Oh I" cried Christine. beautiful arch." longs to the fairies, and the reason that we can't find
What is the matter ? asked Hilary. "Or perhaps angels," whispered Christine. it is because not one of us was born on Christmas Day."
The dearest little rabbit-I thought I had it; but Perhaps so," said Hilary dreamily; but the thought Christine opened her eyes very widely.
it's gone, and I've scratched my fingers." did not chime in with the crock of gold, and her "Yes," said HIilary, nodding her head decisively,
"Oh!" said Silvy. "Silvy's shoe off." mind was just now full of the treasures that might be "I believe that is it. You know our old Irish nurse
Hilary dived into the grass for it, and she, too, ex- in the firy crock, and of the numbers of things she used to tell us of how children born on Christmas Day
"claimed Oh for the nettles she had not seen had could buy, and of the money she could give to all the could see the fairies-not always, but only sometimes,
stung her sharply. She rubbed her hand with some poor children who wanted any. She was so much when the fairies wish to help them. How funny to
cool dock-leaves to take away the prickly pain. absorbed in her plans that she did not notice that a see the little green men and the fairies in gossamer
"A swallow, a swallow, and dewdrops."
Let us follow," Do you really believe it, ilary ? asked Christine.
suddenly said Hilary, forgetting the sting. And the But ilary made no answer-she was gazing up
swallow darted towards the brook, skimming lightly into the clouds.
"on the surface of the water as it went. What are you looking at ?" asked Silvy ; "there
"Perhaps he knows about the crock," half whis- is no rainbow."
pered Christine, "for he has just come from among Hilary did not answer directly, but at last she said,
the clouds, and must have been close to the rainbow." I know there.isn't; but I was thinking that a rain-
"Perhaps," answered Hilary, thoughtfully. "All bow is one of the most beautiful things in the world,
things tell something, only we don't know what it is." even if one cannot find the crock of gold."
"Hop, hop, how quickly he runs. Oh I the beauty!
What a bushy tail !" HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS.
"A squirrel a squirrel I" cried Silvy, clapping his
hands. "-Here I am, mother "
"He's going towards the brook, too; he knows The cry is a cry of joy,
As, bounding up to the door of home,
about hollow trees and holes; perhaps he can say Counding up toes the six months' banished boy.
something about the crock of gold," said Christine. C Here I am, mother "
Patter! patter! patter! Down fell the shining rain, He knows he has done his best;
with the sunlight on it. And mother will like to hear it all,
"And we have no hats on," said Hilary; "we must And he will be glad to rest.
get under the hedgerow till it is over." "Here I am, mother !"
So the children crouched under the hedge, little On the bright, young school-boy face
Silvy being put in the middle to keep him from get- The earnest now of a day to come
I fain at those words would trace:
ting wet. "Here I am, mother!"
"The rain certainly knows about the rainbow, andhen a ood life's work is past,
'When a ood life's work is past,
perhaps about the crock of gold," began HI-ilary. Then May he bound to her with a cry as glad
she stopped suddenly. "Oh, dear I oh, dear! she At the dear Home door at last.







STJ*UNSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

THE BIRD'S MESSAGE. to a wood which she did not remember to have "In a cart ,,' exclaimed Lily; "what cart?"
noticed much before when she had passed that "Our face-cart," replied the old man of the
A little bird, a little love, way. The trees looked very curious, she thought; slate. "You come here frequently-or, at
Flew down to me from skies above, and amongst them were beautiful flowers grow- least, your face does. Look !"
And perched upon my window-sill; ing in profusion. Lily looked down, and was quite surprised to
That little bird is with me still. "What a beautiful place.! I'll go and pick up see a great number of very rude and very ugly

The crimson feathers round its throat some of those flowers, and take them home. I faces, which she immediately recognized as her
Were stirr'd with ev'ry thrilling note daresay I can get through the palings." own work.
Of carol music soft and clear- Lily squeezed herself through after struggling "How horrid they look !" she thought.
A sight to see, a song to hear. and making many faces, and then she found her- "You made them," replied the old man.
self in the wood; but the flowers did not appear "No wonder you are ashamed of them! they
A little bird, a little love, so nice as she had fancied. are very ugly and very rude. Do you know
Came flying down from skies above, "Well, I must bring home some," she thought. them? You made me what I am, too-and I
And, perching on my window-sill, "I wonder if I shall be able to carry them safe- am a fright, I know."
It tapped the pane with news of Lil. ly ? There are some very large things over "I am very sorry," Lily said. "I could not
there." draw you any better; I will do you prettier
It came but once, and flew away; ,, "
t c ut oncew and flew awyay, She ran forward, and was greatly surprised to next time.
But we are lose though from day to day find under a tree a collection of the most curious "Make my hands more useful, and my legs
That we are close though far apart-- ^^ ^ ^ ,, ^.. t
Close to each other, close at heart. things she had ever seen. She did not know straight, please, and a smaller nose, said the
what they were, but they looked like herself at man of the slate. "My eyes are too far apart,
Sand one leg is much shorter than the other. If
THE LITTLE GIRL WHO MADE FACES. you must draw, draw pretty things, not
"Lily, dear, come here and let me cut ( ) ugly, useless men like me. Now look at
your hair a little," said Miss Barrie to her those faces; do you know them ?"
youngest sister. Lily was not sure; she thought she
"You are always wanting to did. She was afraid, yet felt
"cut my hair," replied Lily, "t obliged to answer, so she said:
making a grace. "I think I do. I made
"Not always," replied her that face yesterday," she
sister. "I have done it once said, pointing at one with its
or twice; and you know you <, si tongue out; "I made that
don't like going to the hair- at nurse."
dresser's. Come, there's a Yes, replied the slate
good girl; don't make such a man, and there's the face
ugly faces." you made at the cat; there's
"I can make faces if Ilike, n the face you made at your sis-
Ella, I suppose. It's not ter; there's the face you made
your face, you know," re- when you were sent up stairs
plied Lily, saucily. As she O to bed; there's the rude face
spoke she made two or three you made at the poor woman
very ugly faces and put out last week-"
"her tongue. Oh, stop, stop!" cried
"You silly, ugly child! Lily. "I am very, very
said Ella; "if the wind th sorry. I had no idea they
Changes you will remain like were all kept."
that for ever. Now come "Oh yes, they are," replied
along." the old man; "and here are more.
But Lily would not go with Here is the horrible face you made at
her sister, and ran away down the medicine, and the twist you gave to
stairs before Miss Barrie b- your mouth to imitate a sick child; and if the
could stop her. times, and at others like little boys' and girls' wind changed you would have remained like
"Very well," cried Ella, "then you must be faces, and she thought she recognized some of that."
punished." them. "Please don't show me any more!" cried
Lily, however, was quite out of hearing, for "I wonder what they can be," she thought. Lily, covering up her eyes.
she ran down stairs and hid in the study, where, "There are some faces there I have seen before, "I must," said the man. "Look here-
finding a slate, she began to draw an ugly old I'm sure. Oh, I know there is Willie's face here are all the ugly men you drew, coming to
man on it, and when she had done that she drew like a clown. How funny !" see you. You wrote names upon them, and
all kinds of ugly faces, and made grimaces at She went on a little further into the wood, said one was Doctor James, and another was
the old man on the slate. and there she met an old man-the very same Mr. Cannon, the clergyman, and so on; and
After this she got tired, and feeling her eyes she had drawn on the slate. He was a very ugly there are the schoolmaster and his wife, you
aching she lay down on the rug, and then she and a very curious old fellow, and held his hands laughed at, coming also, with more ugly faces
felt as if she got up and went into the garden, out fully extended, and turned out his toes very you made behind their backs."
and first amused herself by chasing a butterfly stiffly. He also carried a windmill surmounted "I will never make game of people again; I
across the grass. The butterfly at last flew over by a weathercock, to see when the wind changed. was very naughty," cried Lily. "Do let me
the palings that separated the garden from the "How do you do, Miss Lily?" he said. go home, please."
road, and Lily followed it by ol-cning the iron "How do you know me ?" said Lily, in sur- "You must see the end of your rudeness.
gate and running down the path outside. prise. "You have never seen me before." Look there-are you not really ashamed ?"
It was a beautiful afternoon, and Lily ran on, "Oh yes, I have," replied the old man; "you Lily was dreadfully ashamed, I can tell you,
sometimes chasing a butterfly or a bee, which are Lily Barrie. We see you here frequently in when she saw several people who had been very
always escaped her, and sometimes stopping to our cart, and you have drawn me on a slate kind to her, coming carrying faces behind their
,pick flowers by the roadside. At last she came often." backs-faces which she had made when their







STJ*UNSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

THE BIRD'S MESSAGE. to a wood which she did not remember to have "In a cart ,,' exclaimed Lily; "what cart?"
noticed much before when she had passed that "Our face-cart," replied the old man of the
A little bird, a little love, way. The trees looked very curious, she thought; slate. "You come here frequently-or, at
Flew down to me from skies above, and amongst them were beautiful flowers grow- least, your face does. Look !"
And perched upon my window-sill; ing in profusion. Lily looked down, and was quite surprised to
That little bird is with me still. "What a beautiful place.! I'll go and pick up see a great number of very rude and very ugly

The crimson feathers round its throat some of those flowers, and take them home. I faces, which she immediately recognized as her
Were stirr'd with ev'ry thrilling note daresay I can get through the palings." own work.
Of carol music soft and clear- Lily squeezed herself through after struggling "How horrid they look !" she thought.
A sight to see, a song to hear. and making many faces, and then she found her- "You made them," replied the old man.
self in the wood; but the flowers did not appear "No wonder you are ashamed of them! they
A little bird, a little love, so nice as she had fancied. are very ugly and very rude. Do you know
Came flying down from skies above, "Well, I must bring home some," she thought. them? You made me what I am, too-and I
And, perching on my window-sill, "I wonder if I shall be able to carry them safe- am a fright, I know."
It tapped the pane with news of Lil. ly ? There are some very large things over "I am very sorry," Lily said. "I could not
there." draw you any better; I will do you prettier
It came but once, and flew away; ,, "
t c ut oncew and flew awyay, She ran forward, and was greatly surprised to next time.
But we are lose though from day to day find under a tree a collection of the most curious "Make my hands more useful, and my legs
That we are close though far apart-- ^^ ^ ^ ,, ^.. t
Close to each other, close at heart. things she had ever seen. She did not know straight, please, and a smaller nose, said the
what they were, but they looked like herself at man of the slate. "My eyes are too far apart,
Sand one leg is much shorter than the other. If
THE LITTLE GIRL WHO MADE FACES. you must draw, draw pretty things, not
"Lily, dear, come here and let me cut ( ) ugly, useless men like me. Now look at
your hair a little," said Miss Barrie to her those faces; do you know them ?"
youngest sister. Lily was not sure; she thought she
"You are always wanting to did. She was afraid, yet felt
"cut my hair," replied Lily, "t obliged to answer, so she said:
making a grace. "I think I do. I made
"Not always," replied her that face yesterday," she
sister. "I have done it once said, pointing at one with its
or twice; and you know you <, si tongue out; "I made that
don't like going to the hair- at nurse."
dresser's. Come, there's a Yes, replied the slate
good girl; don't make such a man, and there's the face
ugly faces." you made at the cat; there's
"I can make faces if Ilike, n the face you made at your sis-
Ella, I suppose. It's not ter; there's the face you made
your face, you know," re- when you were sent up stairs
plied Lily, saucily. As she O to bed; there's the rude face
spoke she made two or three you made at the poor woman
very ugly faces and put out last week-"
"her tongue. Oh, stop, stop!" cried
"You silly, ugly child! Lily. "I am very, very
said Ella; "if the wind th sorry. I had no idea they
Changes you will remain like were all kept."
that for ever. Now come "Oh yes, they are," replied
along." the old man; "and here are more.
But Lily would not go with Here is the horrible face you made at
her sister, and ran away down the medicine, and the twist you gave to
stairs before Miss Barrie b- your mouth to imitate a sick child; and if the
could stop her. times, and at others like little boys' and girls' wind changed you would have remained like
"Very well," cried Ella, "then you must be faces, and she thought she recognized some of that."
punished." them. "Please don't show me any more!" cried
Lily, however, was quite out of hearing, for "I wonder what they can be," she thought. Lily, covering up her eyes.
she ran down stairs and hid in the study, where, "There are some faces there I have seen before, "I must," said the man. "Look here-
finding a slate, she began to draw an ugly old I'm sure. Oh, I know there is Willie's face here are all the ugly men you drew, coming to
man on it, and when she had done that she drew like a clown. How funny !" see you. You wrote names upon them, and
all kinds of ugly faces, and made grimaces at She went on a little further into the wood, said one was Doctor James, and another was
the old man on the slate. and there she met an old man-the very same Mr. Cannon, the clergyman, and so on; and
After this she got tired, and feeling her eyes she had drawn on the slate. He was a very ugly there are the schoolmaster and his wife, you
aching she lay down on the rug, and then she and a very curious old fellow, and held his hands laughed at, coming also, with more ugly faces
felt as if she got up and went into the garden, out fully extended, and turned out his toes very you made behind their backs."
and first amused herself by chasing a butterfly stiffly. He also carried a windmill surmounted "I will never make game of people again; I
across the grass. The butterfly at last flew over by a weathercock, to see when the wind changed. was very naughty," cried Lily. "Do let me
the palings that separated the garden from the "How do you do, Miss Lily?" he said. go home, please."
road, and Lily followed it by ol-cning the iron "How do you know me ?" said Lily, in sur- "You must see the end of your rudeness.
gate and running down the path outside. prise. "You have never seen me before." Look there-are you not really ashamed ?"
It was a beautiful afternoon, and Lily ran on, "Oh yes, I have," replied the old man; "you Lily was dreadfully ashamed, I can tell you,
sometimes chasing a butterfly or a bee, which are Lily Barrie. We see you here frequently in when she saw several people who had been very
always escaped her, and sometimes stopping to our cart, and you have drawn me on a slate kind to her, coming carrying faces behind their
,pick flowers by the roadside. At last she came often." backs-faces which she had made when their






SUTNShIIINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

backs were turned. Her mamma, even, was "I wonder for whom God made the flowers ?" into the country, where they see fields and woods
there; and her sister Ella, who loved her so; and he said, after quite a long pause. like these around our home. Oh, how glad the
there was the very face she had made when Ella Mary turned to her brother and asked him if children are to romp among the grass, and to
wanted to cut her hair! he liked to see flowers, ramble through the woods and gather flowers."
Poor Lily was so completely upset at this that "Oh, yes," he replied, nodding his wee head. "I wish they would come here," said Fred;
she sat down and cried bitterly. "Why do you like them ?" she asked. "I would give them lots and lots of our flowers! "
I will let her cut off all my hair if you will "Because they look so pretty and they smell "So you ought," said Mary, "for God wishes
only let me go home. I will be good-indeed, so nice," he said, in answer to her question. us to make one another happy. Let me tell you
I will. I won't draw ugly pictures any more." "Yes," said Mary, "you like them because a story about a little girl who loved her neigh-
"And you won't draw me out of all proportion they make you happy. You do not need them bors so much that she was always trying to
any more-promise me that," said the man, who for food or for clothes, but to look upon and make some one happy.
looked something like the verger at the church, smell at. And this shows the great kindness of "Martha was her name, and she lived in a
Lily promised, and immediately the faces God. lie not only gives us all that we need, house in a town where few flowers were ever
vanished and the man led her towards the but more than we need. He knows what will seen. One day her father bought her a little
edge of the wood. Lily screamed in her delight, make us happy; He wishes us to be happy, and garden, and took it home for her to take care of."
"Hush, hush!" said the man; "you must "Bought her a garden and took it home!"
not scream here. Look up at that notice." said Fred, who thought that could not be.
Lily looked up, and on a tree she saw "Yes," said Mary; "he bought it, and
a board was fixed, with a notice on it carried it home for his little girl. It
which read as follows: "People are was such a small garden that it con-
requested not to halloo till they trained only one tree-a rose tree."
are out of the woods." I know what you mean," said
"You have some things Fred; "it was a tree in a
"to pass yet," he added. pot, like those we have in
"What are they ? asked our parlor window."
Lily, much frightened. "Yes, that was it," said
Some butterflies you a Mary; "and you may be
chased are waiting for you, sure that Martha danced for
I think. They will chase joy when she saw the pretty
you now, and if they catch plant. Her father showed
you they will-" her how to water it, and to
The old man suddenly c turn it every day; and soon
"vanished, and Lily made a it grew into a large tree, and
jump, and found herself on bore many pretty flowers.
the carpet in the library Martha often gave her
again, in her own home. little friends, who had no
There was the ugly old trees, some of the flowers;
"man on the slate, still hold- and people passing that way
ing out his hand, with all his used to stop for a moment to
fingers extended; but the look at the beautiful sight
faces were not visible. r to be seen in the window.
"I'll make you nicer, as "It is a good sign when
I promised I would." So K children are fond of flowers.
she straightened his legs and A love for the beautiful im-
arms, and put a hat on him, presses them with a love for
and made his eyes equal, and that which is good, and leads
gave him boots, and was sure them on to bud, blossom and
he felt more comfortable. bloom, through life, to the
"There," she said; "and joy and delight of their pa-
now I'll go and let Ella cut my rents and teachers, and to the
hair, and say I'm sorry I made ) ionor and glory of the Father
faces at her and drew ugly pictures." above, even as the beautiful flowers
And so she did; and she stood on 7- _.ad, blossom and bloom to our great
the stool, and her sister said she was "as l. light, and to the pleasure of all who
good as gold," and never made any faces.- Once enjoy their fragrance and loveliness."
she was very near doing so, but she suddenly so IIe gives us all the pretty flowers we have.
remembered that the wind might change. She But we do not feel so thankful for them as we
didn't make a grimace at all that day, and was ought to do, because we see them so often, and TRUE BEAUTY.
praised by her mamma for being a good girl. may gather as many as we like. And in some Handsome they that handsome do,"
I am very glad to be able to tell you that places not very far away from here there are Grandma said to little Sue;
Lily never made any more faces. She grew up houses built close together, and paved streets, And the dull gray eyes grew bright
to be a pretty and obedient child, and every- where there are hundreds and hundreds of chil- Kindled with an eager light.
body loved her and made a great pet of her. dren living, but no flowers."
"Children, and no flowers !" said Fred, lost Ierself more fair for others' sake.
in wonder; for he could not think how chil-
STORY OF A ROSE TREE. dren could do without flowers. Though no roses decked her cheek,
"I wonder who made the flowers ? said little "Yes," said his sister, "hundreds of children, She grew gentle, kind, and meek;
Fred to his sister Mary, as she arranged the and no flowers; for there is no place in which And her voice soon found a tone,
flowers they had gathered in bunches. flowers will grow. Which, till then, it had not known.
God," replied his sister. "Sometimes kind friends take a large number And, at length, her playmates all
Then there were several minutes of silence. of these poor children in wagons or by railway Their "best friend" did Susie call.






SUTNShIIINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

backs were turned. Her mamma, even, was "I wonder for whom God made the flowers ?" into the country, where they see fields and woods
there; and her sister Ella, who loved her so; and he said, after quite a long pause. like these around our home. Oh, how glad the
there was the very face she had made when Ella Mary turned to her brother and asked him if children are to romp among the grass, and to
wanted to cut her hair! he liked to see flowers, ramble through the woods and gather flowers."
Poor Lily was so completely upset at this that "Oh, yes," he replied, nodding his wee head. "I wish they would come here," said Fred;
she sat down and cried bitterly. "Why do you like them ?" she asked. "I would give them lots and lots of our flowers! "
I will let her cut off all my hair if you will "Because they look so pretty and they smell "So you ought," said Mary, "for God wishes
only let me go home. I will be good-indeed, so nice," he said, in answer to her question. us to make one another happy. Let me tell you
I will. I won't draw ugly pictures any more." "Yes," said Mary, "you like them because a story about a little girl who loved her neigh-
"And you won't draw me out of all proportion they make you happy. You do not need them bors so much that she was always trying to
any more-promise me that," said the man, who for food or for clothes, but to look upon and make some one happy.
looked something like the verger at the church, smell at. And this shows the great kindness of "Martha was her name, and she lived in a
Lily promised, and immediately the faces God. lie not only gives us all that we need, house in a town where few flowers were ever
vanished and the man led her towards the but more than we need. He knows what will seen. One day her father bought her a little
edge of the wood. Lily screamed in her delight, make us happy; He wishes us to be happy, and garden, and took it home for her to take care of."
"Hush, hush!" said the man; "you must "Bought her a garden and took it home!"
not scream here. Look up at that notice." said Fred, who thought that could not be.
Lily looked up, and on a tree she saw "Yes," said Mary; "he bought it, and
a board was fixed, with a notice on it carried it home for his little girl. It
which read as follows: "People are was such a small garden that it con-
requested not to halloo till they trained only one tree-a rose tree."
are out of the woods." I know what you mean," said
"You have some things Fred; "it was a tree in a
"to pass yet," he added. pot, like those we have in
"What are they ? asked our parlor window."
Lily, much frightened. "Yes, that was it," said
Some butterflies you a Mary; "and you may be
chased are waiting for you, sure that Martha danced for
I think. They will chase joy when she saw the pretty
you now, and if they catch plant. Her father showed
you they will-" her how to water it, and to
The old man suddenly c turn it every day; and soon
"vanished, and Lily made a it grew into a large tree, and
jump, and found herself on bore many pretty flowers.
the carpet in the library Martha often gave her
again, in her own home. little friends, who had no
There was the ugly old trees, some of the flowers;
"man on the slate, still hold- and people passing that way
ing out his hand, with all his used to stop for a moment to
fingers extended; but the look at the beautiful sight
faces were not visible. r to be seen in the window.
"I'll make you nicer, as "It is a good sign when
I promised I would." So K children are fond of flowers.
she straightened his legs and A love for the beautiful im-
arms, and put a hat on him, presses them with a love for
and made his eyes equal, and that which is good, and leads
gave him boots, and was sure them on to bud, blossom and
he felt more comfortable. bloom, through life, to the
"There," she said; "and joy and delight of their pa-
now I'll go and let Ella cut my rents and teachers, and to the
hair, and say I'm sorry I made ) ionor and glory of the Father
faces at her and drew ugly pictures." above, even as the beautiful flowers
And so she did; and she stood on 7- _.ad, blossom and bloom to our great
the stool, and her sister said she was "as l. light, and to the pleasure of all who
good as gold," and never made any faces.- Once enjoy their fragrance and loveliness."
she was very near doing so, but she suddenly so IIe gives us all the pretty flowers we have.
remembered that the wind might change. She But we do not feel so thankful for them as we
didn't make a grimace at all that day, and was ought to do, because we see them so often, and TRUE BEAUTY.
praised by her mamma for being a good girl. may gather as many as we like. And in some Handsome they that handsome do,"
I am very glad to be able to tell you that places not very far away from here there are Grandma said to little Sue;
Lily never made any more faces. She grew up houses built close together, and paved streets, And the dull gray eyes grew bright
to be a pretty and obedient child, and every- where there are hundreds and hundreds of chil- Kindled with an eager light.
body loved her and made a great pet of her. dren living, but no flowers."
"Children, and no flowers !" said Fred, lost Ierself more fair for others' sake.
in wonder; for he could not think how chil-
STORY OF A ROSE TREE. dren could do without flowers. Though no roses decked her cheek,
"I wonder who made the flowers ? said little "Yes," said his sister, "hundreds of children, She grew gentle, kind, and meek;
Fred to his sister Mary, as she arranged the and no flowers; for there is no place in which And her voice soon found a tone,
flowers they had gathered in bunches. flowers will grow. Which, till then, it had not known.
God," replied his sister. "Sometimes kind friends take a large number And, at length, her playmates all
Then there were several minutes of silence. of these poor children in wagons or by railway Their "best friend" did Susie call.






SUTNSHINTE FOR LITTLE CHIILDREIN.

THE COOKEY TREE. wish we had brought something to eat." And parents, who opened their eyes wider and wider,
Grandma Day's house was somewhat like a then all the children, one after another, declared and declared that, old as they were, they had
horse car-it had always "room for one more." themselves as "hungry as bears." never seen such a tree as that.
Although the number of grandchildren kept What a pity said uncle Harry. "Why Uncle Harry winked his eye at grandma, and
increasing, there always seemed to be plenty of didn't we think to bring something to eat? But said he shouldn't wonder a bit if they found
rooms, plenty of beds and plenty to eat. As there's no help for it. I'll do the best I can for another some day; and I dare say they will,
surely as summer came around was the old house you. Come with me, and I'll show you a spring when summer-time finds them together again.
filled with children, and many were the merry where you can get a nice drink of water." So,
times they had. taking a tin pail in his hand, he led the way, TEDDY'S FISHING.
I am going to tell you, now, what a queer tree with all the children following him. Teddy stuffed a biscuit into each of his jacket
they found last summer. You have seen apple All at once Freddie exclaimed, "Oh, oh, pockets, put his little straw hat upon his head,
trees, and pear trees, and peach trees, and plum -. .,, and said that he was ready for a jaunt. It was
trees; but of all the trees you ever saw a lovely morning-so sunny and warm
or heard of, this tree bore the most itltl his aunt had said she would
curious kind of eatable fruit. spend the whole forenoon in
Said uncle Harry at the the park with him. Now,
breakfast-table, one morn- w:e e there was nothing Teddy
ing, "What a fine day this L liked so well as this. He
would be for a trip to the .' was never tired of roam-
woods! I should feel o ing through the beautiful
tempted to go if I could and shady paths, while his
get any one to go with aunt, within call, sat read-
me." A chorus of voices ing on one of the rustic
exclaimed at once, "I'll seats. On this occasion,
go!" "Take me along however, he had a new
"Here's your passenger!" idea, and that was that
Well, well," said li he would combine fishing
uncle Harry, "its most v- with his other sports. He
too bad to make you all V did not know that this was
go." But as the children against the rules; and so,
said they would rather when his aunt got nicely
go than not," and even seated beneath a widely-
aunt Annie said she was branching tree near the
willing to go with them, .i 4 pond, Teddy bent a pin,
he told them to get ready and out of the tangles and
as soon as they could; i bunches of string which
and, after a scramble for lie always carried in his
hats and baskets, they pockets lie made a nice,
were all ready and wait- long line. Then he tied
ing when uncle Harry, in his line to the end of a
the big wagon, drove up stick, sat down on the
to the door. bank, and threw out his
While they were crowd- hook. Poor, little, inno-
ing into the wagon, no- cent city boy! He did
body noticed that grand- ,not know that it ought to
ma brought out from the have some nice morsel on
pantry a large basket, it to lure the fish with.
which uncle Harry slyly IIe expected them to come
hid under the front seat. right up and bite at the
The wagon was so full, bare hook. He waited pa-
that Mollie, who sat in tiently, but did not feel
the back part, thought it .. even a nibble. So intent
was too heavy a load for was he upon catching fish
olbid "Billy," the horse; that he waded into the
so she held a basket and an water in search of them; and
umbrella outside all the way, : l just then a huge policeman,
thinking thereby to lighten I --brass buttons and all, walked up
burden, and make it easier to ,I,:. behind Teddy. A smile lighted up
As they rode on the houses .i.f '. i,.:re i' his grim face as lie watched the ex-
scarce, till by and by there was nothing to be cited little fellow. At that moment Teddy hap-
seen but rocks and trees and bushes. At last look !" and at the same instant, every eye was opened to look around, and, seeing the dreadful
uncle Harry found a good place to stop at; so directed to the most curious sight. What do figure of the policeman, lie dropped his fishing-
he drove into a shaded lane, where he tied the you suppose it was ? Why, it was a tree with line and ran, pale and frightened, to his aunt,
horse, and helped the children to alight. cookeys hanging on every limb; and what was who had hard work to keep from laughing.
They amused themselves for some time gath- strange, the cookeys looked just like those grand- The policeman, seeing Teddy's alarm, said, I
ering wild flowers, ferns, and mosses, stopping ma always made. guess you haven't broken the law very much,
now and then to chase a butterfly or scare a Uncle Harry began at once to pluck them off, my little man," and walked quietly away.
squirrel out of a year's growth; but, tiring at and hand them to the children, who all agreed Teddy gave up fishing for that day, amusing
last, they sat down under a tree, where aunt that the cookeys tasted also "just like grand- himself by throwing crumbs to the swan. -nd
Annie with her pencil and paper had begun to ma's." When then reached home, they all ran ducks. The next time lie goes fishing he will
take a sketch. Oh, dear said Bessie, I at once to tell the strange tale to their grand- have a real fishing line and some good bait.






SUTNSHINTE FOR LITTLE CHIILDREIN.

THE COOKEY TREE. wish we had brought something to eat." And parents, who opened their eyes wider and wider,
Grandma Day's house was somewhat like a then all the children, one after another, declared and declared that, old as they were, they had
horse car-it had always "room for one more." themselves as "hungry as bears." never seen such a tree as that.
Although the number of grandchildren kept What a pity said uncle Harry. "Why Uncle Harry winked his eye at grandma, and
increasing, there always seemed to be plenty of didn't we think to bring something to eat? But said he shouldn't wonder a bit if they found
rooms, plenty of beds and plenty to eat. As there's no help for it. I'll do the best I can for another some day; and I dare say they will,
surely as summer came around was the old house you. Come with me, and I'll show you a spring when summer-time finds them together again.
filled with children, and many were the merry where you can get a nice drink of water." So,
times they had. taking a tin pail in his hand, he led the way, TEDDY'S FISHING.
I am going to tell you, now, what a queer tree with all the children following him. Teddy stuffed a biscuit into each of his jacket
they found last summer. You have seen apple All at once Freddie exclaimed, "Oh, oh, pockets, put his little straw hat upon his head,
trees, and pear trees, and peach trees, and plum -. .,, and said that he was ready for a jaunt. It was
trees; but of all the trees you ever saw a lovely morning-so sunny and warm
or heard of, this tree bore the most itltl his aunt had said she would
curious kind of eatable fruit. spend the whole forenoon in
Said uncle Harry at the the park with him. Now,
breakfast-table, one morn- w:e e there was nothing Teddy
ing, "What a fine day this L liked so well as this. He
would be for a trip to the .' was never tired of roam-
woods! I should feel o ing through the beautiful
tempted to go if I could and shady paths, while his
get any one to go with aunt, within call, sat read-
me." A chorus of voices ing on one of the rustic
exclaimed at once, "I'll seats. On this occasion,
go!" "Take me along however, he had a new
"Here's your passenger!" idea, and that was that
Well, well," said li he would combine fishing
uncle Harry, "its most v- with his other sports. He
too bad to make you all V did not know that this was
go." But as the children against the rules; and so,
said they would rather when his aunt got nicely
go than not," and even seated beneath a widely-
aunt Annie said she was branching tree near the
willing to go with them, .i 4 pond, Teddy bent a pin,
he told them to get ready and out of the tangles and
as soon as they could; i bunches of string which
and, after a scramble for lie always carried in his
hats and baskets, they pockets lie made a nice,
were all ready and wait- long line. Then he tied
ing when uncle Harry, in his line to the end of a
the big wagon, drove up stick, sat down on the
to the door. bank, and threw out his
While they were crowd- hook. Poor, little, inno-
ing into the wagon, no- cent city boy! He did
body noticed that grand- ,not know that it ought to
ma brought out from the have some nice morsel on
pantry a large basket, it to lure the fish with.
which uncle Harry slyly IIe expected them to come
hid under the front seat. right up and bite at the
The wagon was so full, bare hook. He waited pa-
that Mollie, who sat in tiently, but did not feel
the back part, thought it .. even a nibble. So intent
was too heavy a load for was he upon catching fish
olbid "Billy," the horse; that he waded into the
so she held a basket and an water in search of them; and
umbrella outside all the way, : l just then a huge policeman,
thinking thereby to lighten I --brass buttons and all, walked up
burden, and make it easier to ,I,:. behind Teddy. A smile lighted up
As they rode on the houses .i.f '. i,.:re i' his grim face as lie watched the ex-
scarce, till by and by there was nothing to be cited little fellow. At that moment Teddy hap-
seen but rocks and trees and bushes. At last look !" and at the same instant, every eye was opened to look around, and, seeing the dreadful
uncle Harry found a good place to stop at; so directed to the most curious sight. What do figure of the policeman, lie dropped his fishing-
he drove into a shaded lane, where he tied the you suppose it was ? Why, it was a tree with line and ran, pale and frightened, to his aunt,
horse, and helped the children to alight. cookeys hanging on every limb; and what was who had hard work to keep from laughing.
They amused themselves for some time gath- strange, the cookeys looked just like those grand- The policeman, seeing Teddy's alarm, said, I
ering wild flowers, ferns, and mosses, stopping ma always made. guess you haven't broken the law very much,
now and then to chase a butterfly or scare a Uncle Harry began at once to pluck them off, my little man," and walked quietly away.
squirrel out of a year's growth; but, tiring at and hand them to the children, who all agreed Teddy gave up fishing for that day, amusing
last, they sat down under a tree, where aunt that the cookeys tasted also "just like grand- himself by throwing crumbs to the swan. -nd
Annie with her pencil and paper had begun to ma's." When then reached home, they all ran ducks. The next time lie goes fishing he will
take a sketch. Oh, dear said Bessie, I at once to tell the strange tale to their grand- have a real fishing line and some good bait.






SIUN SBIHINE FOR LITTLE CIIILDREISN.

TIZ-A-RING. wardrobe. After looking at all the furniture in that way and that, and then flew up on the bed. She
"Tiz-a-r! way, she flew up, and came down right in the middle seemed pleased with my arrangements, and sat down
"What a unnsng t sig of my bed. Ah Miss Brownie," I thought, "that as before.
What a funny song to sing I
Sa nnn l n, is almost too saucy; but I will watch you a minute, I told her she must not wake my baby with her
You're a cunning little thing,
Busy bee, busy bee! and see what you will do." Cut-cut, ca-dar-cut; but he waked in a few min-
uh yu fy so fr n n She scratched about with her feet, and picked with utes, and, seeing Brownie on the bed, he put out his
Though you fly so far and long,
And your wings are good and strong, her bill a little while, and then she sat down very little fat hands to pull her feathers. I was afraid she
Yet you sig no other song, quietly. After a few minutes she got up, said "Cut- would scratch or peck him, and went quickly to take
Busy bee, busy bee I cut-cut, ca-dar-cut," flew down off the bed, and walked him away; but she only turned her head and looked
out. I looked on the bed, and what do you think I at him in a motherly way, as if to say, "Pull my
"I am sure, if I were you, saw? A little white egg! feathers as much as you like, Harry; I am used to
I would learn a tune or two babies." She staid about as
From the birds that sip the long as the day before; and
dew to- then she said, "Cut-cut-cut,
By your side, busy bee 1 m ca-dar-cut," and went out.
So that with your gauzy When I looked on the bed,
wing there were two eggs i
You might fly, and sweetly And so, day after day, for
sing two weeks, Brownie came
Something more than tiz-a- to my room. I made her
ring always nest, and put one egg in it,
All the day, busy bee !" __ and every day she left anoth-
S t or, till Elsie's basket was full.
"I'm too busy, don't you see, And when I stop here,
To be learning melody," Louise always laughs heart-
Quoth the cunning little bee, i ily, and says, Tell t again,
And went hurrying along. auntie."
" Tiz-a-ring may sound but -A
queer A CARTFUL OF KINGS.
To my little critic's ear; THE SEASONS.
But you'll like my honey, An amusing incident is
dear, In the Spring told by a German corres-
If you do not like my All the birds begin, pondent as having occurred
song." Early and late during recent imperial hunt
To build and sing; at Hubertustock. The
hounds had just been called
BROWNIE. In the Summer off, and the guests were dis-
Every evening, in the twi- The roses smile, persing, when the Emperor
light, my little niece Louise Painting the roadside William, feeling slightly un-
climbs into my lap, and says, Mile on mile; well, proposed to return to
"Now, auntie, tell me about In the Autumn the castle on foot. The King
Brownie." As it is a true of Saxony and the Grand
story, I think the "Sunshine" The sap runs down, Duke of Mecklenburg accom-
girls and boys would like to And leaves are tinted panied him; but when the
hear it; and my little pet, Gold and brown. august party were about half
who dearly loves the "Sun- When Winter comes way to the castle the Em-
shine," will be delighted All these must go; peror became fatigued, and,
when she reads it there. a peasant driving a cart in
Once I had a little brown The Earth es hid the directionof lubertustock
chicken. She was one of a In a shroud of snow. happening to pass by, they
brood which came out of the asked him to give them a lift,
shell very early in the Spring, which he willingly did. On
while the ground was cov- the way, however, the good
ered with snow. All the man's curiosity was excited by
rest of the brood died from the appearance of his passen-
the cold; and then the chil- gers, and he said, turning to one
dren took this little chicken of them:
into the house, wrapped her "And who may you be?"
in soft wool, and laid her in "I am the Grand Duke of
a warm corner by the fire. Mocklenburg."
They fed her with crumbs, ."Oh, indeed! returned the
and gave her fresh water peasant, with a wink. "And
every day, until the warm who may you be?" he inquired
weather came, when she had of the next.
grown so strong that she was I am the King of Saxony."
able to run about with the other chickens. The next day I was watching my baby Harry, who "Better and better!" cried the carter. "And
But she did not forget her warm corner by the fire was asleep on the bed. Elsie and Fred were playing you?" accosting the third member of the party.
or the children's care, for whenever the door was with their blocks on the carpet. The door was shut. "I am the Emperor of Germany."
open she would run in, and make herself at home. I heard two little feet come patting along through the "Well, then," said the countryman, in high humor,
The children named her Brownie. She grew to be entry, and scratch at the door. I went to the door "I shall tell you who I am. I am the Shah of Persia,
a hen ; but she still loved to come into the house, and and opened it. and can hoax people as well as you."
was always petted. There stood Brownie. I knew she had come to But when he drove up to the Castle of IIubertu-
One day I was sewing in my room, when Brownie find her nest; so I thought I would make it ready stock, the honest fellow found that of all the potentates
walked in. She turned her little head to one side, for her. I threw an old quilt over my white bed- in the cart he was the only one whose claim could not
and looked at the bureau; then she stepped along, spread, put on it the egg she had left the day before, be made good-muoh to his own confusion, and to
turned her head to the other side, and looked at the and then sat down. She walked around, peeping this the amusement of his passengers.






SIUN SBIHINE FOR LITTLE CIIILDREISN.

TIZ-A-RING. wardrobe. After looking at all the furniture in that way and that, and then flew up on the bed. She
"Tiz-a-r! way, she flew up, and came down right in the middle seemed pleased with my arrangements, and sat down
"What a unnsng t sig of my bed. Ah Miss Brownie," I thought, "that as before.
What a funny song to sing I
Sa nnn l n, is almost too saucy; but I will watch you a minute, I told her she must not wake my baby with her
You're a cunning little thing,
Busy bee, busy bee! and see what you will do." Cut-cut, ca-dar-cut; but he waked in a few min-
uh yu fy so fr n n She scratched about with her feet, and picked with utes, and, seeing Brownie on the bed, he put out his
Though you fly so far and long,
And your wings are good and strong, her bill a little while, and then she sat down very little fat hands to pull her feathers. I was afraid she
Yet you sig no other song, quietly. After a few minutes she got up, said "Cut- would scratch or peck him, and went quickly to take
Busy bee, busy bee I cut-cut, ca-dar-cut," flew down off the bed, and walked him away; but she only turned her head and looked
out. I looked on the bed, and what do you think I at him in a motherly way, as if to say, "Pull my
"I am sure, if I were you, saw? A little white egg! feathers as much as you like, Harry; I am used to
I would learn a tune or two babies." She staid about as
From the birds that sip the long as the day before; and
dew to- then she said, "Cut-cut-cut,
By your side, busy bee 1 m ca-dar-cut," and went out.
So that with your gauzy When I looked on the bed,
wing there were two eggs i
You might fly, and sweetly And so, day after day, for
sing two weeks, Brownie came
Something more than tiz-a- to my room. I made her
ring always nest, and put one egg in it,
All the day, busy bee !" __ and every day she left anoth-
S t or, till Elsie's basket was full.
"I'm too busy, don't you see, And when I stop here,
To be learning melody," Louise always laughs heart-
Quoth the cunning little bee, i ily, and says, Tell t again,
And went hurrying along. auntie."
" Tiz-a-ring may sound but -A
queer A CARTFUL OF KINGS.
To my little critic's ear; THE SEASONS.
But you'll like my honey, An amusing incident is
dear, In the Spring told by a German corres-
If you do not like my All the birds begin, pondent as having occurred
song." Early and late during recent imperial hunt
To build and sing; at Hubertustock. The
hounds had just been called
BROWNIE. In the Summer off, and the guests were dis-
Every evening, in the twi- The roses smile, persing, when the Emperor
light, my little niece Louise Painting the roadside William, feeling slightly un-
climbs into my lap, and says, Mile on mile; well, proposed to return to
"Now, auntie, tell me about In the Autumn the castle on foot. The King
Brownie." As it is a true of Saxony and the Grand
story, I think the "Sunshine" The sap runs down, Duke of Mecklenburg accom-
girls and boys would like to And leaves are tinted panied him; but when the
hear it; and my little pet, Gold and brown. august party were about half
who dearly loves the "Sun- When Winter comes way to the castle the Em-
shine," will be delighted All these must go; peror became fatigued, and,
when she reads it there. a peasant driving a cart in
Once I had a little brown The Earth es hid the directionof lubertustock
chicken. She was one of a In a shroud of snow. happening to pass by, they
brood which came out of the asked him to give them a lift,
shell very early in the Spring, which he willingly did. On
while the ground was cov- the way, however, the good
ered with snow. All the man's curiosity was excited by
rest of the brood died from the appearance of his passen-
the cold; and then the chil- gers, and he said, turning to one
dren took this little chicken of them:
into the house, wrapped her "And who may you be?"
in soft wool, and laid her in "I am the Grand Duke of
a warm corner by the fire. Mocklenburg."
They fed her with crumbs, ."Oh, indeed! returned the
and gave her fresh water peasant, with a wink. "And
every day, until the warm who may you be?" he inquired
weather came, when she had of the next.
grown so strong that she was I am the King of Saxony."
able to run about with the other chickens. The next day I was watching my baby Harry, who "Better and better!" cried the carter. "And
But she did not forget her warm corner by the fire was asleep on the bed. Elsie and Fred were playing you?" accosting the third member of the party.
or the children's care, for whenever the door was with their blocks on the carpet. The door was shut. "I am the Emperor of Germany."
open she would run in, and make herself at home. I heard two little feet come patting along through the "Well, then," said the countryman, in high humor,
The children named her Brownie. She grew to be entry, and scratch at the door. I went to the door "I shall tell you who I am. I am the Shah of Persia,
a hen ; but she still loved to come into the house, and and opened it. and can hoax people as well as you."
was always petted. There stood Brownie. I knew she had come to But when he drove up to the Castle of IIubertu-
One day I was sewing in my room, when Brownie find her nest; so I thought I would make it ready stock, the honest fellow found that of all the potentates
walked in. She turned her little head to one side, for her. I threw an old quilt over my white bed- in the cart he was the only one whose claim could not
and looked at the bureau; then she stepped along, spread, put on it the egg she had left the day before, be made good-muoh to his own confusion, and to
turned her head to the other side, and looked at the and then sat down. She walked around, peeping this the amusement of his passengers.






SIUN SBIHINE FOR LITTLE CIIILDREISN.

TIZ-A-RING. wardrobe. After looking at all the furniture in that way and that, and then flew up on the bed. She
"Tiz-a-r! way, she flew up, and came down right in the middle seemed pleased with my arrangements, and sat down
"What a unnsng t sig of my bed. Ah Miss Brownie," I thought, "that as before.
What a funny song to sing I
Sa nnn l n, is almost too saucy; but I will watch you a minute, I told her she must not wake my baby with her
You're a cunning little thing,
Busy bee, busy bee! and see what you will do." Cut-cut, ca-dar-cut; but he waked in a few min-
uh yu fy so fr n n She scratched about with her feet, and picked with utes, and, seeing Brownie on the bed, he put out his
Though you fly so far and long,
And your wings are good and strong, her bill a little while, and then she sat down very little fat hands to pull her feathers. I was afraid she
Yet you sig no other song, quietly. After a few minutes she got up, said "Cut- would scratch or peck him, and went quickly to take
Busy bee, busy bee I cut-cut, ca-dar-cut," flew down off the bed, and walked him away; but she only turned her head and looked
out. I looked on the bed, and what do you think I at him in a motherly way, as if to say, "Pull my
"I am sure, if I were you, saw? A little white egg! feathers as much as you like, Harry; I am used to
I would learn a tune or two babies." She staid about as
From the birds that sip the long as the day before; and
dew to- then she said, "Cut-cut-cut,
By your side, busy bee 1 m ca-dar-cut," and went out.
So that with your gauzy When I looked on the bed,
wing there were two eggs i
You might fly, and sweetly And so, day after day, for
sing two weeks, Brownie came
Something more than tiz-a- to my room. I made her
ring always nest, and put one egg in it,
All the day, busy bee !" __ and every day she left anoth-
S t or, till Elsie's basket was full.
"I'm too busy, don't you see, And when I stop here,
To be learning melody," Louise always laughs heart-
Quoth the cunning little bee, i ily, and says, Tell t again,
And went hurrying along. auntie."
" Tiz-a-ring may sound but -A
queer A CARTFUL OF KINGS.
To my little critic's ear; THE SEASONS.
But you'll like my honey, An amusing incident is
dear, In the Spring told by a German corres-
If you do not like my All the birds begin, pondent as having occurred
song." Early and late during recent imperial hunt
To build and sing; at Hubertustock. The
hounds had just been called
BROWNIE. In the Summer off, and the guests were dis-
Every evening, in the twi- The roses smile, persing, when the Emperor
light, my little niece Louise Painting the roadside William, feeling slightly un-
climbs into my lap, and says, Mile on mile; well, proposed to return to
"Now, auntie, tell me about In the Autumn the castle on foot. The King
Brownie." As it is a true of Saxony and the Grand
story, I think the "Sunshine" The sap runs down, Duke of Mecklenburg accom-
girls and boys would like to And leaves are tinted panied him; but when the
hear it; and my little pet, Gold and brown. august party were about half
who dearly loves the "Sun- When Winter comes way to the castle the Em-
shine," will be delighted All these must go; peror became fatigued, and,
when she reads it there. a peasant driving a cart in
Once I had a little brown The Earth es hid the directionof lubertustock
chicken. She was one of a In a shroud of snow. happening to pass by, they
brood which came out of the asked him to give them a lift,
shell very early in the Spring, which he willingly did. On
while the ground was cov- the way, however, the good
ered with snow. All the man's curiosity was excited by
rest of the brood died from the appearance of his passen-
the cold; and then the chil- gers, and he said, turning to one
dren took this little chicken of them:
into the house, wrapped her "And who may you be?"
in soft wool, and laid her in "I am the Grand Duke of
a warm corner by the fire. Mocklenburg."
They fed her with crumbs, ."Oh, indeed! returned the
and gave her fresh water peasant, with a wink. "And
every day, until the warm who may you be?" he inquired
weather came, when she had of the next.
grown so strong that she was I am the King of Saxony."
able to run about with the other chickens. The next day I was watching my baby Harry, who "Better and better!" cried the carter. "And
But she did not forget her warm corner by the fire was asleep on the bed. Elsie and Fred were playing you?" accosting the third member of the party.
or the children's care, for whenever the door was with their blocks on the carpet. The door was shut. "I am the Emperor of Germany."
open she would run in, and make herself at home. I heard two little feet come patting along through the "Well, then," said the countryman, in high humor,
The children named her Brownie. She grew to be entry, and scratch at the door. I went to the door "I shall tell you who I am. I am the Shah of Persia,
a hen ; but she still loved to come into the house, and and opened it. and can hoax people as well as you."
was always petted. There stood Brownie. I knew she had come to But when he drove up to the Castle of IIubertu-
One day I was sewing in my room, when Brownie find her nest; so I thought I would make it ready stock, the honest fellow found that of all the potentates
walked in. She turned her little head to one side, for her. I threw an old quilt over my white bed- in the cart he was the only one whose claim could not
and looked at the bureau; then she stepped along, spread, put on it the egg she had left the day before, be made good-muoh to his own confusion, and to
turned her head to the other side, and looked at the and then sat down. She walked around, peeping this the amusement of his passengers.






SUNSI{IINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

were quite safe, and Aunt Louie was not uneasy about
'.'t them. One day, when they had been about a week at
t L" S ; the farm, Barbara said, "You can have a picnic to-morrow,
"'- if you like, missies. I'll pack you a nice little basket, and
S you can go off to the fields to gather flowers, and take
""I- --_ your dinner under the trees."
j Doffin fairly danced for joy. That was just what she
J
41. had been wanting to do ever so much, and at five o'clock
PO' next morning she was awake and thinking about it. The
S "' truth was, Barbara and Aunt Louie had a great many
"things to attend to that day, and did not want to be
". HE THE ADVENTURES tr lul.. I with little people trotting in and out asking questions, and that
%:, t1! r ..i-, n of the picnic; but of course the children did not know that.
OF PIPPIN AND DOFFIN. W\.-r, .. t going to have breakfast in the fields too, are we, Doffin?"
S ". h, l'ipi ,t i- -in l ., t l. ,v ., I'ill..in ao-k.kl, after a long look out of the window.
S ,r i,..iN.." D.:,h- r.,1, "N.. I'l,, :f raid not."
Si.1i' ,i,..I th.: in1w..w It' h irr TIli..-. I t'. go back to bed again till Barbara calls us, and leave the
-L I, ..lir."..i crl'. :.ii. ItIneir \ iiil., ,'l..:i so that we can see the birds and hear them talking."
I..rIII,',, ail gl.ii...i.l p .\lII .1 l.1i;, thought that was, perhaps, the best thing to do, and the
th. I ..i.,iI'l .iiie kv. ... (..i:- t \\.y .t passing the time, for it would be eight o'clock before they
S' .. t Ip, 1'il'l.i,: it's Zn..l, a g;..,t i:miv lr.:il.l ast. It seemed a very long morning; but it was over at last.
""' I.....l,.," B;irl. ri \% lii-ked away the breakfast things, then went into the dairy,
l'ii t.ir'ul ..rv :i fr..ii tin:,re into the pantry; and just as the children were beginning
1 ,I. ,T u :-i.r1 it I.:\ <.-. t... thliik li- I, d forgotten all about the promised basket she came with it.
"Ind :I ,th'Ir. :,"l.1 titall1 -.it u1', ih N",.w th, il, my lassies, away to the fields with you, and don't come
I.1. u 1 n '..... I l. PrI-Etitly l..a..kL till -nii'l'.wn. Keep near the haymakers; and if you look around I
1 '..f!i, rt tie !l.:.iw, -hi..l tIliik you'll find strawberries on the banks down there, and flowers
"I"MI. .' .. __ ". :iil st'',,l [,-t i ii ,,idt'. r-. in Ipl,'iitv. I'on't eant all vour


-It ', t INr- III-' rt ], t 1,110 -!:It I ,I:,r O w v,- ,: il k!.hill i -


-- U .ihil ti r .v : it ii .- ,.,,rit tr T ,..r ,h."1 --L I l.
ta. -- I'd 'i l: g ;t t iil. ', ,t 1t tthi. '. ..,a t it. ,,,, til- !




tI-'4 Si uI riii .",,vit..i-,-l" tm,,in ,,_i t i.t tl. l i i.a q :-.I-I-





voices from tame iti 1 I.I..
the two great farm-hlorses; and presently thle merry music '. tlt.uit II f: ti 1. 1 l.ik! fii' ltt:jt*w I 'flt .'
was heard tinkling, tinkling down the lane, while the hensa t ei t r.... a e. i ti'
,chatted away to each other merrily. And over and above a 'l. te- sat.I, I,. ," .l.. .
freshness to be felt at five o'clock on a summer's morning. .t rlIIt ''?iirl Ii..I. I2 it-:'., t1i ,*' .trl.",
pippin rand Doflin stood at the open window, enjoying it :tI l-t itr a -ii r li
Their reld names were Alice and Ethel Lee, and they li'l I'':'itr 't .t t.... tt
visit to th.ir aunt and ucle at Two-Elm Fbam becatu-. Li ti.t i ol ,-
+c I ,'.. ,h ,' e " d af r ,.. t.ei P u.. i; .,lt th,.. ,











mother u was very ill, and their father had too take siher awa t. theo -ilth IIi'' i : t .
of France, where the weather was warm and bringht, M i.t i,.ri ,, ...,y. It '
+'"'the t t far -or ; a nd pr ese ntly" te m orry music .4, t x., tlk 1.11.1 til, .








Dofin where setntik on a long-promised visne it to Uncle Frbi ;iiT-l i r l .
Loie. The first day they felt very s' and solitary. Hi. ,t. '1,',
nurse, had gone with their mother. and Barbara, Aunt Li.- .t. w.di- [..t abv al





wasalw ays in such ast huy that the children seemed afraid t- 1 ,I r' aitil tI!i
Their aunt was w hiking about the house, too, in the stiffest L I.hrl 1-.l I,..i
and the primmest cap; and Uncle Fred and Jim seemed t--..h I. -,.:\- .,, 1, ,ii
bsy thar t they ihad not a mom ent to t tke notice rof t tle t,, H ;-iitl, 'tii
"ofFran ce wher lt h ather waswar and bra Iv ml, .[. kiti'







end there did not seem to be one single little bos y t or girl al:',. ..' i iI I .
am; while Tigert Uncle Fred's dog, sniffe d very suspi-..
ciously, and looked as if he didn't think much of little
girls in general, and of Pippin and Doffin in particular.
After a day or two the first shyness wore off, and the
children found they might ramble about the garden all day, A=
and play just as much as they liked; and Barbara was not i"i
really cross or unkind a bit-only very busy with the .tJ
hay-making. It was Uncle Fred's farm all round in every -
direction; and so long as they kept in the new-mown
meadows, or wide, rambling, old-fiashioned garden, they .






SUNTSHIINE FOR LITTLE CHILDRERN.__

ing their hands with wild flowers-and all the time "You just look right under the leaves; that's way, sir," and he ran quickly in the direction he
the haymakers were at work on either side, and where the best 'uns grow," he said. had taken the children in the morning.
great farm-horses stood in the lane rubbing their Doffin and Pippin found searching for the Doffin and Pippin, meantime, had eaten straw-
noses over the gates; and Doffin thought they strawberries very amusing, and they never missed berries till they could eat no more, and walked so
were Might and Majesty all the time, for she the r.i. .1 little boy, who had run away as soon far that they lay down under a tree to rest, and so
never noticed that they had quite lost sight of as he got a chance, and went right back to where fell fast asleep, which was not at all surprising.
the red chimneys and sharp-pointed gables of the basket was left. First he ate one tart, then When they opened their eyes it was quite
Two-Elm Farm, and that they were all quite the other, and finally ran away as quickly as dark, and cold, too; and round on every side
strange haymakers that they saw about them. ever lie could in an opposite direction. But after I were tall trees, looking quite weird in the pale
At length they came to a pretty, mossy spot, a few hours he began to think it was very, very moonlight.
where a little brook chatted away merrily, and mean of him to have robbed the little girls who It was impossible to tell which way to turn,
a tall tree cast a delightful shadow, and it was had been so kind to him; so he went back again to even to search for the basket; so Doffin pressed
the cosiest place they had seen since they set out. where the basket was, feeling determined to tell her little sister closer to her, and determined to
"Let us have our dinner here, Pippin," she them how sorry he was. For a long time he stay just where they were till some one came to
said, putting down her basket; "I am so waited, but no little girls came back. Sitting on look for them. She thought of the story of the
hungry!" the fence, throwing stones into the brook, and Babes in the Wood; but she was not afraid of
Pippin was tired and hungry, too. their being so harshly treated, and it
So they sat down and opened the made her happy to remember that
little parcels Barbara had packed up. there were no cruel animals in Eng-
First there were some sandwiches; lish forests; but poor little Pippin
then lots of delicious brown bread was cold, tired, hungry, and fright-
and butter, cake, apples, and a bottle ended, and wept very bitterly. Pres-
of milk, and in a snug corner two of ently there was a sound of voices in
Barbara's special raspberry tarts. ''; the distance, and the children jumped
"I'll have a sandwich," Doffin up and clung closer to each other;
said, helping herself; and Pippin then came a strange flashing of light
followed her example. Just as they j T TE 1 R 3F-E UE. through the trees, followed by two or
were in the middle of their feast '. three sharp barks, and a shrill voice
there passed down the lane a little :. t 1,al !, t1 t cried, Here they are, sir, where the
boy, and as soon as he saw them he ) best strawberries in the whole wood
came to where they were sitting- I- re grow;" d D n and Doffin and Pippin ran
such ragged little boy, with no boots forward with a great cry of delight,
or socks, and his bare, brown legs all ,i for there stood Uncle Fred and Jim
scratched, his straw hat torn and bat- and Tiger.
tered, and his jacket quite in rags. I t e tC1 ]ic tlPe Ir 1, in Uncle took Pippin in his arms,
"Please give me a piece of bread," l/'- L ( i, d rerii)icPh'itg' ig Jim swung Doffin on his shoulder,
he said, in a whining voice. "I'm ^ |'irt o.i^ Tiger ran on in front, and so they all
very hungr-didn't have nothing to went towards home, the ragged little
eat all day." o I, boy following a step behind. Pre-
"Poor boy! Doffin said, handing sently he ran on in front and got the
him the largest sandwich, which he _" d_' ,, [reside-: basket, which he gave to Jim. "I
devoured greedily, while Pippin gave 1 atethemtarts," hesaid, holding down
him the biggest and rosiest apple. 'his head. "I'm very sorry, but I
He seemed evidently surprised at 'd was so hungry, and I ken back to
their kindness, and a little taken fI,' i' i'- r e jtd I'-. ll' j tell you, and waited for you ever so
aback, for he had meant to help 'a long."
himself had they refused. "Would "And if you hadn't come back,
you like apieceof bread-and-butter?" I'm afraid we should not have found
Doffin asked, when the sandwich had ., --- our little wanderers to-night," Uncle
disappeared. And the boy said he f Fred said. So we will forgive you,
"would-or two, "if miss has 'em to .' Johnnie Simms. Yes, I know you
spare." And then they gave him a L' -. very well; and though you deserve
drink of milk from the horn cup ''i 'I to be punished for stealing, I'll give
Barbara had put in the basket; and you something for having helped
then they put up all that was left of to find my little girls, if you come
the feast-not very much, for the i1 i-. .1 boy otherwise amusing himself till he began to get up to the farm to-morrow."
had quite a dreadful appetite-and prepared for hungry again, and having eaten up the few scraps "I don't want nothing," Johnnie replied.
another walk. of bread that remained, he lay down and was soon "It was me got 'em into the wood, and it was
"I say, would you like to get some straw- fast asleep. It was long past sunset then, and when me got 'em out, and them tarts were uncommon
berries-good 'uns ? the boy said, after a he awoke he could see the stars shining quite clear- good! and without another word he disappeared
minute's silence. He felt he should do some- ly, and there was the basket still by his side. down the lane like a dusty little shadow; and
thing in return for his good dinner. "Leave Presently he heard the sound of voices coming Pippin and Doffin got home safely, and were
your basket here under the tree, and I'll show down the lane, and the barking of dogs, and petted first and scolded after; and Aunt Louie
you." starting up he ran to see what could be the mat- herself tucked them into bed and gave them
"Thank you very much," Doffin said. So the ter. There were two men with lanterns, and in some nice hot milk, and declared over and over
basket containing the two tarts, the empty bottle, a moment he guessed they were coming to look again to Barbara that she was truly thankful
and the horn cup, was concealed under some for the .children. matters were no worse. And that was the
ferns, and away they scampered after the ragged They went into the wood, sir, to look for end of the adventures of Pippin and Doffin in
boy, down a narrow lane, across a turnip field, strawberries. I showed them the way," he cried the country; for never again were they allowed
and into a wood, where the boy declared there in his shrill voice, and I was waiting for them to go out a long way, or for along time, by
were stacks of strawberries, here with the basket, -when I fell asleep. This themselves.






SUNSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

THE PUMPKIN. catch the oranges as Miles tosses them .
LITTLE folks are much beholden down. Sometimes they pick five or six,
To the pumpkin fair and golden. baskets in an afternoon. Miles says ii
Who within a pumpkin-shell Willy is a "bery good catch." He ..
Put his wife and kept her well? sometimes tires of catching them, but .- '
Peter, Peter was the man: he never tires of eating them.
Catch the fellow if you can! I looked into the packing-room this
Cinderella, for her carriage, morning, and there lay seventeen hun-
Cinderella, for her marriage, dred yellow balls. Papa lets both his
To the pumpkin owed a debt: little boys help wrap the oranges. Each
Has she paid it, think you, yet? orange is wrapped in a piece of tissue-
Jack-a-Lantern is beholden paper that is cut just the right size.
To the pumpkin fair and golden: Willy always says as he begins, "Now
But the shell is his alone, let's see who'll beat!" Do you know -
For the pudding is our own; what he means?
And if we the stalk can take Ben cannot wrap oranges as fast as
We a pipe to play on make. Willy, but as they are wrapped he
n hands them to papa to pack in boxes.
PICKING ORANGES. He can read the word "Boston" that i
WILLY and Ben are two little boys who live in papa writes in black letters on the out- -
the old city of Saint Augustine. They do not have side of the boxes. --- -
sleigh-rides and coasts, for Saint Augustine is 'way Of course papa pays his workers, and
down South in Florida, where snow never falls. they take their money all to mamma to .-
But while the boys and girls in the North are keep for them. They have so much -
"wearing mittens and tippets and thick coats when whispering to do about it that I think
they go out to play, Willy and Ben are running they are saving it to buy holiday gifts.
about bare-headed in the orange-groves or pluck- Charley's patience began to give out.
ing roses from the garden. "I don't believe there are any fish here,"
All around the house are orange trees, and in THE YOUNG FISHERMAN. thought he.
among the glossy green leaves hang the great WHEN Charley was eight years old his Just then the cork dipped a little on
yellow, juicy oranges. The fruit is ripe early in father gave him for a birthday present a one side. Then it stopped. Then it dipped
December, and ready to be picked. nice fishing-line. again.
Miles, the colored man, takes his big clippers The little boy was greatly pleased. He "Hurrah !" said Charley ; and he pull-
and goes up the high step-ladder which he has had fished often in a tub of water with ed up the line with a jerk. Was there a
placed near the tree. He cuts each orange from a pin-hook, but now for the first time he fish on it ? Not a bit of one. But the
the branch, taking care not to get hurt by the had a real fishing-line and pole, and was bait was all gone.
long, sharp thorns, able to go a-fishing in earnest. "Never mind !" said Charley, "I'll
Willy stands at the foot of the ladder, ready to The very first pleasant day he got leave catch him next time."
S.. from hi- father to go to the pond and try He baited the hook, and threw it out
-i- ,i. lk. again. The sport was beginning to get
4. D:.- -III,- to bring home a good mess exciting.
Iif ti-l,. ( 'rley," said his father. Pretty soon the cork bobbed under as
1 .,1, y.-. papa," said Charley; and with before.
SIi- li-in-l)ole on his shoulder out he "Now I have him !" said Charley.
". Lt. He pulled up once more, and this time
\\lh.t ifun it was First he ldug some with such a jerk that he tossed the hook
Sw. ,n ii- tf.ir bait; then he baited his hook right over his head, and it caught in the
i. i.,.I-v tll:n he took his stand on a weeds behind him. But there was no fish
littk- lltt'rl;nn made on purpose for the on it.
S 1-_.f ti-liermen, and threw out his "The third time never fails," said
k. Charley as lie threw out his line again.
T,. T...:- IIh- stood in the shade of the old He waited now until the cork was pulled
willl. t,-t.._ and waited for the fish to bite. clear under water, then he lifted it out
As he looked down into the without too much haste, and sure enough
calm, clear water he saw a he had caught a fish !
boy just about his own size How long do you suppose it had taken
"" looking up at him. He had him to do it ? Pretty nearly all the fore-
no other company. noon. No matter! He had one fish to carry
He kept close watch of the home, and he had had a real good time
.. pretty painted cork, expect- besides.
ing every moment to see it go Charley has caught many a mess of
yt.; under water. But for a long, fish since then, but I doubt if he has ever
S long time it floated almost enjoyed the sport more than he did in
... without motion. catching that one fish.






SUNSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

THE PUMPKIN. catch the oranges as Miles tosses them .
LITTLE folks are much beholden down. Sometimes they pick five or six,
To the pumpkin fair and golden. baskets in an afternoon. Miles says ii
Who within a pumpkin-shell Willy is a "bery good catch." He ..
Put his wife and kept her well? sometimes tires of catching them, but .- '
Peter, Peter was the man: he never tires of eating them.
Catch the fellow if you can! I looked into the packing-room this
Cinderella, for her carriage, morning, and there lay seventeen hun-
Cinderella, for her marriage, dred yellow balls. Papa lets both his
To the pumpkin owed a debt: little boys help wrap the oranges. Each
Has she paid it, think you, yet? orange is wrapped in a piece of tissue-
Jack-a-Lantern is beholden paper that is cut just the right size.
To the pumpkin fair and golden: Willy always says as he begins, "Now
But the shell is his alone, let's see who'll beat!" Do you know -
For the pudding is our own; what he means?
And if we the stalk can take Ben cannot wrap oranges as fast as
We a pipe to play on make. Willy, but as they are wrapped he
n hands them to papa to pack in boxes.
PICKING ORANGES. He can read the word "Boston" that i
WILLY and Ben are two little boys who live in papa writes in black letters on the out- -
the old city of Saint Augustine. They do not have side of the boxes. --- -
sleigh-rides and coasts, for Saint Augustine is 'way Of course papa pays his workers, and
down South in Florida, where snow never falls. they take their money all to mamma to .-
But while the boys and girls in the North are keep for them. They have so much -
"wearing mittens and tippets and thick coats when whispering to do about it that I think
they go out to play, Willy and Ben are running they are saving it to buy holiday gifts.
about bare-headed in the orange-groves or pluck- Charley's patience began to give out.
ing roses from the garden. "I don't believe there are any fish here,"
All around the house are orange trees, and in THE YOUNG FISHERMAN. thought he.
among the glossy green leaves hang the great WHEN Charley was eight years old his Just then the cork dipped a little on
yellow, juicy oranges. The fruit is ripe early in father gave him for a birthday present a one side. Then it stopped. Then it dipped
December, and ready to be picked. nice fishing-line. again.
Miles, the colored man, takes his big clippers The little boy was greatly pleased. He "Hurrah !" said Charley ; and he pull-
and goes up the high step-ladder which he has had fished often in a tub of water with ed up the line with a jerk. Was there a
placed near the tree. He cuts each orange from a pin-hook, but now for the first time he fish on it ? Not a bit of one. But the
the branch, taking care not to get hurt by the had a real fishing-line and pole, and was bait was all gone.
long, sharp thorns, able to go a-fishing in earnest. "Never mind !" said Charley, "I'll
Willy stands at the foot of the ladder, ready to The very first pleasant day he got leave catch him next time."
S.. from hi- father to go to the pond and try He baited the hook, and threw it out
-i- ,i. lk. again. The sport was beginning to get
4. D:.- -III,- to bring home a good mess exciting.
Iif ti-l,. ( 'rley," said his father. Pretty soon the cork bobbed under as
1 .,1, y.-. papa," said Charley; and with before.
SIi- li-in-l)ole on his shoulder out he "Now I have him !" said Charley.
". Lt. He pulled up once more, and this time
\\lh.t ifun it was First he ldug some with such a jerk that he tossed the hook
Sw. ,n ii- tf.ir bait; then he baited his hook right over his head, and it caught in the
i. i.,.I-v tll:n he took his stand on a weeds behind him. But there was no fish
littk- lltt'rl;nn made on purpose for the on it.
S 1-_.f ti-liermen, and threw out his "The third time never fails," said
k. Charley as lie threw out his line again.
T,. T...:- IIh- stood in the shade of the old He waited now until the cork was pulled
willl. t,-t.._ and waited for the fish to bite. clear under water, then he lifted it out
As he looked down into the without too much haste, and sure enough
calm, clear water he saw a he had caught a fish !
boy just about his own size How long do you suppose it had taken
"" looking up at him. He had him to do it ? Pretty nearly all the fore-
no other company. noon. No matter! He had one fish to carry
He kept close watch of the home, and he had had a real good time
.. pretty painted cork, expect- besides.
ing every moment to see it go Charley has caught many a mess of
yt.; under water. But for a long, fish since then, but I doubt if he has ever
S long time it floated almost enjoyed the sport more than he did in
... without motion. catching that one fish.






SUNSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

THE PUMPKIN. catch the oranges as Miles tosses them .
LITTLE folks are much beholden down. Sometimes they pick five or six,
To the pumpkin fair and golden. baskets in an afternoon. Miles says ii
Who within a pumpkin-shell Willy is a "bery good catch." He ..
Put his wife and kept her well? sometimes tires of catching them, but .- '
Peter, Peter was the man: he never tires of eating them.
Catch the fellow if you can! I looked into the packing-room this
Cinderella, for her carriage, morning, and there lay seventeen hun-
Cinderella, for her marriage, dred yellow balls. Papa lets both his
To the pumpkin owed a debt: little boys help wrap the oranges. Each
Has she paid it, think you, yet? orange is wrapped in a piece of tissue-
Jack-a-Lantern is beholden paper that is cut just the right size.
To the pumpkin fair and golden: Willy always says as he begins, "Now
But the shell is his alone, let's see who'll beat!" Do you know -
For the pudding is our own; what he means?
And if we the stalk can take Ben cannot wrap oranges as fast as
We a pipe to play on make. Willy, but as they are wrapped he
n hands them to papa to pack in boxes.
PICKING ORANGES. He can read the word "Boston" that i
WILLY and Ben are two little boys who live in papa writes in black letters on the out- -
the old city of Saint Augustine. They do not have side of the boxes. --- -
sleigh-rides and coasts, for Saint Augustine is 'way Of course papa pays his workers, and
down South in Florida, where snow never falls. they take their money all to mamma to .-
But while the boys and girls in the North are keep for them. They have so much -
"wearing mittens and tippets and thick coats when whispering to do about it that I think
they go out to play, Willy and Ben are running they are saving it to buy holiday gifts.
about bare-headed in the orange-groves or pluck- Charley's patience began to give out.
ing roses from the garden. "I don't believe there are any fish here,"
All around the house are orange trees, and in THE YOUNG FISHERMAN. thought he.
among the glossy green leaves hang the great WHEN Charley was eight years old his Just then the cork dipped a little on
yellow, juicy oranges. The fruit is ripe early in father gave him for a birthday present a one side. Then it stopped. Then it dipped
December, and ready to be picked. nice fishing-line. again.
Miles, the colored man, takes his big clippers The little boy was greatly pleased. He "Hurrah !" said Charley ; and he pull-
and goes up the high step-ladder which he has had fished often in a tub of water with ed up the line with a jerk. Was there a
placed near the tree. He cuts each orange from a pin-hook, but now for the first time he fish on it ? Not a bit of one. But the
the branch, taking care not to get hurt by the had a real fishing-line and pole, and was bait was all gone.
long, sharp thorns, able to go a-fishing in earnest. "Never mind !" said Charley, "I'll
Willy stands at the foot of the ladder, ready to The very first pleasant day he got leave catch him next time."
S.. from hi- father to go to the pond and try He baited the hook, and threw it out
-i- ,i. lk. again. The sport was beginning to get
4. D:.- -III,- to bring home a good mess exciting.
Iif ti-l,. ( 'rley," said his father. Pretty soon the cork bobbed under as
1 .,1, y.-. papa," said Charley; and with before.
SIi- li-in-l)ole on his shoulder out he "Now I have him !" said Charley.
". Lt. He pulled up once more, and this time
\\lh.t ifun it was First he ldug some with such a jerk that he tossed the hook
Sw. ,n ii- tf.ir bait; then he baited his hook right over his head, and it caught in the
i. i.,.I-v tll:n he took his stand on a weeds behind him. But there was no fish
littk- lltt'rl;nn made on purpose for the on it.
S 1-_.f ti-liermen, and threw out his "The third time never fails," said
k. Charley as lie threw out his line again.
T,. T...:- IIh- stood in the shade of the old He waited now until the cork was pulled
willl. t,-t.._ and waited for the fish to bite. clear under water, then he lifted it out
As he looked down into the without too much haste, and sure enough
calm, clear water he saw a he had caught a fish !
boy just about his own size How long do you suppose it had taken
"" looking up at him. He had him to do it ? Pretty nearly all the fore-
no other company. noon. No matter! He had one fish to carry
He kept close watch of the home, and he had had a real good time
.. pretty painted cork, expect- besides.
ing every moment to see it go Charley has caught many a mess of
yt.; under water. But for a long, fish since then, but I doubt if he has ever
S long time it floated almost enjoyed the sport more than he did in
... without motion. catching that one fish.






SUNSIT-IINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.
to punish the poor young girl, who doubtless would have deserved it
S. for so impudently using Liszt's name. But charity is ingenious to
cover a multitude of faults, to turn evil into good. Let us acknowledge,
CAA'bS1 too, that the young girl did the best thing possible in confessing her
"'0g guilt and throwing herself at the feet of the generous man whose name
"V^ on! -she had so wrongly used.


TL VOTS ALWAYS LEARNING.
"Do^0' Tul m rWA^l STW E not your precious hours in play;
Leo (Ca l JC Naught can recall life's morning;
"Lj si -The seeds now sown will cheer your way:
"l0oo oU' lVoar u \i c.r acN "The Wise" are always learning.

T CS Nor think when all school-days are o'er
T You've bid adieu to learning;
SOrSC TYo-uvS yoUT {w\\\& ,Li& vLa*
"I" (i -t Life's deepest lessons are in store:
e^v1 Lf [ li LA utIie- S "The Meek" are always learning.

It s i H-I When, strong in hope, you first launch forth,
is a I "4 ri< C- A name intent on earning,
\o f\ Scorn not the voice of age and worth:
S i \ "The Great" are always learning.

S"w e. When right and wrong within you strive,
tAnd passions fierce are burning,
.,, ll,,,,o Sis sLiLt. Oh, then you'll know how while they live
S" The Good are always learning.


LISZT AND HIS PUPIL.
A YOUNG pianist was giving concerts in the provinces of Germany. e C-.i Lu o-Et 0oVT1 .C.N10 LUYlv &S0oo0..,
In order to attract the public she announced that she was a pupil of 0 ll- yst
the famous Liszt. On arriving at a little town she had advertised a
concert; but great was her consternation when she noticed among the 30 *ylooa, '
list of new arrivals at the hotel the name of the Abb6 Liszt. Howo L
could she get out of the difficulty into which she had brought herself?
Her fraud could not fail to be discovered, and she would not be able to -
give any more concerts; she already saw her future ruined. Trembling
all over, she presented herself before the maestro to confess to him her
trickery and deceit and to implore his pardon. She threw herself at
his feet, and, with her face bathed in tears, related to him her past his- o L.
tory. An orphan at a very early age, poor, possessing nothing but her
talent, the young girl thought she could only surmount the obstacles I .
which beset her path by making use of the name of Liszt.
"Well, well," said the great musician, helping her to rise, we will
see, my child, what we can do. There is a piano; let me hear you play e-5 o 0 LS t. CL 0c-q.d
a piece intended for to-morrow's concert." I CoL too,
She obeyed; the maestro sat down beside her, gave her several hints, tU L' ( o
suggested some changes, and when she had finished her piece said *
to her, 11 S
"Now, my child, I have given you a music-lesson; now you are a "o CIO ,
pupil of Liszt." V LS C --VC
Before she could stammer out a few words of gratitude Liszt cL .tt,
asked her,
"Are the programmes printed ?" n y /
"No, sir, not yet." r",, I- .
"Then put on the programme that you will be assisted by your t O J. .'
master, and that the last piece will be performed by the Abb6 Liszt." 'Co wLu C Y. .LL SCC LWYr y
A vulgar disposition would have gladly embraced this opportunity






SUNSIT-IINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.
to punish the poor young girl, who doubtless would have deserved it
S. for so impudently using Liszt's name. But charity is ingenious to
cover a multitude of faults, to turn evil into good. Let us acknowledge,
CAA'bS1 too, that the young girl did the best thing possible in confessing her
"'0g guilt and throwing herself at the feet of the generous man whose name
"V^ on! -she had so wrongly used.


TL VOTS ALWAYS LEARNING.
"Do^0' Tul m rWA^l STW E not your precious hours in play;
Leo (Ca l JC Naught can recall life's morning;
"Lj si -The seeds now sown will cheer your way:
"l0oo oU' lVoar u \i c.r acN "The Wise" are always learning.

T CS Nor think when all school-days are o'er
T You've bid adieu to learning;
SOrSC TYo-uvS yoUT {w\\\& ,Li& vLa*
"I" (i -t Life's deepest lessons are in store:
e^v1 Lf [ li LA utIie- S "The Meek" are always learning.

It s i H-I When, strong in hope, you first launch forth,
is a I "4 ri< C- A name intent on earning,
\o f\ Scorn not the voice of age and worth:
S i \ "The Great" are always learning.

S"w e. When right and wrong within you strive,
tAnd passions fierce are burning,
.,, ll,,,,o Sis sLiLt. Oh, then you'll know how while they live
S" The Good are always learning.


LISZT AND HIS PUPIL.
A YOUNG pianist was giving concerts in the provinces of Germany. e C-.i Lu o-Et 0oVT1 .C.N10 LUYlv &S0oo0..,
In order to attract the public she announced that she was a pupil of 0 ll- yst
the famous Liszt. On arriving at a little town she had advertised a
concert; but great was her consternation when she noticed among the 30 *ylooa, '
list of new arrivals at the hotel the name of the Abb6 Liszt. Howo L
could she get out of the difficulty into which she had brought herself?
Her fraud could not fail to be discovered, and she would not be able to -
give any more concerts; she already saw her future ruined. Trembling
all over, she presented herself before the maestro to confess to him her
trickery and deceit and to implore his pardon. She threw herself at
his feet, and, with her face bathed in tears, related to him her past his- o L.
tory. An orphan at a very early age, poor, possessing nothing but her
talent, the young girl thought she could only surmount the obstacles I .
which beset her path by making use of the name of Liszt.
"Well, well," said the great musician, helping her to rise, we will
see, my child, what we can do. There is a piano; let me hear you play e-5 o 0 LS t. CL 0c-q.d
a piece intended for to-morrow's concert." I CoL too,
She obeyed; the maestro sat down beside her, gave her several hints, tU L' ( o
suggested some changes, and when she had finished her piece said *
to her, 11 S
"Now, my child, I have given you a music-lesson; now you are a "o CIO ,
pupil of Liszt." V LS C --VC
Before she could stammer out a few words of gratitude Liszt cL .tt,
asked her,
"Are the programmes printed ?" n y /
"No, sir, not yet." r",, I- .
"Then put on the programme that you will be assisted by your t O J. .'
master, and that the last piece will be performed by the Abb6 Liszt." 'Co wLu C Y. .LL SCC LWYr y
A vulgar disposition would have gladly embraced this opportunity






SUTNSHITNE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.
THE VOYAGE. taking a little at a time. Chil-
GOOD-BYE, mamma, good-bye to you! dren sometimes complain that
A merry crew are we: they have no time to learn their
We're on a cruise to Wonderland Sunday-school lessons, but ihe
Across the foaming sea. -i .t
'Across te foaming sea. fact is, they do not imIprove the
'-i, e~. ,- ~ odd moments. It is the ifttles
A steersman safe and bold am I- odd moments. A isall bo ales
At least that's my belief; .-'- ^., --- .' ... that count. A small boy was
At least that's my belief;
Only, my dears, don't rock the boat, seen one winter morning shovel-
Or we shall come to grief. ling away at a pile of inviw in
front of his house.
Good store of wholesome food have "Why, my boy," said a gen-
we- -, ::- tleman who was paSing, "do
Five pears, somebread and cheese- you expect to get all that snow
And Ruth shall catch the fish we off the path ?"
need 2
need: -'Yes, sir," ansr,.,1& the boy
Come and blow fair, 0 breeze! "Yes, sir," an.iv the boy
I_-L as he kep-t on shoveling.
It lifts the waves ; what shall we do ? "Why, how can you do it?"
Ah, there's an island near! asked the gentleman.
But what if cannibals live there? -- By throwing out a little at a
What then ? Oh thought of fear LITTLE THINGS. time," was the reply of the boy.
A GRAIN of sand is a little thing And he was right. One shovelful
No! there's a. lighthouse on the point; that would scarcely be noticed in a at a time did the work. A small
So do not feel alarm: cup of water, yet the hard beach on part of a lesson learned at one time,
No cannibals are there, be sure, which the ocean beats with fur is and repeated whenever the chance
To do us any harm. 1
made up of grains of sand. A snow- offers, will complete the lesson be-
So we will land, and haul the boat flake is a little thing, yet heavy en- fore the week is out.
Up high and dry on shore, gines and long trains have been hin- Not only is the importance of little
Then eat our dinner merrily, dered for hours by the heaping up things seen when they are brought
And go round to explore, of little snowflakes. A drop of water together in a great mass, but some-
is a little thing, yet the great ocean times a little thing in itself produces
A NICE LITTLE FAMILY. is made up of drops. great results. An atom of dust, so
L at the old mother-rabbit and her A verse of Scripture is not much, small as scarcely to be seen, causes
LOOK at the old mother-rabbit and her *
five children. There they sit, all cozy yet one verse learned every day would great pain if it gets into the eye. A
and comfortable, right at the door of their be three hundred and sixty-five verses spark of fire, that could be instantly
house. learned in the year. So the lesson quenched by a very little water, Nwolld
They do not live in a box made by a for Sunday-school may be learned by be the means of destroying a ship of
carpenter, as tame rabbits do. They A war if it should drop into the
are wild rabbits, free to roam at their p- owder-magazine. A very small
will, and their home is in the woods. portion of medicine is sometimes
I know a small boy who would sufficient to believe pain.
like right well to have one of these a word a is a very
- So a word or a look is a very
little fellows for a pet. He would little thin, but it sometimes does
like to take one of them right up by u
the ears. much harm or much good. A sour
the ears. : -""
That one sitting up so straight -! look often irritates the soul, as an
looks as if he wanted to be taken. atom of dust iritates the eye, and
That one scratching his nose looks cross word will at times be as
as if he would have no objection. explosive as fire among powder.
In fact, they all seem ready to be In like manner a kind word or
petted. a loving look will bring sunshine
But they are not. If any small and joy to a troubled heart.
boy should go near them, they would The power of little things
run into their hole at the first sound
of his footstep. That is their home, ought to be lem.befe d it fbrn-
S.ilies and in schools. If it be un-
and they are contented with it.
After all, that is the best place for derstood, held word will becile
them, and I hope that neither boys easier, the little word that I ii.g
nor dogs will try to take them away. X!. and wounds will be left unsaid,
It would be cruel to disturb such a -_- .while in its place will be spoken
nice little family, wouldn't it? : words of comfort and of love.






SUTNSHITNE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.
THE VOYAGE. taking a little at a time. Chil-
GOOD-BYE, mamma, good-bye to you! dren sometimes complain that
A merry crew are we: they have no time to learn their
We're on a cruise to Wonderland Sunday-school lessons, but ihe
Across the foaming sea. -i .t
'Across te foaming sea. fact is, they do not imIprove the
'-i, e~. ,- ~ odd moments. It is the ifttles
A steersman safe and bold am I- odd moments. A isall bo ales
At least that's my belief; .-'- ^., --- .' ... that count. A small boy was
At least that's my belief;
Only, my dears, don't rock the boat, seen one winter morning shovel-
Or we shall come to grief. ling away at a pile of inviw in
front of his house.
Good store of wholesome food have "Why, my boy," said a gen-
we- -, ::- tleman who was paSing, "do
Five pears, somebread and cheese- you expect to get all that snow
And Ruth shall catch the fish we off the path ?"
need 2
need: -'Yes, sir," ansr,.,1& the boy
Come and blow fair, 0 breeze! "Yes, sir," an.iv the boy
I_-L as he kep-t on shoveling.
It lifts the waves ; what shall we do ? "Why, how can you do it?"
Ah, there's an island near! asked the gentleman.
But what if cannibals live there? -- By throwing out a little at a
What then ? Oh thought of fear LITTLE THINGS. time," was the reply of the boy.
A GRAIN of sand is a little thing And he was right. One shovelful
No! there's a. lighthouse on the point; that would scarcely be noticed in a at a time did the work. A small
So do not feel alarm: cup of water, yet the hard beach on part of a lesson learned at one time,
No cannibals are there, be sure, which the ocean beats with fur is and repeated whenever the chance
To do us any harm. 1
made up of grains of sand. A snow- offers, will complete the lesson be-
So we will land, and haul the boat flake is a little thing, yet heavy en- fore the week is out.
Up high and dry on shore, gines and long trains have been hin- Not only is the importance of little
Then eat our dinner merrily, dered for hours by the heaping up things seen when they are brought
And go round to explore, of little snowflakes. A drop of water together in a great mass, but some-
is a little thing, yet the great ocean times a little thing in itself produces
A NICE LITTLE FAMILY. is made up of drops. great results. An atom of dust, so
L at the old mother-rabbit and her A verse of Scripture is not much, small as scarcely to be seen, causes
LOOK at the old mother-rabbit and her *
five children. There they sit, all cozy yet one verse learned every day would great pain if it gets into the eye. A
and comfortable, right at the door of their be three hundred and sixty-five verses spark of fire, that could be instantly
house. learned in the year. So the lesson quenched by a very little water, Nwolld
They do not live in a box made by a for Sunday-school may be learned by be the means of destroying a ship of
carpenter, as tame rabbits do. They A war if it should drop into the
are wild rabbits, free to roam at their p- owder-magazine. A very small
will, and their home is in the woods. portion of medicine is sometimes
I know a small boy who would sufficient to believe pain.
like right well to have one of these a word a is a very
- So a word or a look is a very
little fellows for a pet. He would little thin, but it sometimes does
like to take one of them right up by u
the ears. much harm or much good. A sour
the ears. : -""
That one sitting up so straight -! look often irritates the soul, as an
looks as if he wanted to be taken. atom of dust iritates the eye, and
That one scratching his nose looks cross word will at times be as
as if he would have no objection. explosive as fire among powder.
In fact, they all seem ready to be In like manner a kind word or
petted. a loving look will bring sunshine
But they are not. If any small and joy to a troubled heart.
boy should go near them, they would The power of little things
run into their hole at the first sound
of his footstep. That is their home, ought to be lem.befe d it fbrn-
S.ilies and in schools. If it be un-
and they are contented with it.
After all, that is the best place for derstood, held word will becile
them, and I hope that neither boys easier, the little word that I ii.g
nor dogs will try to take them away. X!. and wounds will be left unsaid,
It would be cruel to disturb such a -_- .while in its place will be spoken
nice little family, wouldn't it? : words of comfort and of love.






SUTNSHITNE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.
THE VOYAGE. taking a little at a time. Chil-
GOOD-BYE, mamma, good-bye to you! dren sometimes complain that
A merry crew are we: they have no time to learn their
We're on a cruise to Wonderland Sunday-school lessons, but ihe
Across the foaming sea. -i .t
'Across te foaming sea. fact is, they do not imIprove the
'-i, e~. ,- ~ odd moments. It is the ifttles
A steersman safe and bold am I- odd moments. A isall bo ales
At least that's my belief; .-'- ^., --- .' ... that count. A small boy was
At least that's my belief;
Only, my dears, don't rock the boat, seen one winter morning shovel-
Or we shall come to grief. ling away at a pile of inviw in
front of his house.
Good store of wholesome food have "Why, my boy," said a gen-
we- -, ::- tleman who was paSing, "do
Five pears, somebread and cheese- you expect to get all that snow
And Ruth shall catch the fish we off the path ?"
need 2
need: -'Yes, sir," ansr,.,1& the boy
Come and blow fair, 0 breeze! "Yes, sir," an.iv the boy
I_-L as he kep-t on shoveling.
It lifts the waves ; what shall we do ? "Why, how can you do it?"
Ah, there's an island near! asked the gentleman.
But what if cannibals live there? -- By throwing out a little at a
What then ? Oh thought of fear LITTLE THINGS. time," was the reply of the boy.
A GRAIN of sand is a little thing And he was right. One shovelful
No! there's a. lighthouse on the point; that would scarcely be noticed in a at a time did the work. A small
So do not feel alarm: cup of water, yet the hard beach on part of a lesson learned at one time,
No cannibals are there, be sure, which the ocean beats with fur is and repeated whenever the chance
To do us any harm. 1
made up of grains of sand. A snow- offers, will complete the lesson be-
So we will land, and haul the boat flake is a little thing, yet heavy en- fore the week is out.
Up high and dry on shore, gines and long trains have been hin- Not only is the importance of little
Then eat our dinner merrily, dered for hours by the heaping up things seen when they are brought
And go round to explore, of little snowflakes. A drop of water together in a great mass, but some-
is a little thing, yet the great ocean times a little thing in itself produces
A NICE LITTLE FAMILY. is made up of drops. great results. An atom of dust, so
L at the old mother-rabbit and her A verse of Scripture is not much, small as scarcely to be seen, causes
LOOK at the old mother-rabbit and her *
five children. There they sit, all cozy yet one verse learned every day would great pain if it gets into the eye. A
and comfortable, right at the door of their be three hundred and sixty-five verses spark of fire, that could be instantly
house. learned in the year. So the lesson quenched by a very little water, Nwolld
They do not live in a box made by a for Sunday-school may be learned by be the means of destroying a ship of
carpenter, as tame rabbits do. They A war if it should drop into the
are wild rabbits, free to roam at their p- owder-magazine. A very small
will, and their home is in the woods. portion of medicine is sometimes
I know a small boy who would sufficient to believe pain.
like right well to have one of these a word a is a very
- So a word or a look is a very
little fellows for a pet. He would little thin, but it sometimes does
like to take one of them right up by u
the ears. much harm or much good. A sour
the ears. : -""
That one sitting up so straight -! look often irritates the soul, as an
looks as if he wanted to be taken. atom of dust iritates the eye, and
That one scratching his nose looks cross word will at times be as
as if he would have no objection. explosive as fire among powder.
In fact, they all seem ready to be In like manner a kind word or
petted. a loving look will bring sunshine
But they are not. If any small and joy to a troubled heart.
boy should go near them, they would The power of little things
run into their hole at the first sound
of his footstep. That is their home, ought to be lem.befe d it fbrn-
S.ilies and in schools. If it be un-
and they are contented with it.
After all, that is the best place for derstood, held word will becile
them, and I hope that neither boys easier, the little word that I ii.g
nor dogs will try to take them away. X!. and wounds will be left unsaid,
It would be cruel to disturb such a -_- .while in its place will be spoken
nice little family, wouldn't it? : words of comfort and of love.






SUNTjSHITNTE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

OUT IN THE SNOW. Look, grannie, look at my scutcher. I call this very anxious to show it to grannie; and, after waiting
All in a row, thing my scutcher," said Tommy, because I shall awhile, as no more carriages came in sight, they put
Birds in the snow, always scutch the wheels with it. I shall never pinch what they had earned in the pail, and came singing
Waiting till somebody, my fingers again; my hands, you see, will be safe. home to grannie.
Somebody comes Now, Annie you will not have to carry up stones any "Hurrah! grannie," shouted Tommy, "here's the
With a heart full of love more. I wish it was morning, and that a carriage pail rattling with money; all yours; count it, and tell
And hands full of crumbs, would come along that I might run up the hill and us how much there is."
Nowhere to go, try my scutcher." "I do hope," said Annie, "there is enough to buy
Out in the snow, The morning came, but no carriages were heard, grannie a new pair of warm shoes, for her dear old
n though Tommy and Annie had risen at five o'clock, feet have traveled many a mile for us."
All in a row.
that they might be ready for early travelers. Tommy Grannie opened the pail, and when she saw the
kept his scutcher upon his shoulder, and watched two gold pieces tears fell like rain, and she caught
THE GRATEFUL CHILDREN. eagerly at the bottom of the hill until a carriage came the dear children to her heart, and kissed them over
At the foot of a steep, slippery white hill called in sight; and the moment the driver called to him, and over again, telling them they were daily repaying
Chalk Hill, near a certain town in England, there is and bid him stop the wheels, he put his scutcher be- her for all she had done for them. But dutiful
a hut, or rather a hovel, so poor that travelers would hind them, and was much delighted to find that it children always try to help those who care for them.
scarcely suppose that any one lived w l
in it if they did not see the smoke TRUE POLITENESS.
rising from its roof. An old woman going th ouh
lived in this hovel, and with her a A poor Arab o n
little boy and girl, the children of a the desert met with a spark-
beggar who died and left these lng spring Accustomed to
orphans perishing with hunger. brackish water, a draught
They thought themselves very a h asked fromn this sweet well in the
happy when the good woman took w wilderness seemed, in his
"them in and bade them warm them-
"selves at her small fire, and gave a mind, a fit present for the
"them a crust of bread to cat. She Caliph. So he filled his
"had not much to give, but what she Y.. leather bottle, and after a
had she gave with a good will. weary tramp laid his hum-
She worked very hard at her ble gift at his sovereign's
spinning to support herself and the feet
children. She earned money also
3' The monarch, with a mag-
in another way. She used to follow h
all the carriages as they went up unanimity that may put many
Chalk Hill, and when the horses a Christian to blush, called
stopped to take breath she would g for a cup and drank freely,
put stones behind the carriage and then with a smile
wheels to prevent them from rolling .t thanked the Arab, and pre-
backwards. The children loved to -
sented him with a reward.
stand beside the old lady while she
was spinning, and to talk to her. d n r ..u The courtiers pressed eager-
At these times she taught them 1 1.. L .. ly for a draught of the won-
something which she hoped they I 'TIw:, .It jX'.1% Wb derful water, which was
would rememberalltheir lives. She 1 4 worthy such a princely
explained to them what is meantby i.,- i:s wrh suh a pncl
STI %x:! -. .t1oent. To their surprise, the
truth, and what it is to be honest. e nItv ki.-w r:iv c vrrai wiill *... 1ov
She taught them to dislike idleness on this day, and they were eager to earn uade them to touch a drop.
and to wish to be useful. The dear all they could for grannie, who had done Then, after the simple-hearted giver left
old lady worked early and late for the children, so much for them. the royal presence, with a new spring of
leaving her spinning so many times to climb the After breakfast they started, Tommy with the joy welling up in his heart, the monarch
hill, while they were always by her side watching scutcher and Annie with the lunch-pail; for, as Tommy explained his motive of prohibition.
grannie stone the wheels, as Tommy called it. one said, we must not waste time going home to "During ie long journey, the water in,
day a bright idea struck Tommy, and he asked dinner, but must get all we can this day." Tommy his later bottle
granny for her old crutch. had to work pretty spry when two or three
"There is nothing but the handle," says grannie, teams came along together, and Annie had to run distasteful; but it was an offering of love,
"but if it's of any use to you, take it." with the stones. Just as the sun was going down, a and as such I accepted it with pleasure. I
"I have a block of wood I can use," said Tommy; span of spirited horses came in sight, two elderly feared, however, if I allowed another to
"and, with the crutch-handle, I can invent something gentlemen in the carriage and a driver. As Tommy taste it, hlie would not conceal his disgust.
better than stones for stopping wheels. I pinched my and Annie tugged away at the wheels, one of the gen- Therefore it was that I forbade you to par-
fingers dreadfully this morning trying to stop that large tlemen inquired of Tommy who he was and where
team, and I father guess that it sharpened my ideas." he lived;ake, lest the heart of the poor man should
Tommy went to work immediately, and fastened trying to help poor grannie take care of them in be wounded."
one end of the crutch into the block of wood, so as to doing their part he gave each of them a gold piece; Such consideration for the feelings of
make something like a dry scrubbing-brush. but as Tommy did not know the value of it, he was others is as rare as it is commendable.






SUNTjSHITNTE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

OUT IN THE SNOW. Look, grannie, look at my scutcher. I call this very anxious to show it to grannie; and, after waiting
All in a row, thing my scutcher," said Tommy, because I shall awhile, as no more carriages came in sight, they put
Birds in the snow, always scutch the wheels with it. I shall never pinch what they had earned in the pail, and came singing
Waiting till somebody, my fingers again; my hands, you see, will be safe. home to grannie.
Somebody comes Now, Annie you will not have to carry up stones any "Hurrah! grannie," shouted Tommy, "here's the
With a heart full of love more. I wish it was morning, and that a carriage pail rattling with money; all yours; count it, and tell
And hands full of crumbs, would come along that I might run up the hill and us how much there is."
Nowhere to go, try my scutcher." "I do hope," said Annie, "there is enough to buy
Out in the snow, The morning came, but no carriages were heard, grannie a new pair of warm shoes, for her dear old
n though Tommy and Annie had risen at five o'clock, feet have traveled many a mile for us."
All in a row.
that they might be ready for early travelers. Tommy Grannie opened the pail, and when she saw the
kept his scutcher upon his shoulder, and watched two gold pieces tears fell like rain, and she caught
THE GRATEFUL CHILDREN. eagerly at the bottom of the hill until a carriage came the dear children to her heart, and kissed them over
At the foot of a steep, slippery white hill called in sight; and the moment the driver called to him, and over again, telling them they were daily repaying
Chalk Hill, near a certain town in England, there is and bid him stop the wheels, he put his scutcher be- her for all she had done for them. But dutiful
a hut, or rather a hovel, so poor that travelers would hind them, and was much delighted to find that it children always try to help those who care for them.
scarcely suppose that any one lived w l
in it if they did not see the smoke TRUE POLITENESS.
rising from its roof. An old woman going th ouh
lived in this hovel, and with her a A poor Arab o n
little boy and girl, the children of a the desert met with a spark-
beggar who died and left these lng spring Accustomed to
orphans perishing with hunger. brackish water, a draught
They thought themselves very a h asked fromn this sweet well in the
happy when the good woman took w wilderness seemed, in his
"them in and bade them warm them-
"selves at her small fire, and gave a mind, a fit present for the
"them a crust of bread to cat. She Caliph. So he filled his
"had not much to give, but what she Y.. leather bottle, and after a
had she gave with a good will. weary tramp laid his hum-
She worked very hard at her ble gift at his sovereign's
spinning to support herself and the feet
children. She earned money also
3' The monarch, with a mag-
in another way. She used to follow h
all the carriages as they went up unanimity that may put many
Chalk Hill, and when the horses a Christian to blush, called
stopped to take breath she would g for a cup and drank freely,
put stones behind the carriage and then with a smile
wheels to prevent them from rolling .t thanked the Arab, and pre-
backwards. The children loved to -
sented him with a reward.
stand beside the old lady while she
was spinning, and to talk to her. d n r ..u The courtiers pressed eager-
At these times she taught them 1 1.. L .. ly for a draught of the won-
something which she hoped they I 'TIw:, .It jX'.1% Wb derful water, which was
would rememberalltheir lives. She 1 4 worthy such a princely
explained to them what is meantby i.,- i:s wrh suh a pncl
STI %x:! -. .t1oent. To their surprise, the
truth, and what it is to be honest. e nItv ki.-w r:iv c vrrai wiill *... 1ov
She taught them to dislike idleness on this day, and they were eager to earn uade them to touch a drop.
and to wish to be useful. The dear all they could for grannie, who had done Then, after the simple-hearted giver left
old lady worked early and late for the children, so much for them. the royal presence, with a new spring of
leaving her spinning so many times to climb the After breakfast they started, Tommy with the joy welling up in his heart, the monarch
hill, while they were always by her side watching scutcher and Annie with the lunch-pail; for, as Tommy explained his motive of prohibition.
grannie stone the wheels, as Tommy called it. one said, we must not waste time going home to "During ie long journey, the water in,
day a bright idea struck Tommy, and he asked dinner, but must get all we can this day." Tommy his later bottle
granny for her old crutch. had to work pretty spry when two or three
"There is nothing but the handle," says grannie, teams came along together, and Annie had to run distasteful; but it was an offering of love,
"but if it's of any use to you, take it." with the stones. Just as the sun was going down, a and as such I accepted it with pleasure. I
"I have a block of wood I can use," said Tommy; span of spirited horses came in sight, two elderly feared, however, if I allowed another to
"and, with the crutch-handle, I can invent something gentlemen in the carriage and a driver. As Tommy taste it, hlie would not conceal his disgust.
better than stones for stopping wheels. I pinched my and Annie tugged away at the wheels, one of the gen- Therefore it was that I forbade you to par-
fingers dreadfully this morning trying to stop that large tlemen inquired of Tommy who he was and where
team, and I father guess that it sharpened my ideas." he lived;ake, lest the heart of the poor man should
Tommy went to work immediately, and fastened trying to help poor grannie take care of them in be wounded."
one end of the crutch into the block of wood, so as to doing their part he gave each of them a gold piece; Such consideration for the feelings of
make something like a dry scrubbing-brush. but as Tommy did not know the value of it, he was others is as rare as it is commendable.






SUNTjSHITNTE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

OUT IN THE SNOW. Look, grannie, look at my scutcher. I call this very anxious to show it to grannie; and, after waiting
All in a row, thing my scutcher," said Tommy, because I shall awhile, as no more carriages came in sight, they put
Birds in the snow, always scutch the wheels with it. I shall never pinch what they had earned in the pail, and came singing
Waiting till somebody, my fingers again; my hands, you see, will be safe. home to grannie.
Somebody comes Now, Annie you will not have to carry up stones any "Hurrah! grannie," shouted Tommy, "here's the
With a heart full of love more. I wish it was morning, and that a carriage pail rattling with money; all yours; count it, and tell
And hands full of crumbs, would come along that I might run up the hill and us how much there is."
Nowhere to go, try my scutcher." "I do hope," said Annie, "there is enough to buy
Out in the snow, The morning came, but no carriages were heard, grannie a new pair of warm shoes, for her dear old
n though Tommy and Annie had risen at five o'clock, feet have traveled many a mile for us."
All in a row.
that they might be ready for early travelers. Tommy Grannie opened the pail, and when she saw the
kept his scutcher upon his shoulder, and watched two gold pieces tears fell like rain, and she caught
THE GRATEFUL CHILDREN. eagerly at the bottom of the hill until a carriage came the dear children to her heart, and kissed them over
At the foot of a steep, slippery white hill called in sight; and the moment the driver called to him, and over again, telling them they were daily repaying
Chalk Hill, near a certain town in England, there is and bid him stop the wheels, he put his scutcher be- her for all she had done for them. But dutiful
a hut, or rather a hovel, so poor that travelers would hind them, and was much delighted to find that it children always try to help those who care for them.
scarcely suppose that any one lived w l
in it if they did not see the smoke TRUE POLITENESS.
rising from its roof. An old woman going th ouh
lived in this hovel, and with her a A poor Arab o n
little boy and girl, the children of a the desert met with a spark-
beggar who died and left these lng spring Accustomed to
orphans perishing with hunger. brackish water, a draught
They thought themselves very a h asked fromn this sweet well in the
happy when the good woman took w wilderness seemed, in his
"them in and bade them warm them-
"selves at her small fire, and gave a mind, a fit present for the
"them a crust of bread to cat. She Caliph. So he filled his
"had not much to give, but what she Y.. leather bottle, and after a
had she gave with a good will. weary tramp laid his hum-
She worked very hard at her ble gift at his sovereign's
spinning to support herself and the feet
children. She earned money also
3' The monarch, with a mag-
in another way. She used to follow h
all the carriages as they went up unanimity that may put many
Chalk Hill, and when the horses a Christian to blush, called
stopped to take breath she would g for a cup and drank freely,
put stones behind the carriage and then with a smile
wheels to prevent them from rolling .t thanked the Arab, and pre-
backwards. The children loved to -
sented him with a reward.
stand beside the old lady while she
was spinning, and to talk to her. d n r ..u The courtiers pressed eager-
At these times she taught them 1 1.. L .. ly for a draught of the won-
something which she hoped they I 'TIw:, .It jX'.1% Wb derful water, which was
would rememberalltheir lives. She 1 4 worthy such a princely
explained to them what is meantby i.,- i:s wrh suh a pncl
STI %x:! -. .t1oent. To their surprise, the
truth, and what it is to be honest. e nItv ki.-w r:iv c vrrai wiill *... 1ov
She taught them to dislike idleness on this day, and they were eager to earn uade them to touch a drop.
and to wish to be useful. The dear all they could for grannie, who had done Then, after the simple-hearted giver left
old lady worked early and late for the children, so much for them. the royal presence, with a new spring of
leaving her spinning so many times to climb the After breakfast they started, Tommy with the joy welling up in his heart, the monarch
hill, while they were always by her side watching scutcher and Annie with the lunch-pail; for, as Tommy explained his motive of prohibition.
grannie stone the wheels, as Tommy called it. one said, we must not waste time going home to "During ie long journey, the water in,
day a bright idea struck Tommy, and he asked dinner, but must get all we can this day." Tommy his later bottle
granny for her old crutch. had to work pretty spry when two or three
"There is nothing but the handle," says grannie, teams came along together, and Annie had to run distasteful; but it was an offering of love,
"but if it's of any use to you, take it." with the stones. Just as the sun was going down, a and as such I accepted it with pleasure. I
"I have a block of wood I can use," said Tommy; span of spirited horses came in sight, two elderly feared, however, if I allowed another to
"and, with the crutch-handle, I can invent something gentlemen in the carriage and a driver. As Tommy taste it, hlie would not conceal his disgust.
better than stones for stopping wheels. I pinched my and Annie tugged away at the wheels, one of the gen- Therefore it was that I forbade you to par-
fingers dreadfully this morning trying to stop that large tlemen inquired of Tommy who he was and where
team, and I father guess that it sharpened my ideas." he lived;ake, lest the heart of the poor man should
Tommy went to work immediately, and fastened trying to help poor grannie take care of them in be wounded."
one end of the crutch into the block of wood, so as to doing their part he gave each of them a gold piece; Such consideration for the feelings of
make something like a dry scrubbing-brush. but as Tommy did not know the value of it, he was others is as rare as it is commendable.






SUNSHINTE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

THE BROOK. ; Daisy had never been known to kick at
FRor a fountain anybody before, and she never kicked any-
In a mountain body afterward.
Drops of water ran ,
Trickling through the grasses: HELEN'S BIRD.
So our brook began.
Ou W WHEN Helen was eight years old
Slow it started; a pretty little canary-bird was given
Soon it darted, to her as a birthday present. She
Cool and clear and free, V named it "Chirp," and she and
Rippling over pebbles, Chirp soon got to be very fond of
Hurrying to the sea. each other.
il Helen took the whole care of him,
Children, straying, ,
Come a-playing 4a and he grew so tame that he would
On its pretty banks: -' i' perch on her hand, and take seeds
Glad, our little brooklet from her finger, and even from her
Sparkles up is thanks. lips. He was a fine singer, and
blossoms flotin, Helen liked to be waked in the
lomic fo ati ng, morning by his music.
Fishes darting past-- H is cage was placed on the table
Swift and strong and happy, .. ... near her bed, and she always began
Widening very fast. the day by having a little talk with
"Bublig,-.lsingn te Chirp. There was not the least risk
Bubshing, ringing, in opening the cage and letting him
Rushing, ringing, 'i. ,. s.e w .... _u- -t.
Flecked with shade and sun, out into the room, for he would fly
Flecked wuith shade antd sun, "- -jt
Soon our pretty brooklet to Helen as soon as she called him.
To the sca, has run. Is the h be n
o the sea ha rn The next morning Mr. S. asked his visitor to walk with So for years the little bird and
him through his grounds, and as they were walking along the little girl lived happily together.
DAISY. they passed a place where Daisy, who still looked as if she One November day, when Helen was
A FRIEND of mine, Mr. S., had a beauti- felt insulted and injured, was quietly grazing. almost eleven years old, she had been
ful colt named Daisy, who was the pet of As soon as she saw her enemy (as she must have con- out making a call, and on her return
all the family. She was so tame she would sidered him) she pricked up her ears as if some happy idea Chirp was missing. Helen saw that
put her head in at the open windows to see had come into her head. She gave herself a little shake, a window had been left open, and
what was going on in the house; and very and, walking behind him until she was quite near, sud- knew that he must have flown out.
often, when she saw the front door open, denly wheeled around and gave a kick that would have Oh dear !" said she in great dis-
she would go up the steps of the piazza broken some of his bones if he had not jumped out of the tress, y poor little Chirp is gone,
and deliberately march into the hall. No way just in time to escape her heels. tress, "my poor lite hi i gne,
one ever struck Daisy with a whip or even t and I shall never see him again.
a switch. A little slap of the hand, and ,,u hi tri.ct, n, ,. a.I .- Her mother tried to comfort her
.a "Go out, Daisy," were all that were I.k.1 v II.-an t, I. by saying that he had not been gone
necessary. ._ tlht:, k;.k ,a.-jt 7- long, and could not be far away.
Mrs. S. had a new cook, and one day lr. t I... ,, -r.,, I,- g But," said Helen, it is cold
she set a pan of custard on the back porch I-mi..it.y i.I in-,I-l.. weather, and is snowing too, and he
to cool. When she went out to get it an must be chilled to death."
hour or two after, she found nothing but However, without wasting time in
the empty pan. Molly ran to Mrs. S. in talk, she snatched up a hadfl of
great distress, and told her of the loss of talk, she snatched up a handful of
the custard. Ah !" said Mrs. S., then car-see and ra out of doors at
Daisy has eaten it." And, sure enough, once in search of her little pet. She
Daisy was the thief. looked up into the vine that grew
Another time the naughty colt put her on the side of the house, and called
head in the kitchen-window and ate up Chirp! Chirp!"
some apple-pies that were on the table. She could see nothing of him, but
All this was very bad indeed, but Daisy Chirp saw her, and in a moment came
was always forgiven because she was so fluttering down among the snowflakes
lovely and gentle. She would follow any and perched upon her hand. Oh, how
of the family about the grounds, and rub deli hted Helen was to see him! The
her head against them to show Iow much delighted Helen was to see him
she loved them. first thing she did was to give him
One day a man came to Mr. S.'s house some seeds to eat, for she knew he
to make a visit. He was not in the habit 'a must be half starved.
of visiting the family, and so had not "You dear little venturesome
made Daisy's acquaintance. After tea thing !" she said. You wanted to
Mr. S. and his visitor were standing on the piazza when Daisy came see the world, didn't you? But why
trotting up, as she always did when she saw one of the family there, couldn't youwait for warmerweather?
and opened her mouth, expecting Mr. S. to put a piece of bread or
apple.You have given me a dreadful fright.
apple in. The stranger did not understand this little trick, and (coarse ou hav me a dnful fright.
man that he was!) spat a quantity of tobacco-juice into Daisy's face. Come into the house now and be con-
Poor little Daisy She hung her head down and walked off under the X- tented, and next summer you shall
trees, where she stood looking very miserable. go out with me."






SUNSHINTE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

THE BROOK. ; Daisy had never been known to kick at
FRor a fountain anybody before, and she never kicked any-
In a mountain body afterward.
Drops of water ran ,
Trickling through the grasses: HELEN'S BIRD.
So our brook began.
Ou W WHEN Helen was eight years old
Slow it started; a pretty little canary-bird was given
Soon it darted, to her as a birthday present. She
Cool and clear and free, V named it "Chirp," and she and
Rippling over pebbles, Chirp soon got to be very fond of
Hurrying to the sea. each other.
il Helen took the whole care of him,
Children, straying, ,
Come a-playing 4a and he grew so tame that he would
On its pretty banks: -' i' perch on her hand, and take seeds
Glad, our little brooklet from her finger, and even from her
Sparkles up is thanks. lips. He was a fine singer, and
blossoms flotin, Helen liked to be waked in the
lomic fo ati ng, morning by his music.
Fishes darting past-- H is cage was placed on the table
Swift and strong and happy, .. ... near her bed, and she always began
Widening very fast. the day by having a little talk with
"Bublig,-.lsingn te Chirp. There was not the least risk
Bubshing, ringing, in opening the cage and letting him
Rushing, ringing, 'i. ,. s.e w .... _u- -t.
Flecked with shade and sun, out into the room, for he would fly
Flecked wuith shade antd sun, "- -jt
Soon our pretty brooklet to Helen as soon as she called him.
To the sca, has run. Is the h be n
o the sea ha rn The next morning Mr. S. asked his visitor to walk with So for years the little bird and
him through his grounds, and as they were walking along the little girl lived happily together.
DAISY. they passed a place where Daisy, who still looked as if she One November day, when Helen was
A FRIEND of mine, Mr. S., had a beauti- felt insulted and injured, was quietly grazing. almost eleven years old, she had been
ful colt named Daisy, who was the pet of As soon as she saw her enemy (as she must have con- out making a call, and on her return
all the family. She was so tame she would sidered him) she pricked up her ears as if some happy idea Chirp was missing. Helen saw that
put her head in at the open windows to see had come into her head. She gave herself a little shake, a window had been left open, and
what was going on in the house; and very and, walking behind him until she was quite near, sud- knew that he must have flown out.
often, when she saw the front door open, denly wheeled around and gave a kick that would have Oh dear !" said she in great dis-
she would go up the steps of the piazza broken some of his bones if he had not jumped out of the tress, y poor little Chirp is gone,
and deliberately march into the hall. No way just in time to escape her heels. tress, "my poor lite hi i gne,
one ever struck Daisy with a whip or even t and I shall never see him again.
a switch. A little slap of the hand, and ,,u hi tri.ct, n, ,. a.I .- Her mother tried to comfort her
.a "Go out, Daisy," were all that were I.k.1 v II.-an t, I. by saying that he had not been gone
necessary. ._ tlht:, k;.k ,a.-jt 7- long, and could not be far away.
Mrs. S. had a new cook, and one day lr. t I... ,, -r.,, I,- g But," said Helen, it is cold
she set a pan of custard on the back porch I-mi..it.y i.I in-,I-l.. weather, and is snowing too, and he
to cool. When she went out to get it an must be chilled to death."
hour or two after, she found nothing but However, without wasting time in
the empty pan. Molly ran to Mrs. S. in talk, she snatched up a hadfl of
great distress, and told her of the loss of talk, she snatched up a handful of
the custard. Ah !" said Mrs. S., then car-see and ra out of doors at
Daisy has eaten it." And, sure enough, once in search of her little pet. She
Daisy was the thief. looked up into the vine that grew
Another time the naughty colt put her on the side of the house, and called
head in the kitchen-window and ate up Chirp! Chirp!"
some apple-pies that were on the table. She could see nothing of him, but
All this was very bad indeed, but Daisy Chirp saw her, and in a moment came
was always forgiven because she was so fluttering down among the snowflakes
lovely and gentle. She would follow any and perched upon her hand. Oh, how
of the family about the grounds, and rub deli hted Helen was to see him! The
her head against them to show Iow much delighted Helen was to see him
she loved them. first thing she did was to give him
One day a man came to Mr. S.'s house some seeds to eat, for she knew he
to make a visit. He was not in the habit 'a must be half starved.
of visiting the family, and so had not "You dear little venturesome
made Daisy's acquaintance. After tea thing !" she said. You wanted to
Mr. S. and his visitor were standing on the piazza when Daisy came see the world, didn't you? But why
trotting up, as she always did when she saw one of the family there, couldn't youwait for warmerweather?
and opened her mouth, expecting Mr. S. to put a piece of bread or
apple.You have given me a dreadful fright.
apple in. The stranger did not understand this little trick, and (coarse ou hav me a dnful fright.
man that he was!) spat a quantity of tobacco-juice into Daisy's face. Come into the house now and be con-
Poor little Daisy She hung her head down and walked off under the X- tented, and next summer you shall
trees, where she stood looking very miserable. go out with me."






SUNSHINTE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

THE BROOK. ; Daisy had never been known to kick at
FRor a fountain anybody before, and she never kicked any-
In a mountain body afterward.
Drops of water ran ,
Trickling through the grasses: HELEN'S BIRD.
So our brook began.
Ou W WHEN Helen was eight years old
Slow it started; a pretty little canary-bird was given
Soon it darted, to her as a birthday present. She
Cool and clear and free, V named it "Chirp," and she and
Rippling over pebbles, Chirp soon got to be very fond of
Hurrying to the sea. each other.
il Helen took the whole care of him,
Children, straying, ,
Come a-playing 4a and he grew so tame that he would
On its pretty banks: -' i' perch on her hand, and take seeds
Glad, our little brooklet from her finger, and even from her
Sparkles up is thanks. lips. He was a fine singer, and
blossoms flotin, Helen liked to be waked in the
lomic fo ati ng, morning by his music.
Fishes darting past-- H is cage was placed on the table
Swift and strong and happy, .. ... near her bed, and she always began
Widening very fast. the day by having a little talk with
"Bublig,-.lsingn te Chirp. There was not the least risk
Bubshing, ringing, in opening the cage and letting him
Rushing, ringing, 'i. ,. s.e w .... _u- -t.
Flecked with shade and sun, out into the room, for he would fly
Flecked wuith shade antd sun, "- -jt
Soon our pretty brooklet to Helen as soon as she called him.
To the sca, has run. Is the h be n
o the sea ha rn The next morning Mr. S. asked his visitor to walk with So for years the little bird and
him through his grounds, and as they were walking along the little girl lived happily together.
DAISY. they passed a place where Daisy, who still looked as if she One November day, when Helen was
A FRIEND of mine, Mr. S., had a beauti- felt insulted and injured, was quietly grazing. almost eleven years old, she had been
ful colt named Daisy, who was the pet of As soon as she saw her enemy (as she must have con- out making a call, and on her return
all the family. She was so tame she would sidered him) she pricked up her ears as if some happy idea Chirp was missing. Helen saw that
put her head in at the open windows to see had come into her head. She gave herself a little shake, a window had been left open, and
what was going on in the house; and very and, walking behind him until she was quite near, sud- knew that he must have flown out.
often, when she saw the front door open, denly wheeled around and gave a kick that would have Oh dear !" said she in great dis-
she would go up the steps of the piazza broken some of his bones if he had not jumped out of the tress, y poor little Chirp is gone,
and deliberately march into the hall. No way just in time to escape her heels. tress, "my poor lite hi i gne,
one ever struck Daisy with a whip or even t and I shall never see him again.
a switch. A little slap of the hand, and ,,u hi tri.ct, n, ,. a.I .- Her mother tried to comfort her
.a "Go out, Daisy," were all that were I.k.1 v II.-an t, I. by saying that he had not been gone
necessary. ._ tlht:, k;.k ,a.-jt 7- long, and could not be far away.
Mrs. S. had a new cook, and one day lr. t I... ,, -r.,, I,- g But," said Helen, it is cold
she set a pan of custard on the back porch I-mi..it.y i.I in-,I-l.. weather, and is snowing too, and he
to cool. When she went out to get it an must be chilled to death."
hour or two after, she found nothing but However, without wasting time in
the empty pan. Molly ran to Mrs. S. in talk, she snatched up a hadfl of
great distress, and told her of the loss of talk, she snatched up a handful of
the custard. Ah !" said Mrs. S., then car-see and ra out of doors at
Daisy has eaten it." And, sure enough, once in search of her little pet. She
Daisy was the thief. looked up into the vine that grew
Another time the naughty colt put her on the side of the house, and called
head in the kitchen-window and ate up Chirp! Chirp!"
some apple-pies that were on the table. She could see nothing of him, but
All this was very bad indeed, but Daisy Chirp saw her, and in a moment came
was always forgiven because she was so fluttering down among the snowflakes
lovely and gentle. She would follow any and perched upon her hand. Oh, how
of the family about the grounds, and rub deli hted Helen was to see him! The
her head against them to show Iow much delighted Helen was to see him
she loved them. first thing she did was to give him
One day a man came to Mr. S.'s house some seeds to eat, for she knew he
to make a visit. He was not in the habit 'a must be half starved.
of visiting the family, and so had not "You dear little venturesome
made Daisy's acquaintance. After tea thing !" she said. You wanted to
Mr. S. and his visitor were standing on the piazza when Daisy came see the world, didn't you? But why
trotting up, as she always did when she saw one of the family there, couldn't youwait for warmerweather?
and opened her mouth, expecting Mr. S. to put a piece of bread or
apple.You have given me a dreadful fright.
apple in. The stranger did not understand this little trick, and (coarse ou hav me a dnful fright.
man that he was!) spat a quantity of tobacco-juice into Daisy's face. Come into the house now and be con-
Poor little Daisy She hung her head down and walked off under the X- tented, and next summer you shall
trees, where she stood looking very miserable. go out with me."





SUNSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

DICK'S DREAM.
"YES, step right down upon me, and kill me, if you
like," said Mrs. Tarantula to Dick as they met at the
0 school-house door. This is a hard world, Dick Adams,
and I am about tired of living in it.
You don't know what a fine home I once had! It
BABY loves to see was in that clay mound; and, when I had dug me a hole
-' fully a foot deep and an inch across, my jaws and my
the chicks- eight legs were quite tired out. I left some small stones
"Chicks in fluffy on the side for stairs: I lined the hole with brown silk
y ellow; next to the dirt, and with white satin inside, both of
B aylo t h which I spun and wove on the spot.
SBabv loves to hear
"My nice round lid fitted so snug and even that I
them chirp, ,, thought no one but myself ever could find my house.
"I'm a saucy But last week your brother Will's sharp eyes spied the
'round ring that marks my nest, and he went and tore
the lid from its hinges, and left my hundred and ten
-' children without a roof to cover their heads. How I
"would like to bite that boy!
I found the lid and tried to fasten it down again,
-. but a heavy shower'came up and I could not fix it in
Baby loves to the rain. Then my husband came over from his house.
watch them peck, You know our husbands never live with the rest of the
family; they are too cross and get too hungry at times.
Stretching each an "We were not on very good terms; for some time
eager neck: -- -- before, when he thought I was away from home, he
tried to get into my house. I heard him, and, running
Sup stairs, I put my claws in the two little holes in the
lining of the lid and braced myself, so thac he could not
pry open the lid. He said he only wanted to pay me a
Twicklety twee! it is such fun visit, but I knew he was hungry and wanted to eat up our
children.
All in a hurry to see them run. But now he spoke very kindly to me, and told me that my
lid could not be fixed on, but as my children were now old
enough to care for themselves, I had better go home with him.
Baby Jim loves all the chicks: I went to his house to talk it over, and forgot to give the chil-
dren their supper and tell them to work for themselves after
All the chicks love Baby Jim; this.
Sy h a bi, big bi, My husband told me a few days after that my boys and
S girls got into a fight, and before they quit ate each other up;
And tell such funny tales to him. but he was away from home foi two days, and looked very full
when he came back.
Baby hears and answers all "He may have told the truth, but I can't see how one of my
little ones could eat the other one hundred and nine, and then
As they come running to his call. swallow himself too."
This is what Dick Adams dreamed that a tarantula said to
Twicklety twee! it is such fun him. He had seen one on his way to school, and what the
All in a hurry to see them run. teacher told him about the insect had interested him so much
that he found himself dreaming about it all night long.
With a "chicklety chy! chicklety choo! --

Little bird, baby boy, how do you do? .._.

Chicklety choo, chicklety chy,

Why don't you spread yoir wings and fly ?"





SUNSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

DICK'S DREAM.
"YES, step right down upon me, and kill me, if you
like," said Mrs. Tarantula to Dick as they met at the
0 school-house door. This is a hard world, Dick Adams,
and I am about tired of living in it.
You don't know what a fine home I once had! It
BABY loves to see was in that clay mound; and, when I had dug me a hole
-' fully a foot deep and an inch across, my jaws and my
the chicks- eight legs were quite tired out. I left some small stones
"Chicks in fluffy on the side for stairs: I lined the hole with brown silk
y ellow; next to the dirt, and with white satin inside, both of
B aylo t h which I spun and wove on the spot.
SBabv loves to hear
"My nice round lid fitted so snug and even that I
them chirp, ,, thought no one but myself ever could find my house.
"I'm a saucy But last week your brother Will's sharp eyes spied the
'round ring that marks my nest, and he went and tore
the lid from its hinges, and left my hundred and ten
-' children without a roof to cover their heads. How I
"would like to bite that boy!
I found the lid and tried to fasten it down again,
-. but a heavy shower'came up and I could not fix it in
Baby loves to the rain. Then my husband came over from his house.
watch them peck, You know our husbands never live with the rest of the
family; they are too cross and get too hungry at times.
Stretching each an "We were not on very good terms; for some time
eager neck: -- -- before, when he thought I was away from home, he
tried to get into my house. I heard him, and, running
Sup stairs, I put my claws in the two little holes in the
lining of the lid and braced myself, so thac he could not
pry open the lid. He said he only wanted to pay me a
Twicklety twee! it is such fun visit, but I knew he was hungry and wanted to eat up our
children.
All in a hurry to see them run. But now he spoke very kindly to me, and told me that my
lid could not be fixed on, but as my children were now old
enough to care for themselves, I had better go home with him.
Baby Jim loves all the chicks: I went to his house to talk it over, and forgot to give the chil-
dren their supper and tell them to work for themselves after
All the chicks love Baby Jim; this.
Sy h a bi, big bi, My husband told me a few days after that my boys and
S girls got into a fight, and before they quit ate each other up;
And tell such funny tales to him. but he was away from home foi two days, and looked very full
when he came back.
Baby hears and answers all "He may have told the truth, but I can't see how one of my
little ones could eat the other one hundred and nine, and then
As they come running to his call. swallow himself too."
This is what Dick Adams dreamed that a tarantula said to
Twicklety twee! it is such fun him. He had seen one on his way to school, and what the
All in a hurry to see them run. teacher told him about the insect had interested him so much
that he found himself dreaming about it all night long.
With a "chicklety chy! chicklety choo! --

Little bird, baby boy, how do you do? .._.

Chicklety choo, chicklety chy,

Why don't you spread yoir wings and fly ?"





STUNSHTIINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.
MY DOLLIES. ,
UP, my dollies, one, two, three; .

I must bathe you all, I see. I '!i l

Dollies of china, wax, and wood. 1
', P. ili ill, i
Let me beg you to be good! 7 P

Don't cry at the soap, and don't kick % P, -, S?-.*

at the rubbing, '

Dollies, you know, are the better for i '

scrubbing 4, ,' .

Big Mabel, shall it be your turn first ?.

No, for I think the sawdust has burst;

Or you, Miss Belle, with the curly hair; BOYS' L E
BOYS' LEISURE HOURS.
Or Rosalinda, pink and fair; A BOY was employed in a
lawyer's office, and had the ,*
Or little black Judy lying there, daily paper to amuse him-
self with. He commenced
Looking about with a queer glass stare ? to study French, and at that .,
little desk became a fluent
reader and writer of the
THE dolls had a tea-party: wasn't it fun? French language. He accomplished this by laying aside the
In ribbons and laces they came, one by one. newspaper and taking up something not so amusing, but far
The girls set the table and poured out the tea, more profitable.
A coachman was often obliged to wait long hours while his
And each of them held up a doll on her knee. .
Se ach mistress made calls. He determined to improve the time; he
You never saw children behave half so well:
found a small volume containing the Eclogues of Virgil, but could
Why nobody had any gossip to tell! d
Sn b a i not read it, so he purchased a Latin grammar. Day by day he
And (can you believe it?) for badness that day studied this, and finally mastered all its intricacies. His mistress
No dolly was sent from the table away. came behind him one day as he stood by the horses waiting for
her, and she asked him what he was so intently reading.
--" -Only a bit of Virgil, my lady."
;---^---=- ------ "What do you read Latin ?"
.... A little, my lady."
"r"-,ill. --:, .:'" ,) She mentioned this to her husband, who insisted that David
.l..i ,,-i shouldd have a teacher to instruct him. In a few years David
~' III,,t1Tecame a learned man, and was for many years a useful and
I'l i 1,eloved minister in Scotland.
p A boy was told to open and shut the gates to let the teams
iii'I i '' .alt of an iron-mine. He sat on a log all day by the side of the
V11 i .ate. Sometimes an hour would pass before the teams came,
Sand this he employed so well that there was ceur:uly any fact in
S"'listory that escaped his attention. He began with a little book
Son English history that he found on the road; having
1 learned that thoroughly, he borrowed of a minister
E Goldsmith's History of Greece. This good man be-
% Ucame greatly interested in him and lent him books,
and was often seen sitting by him on the log con-
Sversing with him about the people of ancient times.
Boys, it will pay to use your leisure hours well.





STUNSHTIINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.
MY DOLLIES. ,
UP, my dollies, one, two, three; .

I must bathe you all, I see. I '!i l

Dollies of china, wax, and wood. 1
', P. ili ill, i
Let me beg you to be good! 7 P

Don't cry at the soap, and don't kick % P, -, S?-.*

at the rubbing, '

Dollies, you know, are the better for i '

scrubbing 4, ,' .

Big Mabel, shall it be your turn first ?.

No, for I think the sawdust has burst;

Or you, Miss Belle, with the curly hair; BOYS' L E
BOYS' LEISURE HOURS.
Or Rosalinda, pink and fair; A BOY was employed in a
lawyer's office, and had the ,*
Or little black Judy lying there, daily paper to amuse him-
self with. He commenced
Looking about with a queer glass stare ? to study French, and at that .,
little desk became a fluent
reader and writer of the
THE dolls had a tea-party: wasn't it fun? French language. He accomplished this by laying aside the
In ribbons and laces they came, one by one. newspaper and taking up something not so amusing, but far
The girls set the table and poured out the tea, more profitable.
A coachman was often obliged to wait long hours while his
And each of them held up a doll on her knee. .
Se ach mistress made calls. He determined to improve the time; he
You never saw children behave half so well:
found a small volume containing the Eclogues of Virgil, but could
Why nobody had any gossip to tell! d
Sn b a i not read it, so he purchased a Latin grammar. Day by day he
And (can you believe it?) for badness that day studied this, and finally mastered all its intricacies. His mistress
No dolly was sent from the table away. came behind him one day as he stood by the horses waiting for
her, and she asked him what he was so intently reading.
--" -Only a bit of Virgil, my lady."
;---^---=- ------ "What do you read Latin ?"
.... A little, my lady."
"r"-,ill. --:, .:'" ,) She mentioned this to her husband, who insisted that David
.l..i ,,-i shouldd have a teacher to instruct him. In a few years David
~' III,,t1Tecame a learned man, and was for many years a useful and
I'l i 1,eloved minister in Scotland.
p A boy was told to open and shut the gates to let the teams
iii'I i '' .alt of an iron-mine. He sat on a log all day by the side of the
V11 i .ate. Sometimes an hour would pass before the teams came,
Sand this he employed so well that there was ceur:uly any fact in
S"'listory that escaped his attention. He began with a little book
Son English history that he found on the road; having
1 learned that thoroughly, he borrowed of a minister
E Goldsmith's History of Greece. This good man be-
% Ucame greatly interested in him and lent him books,
and was often seen sitting by him on the log con-
Sversing with him about the people of ancient times.
Boys, it will pay to use your leisure hours well.






SUNSHIINE FOR LITTLE CITILDREIN.
HAMMOCK SONG. TLJ,
HEIGH-HO, to and fro! ,
How the merry breezes blow! .


"Blue skies, blue eyes,., '-
Baby, bees, and butterflies.


Daisies growing everywhere, t -4 "
Breath of roses in the air. ROSIE AND THE PIGS.
ROSIE was breakfasting out on the grass
When two pigs, on a walking-tour, happened to pass.
Dollie Dimple, swing away, One pi-., with rude manners, came boldly in front,
by darlinA at your pl nd first gave a stare, and then gave a grunt,
B, at y r p As much as to say, "What is that you have got?
Just give us a taste, my dear, out of your pot!"

S' ,. ... n OUTWITTED.
'' ONE fine summer day a very hungry fox sallied out in
.'- -: search of his dinner. After a while his eye rested on a
S-, young rooster, which he thought would make a very good
S- meal; so he lay down under a wall and hid himself in the
S/ high grass, intending to wait until the rooster got near
-- -enough, and then to spring on him and carry him off.
St Suddenly, however, the rooster saw him, and flew in
'' .a great fright to the top of the wall.
', e -- .., The fox could not get him there, and he knew it, so
._. i- .' ihe came out from his hiding-place and addressed the
.rooster thus: "Dear me, how finely you are dressed! I
came to invite Your Magnificence to a grand christening-
ALPHABETICAL ADVICE. feast. The duck and the goose have promised to come,
As ye pass lightly on and the turkey, though slightly ill, will try to come also.
Blithely and gay, "You see that only those of rank are bidden to this
Careless of aught beside feast, and we beg you to adorn it with your splendid
Deeds of to-day, talent for music. We are to have the most
Ere long the years will say, delicate little cockchafers served up on
Fruitless are joys; toast, a delicious salad of earth-worms; J
Give now to nobler things, in fact, all manner of good things. Will
Happy-faced boys!" you not return, then, with
In whatsoe'er ye do me to my house ?" / -.
Join to do well, "Oh ho!" said the
Kindness and fellowship rooster, "how kind you '
Lending their spell; are! What fine stories -
Manhood's gray cares all are you tell! Still, I think
Nearing you now, it safest to decline your
Old Time perchance will set kind invitation. I am 7 ,-
Prints on your brow. sorry not to go to that
Question out, ere they come, splendid feast, but I can- i
Right from the wrong; not leave my wife, for she
Strive e'er to do your best, is sitting on seven new .i "i' -
Try to be strong, eggs. Good-bye! I hope L
Upright and honest, by you will relish those
Verity led, earth-worms. Don't come ,
While you remember me, yours, too near me or I will crow q
X, Y, Z. for the dogs. Good-bye!"






SUNSHIINE FOR LITTLE CITILDREIN.
HAMMOCK SONG. TLJ,
HEIGH-HO, to and fro! ,
How the merry breezes blow! .


"Blue skies, blue eyes,., '-
Baby, bees, and butterflies.


Daisies growing everywhere, t -4 "
Breath of roses in the air. ROSIE AND THE PIGS.
ROSIE was breakfasting out on the grass
When two pigs, on a walking-tour, happened to pass.
Dollie Dimple, swing away, One pi-., with rude manners, came boldly in front,
by darlinA at your pl nd first gave a stare, and then gave a grunt,
B, at y r p As much as to say, "What is that you have got?
Just give us a taste, my dear, out of your pot!"

S' ,. ... n OUTWITTED.
'' ONE fine summer day a very hungry fox sallied out in
.'- -: search of his dinner. After a while his eye rested on a
S-, young rooster, which he thought would make a very good
S- meal; so he lay down under a wall and hid himself in the
S/ high grass, intending to wait until the rooster got near
-- -enough, and then to spring on him and carry him off.
St Suddenly, however, the rooster saw him, and flew in
'' .a great fright to the top of the wall.
', e -- .., The fox could not get him there, and he knew it, so
._. i- .' ihe came out from his hiding-place and addressed the
.rooster thus: "Dear me, how finely you are dressed! I
came to invite Your Magnificence to a grand christening-
ALPHABETICAL ADVICE. feast. The duck and the goose have promised to come,
As ye pass lightly on and the turkey, though slightly ill, will try to come also.
Blithely and gay, "You see that only those of rank are bidden to this
Careless of aught beside feast, and we beg you to adorn it with your splendid
Deeds of to-day, talent for music. We are to have the most
Ere long the years will say, delicate little cockchafers served up on
Fruitless are joys; toast, a delicious salad of earth-worms; J
Give now to nobler things, in fact, all manner of good things. Will
Happy-faced boys!" you not return, then, with
In whatsoe'er ye do me to my house ?" / -.
Join to do well, "Oh ho!" said the
Kindness and fellowship rooster, "how kind you '
Lending their spell; are! What fine stories -
Manhood's gray cares all are you tell! Still, I think
Nearing you now, it safest to decline your
Old Time perchance will set kind invitation. I am 7 ,-
Prints on your brow. sorry not to go to that
Question out, ere they come, splendid feast, but I can- i
Right from the wrong; not leave my wife, for she
Strive e'er to do your best, is sitting on seven new .i "i' -
Try to be strong, eggs. Good-bye! I hope L
Upright and honest, by you will relish those
Verity led, earth-worms. Don't come ,
While you remember me, yours, too near me or I will crow q
X, Y, Z. for the dogs. Good-bye!"






SUNSHIINE FOR LITTLE CITILDREIN.
HAMMOCK SONG. TLJ,
HEIGH-HO, to and fro! ,
How the merry breezes blow! .


"Blue skies, blue eyes,., '-
Baby, bees, and butterflies.


Daisies growing everywhere, t -4 "
Breath of roses in the air. ROSIE AND THE PIGS.
ROSIE was breakfasting out on the grass
When two pigs, on a walking-tour, happened to pass.
Dollie Dimple, swing away, One pi-., with rude manners, came boldly in front,
by darlinA at your pl nd first gave a stare, and then gave a grunt,
B, at y r p As much as to say, "What is that you have got?
Just give us a taste, my dear, out of your pot!"

S' ,. ... n OUTWITTED.
'' ONE fine summer day a very hungry fox sallied out in
.'- -: search of his dinner. After a while his eye rested on a
S-, young rooster, which he thought would make a very good
S- meal; so he lay down under a wall and hid himself in the
S/ high grass, intending to wait until the rooster got near
-- -enough, and then to spring on him and carry him off.
St Suddenly, however, the rooster saw him, and flew in
'' .a great fright to the top of the wall.
', e -- .., The fox could not get him there, and he knew it, so
._. i- .' ihe came out from his hiding-place and addressed the
.rooster thus: "Dear me, how finely you are dressed! I
came to invite Your Magnificence to a grand christening-
ALPHABETICAL ADVICE. feast. The duck and the goose have promised to come,
As ye pass lightly on and the turkey, though slightly ill, will try to come also.
Blithely and gay, "You see that only those of rank are bidden to this
Careless of aught beside feast, and we beg you to adorn it with your splendid
Deeds of to-day, talent for music. We are to have the most
Ere long the years will say, delicate little cockchafers served up on
Fruitless are joys; toast, a delicious salad of earth-worms; J
Give now to nobler things, in fact, all manner of good things. Will
Happy-faced boys!" you not return, then, with
In whatsoe'er ye do me to my house ?" / -.
Join to do well, "Oh ho!" said the
Kindness and fellowship rooster, "how kind you '
Lending their spell; are! What fine stories -
Manhood's gray cares all are you tell! Still, I think
Nearing you now, it safest to decline your
Old Time perchance will set kind invitation. I am 7 ,-
Prints on your brow. sorry not to go to that
Question out, ere they come, splendid feast, but I can- i
Right from the wrong; not leave my wife, for she
Strive e'er to do your best, is sitting on seven new .i "i' -
Try to be strong, eggs. Good-bye! I hope L
Upright and honest, by you will relish those
Verity led, earth-worms. Don't come ,
While you remember me, yours, too near me or I will crow q
X, Y, Z. for the dogs. Good-bye!"






SUNSHIINE FOR LITTLE CITILDREIN.
HAMMOCK SONG. TLJ,
HEIGH-HO, to and fro! ,
How the merry breezes blow! .


"Blue skies, blue eyes,., '-
Baby, bees, and butterflies.


Daisies growing everywhere, t -4 "
Breath of roses in the air. ROSIE AND THE PIGS.
ROSIE was breakfasting out on the grass
When two pigs, on a walking-tour, happened to pass.
Dollie Dimple, swing away, One pi-., with rude manners, came boldly in front,
by darlinA at your pl nd first gave a stare, and then gave a grunt,
B, at y r p As much as to say, "What is that you have got?
Just give us a taste, my dear, out of your pot!"

S' ,. ... n OUTWITTED.
'' ONE fine summer day a very hungry fox sallied out in
.'- -: search of his dinner. After a while his eye rested on a
S-, young rooster, which he thought would make a very good
S- meal; so he lay down under a wall and hid himself in the
S/ high grass, intending to wait until the rooster got near
-- -enough, and then to spring on him and carry him off.
St Suddenly, however, the rooster saw him, and flew in
'' .a great fright to the top of the wall.
', e -- .., The fox could not get him there, and he knew it, so
._. i- .' ihe came out from his hiding-place and addressed the
.rooster thus: "Dear me, how finely you are dressed! I
came to invite Your Magnificence to a grand christening-
ALPHABETICAL ADVICE. feast. The duck and the goose have promised to come,
As ye pass lightly on and the turkey, though slightly ill, will try to come also.
Blithely and gay, "You see that only those of rank are bidden to this
Careless of aught beside feast, and we beg you to adorn it with your splendid
Deeds of to-day, talent for music. We are to have the most
Ere long the years will say, delicate little cockchafers served up on
Fruitless are joys; toast, a delicious salad of earth-worms; J
Give now to nobler things, in fact, all manner of good things. Will
Happy-faced boys!" you not return, then, with
In whatsoe'er ye do me to my house ?" / -.
Join to do well, "Oh ho!" said the
Kindness and fellowship rooster, "how kind you '
Lending their spell; are! What fine stories -
Manhood's gray cares all are you tell! Still, I think
Nearing you now, it safest to decline your
Old Time perchance will set kind invitation. I am 7 ,-
Prints on your brow. sorry not to go to that
Question out, ere they come, splendid feast, but I can- i
Right from the wrong; not leave my wife, for she
Strive e'er to do your best, is sitting on seven new .i "i' -
Try to be strong, eggs. Good-bye! I hope L
Upright and honest, by you will relish those
Verity led, earth-worms. Don't come ,
While you remember me, yours, too near me or I will crow q
X, Y, Z. for the dogs. Good-bye!"






SUNSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

SPRING. single word. He wrote in
am the Spring:r the margin of the book the
number 100, which was that
With sunshine see me coming; of hs ne oeaue
of his new colleagues; then he
Birds begin to twitter; put "0" before the figures,
Hark! the bees are humming. sand wrote underneath, "They
Green to field and hillside, at will be worth neither more
Blossoms to the tree, nor less."
Joy to every human heart The President answered the
modest Doctor with as much
Are what I bring with me.
S. e politeness as presence of mind.
SHe placed "0" after 100, thus
SUMMER. making 1000, and wrote these
See my wealth of flowers! words: They will be worth
ten times more!"
I'm the golden Summer:
Is there for the young or old
A POPULAR
A more welcome comer? a- C EVENING.SE S
CHINESE STORY.
Come and scent the new-mown V Silence hath set her finger with deep touch J The w e to
wtThere were two short-
grass; Upon Creation's brow. Like a young bride, the moon sighted men, Ching and
By the hillside stray; Lifts up Night's curtains, and with countenance mild Chang, who were always quar-
And confess that Summer Smiles on the beauteous Earth, her sleeping child. relying as to which of them
Brings the perfect day. For joy the night-flowers could see best. As they had
SFor joy the night-flowers weep; soft incense, such ee
heard there was to be a tablet
As steals from herbs midst pleasant fields in June, erected at the gate of a neigh-
THE SILENT ACADEMY. Freights the night air. Each light tree's waving tress boring temple, they deter-
A long time ago there ex- Is edged with silver. Flocks lie motionless. mined that they would visit
listed at Hamadan, in Persia, How sweet an hour spent in such scenes as this, it together on a given day,
a celebrated academy. One of and put their powers of eye-
When Peace looks down from heaven in plaintive mood, sight to the test. Bt, each
its principal rules was ex- sight to the test. But, each
pressed in these words: "The And Earth, in deep tranquillity of bliss, desiring to take advantage of
academicians must think Becomes a suitor to fair Solitude! the other, Ching went by
much, write little, and talk 7 What noble actions spring to flowery prime- stealth to the temple, and,
still less." It went under the Spring from the seeds Thought sows in such a time! looking quite close to the tab-
name of the Silent Academy; let he saw an inscription, with A
and there was not a scientific the words, To the great man
man in the whole kingdom who did not aspire to the goblet filled to the brim. The Doctor saw at once of the past and of the future." Chang also went,
honor of becoming a member. that he was too late. prying yet closer, and in addition to the inscription,
Dr. Zeb heard, from the distant province where he Without, however, giving way to despair, he cast "To the great man of the past and of the future," lie
resided, that there was a vacancy at the Academy. about in his mind how he should convince the Presi- read in smaller characters, "This tablet is erected by
He determined to apply for admission, and started for dent that an extra member would by no means affect the family of Ling in honor of the great man."
Hamadan with that purpose in view. On his arrival the well-being of the academicians. He saw at his On the day appointed, standing at a distance from
he presented himself at the door of the hall, where feet a rose-leaf, which, picking up, he let fall lightly which neither could read, Ching exclaimed:
the academicians were assembled, and begged the on the surface of the water-so lightly, indeed, that "The inscription is, To the great man of the past
usher to deliver to the President the note which he not a drop escaped from the goblet. Every one loudly and of the future.'"
put into his hand: "Dr. Zeb humbly requests the applauded this ingenious response. "True," said Chang; "but you have left out a part
honor of filling the vacant place." The rule was laid aside for the occasion, and Dr. of the inscription, which I can read but you cannot,
The usher fulfilled the commission at once; but the Zeb was received with universal joy. The Register and which is written in small letters: 'Erected by the
Doctor and his note arrived too late; the place was of the Academy was presented to him, that he might family of Ling in honor of the great man.' "
already filled up. The academicians were extremely inscribe his name. After he had written it he was "There is no such inscription!" said Ching.
disappointed. They had unwillingly received a court obliged, according to custom, to return thanks for his "There is!" said Chang, assuming an angry look.
wit, whose sprightly eloquence attracted the admira- admission; but, like a truly silent academician, Dr. So they waxed wroth; and, after abusing one an-
tion of the mob; and now they were obliged to reject Zeb thanked the members without uttering a other, they agreed to refer the matter to the high
Dr. Zeb, a clever man of science! The President ', priest of the temple. He heard their story pa-
charged with the announcement of this unfortunate _. tiently, and quietly said, in reply:
news could scarcely make up his mind to commu- "Gentlemen, there is no tablet to read; it was
nicate it to the Doctor. taken into the interior of the temple yesterday! "
Aftef a little thought he filled a large goblet N -
with water-so very full that one more drop luxury of rest
would have caused it to overflow-and then SWET luxury f rest;
sent for the candidate. He appeared with that The sun in the west
modest and unaffected manner which is almost Says night has come;
always a proof of true merit. The President The birds no vigil keep;
rose, and with an appearance of great disap- Their eyes are closed in sleep,
pointment silently showed him the emblematic A tree their home.






SUNSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

SPRING. single word. He wrote in
am the Spring:r the margin of the book the
number 100, which was that
With sunshine see me coming; of hs ne oeaue
of his new colleagues; then he
Birds begin to twitter; put "0" before the figures,
Hark! the bees are humming. sand wrote underneath, "They
Green to field and hillside, at will be worth neither more
Blossoms to the tree, nor less."
Joy to every human heart The President answered the
modest Doctor with as much
Are what I bring with me.
S. e politeness as presence of mind.
SHe placed "0" after 100, thus
SUMMER. making 1000, and wrote these
See my wealth of flowers! words: They will be worth
ten times more!"
I'm the golden Summer:
Is there for the young or old
A POPULAR
A more welcome comer? a- C EVENING.SE S
CHINESE STORY.
Come and scent the new-mown V Silence hath set her finger with deep touch J The w e to
wtThere were two short-
grass; Upon Creation's brow. Like a young bride, the moon sighted men, Ching and
By the hillside stray; Lifts up Night's curtains, and with countenance mild Chang, who were always quar-
And confess that Summer Smiles on the beauteous Earth, her sleeping child. relying as to which of them
Brings the perfect day. For joy the night-flowers could see best. As they had
SFor joy the night-flowers weep; soft incense, such ee
heard there was to be a tablet
As steals from herbs midst pleasant fields in June, erected at the gate of a neigh-
THE SILENT ACADEMY. Freights the night air. Each light tree's waving tress boring temple, they deter-
A long time ago there ex- Is edged with silver. Flocks lie motionless. mined that they would visit
listed at Hamadan, in Persia, How sweet an hour spent in such scenes as this, it together on a given day,
a celebrated academy. One of and put their powers of eye-
When Peace looks down from heaven in plaintive mood, sight to the test. Bt, each
its principal rules was ex- sight to the test. But, each
pressed in these words: "The And Earth, in deep tranquillity of bliss, desiring to take advantage of
academicians must think Becomes a suitor to fair Solitude! the other, Ching went by
much, write little, and talk 7 What noble actions spring to flowery prime- stealth to the temple, and,
still less." It went under the Spring from the seeds Thought sows in such a time! looking quite close to the tab-
name of the Silent Academy; let he saw an inscription, with A
and there was not a scientific the words, To the great man
man in the whole kingdom who did not aspire to the goblet filled to the brim. The Doctor saw at once of the past and of the future." Chang also went,
honor of becoming a member. that he was too late. prying yet closer, and in addition to the inscription,
Dr. Zeb heard, from the distant province where he Without, however, giving way to despair, he cast "To the great man of the past and of the future," lie
resided, that there was a vacancy at the Academy. about in his mind how he should convince the Presi- read in smaller characters, "This tablet is erected by
He determined to apply for admission, and started for dent that an extra member would by no means affect the family of Ling in honor of the great man."
Hamadan with that purpose in view. On his arrival the well-being of the academicians. He saw at his On the day appointed, standing at a distance from
he presented himself at the door of the hall, where feet a rose-leaf, which, picking up, he let fall lightly which neither could read, Ching exclaimed:
the academicians were assembled, and begged the on the surface of the water-so lightly, indeed, that "The inscription is, To the great man of the past
usher to deliver to the President the note which he not a drop escaped from the goblet. Every one loudly and of the future.'"
put into his hand: "Dr. Zeb humbly requests the applauded this ingenious response. "True," said Chang; "but you have left out a part
honor of filling the vacant place." The rule was laid aside for the occasion, and Dr. of the inscription, which I can read but you cannot,
The usher fulfilled the commission at once; but the Zeb was received with universal joy. The Register and which is written in small letters: 'Erected by the
Doctor and his note arrived too late; the place was of the Academy was presented to him, that he might family of Ling in honor of the great man.' "
already filled up. The academicians were extremely inscribe his name. After he had written it he was "There is no such inscription!" said Ching.
disappointed. They had unwillingly received a court obliged, according to custom, to return thanks for his "There is!" said Chang, assuming an angry look.
wit, whose sprightly eloquence attracted the admira- admission; but, like a truly silent academician, Dr. So they waxed wroth; and, after abusing one an-
tion of the mob; and now they were obliged to reject Zeb thanked the members without uttering a other, they agreed to refer the matter to the high
Dr. Zeb, a clever man of science! The President ', priest of the temple. He heard their story pa-
charged with the announcement of this unfortunate _. tiently, and quietly said, in reply:
news could scarcely make up his mind to commu- "Gentlemen, there is no tablet to read; it was
nicate it to the Doctor. taken into the interior of the temple yesterday! "
Aftef a little thought he filled a large goblet N -
with water-so very full that one more drop luxury of rest
would have caused it to overflow-and then SWET luxury f rest;
sent for the candidate. He appeared with that The sun in the west
modest and unaffected manner which is almost Says night has come;
always a proof of true merit. The President The birds no vigil keep;
rose, and with an appearance of great disap- Their eyes are closed in sleep,
pointment silently showed him the emblematic A tree their home.






SUNSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

SPRING. single word. He wrote in
am the Spring:r the margin of the book the
number 100, which was that
With sunshine see me coming; of hs ne oeaue
of his new colleagues; then he
Birds begin to twitter; put "0" before the figures,
Hark! the bees are humming. sand wrote underneath, "They
Green to field and hillside, at will be worth neither more
Blossoms to the tree, nor less."
Joy to every human heart The President answered the
modest Doctor with as much
Are what I bring with me.
S. e politeness as presence of mind.
SHe placed "0" after 100, thus
SUMMER. making 1000, and wrote these
See my wealth of flowers! words: They will be worth
ten times more!"
I'm the golden Summer:
Is there for the young or old
A POPULAR
A more welcome comer? a- C EVENING.SE S
CHINESE STORY.
Come and scent the new-mown V Silence hath set her finger with deep touch J The w e to
wtThere were two short-
grass; Upon Creation's brow. Like a young bride, the moon sighted men, Ching and
By the hillside stray; Lifts up Night's curtains, and with countenance mild Chang, who were always quar-
And confess that Summer Smiles on the beauteous Earth, her sleeping child. relying as to which of them
Brings the perfect day. For joy the night-flowers could see best. As they had
SFor joy the night-flowers weep; soft incense, such ee
heard there was to be a tablet
As steals from herbs midst pleasant fields in June, erected at the gate of a neigh-
THE SILENT ACADEMY. Freights the night air. Each light tree's waving tress boring temple, they deter-
A long time ago there ex- Is edged with silver. Flocks lie motionless. mined that they would visit
listed at Hamadan, in Persia, How sweet an hour spent in such scenes as this, it together on a given day,
a celebrated academy. One of and put their powers of eye-
When Peace looks down from heaven in plaintive mood, sight to the test. Bt, each
its principal rules was ex- sight to the test. But, each
pressed in these words: "The And Earth, in deep tranquillity of bliss, desiring to take advantage of
academicians must think Becomes a suitor to fair Solitude! the other, Ching went by
much, write little, and talk 7 What noble actions spring to flowery prime- stealth to the temple, and,
still less." It went under the Spring from the seeds Thought sows in such a time! looking quite close to the tab-
name of the Silent Academy; let he saw an inscription, with A
and there was not a scientific the words, To the great man
man in the whole kingdom who did not aspire to the goblet filled to the brim. The Doctor saw at once of the past and of the future." Chang also went,
honor of becoming a member. that he was too late. prying yet closer, and in addition to the inscription,
Dr. Zeb heard, from the distant province where he Without, however, giving way to despair, he cast "To the great man of the past and of the future," lie
resided, that there was a vacancy at the Academy. about in his mind how he should convince the Presi- read in smaller characters, "This tablet is erected by
He determined to apply for admission, and started for dent that an extra member would by no means affect the family of Ling in honor of the great man."
Hamadan with that purpose in view. On his arrival the well-being of the academicians. He saw at his On the day appointed, standing at a distance from
he presented himself at the door of the hall, where feet a rose-leaf, which, picking up, he let fall lightly which neither could read, Ching exclaimed:
the academicians were assembled, and begged the on the surface of the water-so lightly, indeed, that "The inscription is, To the great man of the past
usher to deliver to the President the note which he not a drop escaped from the goblet. Every one loudly and of the future.'"
put into his hand: "Dr. Zeb humbly requests the applauded this ingenious response. "True," said Chang; "but you have left out a part
honor of filling the vacant place." The rule was laid aside for the occasion, and Dr. of the inscription, which I can read but you cannot,
The usher fulfilled the commission at once; but the Zeb was received with universal joy. The Register and which is written in small letters: 'Erected by the
Doctor and his note arrived too late; the place was of the Academy was presented to him, that he might family of Ling in honor of the great man.' "
already filled up. The academicians were extremely inscribe his name. After he had written it he was "There is no such inscription!" said Ching.
disappointed. They had unwillingly received a court obliged, according to custom, to return thanks for his "There is!" said Chang, assuming an angry look.
wit, whose sprightly eloquence attracted the admira- admission; but, like a truly silent academician, Dr. So they waxed wroth; and, after abusing one an-
tion of the mob; and now they were obliged to reject Zeb thanked the members without uttering a other, they agreed to refer the matter to the high
Dr. Zeb, a clever man of science! The President ', priest of the temple. He heard their story pa-
charged with the announcement of this unfortunate _. tiently, and quietly said, in reply:
news could scarcely make up his mind to commu- "Gentlemen, there is no tablet to read; it was
nicate it to the Doctor. taken into the interior of the temple yesterday! "
Aftef a little thought he filled a large goblet N -
with water-so very full that one more drop luxury of rest
would have caused it to overflow-and then SWET luxury f rest;
sent for the candidate. He appeared with that The sun in the west
modest and unaffected manner which is almost Says night has come;
always a proof of true merit. The President The birds no vigil keep;
rose, and with an appearance of great disap- Their eyes are closed in sleep,
pointment silently showed him the emblematic A tree their home.






SUNSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

SPRING. single word. He wrote in
am the Spring:r the margin of the book the
number 100, which was that
With sunshine see me coming; of hs ne oeaue
of his new colleagues; then he
Birds begin to twitter; put "0" before the figures,
Hark! the bees are humming. sand wrote underneath, "They
Green to field and hillside, at will be worth neither more
Blossoms to the tree, nor less."
Joy to every human heart The President answered the
modest Doctor with as much
Are what I bring with me.
S. e politeness as presence of mind.
SHe placed "0" after 100, thus
SUMMER. making 1000, and wrote these
See my wealth of flowers! words: They will be worth
ten times more!"
I'm the golden Summer:
Is there for the young or old
A POPULAR
A more welcome comer? a- C EVENING.SE S
CHINESE STORY.
Come and scent the new-mown V Silence hath set her finger with deep touch J The w e to
wtThere were two short-
grass; Upon Creation's brow. Like a young bride, the moon sighted men, Ching and
By the hillside stray; Lifts up Night's curtains, and with countenance mild Chang, who were always quar-
And confess that Summer Smiles on the beauteous Earth, her sleeping child. relying as to which of them
Brings the perfect day. For joy the night-flowers could see best. As they had
SFor joy the night-flowers weep; soft incense, such ee
heard there was to be a tablet
As steals from herbs midst pleasant fields in June, erected at the gate of a neigh-
THE SILENT ACADEMY. Freights the night air. Each light tree's waving tress boring temple, they deter-
A long time ago there ex- Is edged with silver. Flocks lie motionless. mined that they would visit
listed at Hamadan, in Persia, How sweet an hour spent in such scenes as this, it together on a given day,
a celebrated academy. One of and put their powers of eye-
When Peace looks down from heaven in plaintive mood, sight to the test. Bt, each
its principal rules was ex- sight to the test. But, each
pressed in these words: "The And Earth, in deep tranquillity of bliss, desiring to take advantage of
academicians must think Becomes a suitor to fair Solitude! the other, Ching went by
much, write little, and talk 7 What noble actions spring to flowery prime- stealth to the temple, and,
still less." It went under the Spring from the seeds Thought sows in such a time! looking quite close to the tab-
name of the Silent Academy; let he saw an inscription, with A
and there was not a scientific the words, To the great man
man in the whole kingdom who did not aspire to the goblet filled to the brim. The Doctor saw at once of the past and of the future." Chang also went,
honor of becoming a member. that he was too late. prying yet closer, and in addition to the inscription,
Dr. Zeb heard, from the distant province where he Without, however, giving way to despair, he cast "To the great man of the past and of the future," lie
resided, that there was a vacancy at the Academy. about in his mind how he should convince the Presi- read in smaller characters, "This tablet is erected by
He determined to apply for admission, and started for dent that an extra member would by no means affect the family of Ling in honor of the great man."
Hamadan with that purpose in view. On his arrival the well-being of the academicians. He saw at his On the day appointed, standing at a distance from
he presented himself at the door of the hall, where feet a rose-leaf, which, picking up, he let fall lightly which neither could read, Ching exclaimed:
the academicians were assembled, and begged the on the surface of the water-so lightly, indeed, that "The inscription is, To the great man of the past
usher to deliver to the President the note which he not a drop escaped from the goblet. Every one loudly and of the future.'"
put into his hand: "Dr. Zeb humbly requests the applauded this ingenious response. "True," said Chang; "but you have left out a part
honor of filling the vacant place." The rule was laid aside for the occasion, and Dr. of the inscription, which I can read but you cannot,
The usher fulfilled the commission at once; but the Zeb was received with universal joy. The Register and which is written in small letters: 'Erected by the
Doctor and his note arrived too late; the place was of the Academy was presented to him, that he might family of Ling in honor of the great man.' "
already filled up. The academicians were extremely inscribe his name. After he had written it he was "There is no such inscription!" said Ching.
disappointed. They had unwillingly received a court obliged, according to custom, to return thanks for his "There is!" said Chang, assuming an angry look.
wit, whose sprightly eloquence attracted the admira- admission; but, like a truly silent academician, Dr. So they waxed wroth; and, after abusing one an-
tion of the mob; and now they were obliged to reject Zeb thanked the members without uttering a other, they agreed to refer the matter to the high
Dr. Zeb, a clever man of science! The President ', priest of the temple. He heard their story pa-
charged with the announcement of this unfortunate _. tiently, and quietly said, in reply:
news could scarcely make up his mind to commu- "Gentlemen, there is no tablet to read; it was
nicate it to the Doctor. taken into the interior of the temple yesterday! "
Aftef a little thought he filled a large goblet N -
with water-so very full that one more drop luxury of rest
would have caused it to overflow-and then SWET luxury f rest;
sent for the candidate. He appeared with that The sun in the west
modest and unaffected manner which is almost Says night has come;
always a proof of true merit. The President The birds no vigil keep;
rose, and with an appearance of great disap- Their eyes are closed in sleep,
pointment silently showed him the emblematic A tree their home.






SUNSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

SPRING. single word. He wrote in
am the Spring:r the margin of the book the
number 100, which was that
With sunshine see me coming; of hs ne oeaue
of his new colleagues; then he
Birds begin to twitter; put "0" before the figures,
Hark! the bees are humming. sand wrote underneath, "They
Green to field and hillside, at will be worth neither more
Blossoms to the tree, nor less."
Joy to every human heart The President answered the
modest Doctor with as much
Are what I bring with me.
S. e politeness as presence of mind.
SHe placed "0" after 100, thus
SUMMER. making 1000, and wrote these
See my wealth of flowers! words: They will be worth
ten times more!"
I'm the golden Summer:
Is there for the young or old
A POPULAR
A more welcome comer? a- C EVENING.SE S
CHINESE STORY.
Come and scent the new-mown V Silence hath set her finger with deep touch J The w e to
wtThere were two short-
grass; Upon Creation's brow. Like a young bride, the moon sighted men, Ching and
By the hillside stray; Lifts up Night's curtains, and with countenance mild Chang, who were always quar-
And confess that Summer Smiles on the beauteous Earth, her sleeping child. relying as to which of them
Brings the perfect day. For joy the night-flowers could see best. As they had
SFor joy the night-flowers weep; soft incense, such ee
heard there was to be a tablet
As steals from herbs midst pleasant fields in June, erected at the gate of a neigh-
THE SILENT ACADEMY. Freights the night air. Each light tree's waving tress boring temple, they deter-
A long time ago there ex- Is edged with silver. Flocks lie motionless. mined that they would visit
listed at Hamadan, in Persia, How sweet an hour spent in such scenes as this, it together on a given day,
a celebrated academy. One of and put their powers of eye-
When Peace looks down from heaven in plaintive mood, sight to the test. Bt, each
its principal rules was ex- sight to the test. But, each
pressed in these words: "The And Earth, in deep tranquillity of bliss, desiring to take advantage of
academicians must think Becomes a suitor to fair Solitude! the other, Ching went by
much, write little, and talk 7 What noble actions spring to flowery prime- stealth to the temple, and,
still less." It went under the Spring from the seeds Thought sows in such a time! looking quite close to the tab-
name of the Silent Academy; let he saw an inscription, with A
and there was not a scientific the words, To the great man
man in the whole kingdom who did not aspire to the goblet filled to the brim. The Doctor saw at once of the past and of the future." Chang also went,
honor of becoming a member. that he was too late. prying yet closer, and in addition to the inscription,
Dr. Zeb heard, from the distant province where he Without, however, giving way to despair, he cast "To the great man of the past and of the future," lie
resided, that there was a vacancy at the Academy. about in his mind how he should convince the Presi- read in smaller characters, "This tablet is erected by
He determined to apply for admission, and started for dent that an extra member would by no means affect the family of Ling in honor of the great man."
Hamadan with that purpose in view. On his arrival the well-being of the academicians. He saw at his On the day appointed, standing at a distance from
he presented himself at the door of the hall, where feet a rose-leaf, which, picking up, he let fall lightly which neither could read, Ching exclaimed:
the academicians were assembled, and begged the on the surface of the water-so lightly, indeed, that "The inscription is, To the great man of the past
usher to deliver to the President the note which he not a drop escaped from the goblet. Every one loudly and of the future.'"
put into his hand: "Dr. Zeb humbly requests the applauded this ingenious response. "True," said Chang; "but you have left out a part
honor of filling the vacant place." The rule was laid aside for the occasion, and Dr. of the inscription, which I can read but you cannot,
The usher fulfilled the commission at once; but the Zeb was received with universal joy. The Register and which is written in small letters: 'Erected by the
Doctor and his note arrived too late; the place was of the Academy was presented to him, that he might family of Ling in honor of the great man.' "
already filled up. The academicians were extremely inscribe his name. After he had written it he was "There is no such inscription!" said Ching.
disappointed. They had unwillingly received a court obliged, according to custom, to return thanks for his "There is!" said Chang, assuming an angry look.
wit, whose sprightly eloquence attracted the admira- admission; but, like a truly silent academician, Dr. So they waxed wroth; and, after abusing one an-
tion of the mob; and now they were obliged to reject Zeb thanked the members without uttering a other, they agreed to refer the matter to the high
Dr. Zeb, a clever man of science! The President ', priest of the temple. He heard their story pa-
charged with the announcement of this unfortunate _. tiently, and quietly said, in reply:
news could scarcely make up his mind to commu- "Gentlemen, there is no tablet to read; it was
nicate it to the Doctor. taken into the interior of the temple yesterday! "
Aftef a little thought he filled a large goblet N -
with water-so very full that one more drop luxury of rest
would have caused it to overflow-and then SWET luxury f rest;
sent for the candidate. He appeared with that The sun in the west
modest and unaffected manner which is almost Says night has come;
always a proof of true merit. The President The birds no vigil keep;
rose, and with an appearance of great disap- Their eyes are closed in sleep,
pointment silently showed him the emblematic A tree their home.






SUISIIIN] FOR LITTLE CIIILDIREI0N.

LITTLE WINNIE BRIGHT. "Yes," replied the boy, "but we have toys. There's my beautiful
Spaint-box; I only used it once, and it is worth five shillings."
Little dancing feet, in the woods so gay,
Now on this side, now on that, merrily at play. "And there's my battledore and shuttlecock," cried Alice. They go
Happy, merry glances, sunny smiles to all; so well and are so pretty. I suppose they cost three or four shillings."
Running fast and deftly, at everybody's call. "And there's my beautiful doll," joined in Anna. "Uncle George
Little Winnie pleases, for she is so sweet, brought it from Paris for my birthday, and it must have been very, very
Loving, gentle, kind to all, whoever she may meet. dear, you know-perhaps two pounds."
So the children call her little "Winnie bright," At that moment the school-bell rang, and with light hearts the little
Because they are so happy when she comes in sight. ones finished their tasks and said their lessons.
For they have a merry day, and Winnie loves the fun, As soon as school was over the children exhibited their treasures.
Rushing about, and in and out, all in the golden sun. Charles took out his paints, and looked sorrowfully at his dear paint-box.
-- Alice tenderly smoothed the
white, soft feathers of the
THREE ENGLISH CHILDREN. '{ -shuttlecock, and could not
There once lived three halI'.. I I.,- I. il.,, ,II. i-- -- help sighing. Poor little
large, cheerful house, with evythii ...lI ..i t... Anna tried in vain to lkeip
good parents, kind teachers, I.-.-.' t 1i, !A' I. II ,I I ,], I d town her sobs, and whis-
and not too much work. pered a loving farewell in
But alas! a sad day came, !h I!. a I! I. ,l f;! il-- ,i. ;i 1 l the pretty doll's ear.
away. Their father went a. ,iv 1 .i, I ..... i i .. ... ., "Go, she said, go to
sold, and the little ones with another little child, my
their mamma left the coun- pretty darling dolly. With
try for ever. It was thewar the mone1 I get for you
that brought all these great apa shall have nice things
misfortunes. But children to eat, instead of the nasty
must be children, and after soup of the soldiers; and
a week's sadness they began t hen he will think of his
to look cheerfull and merry little girl."
and playful again. Then the three went hand
From time to time a let- in hand to a great bazaar.
fr oml the e arm erchant tere r ood a
ter came from the ar Ty, Te merchant there good-
where their father was; humoredl took their toys,
then the poor children cried and paid them a good price
"and grieved with their for then. But they did iot
mother, for the news was .. know that behind the door a
very sad indeed. good fairy had prepared the
Little Charles, the eldest man to be amiable, and that
of the three, talked about q the good fairy was their
revenge, and battles, and mamma. When th.ehildren
fighting. Alice, thesecond, received the money their
wished she could nurse thle hearts beat high with joy,
wounded men; and Anna, f - and their eyes were quite
a pretty, timid little girl of dazzle. The large sum of
nine, asked if she would r.., ....,.i t .. I i. a fortune. Charlie, Alice and
not be allowed to go and I' a, i .i .. .. I heap of money at one time.
comfort poor papa, who was T',,. r, ... I,. .1i I I t .. the ambulance committee, and
so sad and mesome without be sent to the ar. I can-
his wife and children. .r I .' i1, ,i I1, 1,1 subscription made a great
But this was impossible. ltt...r...... -....1,. ,-. I,,,t it gave much joy to the absent
All they could do was to be good and in(ustr ous, and try to comfort father when he knew that his beloved children were charitable, and
their mother, and help her to bear her affliction loved their native land.
One day the three children stood in the school-room, each of them learning When, three months after, he was able to return home, it was with
steadily and gravely-for they had received a letter saying that their a greater love than ever that he pressed them to his heart.
papa was ill in the camp. (.'id .1,. was bent over his geography, Alice I need not tell you that the playthings were replaced by new ones;
pondered over a difficult sum, and Anna was learning her grammar. and now that the children are grown up, married, and have (hildren2
Suddenly Charles lifted up his head from looking at his country on the of their own, it is with tender emotion that they turn over these oIl toys.
globe. I'll tell you, girls," he said; "every one here make a subscrip-
tion for the army. Yesterday inammla sold her diamond ring for that TALL OAKS.
purpose. We must make a subscription, too." Tall oaks from little acorns grow." Yes, darling children, that i;
"Oh, but Charlie," said Alice, "how can we give anything for that so. Then plant your acorns; do not fear, and fruit will by and by jpf.
purpose? We have no pocket-money, you know!" pear. The lines you learn to-day may be the very seed of Wisdois.-I'.,,






SUISIIIN] FOR LITTLE CIIILDIREI0N.

LITTLE WINNIE BRIGHT. "Yes," replied the boy, "but we have toys. There's my beautiful
Spaint-box; I only used it once, and it is worth five shillings."
Little dancing feet, in the woods so gay,
Now on this side, now on that, merrily at play. "And there's my battledore and shuttlecock," cried Alice. They go
Happy, merry glances, sunny smiles to all; so well and are so pretty. I suppose they cost three or four shillings."
Running fast and deftly, at everybody's call. "And there's my beautiful doll," joined in Anna. "Uncle George
Little Winnie pleases, for she is so sweet, brought it from Paris for my birthday, and it must have been very, very
Loving, gentle, kind to all, whoever she may meet. dear, you know-perhaps two pounds."
So the children call her little "Winnie bright," At that moment the school-bell rang, and with light hearts the little
Because they are so happy when she comes in sight. ones finished their tasks and said their lessons.
For they have a merry day, and Winnie loves the fun, As soon as school was over the children exhibited their treasures.
Rushing about, and in and out, all in the golden sun. Charles took out his paints, and looked sorrowfully at his dear paint-box.
-- Alice tenderly smoothed the
white, soft feathers of the
THREE ENGLISH CHILDREN. '{ -shuttlecock, and could not
There once lived three halI'.. I I.,- I. il.,, ,II. i-- -- help sighing. Poor little
large, cheerful house, with evythii ...lI ..i t... Anna tried in vain to lkeip
good parents, kind teachers, I.-.-.' t 1i, !A' I. II ,I I ,], I d town her sobs, and whis-
and not too much work. pered a loving farewell in
But alas! a sad day came, !h I!. a I! I. ,l f;! il-- ,i. ;i 1 l the pretty doll's ear.
away. Their father went a. ,iv 1 .i, I ..... i i .. ... ., "Go, she said, go to
sold, and the little ones with another little child, my
their mamma left the coun- pretty darling dolly. With
try for ever. It was thewar the mone1 I get for you
that brought all these great apa shall have nice things
misfortunes. But children to eat, instead of the nasty
must be children, and after soup of the soldiers; and
a week's sadness they began t hen he will think of his
to look cheerfull and merry little girl."
and playful again. Then the three went hand
From time to time a let- in hand to a great bazaar.
fr oml the e arm erchant tere r ood a
ter came from the ar Ty, Te merchant there good-
where their father was; humoredl took their toys,
then the poor children cried and paid them a good price
"and grieved with their for then. But they did iot
mother, for the news was .. know that behind the door a
very sad indeed. good fairy had prepared the
Little Charles, the eldest man to be amiable, and that
of the three, talked about q the good fairy was their
revenge, and battles, and mamma. When th.ehildren
fighting. Alice, thesecond, received the money their
wished she could nurse thle hearts beat high with joy,
wounded men; and Anna, f - and their eyes were quite
a pretty, timid little girl of dazzle. The large sum of
nine, asked if she would r.., ....,.i t .. I i. a fortune. Charlie, Alice and
not be allowed to go and I' a, i .i .. .. I heap of money at one time.
comfort poor papa, who was T',,. r, ... I,. .1i I I t .. the ambulance committee, and
so sad and mesome without be sent to the ar. I can-
his wife and children. .r I .' i1, ,i I1, 1,1 subscription made a great
But this was impossible. ltt...r...... -....1,. ,-. I,,,t it gave much joy to the absent
All they could do was to be good and in(ustr ous, and try to comfort father when he knew that his beloved children were charitable, and
their mother, and help her to bear her affliction loved their native land.
One day the three children stood in the school-room, each of them learning When, three months after, he was able to return home, it was with
steadily and gravely-for they had received a letter saying that their a greater love than ever that he pressed them to his heart.
papa was ill in the camp. (.'id .1,. was bent over his geography, Alice I need not tell you that the playthings were replaced by new ones;
pondered over a difficult sum, and Anna was learning her grammar. and now that the children are grown up, married, and have (hildren2
Suddenly Charles lifted up his head from looking at his country on the of their own, it is with tender emotion that they turn over these oIl toys.
globe. I'll tell you, girls," he said; "every one here make a subscrip-
tion for the army. Yesterday inammla sold her diamond ring for that TALL OAKS.
purpose. We must make a subscription, too." Tall oaks from little acorns grow." Yes, darling children, that i;
"Oh, but Charlie," said Alice, "how can we give anything for that so. Then plant your acorns; do not fear, and fruit will by and by jpf.
purpose? We have no pocket-money, you know!" pear. The lines you learn to-day may be the very seed of Wisdois.-I'.,,






SUISIIIN] FOR LITTLE CIIILDIREI0N.

LITTLE WINNIE BRIGHT. "Yes," replied the boy, "but we have toys. There's my beautiful
Spaint-box; I only used it once, and it is worth five shillings."
Little dancing feet, in the woods so gay,
Now on this side, now on that, merrily at play. "And there's my battledore and shuttlecock," cried Alice. They go
Happy, merry glances, sunny smiles to all; so well and are so pretty. I suppose they cost three or four shillings."
Running fast and deftly, at everybody's call. "And there's my beautiful doll," joined in Anna. "Uncle George
Little Winnie pleases, for she is so sweet, brought it from Paris for my birthday, and it must have been very, very
Loving, gentle, kind to all, whoever she may meet. dear, you know-perhaps two pounds."
So the children call her little "Winnie bright," At that moment the school-bell rang, and with light hearts the little
Because they are so happy when she comes in sight. ones finished their tasks and said their lessons.
For they have a merry day, and Winnie loves the fun, As soon as school was over the children exhibited their treasures.
Rushing about, and in and out, all in the golden sun. Charles took out his paints, and looked sorrowfully at his dear paint-box.
-- Alice tenderly smoothed the
white, soft feathers of the
THREE ENGLISH CHILDREN. '{ -shuttlecock, and could not
There once lived three halI'.. I I.,- I. il.,, ,II. i-- -- help sighing. Poor little
large, cheerful house, with evythii ...lI ..i t... Anna tried in vain to lkeip
good parents, kind teachers, I.-.-.' t 1i, !A' I. II ,I I ,], I d town her sobs, and whis-
and not too much work. pered a loving farewell in
But alas! a sad day came, !h I!. a I! I. ,l f;! il-- ,i. ;i 1 l the pretty doll's ear.
away. Their father went a. ,iv 1 .i, I ..... i i .. ... ., "Go, she said, go to
sold, and the little ones with another little child, my
their mamma left the coun- pretty darling dolly. With
try for ever. It was thewar the mone1 I get for you
that brought all these great apa shall have nice things
misfortunes. But children to eat, instead of the nasty
must be children, and after soup of the soldiers; and
a week's sadness they began t hen he will think of his
to look cheerfull and merry little girl."
and playful again. Then the three went hand
From time to time a let- in hand to a great bazaar.
fr oml the e arm erchant tere r ood a
ter came from the ar Ty, Te merchant there good-
where their father was; humoredl took their toys,
then the poor children cried and paid them a good price
"and grieved with their for then. But they did iot
mother, for the news was .. know that behind the door a
very sad indeed. good fairy had prepared the
Little Charles, the eldest man to be amiable, and that
of the three, talked about q the good fairy was their
revenge, and battles, and mamma. When th.ehildren
fighting. Alice, thesecond, received the money their
wished she could nurse thle hearts beat high with joy,
wounded men; and Anna, f - and their eyes were quite
a pretty, timid little girl of dazzle. The large sum of
nine, asked if she would r.., ....,.i t .. I i. a fortune. Charlie, Alice and
not be allowed to go and I' a, i .i .. .. I heap of money at one time.
comfort poor papa, who was T',,. r, ... I,. .1i I I t .. the ambulance committee, and
so sad and mesome without be sent to the ar. I can-
his wife and children. .r I .' i1, ,i I1, 1,1 subscription made a great
But this was impossible. ltt...r...... -....1,. ,-. I,,,t it gave much joy to the absent
All they could do was to be good and in(ustr ous, and try to comfort father when he knew that his beloved children were charitable, and
their mother, and help her to bear her affliction loved their native land.
One day the three children stood in the school-room, each of them learning When, three months after, he was able to return home, it was with
steadily and gravely-for they had received a letter saying that their a greater love than ever that he pressed them to his heart.
papa was ill in the camp. (.'id .1,. was bent over his geography, Alice I need not tell you that the playthings were replaced by new ones;
pondered over a difficult sum, and Anna was learning her grammar. and now that the children are grown up, married, and have (hildren2
Suddenly Charles lifted up his head from looking at his country on the of their own, it is with tender emotion that they turn over these oIl toys.
globe. I'll tell you, girls," he said; "every one here make a subscrip-
tion for the army. Yesterday inammla sold her diamond ring for that TALL OAKS.
purpose. We must make a subscription, too." Tall oaks from little acorns grow." Yes, darling children, that i;
"Oh, but Charlie," said Alice, "how can we give anything for that so. Then plant your acorns; do not fear, and fruit will by and by jpf.
purpose? We have no pocket-money, you know!" pear. The lines you learn to-day may be the very seed of Wisdois.-I'.,,







SUNSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

"r there did not seem to be much chance of their over-
A .taking it. Suddenly the road turned sharply round,
and in another moment the umbrella was blown over
,, -a low bank into the brook that ran by there, and they
i'i l saw it sailing gracefully down the stream I
ii' ...I Oh what shall we do? May cried; and Rosie
burst into tears.
I ''"i',''' i',' litI *I, I.. May, May! Mother's umbrella will be drowned !"
SMay was very much inclined to cry too, but that
S- dk would be of no use; so she took Rosie by the hand,
looking for some one to help her. Presently she saw
E an old man at work with a hook, cutting some shrubs
i, and ferns, and she called to him eagerly:
Please, please, can you get us the umbrella ?"
:u ,.. .1IM wi I.. .' I1 ...I .ii, dw tl r. bi ., 1 doi r, n nothing they The old man looked up from his work and saw the
l ..I *.. ri It *t .. '..... i.i..l i, i, .. 1, or ..it \\..I *.r hue it did not runaway umbrella sailing down the little brook, so he
r, t, -1 ..I .. r.. '.. 1. andI ,,, 'i, i ,.v'. I.ir Io. A.d; and many just leaned forward and caught the handle with his
Sli..,,r t. .iiI 1,. -,r ,I I.. i, -..r ;rl, 1,i I.l..,r, i, srham umbrella hook. Then he handed it to May.
,,, lI ...., i. ......a io, in .e...t. .- .w. i.._ sL. ,r .I.lls, which they Thank you so much she said politely. I am
S I,. .. ....... .I br ,1r a ,,i. ni 1 ,i ti i.. I B It iit in. l.. ,rnibrella was a very much obliged to you."
S.II. a it, I. r. Itr ..I .. ..,I .,I _,_. .. ,,-. 1 t a beautifully- You shall have my flowers," Rosie cried, holding
w.it .c.l. bu, ..e t.re.. ..11. h1.. 1.1.1 I... r1.. ..,_ t ..e e..Iouch it. out the great bunch which she held in her hand.
S \\, I!,-. I.. ,. Iw ..,1. II. nl., I..- ..In .- th.. I. it 1 I..o r. and not drop Here, please take them ; it was good of you to save
... I .r ,, 1, ,1. I, ,, 1' 1.h h,,1 l ,. tl,.ll III. _i,,und. Then, mother's umbrella! and she looked up towards him
i-, r. .. I .... a ...i ti,. eno,,n_ oI,..,,i.in 1 ..fl I. I. wen bank that as if she could have kissed the old man.
.,I .... ,a, l et rl,, h1.,,..rr ,,,,; 1 ,.. 1, I.. I .l, i. r II,. S on the other Thank you, little miss," he said, with a pleasant
i. .I. ,, t... I ... ,r l.. I .t .nd placed the smile; it's very kind of you to give me your posy.
..ll r r. ,.,..1..,.., ,, I.._ .. ri ,h.. riie flowers that You see I'm an old man, and my back and knees are
n, .a 0.t 1n' t, lt a.. ii.g orlh, I .itI.i j ar- .. I delight they too stiff to gather the pretty things, but I like them
S, t bI,., w-,.l i t...... rill II..,, h,,i ,i. r,. I, .:e nosegay. very much, and I'll put them in a jar of water in my
I ,- i I... .I a I I. r ..w ..- -, .i. ..tI k wr its soft green
l a wood er.r .11 .r tl ,1 uI..h ,,,Fi I,, l.* I -... i great t waving chestnut trees
".".. i.I;. ,llt- ita .... .. I ...I t i rl. It a...k i I. bling along right m errily ;
a .,, I tl.h, 1, .Ia ,. ,i .I o..t I Le1t'1 1l .. It Ir I II" li i. i verses in her lesson-book:

.. .. [ ,, 1_ ... ,o ] I !. "a y go


IM li.n I,.,- I,, ith u, a,11. Ir bI .. ....1. 1 I...I ,rh the words, though tlhe
S I1,, I .r. ... ti ri t,6 ,,, _; i '- 1i I,,,tl ...1 r I.. i, having as m any flowers
I.. II l. ir. I II, l, Il. rt .., rr,. ;ie to return hom e.
"". ..... a, i I, .,r i .,II l.r I .. -I.. It. r ..I the trees they saw it was
e u ti n1, v t.. r i it ,t Ir..I t, I 1... I r t l -t, then tf ster and faster;
"dark clouds obscured the sun and chased across the sky; and a sharp, cold .
wind made the children shiver.
"H ow fortunate that we brought the umbrella," May said, as
MOTHER'S UMBRELLA. she opened it carefully and stood with Rosie under the shelter of
Come, Rosic, let us go and gather primroses," May a. great gnarled old tree, which was only just beginning to under-
Lee said one bright, sunny, spring morning. "I'm stand that it was -1Ir;- and time to put on its pretty green attire.
sure there will be lots in the woods down by the brook "I don't think mother will be angry now. Just look how it
to-day; and mother said she wanted some flowers to rains, Rosic."
put in the vases to-night." Rosie shivered, and pressed closer to her sister. She didn't like -
Rosie laid down her book, and went to the window to see the water pouring off mother's umbrella; it would be much
to look out. It was very bright and clear, with a nicer only to have used it in the sunshine. However, as May -
beautiful blue sky overhead all dotted with soft, fleecy said, they would certainly have got very wet without it, and so
white clouds; but the trees were tossing their branches they tried to make excuses to themselves for their disobedience. ,.J(
about, and pieces of straw were whirling down tihe quiet Presently the clouds began to break, the blue sky peeped out
country road as if they enjoyed the fun, for there was again, and the rain only fell in large drops, and May and Rosie
a fresh breeze blowing. But May and Rosie did not set off homewards again.
mind that in the least, and tying on their hats they pre- But just as they turned out of the lane into the road
pared for a good scamper down the lane to the woody puff came a sudden c_-mt of wind, 'rd iqwyv wont. thro
valley by the brook, where the finest primroses grew, umbrella out of M.,,-. I .ii......n .,r ...it
and great yellow daffodils, and purple and white pansies, a pace.
delicate wood-sorrel, and fragrant blue-bells. For a minute th .r......l i .il1 !II -I..... ..... -
I think it will rain, May," Rosie said, lingering meant and dismay, v, i. ti._ II rI i ..1 r ii
a moment in the hall as she passed out. Let's take over, now rising a rIII ....i I,. [ii.
an umbrella." then resting on its .;.I. t- I! I, .. '.I
May lingered too; she thought an umbrella would breath, then
be very nice, but there was enly one in the stand, and starting off I ,,
that was mother's, which they were both forbidden to again. _
touch. Presently --- -
"Run and ask mother if we can have it," May said, they started ,
after hunting in vain for another one; and Rosie ran after it; but
upstairs and downstairs, and returned breathless. though they ,
"I can't find her anywhere, May. Perhaps she's ran as quick- ,..
gone out and has taken our,s ? and then she took up ly as ever i
the one in the stand and ran oil with it. they could, .T I h'. ,, I: i






SUNSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.R

window, and often think of the bright little lassie that string attached, by which he tied it to one crutch. So A QUEER FOUNTAIN.
gave them, if she will tell me her name." he hopped along as fast as he could, looking back at Some people who go to.Europe write about
"I'm Rosie Lee, and this is my sister May. We the wagon, with a pleased face, every few steps. the palaces, and the grand people who live in
"live at Woodbine Cottage." Amy forgot her own discontent in her pity for the them; but I think I enjoyed seeing the children
Woodbine Cottage; why, that's a goodish distance
"poor child, and eagerly asked her aunt if she might of those far countries better than anything else;
off. The umbrella has led you a pretty chase, my ,
off. The umbrella has led you a pretty chase, my not bring him some of her own playthings. "Here is and I had rather have the love of a child than
dears, and I dare say you're tired and hungry too.
This cunning little china baby in my pocket, auntie; the love of a king.
Well, come to my cottage, and I'll give you each a
piece of broad and a cup of milk. But you must will you please let me drop it into his wagon ? I know I was in St. Petersburg last year. That is a
not stop to gather more posies, else some one at home it will please him." long name; but it is the name of a great city, the
will be getting anxious." Aunt Susan gave her consent, and both smiled capital of Russia, one of the largest and most
May and Rosie promised they would not stay a mo- when they saw the bright glow of pleasure that spread powerful countries in the world. In front of my
ment, much as they wanted some more flowers for over his ifce at this addition to his treasures, hotel in St. Petersburg was a large public garden,
mother; and after they had each had a cup of nice milk "See how little this poor child has to make life and in the afternoons I used to walk through
and a piece of bread they started off. The last thing pleasant. Yet I am sure he has spent a happier morn- it to watch the crowds of children at play.
Rosie saw was the old man smelling IIer great bunch ing than some children whose parents give them every In one part of this garden was a little shed,
of flowers, as lie placed them with trees all about it; and
in ajar of water in the win- '- I used to see many chil-
dow; and he looked so pleased dren go to the door of it
that she felt quite glad she adr buy go t e o o it
had given them n to hm. e
u ,.own lg sand buy glasses of some-
had given they rac homl l e thing to drink. One day
When they reached home o
dinner was over, and their I said to myself, "I will
dinner was over, and their go and see what it is that
"fatherjust setting out to look l c go and see what it is that
for them. these children get to drink
Now, my dears, you seeay at that old shed." So I
the result of your disobedi- walked up to the door;
ence," Mr. Lee said, when tol and what do you suppose
lie heard the whole story. wI saw ? Was it a soda
"You've spoiled the um- fountain? No. Was it
brella, lost your flowers, a great bowl of lemonade?
issed yor inner, been No. Was it a spruce-
frightened yourselves, and -beer fountain? Oh! no
caused us a great deal of indeed. It was some,
anxiety, all because you did thing much better than
not do as you were told." ) -any of these. There was
Z 'any of these. There was
May and Rosie promised
tnf again with Mo a cow in the shed, with a
humbly to be more obedient a cow in the shed, with a
in future, and above all never woman in charge of her;
to interfere again with Mo- and when the children
their's Umbrella. came for a drink the wo-
man would sell them a
A CURE FOR DISCON glass of milk, drawn fresh
TENT. ".-from the fountain in the
Amy was very fretful and ,: cow's bag.
discontented one morning. I drank a glass of it
"I do wish I had some .. myself, for which I paid
new play, or something to five kreutzers, or about
amuse me, Aunt Susan," she three cents; and I thought
said, discontentedly, as she "How nice it would be
tossed aside her box of toys, for the children in Phila-
quite heedless whether they delphia if there were cow-
were broken or not. ,t < fountains in Fairmount
"Nothing would amuse Park! and how nice it
you in your present frame of would be for the children
mind, dear. Happiness is j in other large cities if
within, not without us. they could get pure milk
Come, we will take a half- in the parks when they go
hour's walk before dinner; it ----- to play in them."
will do us both good." OUR JENNY.
XAmy got up from her little rocking-chair quite re- OUR JENNY.
luctantly, and went for her hat and coat. As they comfort. Let us remember him, Amy, when we
turned down a long street they passed many rows of again feel discontented. It often helps us a great deal Eyes a nut-brown hue,
factory houses, all under one roof, with a few feet of to compare ourselves with those to whom God has not How we all love you,
door-yard in front, covered, for the most part, with given the same blessings we enjoy. We learn to ap-
tangled grass and weeds. In front of one house Aunt preciate them better, and to thank the hand which Little Jenny!
Susan paused a minute and said to her companion: showers so many mercies upon us. It makes us more
There is a lesson for you, Amy. See hbw little considerate towards the poor and suffering, and teaches Ah! that childish face,
it takes really to make one happy." us to share our good things with them."
A poor crippled child, not over four years of age, Amy spent a very pleasant afternoon in thinking By its own sweet grace,
was hobbling along on two crutches. His face was about the poor lame boy, and planning some little V inneth it a place
pale, and his sunken eyes told of sickness and suf- gifts for his pleasure. Mother knew the family well
fering. But the poor little fellow was having a merry and approved her projects; so she had the pleasure Time cannot efface,
time with his one plaything. It was the box of a of carrying them out before she went to sleep that
little toy wagon, without any wheels. There was a night. In the hearts of many.






SUNSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.R

window, and often think of the bright little lassie that string attached, by which he tied it to one crutch. So A QUEER FOUNTAIN.
gave them, if she will tell me her name." he hopped along as fast as he could, looking back at Some people who go to.Europe write about
"I'm Rosie Lee, and this is my sister May. We the wagon, with a pleased face, every few steps. the palaces, and the grand people who live in
"live at Woodbine Cottage." Amy forgot her own discontent in her pity for the them; but I think I enjoyed seeing the children
Woodbine Cottage; why, that's a goodish distance
"poor child, and eagerly asked her aunt if she might of those far countries better than anything else;
off. The umbrella has led you a pretty chase, my ,
off. The umbrella has led you a pretty chase, my not bring him some of her own playthings. "Here is and I had rather have the love of a child than
dears, and I dare say you're tired and hungry too.
This cunning little china baby in my pocket, auntie; the love of a king.
Well, come to my cottage, and I'll give you each a
piece of broad and a cup of milk. But you must will you please let me drop it into his wagon ? I know I was in St. Petersburg last year. That is a
not stop to gather more posies, else some one at home it will please him." long name; but it is the name of a great city, the
will be getting anxious." Aunt Susan gave her consent, and both smiled capital of Russia, one of the largest and most
May and Rosie promised they would not stay a mo- when they saw the bright glow of pleasure that spread powerful countries in the world. In front of my
ment, much as they wanted some more flowers for over his ifce at this addition to his treasures, hotel in St. Petersburg was a large public garden,
mother; and after they had each had a cup of nice milk "See how little this poor child has to make life and in the afternoons I used to walk through
and a piece of bread they started off. The last thing pleasant. Yet I am sure he has spent a happier morn- it to watch the crowds of children at play.
Rosie saw was the old man smelling IIer great bunch ing than some children whose parents give them every In one part of this garden was a little shed,
of flowers, as lie placed them with trees all about it; and
in ajar of water in the win- '- I used to see many chil-
dow; and he looked so pleased dren go to the door of it
that she felt quite glad she adr buy go t e o o it
had given them n to hm. e
u ,.own lg sand buy glasses of some-
had given they rac homl l e thing to drink. One day
When they reached home o
dinner was over, and their I said to myself, "I will
dinner was over, and their go and see what it is that
"fatherjust setting out to look l c go and see what it is that
for them. these children get to drink
Now, my dears, you seeay at that old shed." So I
the result of your disobedi- walked up to the door;
ence," Mr. Lee said, when tol and what do you suppose
lie heard the whole story. wI saw ? Was it a soda
"You've spoiled the um- fountain? No. Was it
brella, lost your flowers, a great bowl of lemonade?
issed yor inner, been No. Was it a spruce-
frightened yourselves, and -beer fountain? Oh! no
caused us a great deal of indeed. It was some,
anxiety, all because you did thing much better than
not do as you were told." ) -any of these. There was
Z 'any of these. There was
May and Rosie promised
tnf again with Mo a cow in the shed, with a
humbly to be more obedient a cow in the shed, with a
in future, and above all never woman in charge of her;
to interfere again with Mo- and when the children
their's Umbrella. came for a drink the wo-
man would sell them a
A CURE FOR DISCON glass of milk, drawn fresh
TENT. ".-from the fountain in the
Amy was very fretful and ,: cow's bag.
discontented one morning. I drank a glass of it
"I do wish I had some .. myself, for which I paid
new play, or something to five kreutzers, or about
amuse me, Aunt Susan," she three cents; and I thought
said, discontentedly, as she "How nice it would be
tossed aside her box of toys, for the children in Phila-
quite heedless whether they delphia if there were cow-
were broken or not. ,t < fountains in Fairmount
"Nothing would amuse Park! and how nice it
you in your present frame of would be for the children
mind, dear. Happiness is j in other large cities if
within, not without us. they could get pure milk
Come, we will take a half- in the parks when they go
hour's walk before dinner; it ----- to play in them."
will do us both good." OUR JENNY.
XAmy got up from her little rocking-chair quite re- OUR JENNY.
luctantly, and went for her hat and coat. As they comfort. Let us remember him, Amy, when we
turned down a long street they passed many rows of again feel discontented. It often helps us a great deal Eyes a nut-brown hue,
factory houses, all under one roof, with a few feet of to compare ourselves with those to whom God has not How we all love you,
door-yard in front, covered, for the most part, with given the same blessings we enjoy. We learn to ap-
tangled grass and weeds. In front of one house Aunt preciate them better, and to thank the hand which Little Jenny!
Susan paused a minute and said to her companion: showers so many mercies upon us. It makes us more
There is a lesson for you, Amy. See hbw little considerate towards the poor and suffering, and teaches Ah! that childish face,
it takes really to make one happy." us to share our good things with them."
A poor crippled child, not over four years of age, Amy spent a very pleasant afternoon in thinking By its own sweet grace,
was hobbling along on two crutches. His face was about the poor lame boy, and planning some little V inneth it a place
pale, and his sunken eyes told of sickness and suf- gifts for his pleasure. Mother knew the family well
fering. But the poor little fellow was having a merry and approved her projects; so she had the pleasure Time cannot efface,
time with his one plaything. It was the box of a of carrying them out before she went to sleep that
little toy wagon, without any wheels. There was a night. In the hearts of many.






SUNSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.R

window, and often think of the bright little lassie that string attached, by which he tied it to one crutch. So A QUEER FOUNTAIN.
gave them, if she will tell me her name." he hopped along as fast as he could, looking back at Some people who go to.Europe write about
"I'm Rosie Lee, and this is my sister May. We the wagon, with a pleased face, every few steps. the palaces, and the grand people who live in
"live at Woodbine Cottage." Amy forgot her own discontent in her pity for the them; but I think I enjoyed seeing the children
Woodbine Cottage; why, that's a goodish distance
"poor child, and eagerly asked her aunt if she might of those far countries better than anything else;
off. The umbrella has led you a pretty chase, my ,
off. The umbrella has led you a pretty chase, my not bring him some of her own playthings. "Here is and I had rather have the love of a child than
dears, and I dare say you're tired and hungry too.
This cunning little china baby in my pocket, auntie; the love of a king.
Well, come to my cottage, and I'll give you each a
piece of broad and a cup of milk. But you must will you please let me drop it into his wagon ? I know I was in St. Petersburg last year. That is a
not stop to gather more posies, else some one at home it will please him." long name; but it is the name of a great city, the
will be getting anxious." Aunt Susan gave her consent, and both smiled capital of Russia, one of the largest and most
May and Rosie promised they would not stay a mo- when they saw the bright glow of pleasure that spread powerful countries in the world. In front of my
ment, much as they wanted some more flowers for over his ifce at this addition to his treasures, hotel in St. Petersburg was a large public garden,
mother; and after they had each had a cup of nice milk "See how little this poor child has to make life and in the afternoons I used to walk through
and a piece of bread they started off. The last thing pleasant. Yet I am sure he has spent a happier morn- it to watch the crowds of children at play.
Rosie saw was the old man smelling IIer great bunch ing than some children whose parents give them every In one part of this garden was a little shed,
of flowers, as lie placed them with trees all about it; and
in ajar of water in the win- '- I used to see many chil-
dow; and he looked so pleased dren go to the door of it
that she felt quite glad she adr buy go t e o o it
had given them n to hm. e
u ,.own lg sand buy glasses of some-
had given they rac homl l e thing to drink. One day
When they reached home o
dinner was over, and their I said to myself, "I will
dinner was over, and their go and see what it is that
"fatherjust setting out to look l c go and see what it is that
for them. these children get to drink
Now, my dears, you seeay at that old shed." So I
the result of your disobedi- walked up to the door;
ence," Mr. Lee said, when tol and what do you suppose
lie heard the whole story. wI saw ? Was it a soda
"You've spoiled the um- fountain? No. Was it
brella, lost your flowers, a great bowl of lemonade?
issed yor inner, been No. Was it a spruce-
frightened yourselves, and -beer fountain? Oh! no
caused us a great deal of indeed. It was some,
anxiety, all because you did thing much better than
not do as you were told." ) -any of these. There was
Z 'any of these. There was
May and Rosie promised
tnf again with Mo a cow in the shed, with a
humbly to be more obedient a cow in the shed, with a
in future, and above all never woman in charge of her;
to interfere again with Mo- and when the children
their's Umbrella. came for a drink the wo-
man would sell them a
A CURE FOR DISCON glass of milk, drawn fresh
TENT. ".-from the fountain in the
Amy was very fretful and ,: cow's bag.
discontented one morning. I drank a glass of it
"I do wish I had some .. myself, for which I paid
new play, or something to five kreutzers, or about
amuse me, Aunt Susan," she three cents; and I thought
said, discontentedly, as she "How nice it would be
tossed aside her box of toys, for the children in Phila-
quite heedless whether they delphia if there were cow-
were broken or not. ,t < fountains in Fairmount
"Nothing would amuse Park! and how nice it
you in your present frame of would be for the children
mind, dear. Happiness is j in other large cities if
within, not without us. they could get pure milk
Come, we will take a half- in the parks when they go
hour's walk before dinner; it ----- to play in them."
will do us both good." OUR JENNY.
XAmy got up from her little rocking-chair quite re- OUR JENNY.
luctantly, and went for her hat and coat. As they comfort. Let us remember him, Amy, when we
turned down a long street they passed many rows of again feel discontented. It often helps us a great deal Eyes a nut-brown hue,
factory houses, all under one roof, with a few feet of to compare ourselves with those to whom God has not How we all love you,
door-yard in front, covered, for the most part, with given the same blessings we enjoy. We learn to ap-
tangled grass and weeds. In front of one house Aunt preciate them better, and to thank the hand which Little Jenny!
Susan paused a minute and said to her companion: showers so many mercies upon us. It makes us more
There is a lesson for you, Amy. See hbw little considerate towards the poor and suffering, and teaches Ah! that childish face,
it takes really to make one happy." us to share our good things with them."
A poor crippled child, not over four years of age, Amy spent a very pleasant afternoon in thinking By its own sweet grace,
was hobbling along on two crutches. His face was about the poor lame boy, and planning some little V inneth it a place
pale, and his sunken eyes told of sickness and suf- gifts for his pleasure. Mother knew the family well
fering. But the poor little fellow was having a merry and approved her projects; so she had the pleasure Time cannot efface,
time with his one plaything. It was the box of a of carrying them out before she went to sleep that
little toy wagon, without any wheels. There was a night. In the hearts of many.





SUNSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

towards the flood-hatches, but a short distance below.
He'd better have let her drown," cried the gipsy
Sr, t- ^-lad, watching to see what the next act in the .little
-_. o=___ _--i~ _drama would be.
'. Jack could not swim, but he beat about him
I' bravely, the sunlit waters laughing all the while, as
S__ifor it were sport-only sport. Poor little black pussy!
poor, poor Jack They both went hurrying on
_together.
'" He'll be through the flood-hatches in a minute,"
1'- cried the stranger lad who watched with us.
'- -- f' IIa! he held her up at last, a dripping mite, and
.....-- would fain have tossed her on to the friendly bank ere
the current bore him on; but no, she only fell into
41 SMUT'S RESCUE. til, ri..i a a._sain-they went drifting on towards the seething waterfall

f thit il., r...ii. r MiNr:. .ir.- "N.. little missies, I'll not let him get drowned." Now the stranger
S i,_ still r,.tl ri ti... iy ,nI'V -. _... Ivn r d I ..% n along the bank, and dashed in to the rescue.
TI Th...- ,ll. .-I. t rlie r.:Jl..'i iitil.-,,iiii-. i. Lk, l..' id clutched the poor waif again, but, alas! the waters were
i ., o 'lli.ir i it- gi'.ry t" -tet.l : | t,.- t.. h tr him, too much for his boyish rescuer-no, not rescuer. They
-.ri 'l..'' i it: tr:.. iirl I[i..,lr.:.r- I.,th \Int drifting on, the kitten held up a moment, and now going under
l l. >tilr, it. a.'rlv least : ti.. tf: i.-tiru.t I-t a- T:.l.k \..it twirling on. Now another actor came upon the scene-a tall,
Sing rn,.r \.li.-re liii.tt r>:ii., .i ln d i i, r.u h n.. : and he dashed in below, near, dangerously near, the swirl
n .h:,: .l cf y4.ll.w splcndor-y-es, it all abol-e thu pitches.
"c.,Ines back to me: a fair, bright, laughing You two simpletons! why didn't you let her be ?" he roared, as we
pic -tirlle :.f the past. And this is how it all came came within earshot; and we could see that his face was a dark, evil one,
al... ..r. as he struck out towards the drowning lads with his giant strength.
..W 'W I..IT: down by the river, I, my brother Jack, Jick he grasped by the shoulder, the other by the hair of his head.
11i, It..lr- Alice, Annie, and little Bess. A gipsy's I know not how he did it, but he soon
.-.irt--. "\e called the vehicle of any rovers- landed with them, muttering dark, .i! f
""-t ....' iiir,. the shelter of the elms at a short distance words the while, and tossing them fr..in I
fi to the stream. It was nothing unusual; him, away among the dancing buttercup-
.. -.. h.-e itinerant folk often halted there in the -Jack's hand still holding the blach ''
S'" Ir.-t Ired spot, but a stone's throw from the direct kitten. The tall man stalked away .
SrA .'|' to Chistleton. We scarcely heeded the sullenly towards the gipsy cart,
gipsy's cart, or the lean horse tethered leaving us girls to do what we could
:_,-^^-:..---_ -hard by and feeding greedily, for for the two he had rescued. Of
-- little Bess's eyes had espied some dark course we wept for very childish
"object in the water, and we all went joy, mingled 'irl, fI'it. -tf. .kl .
'- -- hurrying on to the bridge to see what Jack, patting tl,. kI,%tt. .i :I I. v.;ii l..:I
it was. Here stood a swarthy-faced lad, of about Jack's age, gazing our stranger fr.. hil' ll 1,i. half '
moodily into the water, where that tiny something was tossed here and curiously. II ..- ...n ri'-e, :.t.- I.. / Ij
there, and carried on by the swift current. Down some way below with a merry IiI. R'K.
were the flood-hatches, where a flour-mill was in full swing; we could Ha! th.a I a wI-tini.., ;I -
hear the rush and roar of the water sweeping through them in their mad no mistake," i:id Ile. tirilir.l t,., -
haste, as we stood on the bridge. Jack, who still I:iy 'l...li till.
Oh it's a dear little black kitten," cried Bess, as we all peered down; ground. "Y., ..1 'i t t
and so it was: a panting, struggling mite, fighting, as only young bath like that e,\'-r il.i', j.
things will fight, for life. Nay, her poor, little, pleading eyes were do you? Gol tr I.l.,.r -
upturned to us, and her small red mouth opened with piteous cries of so the wat.r-crii' t..ik
entreaty. say; but you itillI 't
"Ay, little Nan's kitten, missie," said the swarthy-faced lad, a gloomy take it too ii.ic.k,
scowl on his brow. yousee. Ho, .,., :,.:i i.
"Is this some of your dirty work ?" asked Jack. feel all over:; l. v-I I
"No, it isn't; and if it were it would be no business of yours. Let her think you c. iil1 -
drown," was the return. The lad still scowled, but I saw his lips quiver, manage to walk a :
I'll not let her drown," cried impulsive Jack; and away he scudded bit, youn. -:
along the river's bank. sir? 1Tow,
"'Tis all along of uncle; she ate his sausage, and he tossed her in there," do try, try ,'
the strange lad informed us. And I'm glad she ate it, I be." He laughed hard. Lean
-a wild, reckless laugh-at which I wondered, onme. You IIM .
But now Jack was trying to rescue her, grasping a branch of an over- feel too wet
hanging tree, and bending out and out over the river, reaching down to for comfort, .
her with a twig, if so be she would cling to it, or he could draw her in don't you? ,
towards the bank, and so clutch her up. The little thing was just cling- You'd rath- 9 '
ing to the friendly twig, and we were drawing a deep breath of satisfac- er be home
tion, when, to our childish horror, Jack's hold gave way, the treacherous and tucked
branch failed him, and down, down he went with a great splash into the away in a ,,:rii
water. We girls shrieked in our terror, and not without reason, with the bed, wouldn: '\..i
waters roaring and clamoring, as they rushed on in their swift course my lad?"






SUNSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

"Yes," returned Jack, rather languidly. That's well," quoth the lad, and went away truthfulness, answered, No, we haven't; we live
"Then ye'd better go home, and get ri...1l all down the moonlit walk. alone with grandmamma and Mary," although
out in dry clothes." I kept my visit a secret from everybody, and the lad nodded and winked at me, standing out
And you ? questioned my brother, looking went alone. I may have been wrong to go thus of sight of his uncle behind the cart. I felt half
at the lad's 1r.,.-. .1, dripping garments. alone, but truly my heart throbbed and thrilled afraid, and was glad to get away from them
Ha, ha I shall get dry as I got wet-I'm with I know not what of right feeling and pity. both.
used to it, young sir. But will ye keep the kit- Sitting in the cart on the floor by the side of And that night I heard a sound of confusion
ten? the sick girl's rag of a bed, she told me and cackling at the back of the house, where
"Yes, we shall keep her," I answered, in my of her pain, her weakness, her weariness, her the fowls roosted, and upon which my win-
eagerness. age-just -nine; and Jem's-that was her dow looked. Curious girl that Iwas, I opened the
Then Nan'll be glad." He turned away. brother-was just Jack's, ten years. She kissed old diamond-paned casement and peered out.
I thought I saw tears in his eyes, but I was not my hand for promising to be good to her kitten, There in the moonlight was Nan's brother-I
sure. We called after him to stop, but he never and shed a torrent of tears at the thought of was sure it was he, and no other-hurrying
even looked back. never seeing her again. stealthily along under the shadow of the wall;
Then we all went homeward, feeling very "No; uncle'll kill her," she sobbed, when I then followed whispering voices, a scudding
like children stepped out of a story-book. offered to bring her back; "he said he would. away, sobs and cries, as for mercy, in the dis-,
Our home lay half a mile away tance; after that all was quiet;
"on the banks of this same stream save for the river singing its
-the old Moat House, where only song in the night under the watch-
a grandmother and one old ser- ful stars. On the morrow my
vant lived with us. Well, arrived I beautiful black pet hen was miss-
"there, grandmamma and Mary ea ing, and the gipsy cart nowhere
"took Jack away to bed, while we to be seen. Then this Jem,
attended to our newly-found treas- Nan's brother, who had tried to
"ure by the kitchen fire, where, i I ii save my brother, and whose sis-
"wrapped in flannel and laid to t i Ier I had visited, was a thief-
rest in a hamper, she soon fell could steal from those who had
into a sound sleep. Jack's nurses I been friendly with him! I was
"also left him in a peaceful slum- bitterly disappointed in him-in
ber. The house w\as strangely Nan, if she knew. Still we kept
quiet all that long, long afternoon, Y / little Smut as a sort of reminder
till after sundown, when Jack I of the ignorant children who had
was allowed to sit by the dining- I'' crossed our path on that bleak
room fire, wrapped in a blanket; w e IMarch day; and so the summer
and we brought in Smut-as we bloomed itselfaway,winterpassed,
had already named her-to keep I and spring smiled again.
him company, still snug an(l I Anon, when summer was at
warm in her hamper bed. I ha d _v 11 its prime, the gipsy cart was in
just given her a saucer of milk, its old place again, and Jem, the
and was laughing with the rest I thief, stole to our door early one
at her queer little invalid way forenoon with the request:
of sitting up in her bed and look- I May I see the young lady ? "
ing around her, when Sarah, a I I heard him, and stepped out. I
handmaid of Mary's, came with knew his voice.
the message that a r,_:y..1 boy 1" Miss Mabel, Nan's dead, and
was in the porch, asking to see we're burying her this morning;
one of the young ladies. -- and she bade me say, if I ever
That's me," I said, with the see you again, that she thought,
importance of my eight years, and thought, and talked to Jesus,
and tripped away, knowing I -- till Ile took her to live with Him,
should see our stranger friend of -- _--cause she was so lonely."
the morning. ---- --- -_ The lad wiped his tears away
"How's the young master ? with his smutty hand as he told
he asked, standing in the moonlit porch. And now I'll have no one to love me but Jem- me this in a boy's shamefaced way.
"Better, thank you; how are you ? said I. no, no one." It wrung my heart to hear her "Nan (lead, and going to be buried ? Tears
Ha! ha! that's good; I'm all right. Are sob so. rushed to my own eyes.
ye going to keep the kitten ? "You have Jesus to love you," said I and in "Yes. Will ye see the last of her ? Come
Oh, yes, we shall keep her," I answered, my girlish pity I told her of that good Friend and see us put her in her grave," craved Jem,
feeling half shy, half amused at the gipsy boy. of children, grown-up people, and all. and he looked at me so pleadingly.
"Little Nan bade me ask. Little Nan's my She lay silent a little time after I stopped "Yes, I will come," I told him, and ran and
cripple sister, and lies days and days in the cart, speaking; the sweet afternoon sunshine stole put on my hat and cloak. I told my sisters, and
and frets and fumes, and has nobody to love her into the cart and played over her wan face. I they accompanied me. We all crowded round
now 'cept me." hoped she understood what I had told her, but'I the grave, and wept our childish tears over poor
And this was her kitten ? I questioned, did not know. I left her with tears in my eyes, Nan, whom Jesus had taken home from the old
my heart yearning over this unknown Nan. amid a golden halo of sunset light, and hard by cart, "because she was so lonely."
"Yes; but you keep her, she told me to say. the cart I met her dark, surly uncle. The sun shone then, but in the afternoon came
And will ye come to-moirow, and let her see "You are the little lady as lives along with two a down-pouring of rain-drenching rain, which
her kitten's new mistress ? ol( women yonder, aren't ye? he asked in plashed against the window, and made the sullen
Go to the gipsy cart to see this unknown Nan i his harsh tone, halting in front of me. mill-river murmur and roar. Somehow, I choose
The story-book feeling thrilled over me, and I "No; they have men folk there too," spoke to be alone, and stole away from the general
promised to go. Jem's voice from behind the cart; but I, in my chatter going on in the dining-room, to sit in





SUNSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.
A FUNNY FACT. -. three steps when Rover spied the
TADDY Pole and Polly Wogg I i -/ bread, and thinking it was for him'
Lived together in a bog B'7 began jumping after it. Georgie
Down within a reedy pool, thought he would have to run back
Where they went to swimming-school. -
to tile house, but seeing a stick on
By and by (it is true, but strange) I the ground, he picked it up and
O'er them came a wondrous change: i shook it at Rover. Rover was
One day, while sitting on a log, afraid of the stick, and ran meek-
Each became a speckled frog. ly away.
":I Nothing else happened to trouble
A QUEER MUSICIAN. Georgie until he had gone halfway
ON QUEER MUSICIANt... umC up the walk. Then he met another
ONE fine day last summer I difficulty.
was taking my dolls, Bessy al diffly.
was taking my dolls, Bessy and Two big turkey-gobblers, looking
Jessy, out for a ride in their /. very red about the head and with
carriage, when we met a queer feathers all ruffled up, rushed to-
man. M.arian, the maid, was ward him for the bread, crying,
near by with Baby in her arms, ,' -G'obble, gobble!" in a frightful
and my sister Julia was at myi ma .
side. She too had with her a Georgie hesitated. Dare he go
side. Se to hd with hr a i i" past them? "Gobble, gobble!"
doll. The name of Julia's doll creed tu D n
is-screeched the turkeys. Down went
is Belvidera. the bread on the ground, and back
But how shall I tell you of to the house as fast as his legs would
the queer man? On his head --- carry him ran Georgie.
he had a bright brass cal, ---- -- His mother saw two big tears in
shaped like a cone, and which where he came from, and lie said, 'Fromi the little fellow's eyes, and felt sorry
went up in a peak. On the Tyrol." for him. She cut another piece of
top of it was a tin half-moon, Mr. Merrill has made a good likeness of the bread, turned his apron up over it
and around the rim of the cap, queer man just as we saw him. It was in so the turkeys could not see it, and
and just above it, were bells Roxbury, a part of Boston, that we saw him. told him to run bravely past them.
which jingled when he shook I asked him if lie made much money. He He hoped they were still eating the
his head. said, "Not much." If you see him, I hope other piece ald would not notice
him, but they had swallowed every
Oh what a queer man he \\as! you will give him five cents it you can spare crumb d ran toward for
crumb and ruin toward him for
I have not told you half about them. It is worth all that to see the queer m,,re.
him yet. In his hands before man and hear him play his one tune. Ie screwed up his courage and
him he had a great bagpipe, tried to run by them. Alas! he
with three or four smaller pipes GEORGIE'S FAWN. stumbled and fell. Away rolled
fixed to it. Strapped to his GEORGIE stood at the kitchen-door with a piece of the bread, and before he could get
back was a drum, and the bread in his hand to feed his pet fawn. There was it again the gobblers had it and were
drumstick was so fixed that the fawn chained to a post in the grass-plat. Between quarrelling noisily over it, each try-
he could beat the drum by them was a long gravel-walk. How was Georgie to ing to pull it away from the other
Sh e .t the bread to the fawn? one.
working his elbow.
A l was onto, of te Easily enough, one would think: by This second loss was more than
A ymal ws on carrying it straight to the fawn. little Georgie could bear. He went
drum. The queer man played But Georgie didn't find this such crying into the house. Then his
on t by means of a trap tied an easy thing to do. He met sister Jennie said she would go with
to his right ankle. On the ,i, ,1im.-ni,.-. him and keep off the turkeys. She
drum, too, was a triangle. How i' tir. lir-t pi;..-. t \\, i. took some bread in one hand and
do you suppose he played on F. J. l.'I. II- -l 'ivii, held Georgie's hand with the other,
that? Why, by a strap tied -" "'1. .- and this time the turkeys were pass-
to his left ankle. l1, iint tk.i ed safely.
The queer man stopped as Georgie fed the pretty fawn, who
we drew near. He played a i Y took the bread from his hand and
tune, and a very pretty tune -. capered about with delight, for he
it was. Pipes, drum, bells, cym- -- likes to have Georgie I t him and
I pines for his company. Georgie
bal, and triangle were all sound- s pines for his company. Georgie
ed at once. I had a five-cent is going to ask his friend the gar-
edd a fe-ct dener to buy two chains and fasten
piece in my pocket. I gave it ;the two old gobblers away off in
to him, and he said, "Thank -: some other part of the yard. Then
you, little lady." I asked him he can visit the fawn often.
\ se i 5





SUNSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.
A FUNNY FACT. -. three steps when Rover spied the
TADDY Pole and Polly Wogg I i -/ bread, and thinking it was for him'
Lived together in a bog B'7 began jumping after it. Georgie
Down within a reedy pool, thought he would have to run back
Where they went to swimming-school. -
to tile house, but seeing a stick on
By and by (it is true, but strange) I the ground, he picked it up and
O'er them came a wondrous change: i shook it at Rover. Rover was
One day, while sitting on a log, afraid of the stick, and ran meek-
Each became a speckled frog. ly away.
":I Nothing else happened to trouble
A QUEER MUSICIAN. Georgie until he had gone halfway
ON QUEER MUSICIANt... umC up the walk. Then he met another
ONE fine day last summer I difficulty.
was taking my dolls, Bessy al diffly.
was taking my dolls, Bessy and Two big turkey-gobblers, looking
Jessy, out for a ride in their /. very red about the head and with
carriage, when we met a queer feathers all ruffled up, rushed to-
man. M.arian, the maid, was ward him for the bread, crying,
near by with Baby in her arms, ,' -G'obble, gobble!" in a frightful
and my sister Julia was at myi ma .
side. She too had with her a Georgie hesitated. Dare he go
side. Se to hd with hr a i i" past them? "Gobble, gobble!"
doll. The name of Julia's doll creed tu D n
is-screeched the turkeys. Down went
is Belvidera. the bread on the ground, and back
But how shall I tell you of to the house as fast as his legs would
the queer man? On his head --- carry him ran Georgie.
he had a bright brass cal, ---- -- His mother saw two big tears in
shaped like a cone, and which where he came from, and lie said, 'Fromi the little fellow's eyes, and felt sorry
went up in a peak. On the Tyrol." for him. She cut another piece of
top of it was a tin half-moon, Mr. Merrill has made a good likeness of the bread, turned his apron up over it
and around the rim of the cap, queer man just as we saw him. It was in so the turkeys could not see it, and
and just above it, were bells Roxbury, a part of Boston, that we saw him. told him to run bravely past them.
which jingled when he shook I asked him if lie made much money. He He hoped they were still eating the
his head. said, "Not much." If you see him, I hope other piece ald would not notice
him, but they had swallowed every
Oh what a queer man he \\as! you will give him five cents it you can spare crumb d ran toward for
crumb and ruin toward him for
I have not told you half about them. It is worth all that to see the queer m,,re.
him yet. In his hands before man and hear him play his one tune. Ie screwed up his courage and
him he had a great bagpipe, tried to run by them. Alas! he
with three or four smaller pipes GEORGIE'S FAWN. stumbled and fell. Away rolled
fixed to it. Strapped to his GEORGIE stood at the kitchen-door with a piece of the bread, and before he could get
back was a drum, and the bread in his hand to feed his pet fawn. There was it again the gobblers had it and were
drumstick was so fixed that the fawn chained to a post in the grass-plat. Between quarrelling noisily over it, each try-
he could beat the drum by them was a long gravel-walk. How was Georgie to ing to pull it away from the other
Sh e .t the bread to the fawn? one.
working his elbow.
A l was onto, of te Easily enough, one would think: by This second loss was more than
A ymal ws on carrying it straight to the fawn. little Georgie could bear. He went
drum. The queer man played But Georgie didn't find this such crying into the house. Then his
on t by means of a trap tied an easy thing to do. He met sister Jennie said she would go with
to his right ankle. On the ,i, ,1im.-ni,.-. him and keep off the turkeys. She
drum, too, was a triangle. How i' tir. lir-t pi;..-. t \\, i. took some bread in one hand and
do you suppose he played on F. J. l.'I. II- -l 'ivii, held Georgie's hand with the other,
that? Why, by a strap tied -" "'1. .- and this time the turkeys were pass-
to his left ankle. l1, iint tk.i ed safely.
The queer man stopped as Georgie fed the pretty fawn, who
we drew near. He played a i Y took the bread from his hand and
tune, and a very pretty tune -. capered about with delight, for he
it was. Pipes, drum, bells, cym- -- likes to have Georgie I t him and
I pines for his company. Georgie
bal, and triangle were all sound- s pines for his company. Georgie
ed at once. I had a five-cent is going to ask his friend the gar-
edd a fe-ct dener to buy two chains and fasten
piece in my pocket. I gave it ;the two old gobblers away off in
to him, and he said, "Thank -: some other part of the yard. Then
you, little lady." I asked him he can visit the fawn often.
\ se i 5





SUNSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.
A FUNNY FACT. -. three steps when Rover spied the
TADDY Pole and Polly Wogg I i -/ bread, and thinking it was for him'
Lived together in a bog B'7 began jumping after it. Georgie
Down within a reedy pool, thought he would have to run back
Where they went to swimming-school. -
to tile house, but seeing a stick on
By and by (it is true, but strange) I the ground, he picked it up and
O'er them came a wondrous change: i shook it at Rover. Rover was
One day, while sitting on a log, afraid of the stick, and ran meek-
Each became a speckled frog. ly away.
":I Nothing else happened to trouble
A QUEER MUSICIAN. Georgie until he had gone halfway
ON QUEER MUSICIANt... umC up the walk. Then he met another
ONE fine day last summer I difficulty.
was taking my dolls, Bessy al diffly.
was taking my dolls, Bessy and Two big turkey-gobblers, looking
Jessy, out for a ride in their /. very red about the head and with
carriage, when we met a queer feathers all ruffled up, rushed to-
man. M.arian, the maid, was ward him for the bread, crying,
near by with Baby in her arms, ,' -G'obble, gobble!" in a frightful
and my sister Julia was at myi ma .
side. She too had with her a Georgie hesitated. Dare he go
side. Se to hd with hr a i i" past them? "Gobble, gobble!"
doll. The name of Julia's doll creed tu D n
is-screeched the turkeys. Down went
is Belvidera. the bread on the ground, and back
But how shall I tell you of to the house as fast as his legs would
the queer man? On his head --- carry him ran Georgie.
he had a bright brass cal, ---- -- His mother saw two big tears in
shaped like a cone, and which where he came from, and lie said, 'Fromi the little fellow's eyes, and felt sorry
went up in a peak. On the Tyrol." for him. She cut another piece of
top of it was a tin half-moon, Mr. Merrill has made a good likeness of the bread, turned his apron up over it
and around the rim of the cap, queer man just as we saw him. It was in so the turkeys could not see it, and
and just above it, were bells Roxbury, a part of Boston, that we saw him. told him to run bravely past them.
which jingled when he shook I asked him if lie made much money. He He hoped they were still eating the
his head. said, "Not much." If you see him, I hope other piece ald would not notice
him, but they had swallowed every
Oh what a queer man he \\as! you will give him five cents it you can spare crumb d ran toward for
crumb and ruin toward him for
I have not told you half about them. It is worth all that to see the queer m,,re.
him yet. In his hands before man and hear him play his one tune. Ie screwed up his courage and
him he had a great bagpipe, tried to run by them. Alas! he
with three or four smaller pipes GEORGIE'S FAWN. stumbled and fell. Away rolled
fixed to it. Strapped to his GEORGIE stood at the kitchen-door with a piece of the bread, and before he could get
back was a drum, and the bread in his hand to feed his pet fawn. There was it again the gobblers had it and were
drumstick was so fixed that the fawn chained to a post in the grass-plat. Between quarrelling noisily over it, each try-
he could beat the drum by them was a long gravel-walk. How was Georgie to ing to pull it away from the other
Sh e .t the bread to the fawn? one.
working his elbow.
A l was onto, of te Easily enough, one would think: by This second loss was more than
A ymal ws on carrying it straight to the fawn. little Georgie could bear. He went
drum. The queer man played But Georgie didn't find this such crying into the house. Then his
on t by means of a trap tied an easy thing to do. He met sister Jennie said she would go with
to his right ankle. On the ,i, ,1im.-ni,.-. him and keep off the turkeys. She
drum, too, was a triangle. How i' tir. lir-t pi;..-. t \\, i. took some bread in one hand and
do you suppose he played on F. J. l.'I. II- -l 'ivii, held Georgie's hand with the other,
that? Why, by a strap tied -" "'1. .- and this time the turkeys were pass-
to his left ankle. l1, iint tk.i ed safely.
The queer man stopped as Georgie fed the pretty fawn, who
we drew near. He played a i Y took the bread from his hand and
tune, and a very pretty tune -. capered about with delight, for he
it was. Pipes, drum, bells, cym- -- likes to have Georgie I t him and
I pines for his company. Georgie
bal, and triangle were all sound- s pines for his company. Georgie
ed at once. I had a five-cent is going to ask his friend the gar-
edd a fe-ct dener to buy two chains and fasten
piece in my pocket. I gave it ;the two old gobblers away off in
to him, and he said, "Thank -: some other part of the yard. Then
you, little lady." I asked him he can visit the fawn often.
\ se i 5






SUINSSHIINE FOR LITTLE CHIILDIREN.

THE RIVER. thing you should obey without asking why? Do as came in to see what was the matter, "take poor dolly
e we v you like to-night, and you will soon see why I told away; I can't bear to touch her. Those nasty mice."
While we view,
Amid the noon-tide walk, a limpid rill you to leave her with me." But the mice did not know any better, darling.
Gush through the tickling herbage, to the thirst Accordingly, Maggie took Flora up stairs, and as How about the little girl who would not believe that
Of summer yielding the delicious draught nurse was told not to interfere, she was allowed to her mother knew best?"
Of cool refreshment; o'er the mossy brink undress it and take it into her own little bed. "Please forgive me, mother; I'll try never to say
Shines not the surface clearer, and the waves Now you must know that Maggie lived in an old 'why' again, and to do just as you tell me. Please
With sweeter nusic murmur as they flow. country house, and that the mice used often to come give me a kiss."
And so the rivulet gladly runs
To meet the swiftly flowing river and scamper across the floor of the kitchen and nur- Supposing we put poor Flora on a nail where we
And together, with their forces joined, sery. So of course everyone was careful not to leave can see her; that might help you to remember."
They sweep towards the sea. [ anything upon the ground. So Maggie had her kiss, and Flora was hung on a
wil-only, her poor bitten face was turned

WHY. over her bad habit, until at last
WHY AND WHEREFORE. ----- .1l.ie left off calling her "Miss Where-
It was Valentine's Day, and little ,. -_ I.. and called her Bee-short for "be-
Carter was so excited she could hard: .,M -rill
"at the breakfast-table. \ iW hen Maggie's birthday came round in
Presently the bell rang, and she jun ..:,I e up T t he sunny month of June, she was startled
"That must be the postman, fatlh, I'. i I -. beingg a new doll hanging from the
"let me go and get the letters 'I ll, but she has Flora stored away in a
But before Mr. Carter could an- -__box even now, although she
"swer, the door opened, and the n prtt is a big girl of sixteen, for
"servant said, gravely, "A young she knows that it was
lady wants to see Miss Maggie." through her that she began
Maggie looked rather frightened." -- t : to learn real obedience; and
She was very young, and was not "for old love's sake she is still,
used to visitors. dears, the prettiest doll in the
"Where is she?" asked Mr. 1' world."
Carter.
"I've put her in the drawing- TRUE HAPPINESS.
room, sir."- --J What is happiness? Can you
"Now, Maggie, look sharp; don't / _tell me, children ?
keep your visitor waiting," said -"Well," says noisy Ben Borden,
Johnnie, with a merry twinkle in Ih, "- "I-- "was happy, I tell you, last holi-
"Why?" asked Maggie. day-a deal .happier than I am
"There you go again, little Miss WI.. r.. I:.r, now, when I have to go to school.
can't you do as you are told?" I went fishing and riding, and
"Run, Maggie," said her mother, Lk n,.11; it i- t swimming and sailing; and it was
polite to.keep people waiting." just splendid. Now it's all books
Maggie's mouth opened as if she and study from morning till night.
were going to say that tiresome I am getting almost tired of it
little word again, but a warning --- already. I would like holiday time
look from Johnnie stopped her, and w all the year round."
she walked slowly towards the I"I 'i h u-am most happy," says gentle
drawing-room, wondering why her Annie Ashton, "when I am helping
mother did not come. aiI' II i mamma. I like my school ever so
In another moment she gave a much. We have a nice teacher,
loud cry of surprise and delight, AJ-/ Iu and there are some very pleasant
and called out to Johnnie: -- -- girls there. We have real good
"Come quickly: do come and _-times together. But I think I am
look at her." happiest, the deepest-down kind of
"Why?" drawled out the mis- _,- happiness, you know, when I am
chievous boy, as he put his head helping mamma. It.seems to make
round the half-open door. ---her so glad."
"You are a naughty boy," said Annie comes nearer it than Ben.
Maggie, grandly. "I want you to / No doubt Ben had a grand, good
come quick, and you stop to say -- --r time, and found his sport very en-
'Why!' Do come and look at this .- ,-- joyable. But Annie's happiness
lovely doll." /- V-.. goes deeper, and lasts longer.
She was indeed a beauty, dressed --- Is there any better kind of hap-
in the latest style, with hat, jacket, t. piness than Annie's, even?
gloves, and muff complete, and "I feel very happy," says sweet
seated in a delightful perambula- Mary Minton, when I think I love
THE RIVER.
tor. I don't think Maggie said Jesus, and that He loves me."
" Why? ?" all that day; in fact, she said very little at Maggie went to sleep with Flora in her arms, but That is all she says; but you can see in her daily
all to any one but Flora. when she had turned over once or twice the poor doll conduct how happy she is. She goes singing about
Bedtime came, and, with Flora in her arms, Maggie was driven to the edge of the bed, and after hanging her work; she is lively in her play; she tries to help
went to say good-night. with her head out in a dreadful way, she fell plump her mother all she can; and if you watch her, you can
You had better leave your doll with me," said her on the floor. see that she has real deep happiness coming from
mother. It won't do to take such a nice one into When nurse came in, she found the little girl crying something within. Her heart is a fountain of life, full
the nursery." bitterly. Alas! poor Flora's neck had been cracked to overflowing with genuine affection.
Why ?" by the fall, and her pretty wax face had been nibbled But Mary has found out the secret of true happi-
"Oh, Maggie darling, when will you learn to leave by the hungry mice till she was so ugly that Maggie ness. She loves Christ, and knows that Christ loves'
off saying that? Can't you believe that mother could not bear to look at her. her. So she carries her happiness with her wherever
knows best, and that when she tells you to do any- "Mother dear," sobbed the child, when her mother she goes, and into whatever she does.






SUINSSHIINE FOR LITTLE CHIILDIREN.

THE RIVER. thing you should obey without asking why? Do as came in to see what was the matter, "take poor dolly
e we v you like to-night, and you will soon see why I told away; I can't bear to touch her. Those nasty mice."
While we view,
Amid the noon-tide walk, a limpid rill you to leave her with me." But the mice did not know any better, darling.
Gush through the tickling herbage, to the thirst Accordingly, Maggie took Flora up stairs, and as How about the little girl who would not believe that
Of summer yielding the delicious draught nurse was told not to interfere, she was allowed to her mother knew best?"
Of cool refreshment; o'er the mossy brink undress it and take it into her own little bed. "Please forgive me, mother; I'll try never to say
Shines not the surface clearer, and the waves Now you must know that Maggie lived in an old 'why' again, and to do just as you tell me. Please
With sweeter nusic murmur as they flow. country house, and that the mice used often to come give me a kiss."
And so the rivulet gladly runs
To meet the swiftly flowing river and scamper across the floor of the kitchen and nur- Supposing we put poor Flora on a nail where we
And together, with their forces joined, sery. So of course everyone was careful not to leave can see her; that might help you to remember."
They sweep towards the sea. [ anything upon the ground. So Maggie had her kiss, and Flora was hung on a
wil-only, her poor bitten face was turned

WHY. over her bad habit, until at last
WHY AND WHEREFORE. ----- .1l.ie left off calling her "Miss Where-
It was Valentine's Day, and little ,. -_ I.. and called her Bee-short for "be-
Carter was so excited she could hard: .,M -rill
"at the breakfast-table. \ iW hen Maggie's birthday came round in
Presently the bell rang, and she jun ..:,I e up T t he sunny month of June, she was startled
"That must be the postman, fatlh, I'. i I -. beingg a new doll hanging from the
"let me go and get the letters 'I ll, but she has Flora stored away in a
But before Mr. Carter could an- -__box even now, although she
"swer, the door opened, and the n prtt is a big girl of sixteen, for
"servant said, gravely, "A young she knows that it was
lady wants to see Miss Maggie." through her that she began
Maggie looked rather frightened." -- t : to learn real obedience; and
She was very young, and was not "for old love's sake she is still,
used to visitors. dears, the prettiest doll in the
"Where is she?" asked Mr. 1' world."
Carter.
"I've put her in the drawing- TRUE HAPPINESS.
room, sir."- --J What is happiness? Can you
"Now, Maggie, look sharp; don't / _tell me, children ?
keep your visitor waiting," said -"Well," says noisy Ben Borden,
Johnnie, with a merry twinkle in Ih, "- "I-- "was happy, I tell you, last holi-
"Why?" asked Maggie. day-a deal .happier than I am
"There you go again, little Miss WI.. r.. I:.r, now, when I have to go to school.
can't you do as you are told?" I went fishing and riding, and
"Run, Maggie," said her mother, Lk n,.11; it i- t swimming and sailing; and it was
polite to.keep people waiting." just splendid. Now it's all books
Maggie's mouth opened as if she and study from morning till night.
were going to say that tiresome I am getting almost tired of it
little word again, but a warning --- already. I would like holiday time
look from Johnnie stopped her, and w all the year round."
she walked slowly towards the I"I 'i h u-am most happy," says gentle
drawing-room, wondering why her Annie Ashton, "when I am helping
mother did not come. aiI' II i mamma. I like my school ever so
In another moment she gave a much. We have a nice teacher,
loud cry of surprise and delight, AJ-/ Iu and there are some very pleasant
and called out to Johnnie: -- -- girls there. We have real good
"Come quickly: do come and _-times together. But I think I am
look at her." happiest, the deepest-down kind of
"Why?" drawled out the mis- _,- happiness, you know, when I am
chievous boy, as he put his head helping mamma. It.seems to make
round the half-open door. ---her so glad."
"You are a naughty boy," said Annie comes nearer it than Ben.
Maggie, grandly. "I want you to / No doubt Ben had a grand, good
come quick, and you stop to say -- --r time, and found his sport very en-
'Why!' Do come and look at this .- ,-- joyable. But Annie's happiness
lovely doll." /- V-.. goes deeper, and lasts longer.
She was indeed a beauty, dressed --- Is there any better kind of hap-
in the latest style, with hat, jacket, t. piness than Annie's, even?
gloves, and muff complete, and "I feel very happy," says sweet
seated in a delightful perambula- Mary Minton, when I think I love
THE RIVER.
tor. I don't think Maggie said Jesus, and that He loves me."
" Why? ?" all that day; in fact, she said very little at Maggie went to sleep with Flora in her arms, but That is all she says; but you can see in her daily
all to any one but Flora. when she had turned over once or twice the poor doll conduct how happy she is. She goes singing about
Bedtime came, and, with Flora in her arms, Maggie was driven to the edge of the bed, and after hanging her work; she is lively in her play; she tries to help
went to say good-night. with her head out in a dreadful way, she fell plump her mother all she can; and if you watch her, you can
You had better leave your doll with me," said her on the floor. see that she has real deep happiness coming from
mother. It won't do to take such a nice one into When nurse came in, she found the little girl crying something within. Her heart is a fountain of life, full
the nursery." bitterly. Alas! poor Flora's neck had been cracked to overflowing with genuine affection.
Why ?" by the fall, and her pretty wax face had been nibbled But Mary has found out the secret of true happi-
"Oh, Maggie darling, when will you learn to leave by the hungry mice till she was so ugly that Maggie ness. She loves Christ, and knows that Christ loves'
off saying that? Can't you believe that mother could not bear to look at her. her. So she carries her happiness with her wherever
knows best, and that when she tells you to do any- "Mother dear," sobbed the child, when her mother she goes, and into whatever she does.






SUINSSHIINE FOR LITTLE CHIILDIREN.

THE RIVER. thing you should obey without asking why? Do as came in to see what was the matter, "take poor dolly
e we v you like to-night, and you will soon see why I told away; I can't bear to touch her. Those nasty mice."
While we view,
Amid the noon-tide walk, a limpid rill you to leave her with me." But the mice did not know any better, darling.
Gush through the tickling herbage, to the thirst Accordingly, Maggie took Flora up stairs, and as How about the little girl who would not believe that
Of summer yielding the delicious draught nurse was told not to interfere, she was allowed to her mother knew best?"
Of cool refreshment; o'er the mossy brink undress it and take it into her own little bed. "Please forgive me, mother; I'll try never to say
Shines not the surface clearer, and the waves Now you must know that Maggie lived in an old 'why' again, and to do just as you tell me. Please
With sweeter nusic murmur as they flow. country house, and that the mice used often to come give me a kiss."
And so the rivulet gladly runs
To meet the swiftly flowing river and scamper across the floor of the kitchen and nur- Supposing we put poor Flora on a nail where we
And together, with their forces joined, sery. So of course everyone was careful not to leave can see her; that might help you to remember."
They sweep towards the sea. [ anything upon the ground. So Maggie had her kiss, and Flora was hung on a
wil-only, her poor bitten face was turned

WHY. over her bad habit, until at last
WHY AND WHEREFORE. ----- .1l.ie left off calling her "Miss Where-
It was Valentine's Day, and little ,. -_ I.. and called her Bee-short for "be-
Carter was so excited she could hard: .,M -rill
"at the breakfast-table. \ iW hen Maggie's birthday came round in
Presently the bell rang, and she jun ..:,I e up T t he sunny month of June, she was startled
"That must be the postman, fatlh, I'. i I -. beingg a new doll hanging from the
"let me go and get the letters 'I ll, but she has Flora stored away in a
But before Mr. Carter could an- -__box even now, although she
"swer, the door opened, and the n prtt is a big girl of sixteen, for
"servant said, gravely, "A young she knows that it was
lady wants to see Miss Maggie." through her that she began
Maggie looked rather frightened." -- t : to learn real obedience; and
She was very young, and was not "for old love's sake she is still,
used to visitors. dears, the prettiest doll in the
"Where is she?" asked Mr. 1' world."
Carter.
"I've put her in the drawing- TRUE HAPPINESS.
room, sir."- --J What is happiness? Can you
"Now, Maggie, look sharp; don't / _tell me, children ?
keep your visitor waiting," said -"Well," says noisy Ben Borden,
Johnnie, with a merry twinkle in Ih, "- "I-- "was happy, I tell you, last holi-
"Why?" asked Maggie. day-a deal .happier than I am
"There you go again, little Miss WI.. r.. I:.r, now, when I have to go to school.
can't you do as you are told?" I went fishing and riding, and
"Run, Maggie," said her mother, Lk n,.11; it i- t swimming and sailing; and it was
polite to.keep people waiting." just splendid. Now it's all books
Maggie's mouth opened as if she and study from morning till night.
were going to say that tiresome I am getting almost tired of it
little word again, but a warning --- already. I would like holiday time
look from Johnnie stopped her, and w all the year round."
she walked slowly towards the I"I 'i h u-am most happy," says gentle
drawing-room, wondering why her Annie Ashton, "when I am helping
mother did not come. aiI' II i mamma. I like my school ever so
In another moment she gave a much. We have a nice teacher,
loud cry of surprise and delight, AJ-/ Iu and there are some very pleasant
and called out to Johnnie: -- -- girls there. We have real good
"Come quickly: do come and _-times together. But I think I am
look at her." happiest, the deepest-down kind of
"Why?" drawled out the mis- _,- happiness, you know, when I am
chievous boy, as he put his head helping mamma. It.seems to make
round the half-open door. ---her so glad."
"You are a naughty boy," said Annie comes nearer it than Ben.
Maggie, grandly. "I want you to / No doubt Ben had a grand, good
come quick, and you stop to say -- --r time, and found his sport very en-
'Why!' Do come and look at this .- ,-- joyable. But Annie's happiness
lovely doll." /- V-.. goes deeper, and lasts longer.
She was indeed a beauty, dressed --- Is there any better kind of hap-
in the latest style, with hat, jacket, t. piness than Annie's, even?
gloves, and muff complete, and "I feel very happy," says sweet
seated in a delightful perambula- Mary Minton, when I think I love
THE RIVER.
tor. I don't think Maggie said Jesus, and that He loves me."
" Why? ?" all that day; in fact, she said very little at Maggie went to sleep with Flora in her arms, but That is all she says; but you can see in her daily
all to any one but Flora. when she had turned over once or twice the poor doll conduct how happy she is. She goes singing about
Bedtime came, and, with Flora in her arms, Maggie was driven to the edge of the bed, and after hanging her work; she is lively in her play; she tries to help
went to say good-night. with her head out in a dreadful way, she fell plump her mother all she can; and if you watch her, you can
You had better leave your doll with me," said her on the floor. see that she has real deep happiness coming from
mother. It won't do to take such a nice one into When nurse came in, she found the little girl crying something within. Her heart is a fountain of life, full
the nursery." bitterly. Alas! poor Flora's neck had been cracked to overflowing with genuine affection.
Why ?" by the fall, and her pretty wax face had been nibbled But Mary has found out the secret of true happi-
"Oh, Maggie darling, when will you learn to leave by the hungry mice till she was so ugly that Maggie ness. She loves Christ, and knows that Christ loves'
off saying that? Can't you believe that mother could not bear to look at her. her. So she carries her happiness with her wherever
knows best, and that when she tells you to do any- "Mother dear," sobbed the child, when her mother she goes, and into whatever she does.






SU1NSTIINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

GETTING UP. hind the tool-house; that was a good place to prac- "H'm!" said Boy Blue, suddenly looking up; "1
"tise, because the clapboards were so smooth and of fink-Jotham, I fink I've got frough."
SEVEN o'clock" says Nurse at the door; a nice gray color, on which the blue paint showed "The land of liberty 1" said Jotham, looking down.
Kate lifts not her drowsy head. beautifully. You're blue, sure enough."
Eight o'clock says Nurse once more, I'll make five stripes, 'cause I'm 'most five years Then he picked up the little workman and carried
"old," thought Boy Blue. him into the house.
But Katie is still in bed. The first were crooked, and he had to make five When mamma had been out and looked at the tool-
"Nine o'clock I" says Nurse with a frown; more; they were too long, so he made some shorter house and Piggy White, and had come in and looked
Kate opens one sleepy eye. ones. Soon all the side of the tool-house as high as at Boy Blue, she said what she had said about five
Ten o'clock and Katie comes down, his short arm could reach was painted ii blue stripes, hundred times:
Sin te s. If I only had a ladder I" mused Boy Blue. Fink I don't know what I shall do with you!"
And the sun is high up in the sky. I'd better get one." But she did, for she told Nurse Norah to give him
Alas! alas! when the day is half done He trudged into the shed, still carrying the paint- a bath.
Katie's work is but just begun, bucket; it was not so full now as when Jotham left When he had been scrubbed and rubbed and dried,
it, and did not slop much. and stood very red and warm to have his head brushed,
___ There was, no ladder in the shed, so he went on into he sobbed:
the barn. Somebody didn't ought to looked after me better!"
"Ouf! ouf!" grunted Piggy White, hearing steps "Sure, wouldd take a paycock's eyes, and more, to
LITTLE BOY BLUE. and expecting dinner, look after such a stirabout! Now run, see the organ-
"I'm busy now, Piggy White," said Boy Blue, look- man with your sisters, and be good," said Norah.
NOT the identical one that slept under the hay- ing over the side of the pen: "I'm painting. Oh The organ-man carried a monkey, and the monkey
stack while the cows trampled carried a tambourine, with which
the corn; no, indeed, he was he played such pranks the little
quite too wide awake for that! Wares fell off the steps one after
Our little Boy Blue had another another in fits of laughter, and
name, but he was seldom called Boy Blue decided at once to buy
by it, and did not much like it that monkey if he could. So
when he was. For when he when the organ-man went away,
heard people say "John Allison Boy Blue followed. Only Tot saw
Ware!" he knew that he was in him go, for the others were run-
mischief, and justice was about ning back to the nursery to see
to be meted unto him. if the dolls were awake. And
Why was he called little Boy Tot could not make people un-
Blue? Because when he was a derstand what her little lisping
tiny baby his eyes were so very -tongue meant to say.
blue-" real ultramarine," Aunt It grew late and later; it was
Sue said; but Baby only wrinkled almost dark. Boy Blue did not
his nose at the long word, and come home. They began to won-
mamma smiled. I der; they began to be anxious;
However, the eyes kept their e ph they began to look for him. They
wonderful color as the baby grew called his name everywhere. They
tp, so the name was kept too. / shouted, "Little Boy Blue! Boy
Boy Blue had four sisters-- Blu-u-u-e! Blu-u-u-ue!"
three older, one younger, than He did not come. They thought,
"himself. He used sometimes to What if he should never come
wish for a brother, but mostly he back ?
was too busy to worry over trifles. Mamma cried.
He had so much to do the days '" Somebody has stolen him,"
were not long enough. said Norah.
He had to work in his garden: He is drowned."
it was about as large as a pocket- He is run over."
handkerchief, but it required a "He is-"
great deal of care. He had to "Here he is!"
feed the kitty, help shell the peas '.. So he was! They had looked
for dinner, ride on the saw-horse, everywhere and inquired of every-
and be an ice-man, a strawberry- body, and given up in despair.
seller, a coal-heaver, and a fish- Papa and Jotham had gone to
monger, all with only the aid of get help in searching for him.
his wheelbarrow. Mamma was in distress. And
Above all, he had to help there little Boy Blue came walk-
Jotham. ing into the house himself!
What Jotham would have done Where have you been ?" cried
without his help I cannot tell. the sisters.
With it he kept the garden in He -had followed the monkey
order, mended the broken tools, until he was tired, had come
made sleds, swings, skipping- back unseen and climbed into
ropes, carts, and baby-houses for the hammock in the orchard,
the five little Wares. and had been asleep there ever
If Jotham could not have got since.
along without Boy Blue, I am And we just crazed about ye,
sure the little Wares would have ye bad boy !" said Norah, while
sadly missed Jotham. mamma hugged him.
One day Jotham was making "You needn't fink I'd get
a sled for Elsie. It was June, lost," said Boy Blue proudly.
and people do not usually wish "I don't do such fings. I want
to slide on the daisies and clover, my supper."
but Jotham liked tq get things He had it. But at our house
finished early. I suppose he we still keep asking this ques-
knew, too, that when Elsie's sled tion:
was done he would have to make
one apiece for Lill, for Dora, for What shall we do
Boy Blue, and for little Tot; so, With little Boy Blue ?"
perhaps he thought from June to
December was not too long a time
for so much work. THE DOG IN THE MANGER.
The sled was ready to be paint-
ed, and blue paint in a nice little bucket with a small my, Piggy White! you'd look just beautiful if you THE DOG IN THE MANGER.
brush in it was waiting for the sled. Boy Blue stood only had some blue stripes!"
by helping. Piggy White was a young pig, quite clean and A DOG made his bed in a manger,
Just then somebody called Jotham into the house. pretty; the little Wares made a pet of him. He
"I might paint a little until he comes back," had a fresh straw bed every night, and Jotham took and lay snarling and growling to
thought Boy Blue. "Don't fink I'd better, maybe. a deal of care to keep his house tidy. He was so
Elsie said blue stripes; 'haps I shouldn't get them accustomed to visits from the children he only gently keep the oxen from their provender.
even. H'm I" grunted in reply to Boy Blue's remark.
The blue eyes twinkled and the funny little mouth The next thing seen of that small lad he had See," said an old ox, "what a mis-
was puckered in a round, rosy button as their owner climbed over, and was as busy over Piggy White as
considered the matter. he had been on the tool-house. Piggy liked to have erable cur, who neither can eat corn
"I might practise first," said Boy Blue. his back rubbed, and was very quiet while Boy Blue
So he tugged the paint-bucket down from the painted a long stripe down his spine and shorter ones himlSelf nor will allow those to eat it
bench; he slopped a little over, too. It did not fall across his sides.
on his trousers; they were short and fastened at the "Piggy White, if you wig your tail so I fink I'll who c
kite with three buttons; the blue splashes were on scold. I want to paint the end of it." who can!"
the white stockings below the trousers, and Boy Blue By this time there was not much paint in the bucket,
saw them. but there was a great deal on Boy Blue's hands, on his Unbidden guests are seldom wel-
"But they will wash," said he to himself. stockings; on the short trousers, and on the front of
Then Boy Blue and the paint-bucket walked off be- his little blouse. come when they come.






SU1NSTIINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

GETTING UP. hind the tool-house; that was a good place to prac- "H'm!" said Boy Blue, suddenly looking up; "1
"tise, because the clapboards were so smooth and of fink-Jotham, I fink I've got frough."
SEVEN o'clock" says Nurse at the door; a nice gray color, on which the blue paint showed "The land of liberty 1" said Jotham, looking down.
Kate lifts not her drowsy head. beautifully. You're blue, sure enough."
Eight o'clock says Nurse once more, I'll make five stripes, 'cause I'm 'most five years Then he picked up the little workman and carried
"old," thought Boy Blue. him into the house.
But Katie is still in bed. The first were crooked, and he had to make five When mamma had been out and looked at the tool-
"Nine o'clock I" says Nurse with a frown; more; they were too long, so he made some shorter house and Piggy White, and had come in and looked
Kate opens one sleepy eye. ones. Soon all the side of the tool-house as high as at Boy Blue, she said what she had said about five
Ten o'clock and Katie comes down, his short arm could reach was painted ii blue stripes, hundred times:
Sin te s. If I only had a ladder I" mused Boy Blue. Fink I don't know what I shall do with you!"
And the sun is high up in the sky. I'd better get one." But she did, for she told Nurse Norah to give him
Alas! alas! when the day is half done He trudged into the shed, still carrying the paint- a bath.
Katie's work is but just begun, bucket; it was not so full now as when Jotham left When he had been scrubbed and rubbed and dried,
it, and did not slop much. and stood very red and warm to have his head brushed,
___ There was, no ladder in the shed, so he went on into he sobbed:
the barn. Somebody didn't ought to looked after me better!"
"Ouf! ouf!" grunted Piggy White, hearing steps "Sure, wouldd take a paycock's eyes, and more, to
LITTLE BOY BLUE. and expecting dinner, look after such a stirabout! Now run, see the organ-
"I'm busy now, Piggy White," said Boy Blue, look- man with your sisters, and be good," said Norah.
NOT the identical one that slept under the hay- ing over the side of the pen: "I'm painting. Oh The organ-man carried a monkey, and the monkey
stack while the cows trampled carried a tambourine, with which
the corn; no, indeed, he was he played such pranks the little
quite too wide awake for that! Wares fell off the steps one after
Our little Boy Blue had another another in fits of laughter, and
name, but he was seldom called Boy Blue decided at once to buy
by it, and did not much like it that monkey if he could. So
when he was. For when he when the organ-man went away,
heard people say "John Allison Boy Blue followed. Only Tot saw
Ware!" he knew that he was in him go, for the others were run-
mischief, and justice was about ning back to the nursery to see
to be meted unto him. if the dolls were awake. And
Why was he called little Boy Tot could not make people un-
Blue? Because when he was a derstand what her little lisping
tiny baby his eyes were so very -tongue meant to say.
blue-" real ultramarine," Aunt It grew late and later; it was
Sue said; but Baby only wrinkled almost dark. Boy Blue did not
his nose at the long word, and come home. They began to won-
mamma smiled. I der; they began to be anxious;
However, the eyes kept their e ph they began to look for him. They
wonderful color as the baby grew called his name everywhere. They
tp, so the name was kept too. / shouted, "Little Boy Blue! Boy
Boy Blue had four sisters-- Blu-u-u-e! Blu-u-u-ue!"
three older, one younger, than He did not come. They thought,
"himself. He used sometimes to What if he should never come
wish for a brother, but mostly he back ?
was too busy to worry over trifles. Mamma cried.
He had so much to do the days '" Somebody has stolen him,"
were not long enough. said Norah.
He had to work in his garden: He is drowned."
it was about as large as a pocket- He is run over."
handkerchief, but it required a "He is-"
great deal of care. He had to "Here he is!"
feed the kitty, help shell the peas '.. So he was! They had looked
for dinner, ride on the saw-horse, everywhere and inquired of every-
and be an ice-man, a strawberry- body, and given up in despair.
seller, a coal-heaver, and a fish- Papa and Jotham had gone to
monger, all with only the aid of get help in searching for him.
his wheelbarrow. Mamma was in distress. And
Above all, he had to help there little Boy Blue came walk-
Jotham. ing into the house himself!
What Jotham would have done Where have you been ?" cried
without his help I cannot tell. the sisters.
With it he kept the garden in He -had followed the monkey
order, mended the broken tools, until he was tired, had come
made sleds, swings, skipping- back unseen and climbed into
ropes, carts, and baby-houses for the hammock in the orchard,
the five little Wares. and had been asleep there ever
If Jotham could not have got since.
along without Boy Blue, I am And we just crazed about ye,
sure the little Wares would have ye bad boy !" said Norah, while
sadly missed Jotham. mamma hugged him.
One day Jotham was making "You needn't fink I'd get
a sled for Elsie. It was June, lost," said Boy Blue proudly.
and people do not usually wish "I don't do such fings. I want
to slide on the daisies and clover, my supper."
but Jotham liked tq get things He had it. But at our house
finished early. I suppose he we still keep asking this ques-
knew, too, that when Elsie's sled tion:
was done he would have to make
one apiece for Lill, for Dora, for What shall we do
Boy Blue, and for little Tot; so, With little Boy Blue ?"
perhaps he thought from June to
December was not too long a time
for so much work. THE DOG IN THE MANGER.
The sled was ready to be paint-
ed, and blue paint in a nice little bucket with a small my, Piggy White! you'd look just beautiful if you THE DOG IN THE MANGER.
brush in it was waiting for the sled. Boy Blue stood only had some blue stripes!"
by helping. Piggy White was a young pig, quite clean and A DOG made his bed in a manger,
Just then somebody called Jotham into the house. pretty; the little Wares made a pet of him. He
"I might paint a little until he comes back," had a fresh straw bed every night, and Jotham took and lay snarling and growling to
thought Boy Blue. "Don't fink I'd better, maybe. a deal of care to keep his house tidy. He was so
Elsie said blue stripes; 'haps I shouldn't get them accustomed to visits from the children he only gently keep the oxen from their provender.
even. H'm I" grunted in reply to Boy Blue's remark.
The blue eyes twinkled and the funny little mouth The next thing seen of that small lad he had See," said an old ox, "what a mis-
was puckered in a round, rosy button as their owner climbed over, and was as busy over Piggy White as
considered the matter. he had been on the tool-house. Piggy liked to have erable cur, who neither can eat corn
"I might practise first," said Boy Blue. his back rubbed, and was very quiet while Boy Blue
So he tugged the paint-bucket down from the painted a long stripe down his spine and shorter ones himlSelf nor will allow those to eat it
bench; he slopped a little over, too. It did not fall across his sides.
on his trousers; they were short and fastened at the "Piggy White, if you wig your tail so I fink I'll who c
kite with three buttons; the blue splashes were on scold. I want to paint the end of it." who can!"
the white stockings below the trousers, and Boy Blue By this time there was not much paint in the bucket,
saw them. but there was a great deal on Boy Blue's hands, on his Unbidden guests are seldom wel-
"But they will wash," said he to himself. stockings; on the short trousers, and on the front of
Then Boy Blue and the paint-bucket walked off be- his little blouse. come when they come.






SU1NSTIINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

GETTING UP. hind the tool-house; that was a good place to prac- "H'm!" said Boy Blue, suddenly looking up; "1
"tise, because the clapboards were so smooth and of fink-Jotham, I fink I've got frough."
SEVEN o'clock" says Nurse at the door; a nice gray color, on which the blue paint showed "The land of liberty 1" said Jotham, looking down.
Kate lifts not her drowsy head. beautifully. You're blue, sure enough."
Eight o'clock says Nurse once more, I'll make five stripes, 'cause I'm 'most five years Then he picked up the little workman and carried
"old," thought Boy Blue. him into the house.
But Katie is still in bed. The first were crooked, and he had to make five When mamma had been out and looked at the tool-
"Nine o'clock I" says Nurse with a frown; more; they were too long, so he made some shorter house and Piggy White, and had come in and looked
Kate opens one sleepy eye. ones. Soon all the side of the tool-house as high as at Boy Blue, she said what she had said about five
Ten o'clock and Katie comes down, his short arm could reach was painted ii blue stripes, hundred times:
Sin te s. If I only had a ladder I" mused Boy Blue. Fink I don't know what I shall do with you!"
And the sun is high up in the sky. I'd better get one." But she did, for she told Nurse Norah to give him
Alas! alas! when the day is half done He trudged into the shed, still carrying the paint- a bath.
Katie's work is but just begun, bucket; it was not so full now as when Jotham left When he had been scrubbed and rubbed and dried,
it, and did not slop much. and stood very red and warm to have his head brushed,
___ There was, no ladder in the shed, so he went on into he sobbed:
the barn. Somebody didn't ought to looked after me better!"
"Ouf! ouf!" grunted Piggy White, hearing steps "Sure, wouldd take a paycock's eyes, and more, to
LITTLE BOY BLUE. and expecting dinner, look after such a stirabout! Now run, see the organ-
"I'm busy now, Piggy White," said Boy Blue, look- man with your sisters, and be good," said Norah.
NOT the identical one that slept under the hay- ing over the side of the pen: "I'm painting. Oh The organ-man carried a monkey, and the monkey
stack while the cows trampled carried a tambourine, with which
the corn; no, indeed, he was he played such pranks the little
quite too wide awake for that! Wares fell off the steps one after
Our little Boy Blue had another another in fits of laughter, and
name, but he was seldom called Boy Blue decided at once to buy
by it, and did not much like it that monkey if he could. So
when he was. For when he when the organ-man went away,
heard people say "John Allison Boy Blue followed. Only Tot saw
Ware!" he knew that he was in him go, for the others were run-
mischief, and justice was about ning back to the nursery to see
to be meted unto him. if the dolls were awake. And
Why was he called little Boy Tot could not make people un-
Blue? Because when he was a derstand what her little lisping
tiny baby his eyes were so very -tongue meant to say.
blue-" real ultramarine," Aunt It grew late and later; it was
Sue said; but Baby only wrinkled almost dark. Boy Blue did not
his nose at the long word, and come home. They began to won-
mamma smiled. I der; they began to be anxious;
However, the eyes kept their e ph they began to look for him. They
wonderful color as the baby grew called his name everywhere. They
tp, so the name was kept too. / shouted, "Little Boy Blue! Boy
Boy Blue had four sisters-- Blu-u-u-e! Blu-u-u-ue!"
three older, one younger, than He did not come. They thought,
"himself. He used sometimes to What if he should never come
wish for a brother, but mostly he back ?
was too busy to worry over trifles. Mamma cried.
He had so much to do the days '" Somebody has stolen him,"
were not long enough. said Norah.
He had to work in his garden: He is drowned."
it was about as large as a pocket- He is run over."
handkerchief, but it required a "He is-"
great deal of care. He had to "Here he is!"
feed the kitty, help shell the peas '.. So he was! They had looked
for dinner, ride on the saw-horse, everywhere and inquired of every-
and be an ice-man, a strawberry- body, and given up in despair.
seller, a coal-heaver, and a fish- Papa and Jotham had gone to
monger, all with only the aid of get help in searching for him.
his wheelbarrow. Mamma was in distress. And
Above all, he had to help there little Boy Blue came walk-
Jotham. ing into the house himself!
What Jotham would have done Where have you been ?" cried
without his help I cannot tell. the sisters.
With it he kept the garden in He -had followed the monkey
order, mended the broken tools, until he was tired, had come
made sleds, swings, skipping- back unseen and climbed into
ropes, carts, and baby-houses for the hammock in the orchard,
the five little Wares. and had been asleep there ever
If Jotham could not have got since.
along without Boy Blue, I am And we just crazed about ye,
sure the little Wares would have ye bad boy !" said Norah, while
sadly missed Jotham. mamma hugged him.
One day Jotham was making "You needn't fink I'd get
a sled for Elsie. It was June, lost," said Boy Blue proudly.
and people do not usually wish "I don't do such fings. I want
to slide on the daisies and clover, my supper."
but Jotham liked tq get things He had it. But at our house
finished early. I suppose he we still keep asking this ques-
knew, too, that when Elsie's sled tion:
was done he would have to make
one apiece for Lill, for Dora, for What shall we do
Boy Blue, and for little Tot; so, With little Boy Blue ?"
perhaps he thought from June to
December was not too long a time
for so much work. THE DOG IN THE MANGER.
The sled was ready to be paint-
ed, and blue paint in a nice little bucket with a small my, Piggy White! you'd look just beautiful if you THE DOG IN THE MANGER.
brush in it was waiting for the sled. Boy Blue stood only had some blue stripes!"
by helping. Piggy White was a young pig, quite clean and A DOG made his bed in a manger,
Just then somebody called Jotham into the house. pretty; the little Wares made a pet of him. He
"I might paint a little until he comes back," had a fresh straw bed every night, and Jotham took and lay snarling and growling to
thought Boy Blue. "Don't fink I'd better, maybe. a deal of care to keep his house tidy. He was so
Elsie said blue stripes; 'haps I shouldn't get them accustomed to visits from the children he only gently keep the oxen from their provender.
even. H'm I" grunted in reply to Boy Blue's remark.
The blue eyes twinkled and the funny little mouth The next thing seen of that small lad he had See," said an old ox, "what a mis-
was puckered in a round, rosy button as their owner climbed over, and was as busy over Piggy White as
considered the matter. he had been on the tool-house. Piggy liked to have erable cur, who neither can eat corn
"I might practise first," said Boy Blue. his back rubbed, and was very quiet while Boy Blue
So he tugged the paint-bucket down from the painted a long stripe down his spine and shorter ones himlSelf nor will allow those to eat it
bench; he slopped a little over, too. It did not fall across his sides.
on his trousers; they were short and fastened at the "Piggy White, if you wig your tail so I fink I'll who c
kite with three buttons; the blue splashes were on scold. I want to paint the end of it." who can!"
the white stockings below the trousers, and Boy Blue By this time there was not much paint in the bucket,
saw them. but there was a great deal on Boy Blue's hands, on his Unbidden guests are seldom wel-
"But they will wash," said he to himself. stockings; on the short trousers, and on the front of
Then Boy Blue and the paint-bucket walked off be- his little blouse. come when they come.





SUNSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

WINTER RHYMES.
THE SNOW-FAIRIES.
THE moon was dim when we went to bed,
:: / ;'r And the stars were covered over,
I .4 .
f-" When the wee white fairies came overhead,
-,I.A2t8b A "V And, whirling down the wind, they sped
E -The trees and ground to cover.
4' v. I ',^ ^ ^rJ.
'\ \, -
Svu waki ?" shout the They danced all night o'er field and rill
Sbr zes To the pipe the breeze was blowing:
"v" To the tree-tops waving high; When the sun came peeping up the hill
"Don't you hear the happy tidings To see what made the world so still,
Whispered to the earth and sky? They whispered, Let's be going !"
Have you caught them in your dreaming,
Brook and rill in snowy dells? P 'J
Do you know the joy we bring you T

In tH e mewho brought thery Christmas be lls Frot cannot wither thee, cold cannot tighten,
Ding, dong ding, dong, Christmas bells Patiently tarrying till skies may bright


Azi_^re you waking, flowers that slumbeyecheererer
SIn the deep and frosty g round? !
Do you hear what we are breathing TO THE SNOW-DROP.
STo the listening wold ound? EnMBLEM of purity, gracefully lifting
For we bear the sweetest story Petals of beauty 'mid wintry snows drifting;
That the glad year ever tells; Brave little snow-drop, so fair and so hardy,
Honw Hle loved the little children- First flower to welcome the spring chill and tardy.
He vho brought the Christmas bells. Frost cannot wither thee, cold cannot frighten,
iDing, dong dincg, doug,, Christmas bells !" Patiently tarrying till skies may brighten;
Snow-piercer, cloud-gazer, wind-scorner, eve-cheerer,
~ t Bring to m:iy heart thy (lear message vet nearer.
AWhen age or sorrow is darkly impen-iding,


Then, springing out of them, checked by no blasting,
Let there bloom thoughts of the life everlasting,
Cominin like snow-drops amid our endurance,
Bringing to each weary heart the assurance
To joy's frozen waste spring draws nigher and
nigher,
j And death is the way to life higher and higher.















Of war and bloodshed, fame and glory, and look. me one, I guess."





































____ ____And save the dreadful fight?" drift here and let's see."
-----------. -_ -: --





































Of war and bloodshed, fame and glory, and look. me one, I guess."
Ic 1o; sothe wekll mk ou,
























And men were killed 'mid cannons' roar, A "Oh, you should see my mother's Christmas pies!
,,It s was not right;


















































Why did not council meet at first, cake was struck from Johnny's hand into a snow- "I guess I can pull some," said Jerry; "get on
And save the dreadful fight?" drift. here, and let's see."
Whn aryofhi gadsreaks "alo, rybbyI"shuedJer a h dsovre "h'srelgodanhw, si Jrr, eolshn















Of war and bloodshed, fame and glory, and look. me one, I guess."





































____ ____And save the dreadful fight?" drift here and let's see."
-----------. -_ -: --





































Of war and bloodshed, fame and glory, and look. me one, I guess."
Ic 1o; sothe wekll mk ou,
























And men were killed 'mid cannons' roar, A "Oh, you should see my mother's Christmas pies!
,,It s was not right;


















































Why did not council meet at first, cake was struck from Johnny's hand into a snow- "I guess I can pull some," said Jerry; "get on
And save the dreadful fight?" drift. here, and let's see."
Whn aryofhi gadsreaks "alo, rybbyI"shuedJer a h dsovre "h'srelgodanhw, si Jrr, eolshn






SUNSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

Johnny loaded himself upon the little new sled, wrong to do some especially pleasant thing for and made his comb swell up, and crowed
and giving command to his one-horse team, went him and with him. So you see, Johnny, there's again; and the barn-yard shuddered, for
spinning down the street directly to the deepest, more than one way to spoil things, and a great ty f d t v o t
highest drift of yesterday's snow. deal of badness-bad fun and mischief-may be they feared the voice o their master.
"Whoa! haw! gee! go long!" shouted the spoiled by taking a little pains to do somebody a He was great. But there came a sound
driver at every step. Steady, Reindeer! good or give somebody a pleasure." in the air, and the cock heard it, but he
But just at that moment Reindeer accomplished never turned his head. The fact is, his
an extraordinary feat of shying, and with one
mischievous jerk Sir Johnny lay sprawling on a head was turned already. Poor fellow,
fresh, unbroken patch of snow. LITTLE SUNSHINE. it was more than turned-it was twisted.
It is very remarkable-at least the reindeer
seemed to think so-that Johnny Lapland didn't WHO is Little Sunshine? The child who does
cry or scold or call names, or something. He not pout, or frown, or say cross words, but who BETTER WHISTLE THAN WHINE.
only jumped up, laughing at the curious print his goes about the house laughing, smiling, singing, As I was taking a walk early in Sep-
figure had made in the snow. saying kind words and doing kind deeds-that
Now, it's your turn," said Johnny; and Jerry, ld is Little Snshine. Does anybody knw tember I noticed two little boys on their
somewhat foiled by the good-humor of his com- chld s Lttle Sushine. Does anybody know
panion, nothing loth, took the seat of command. Little Sunshine? Where does Little Sunshine way to school. The smaller one tumbled
On they went, past the grocer's corner and the live? and fell; and though he was not very
minister's front door and up much hurt, he began to
toward where little Katy Mil- much hurt, he began to
ler was always looking out of -__-whine in a babyish way
the window. "Jolly, and not a regular roaring
that's so, I declare! said -
Jerry; but whoa we've got boy cry, as though he
there. Johnny was tired by were half killed, but a
this time; he couldn't pull up NI- I i e ut a
hill. He wiped the sweat from -- little cross whine.
his forehead, and the two boys The older boy took
examined the new sled with I i his hand in a kind a
exceeding satisfaction. his hand in a kind and
"There's old Betsey taking fatherly way, and said:
home Miss Penny's wash," Oh, never mind, Jim-
"said Jerry, as he bobbed round ; m-- Oh, doneer ine it i m
the nearest corner just to mydon't whine it is a
see who might be coming; great deal better to
"hasn't she got atug, though, greatdeal better to
with that basket! Let's give whistle."
one little soft snow-ball-on eAnd he bean in
her back, you know."
",Let's give that great merriest way a cheerful
basket a ride," said Johnny; boy whistle.
"-you pull some and I'll pull
some. Say, will you? Mother Jimmy tried to join in
says she's real good." the whistle.
It was soon settled with "Ican'twhistleasnice
poor Betsey that the heavy whistles nice
basket should be transferred as you, Charlie," said he,
to the new sled, and that the "--
double team should, "honor my lips won't puck
bright," be dreadful careful up good."
not to spill off a single piece p "Oh, that is because
or to let a drop spatter the ha t i
clean sweet things. Of course _- you have not got all
it was more a frolic than a the whine out yet," said
task, that half-mile journey; "t
but the washwoman, reliev- Charlie; "but you try a
ed of her burden, was already minute, and the whistle
at Miss Penny's gate when the minute, and the whistle
boys arrived. will drive the whine
"And I don't know what --away."
good mothers ye belong to," way.
said Betsey, in her gratitude So he did; and the
for the help, "but it's bles- m last I saw or heard of
sed boys ye are to save such the little fellows, they
an aching from a poor wom- the little fellows, they
an's back. My blessing goes were whistling away as
with ye and the pretty bright though that
sled, and the best of good fun rnestly as though that
in your play!" as the chief end of life.
"Thank you!" returned .
Johnny. "Thank you!" re-
peated Jerry; and then the boys both concluded THE ROOSTER. THE PRECIOUS LITTLE PLANT.
"that it must be dinnr-tie, and more too. THE day was sunny and the air full of Two little girls, Bridget and Walburga, went
"Well, Johnny," said his mother, when the to a neighboring town, each carrying on her head
dinner was over and Johnny had finished the story sweet sounds from the adjoining fields. a basket of fruit to sell far money enough to buy
of his adventures. "I am glad you and Jerry got The birds were singing their merriest the family dinner.
on so well. I thought you would, my son, if you songs. The streams were running gladly Bridget fretted all the way, but Walburga only
"onlyBut didn't his fun get a spoiling, though through the meadows, and the chickens, joked and laughed. At last Bridget got out of ail
"moBut didn't his fun get a spoiling, though, he out for a holiday, were enjoying the fun patience, and said, How can you go on laughing
mother? He meant to get me mad when he out for a holiday, were enjoying the fun so? Your basket is as heavy as mine, and you are
pitched me into the snow, but I spoiled that, I of racing along the hedge, not a bit stronger. I don't understand it."
guess. He meant to make me upset him so he On a piece of rising ground stood the "Oh," said Walburga, "it is easy enough to
could give me a rubbing in the snow; I thought proud idol of the farm yard. "Cock-a- understand. I have a little plant that I put on the
I'd spoil that to. And then we' both spoiled top of my load, and it makes it so light I hardly
Aunt Betsey's back-ache, and 'twas good fun, as doodle-doo!" he crowed. "The chickens feel it. Why don't you do so too? "
good as she blessed us for. Oh, I like Jerry well will grow up large fowls, if I make noise Indeed," said Bridget, it must be a very
enough, mother; he's real strong at a pull! in the poultry-yard of the world! And precious little plant I wish I could lighten my
My dear child," said the mother, you may hens and chickens clucked and chirped, load with it. Where does it grow? Tell me.
always remember that the best way to learn to like What do you call it ? I It grows," replied Wal-
anybody, and to have a good time with him, is to and the rooster told them, Cock of the burga, wherever you plant it and give it a chance
be as kind as you can always, and when he is walk am I!" and he flapped hi: wings, to take root. Its name is Patience."






SUNSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

Johnny loaded himself upon the little new sled, wrong to do some especially pleasant thing for and made his comb swell up, and crowed
and giving command to his one-horse team, went him and with him. So you see, Johnny, there's again; and the barn-yard shuddered, for
spinning down the street directly to the deepest, more than one way to spoil things, and a great ty f d t v o t
highest drift of yesterday's snow. deal of badness-bad fun and mischief-may be they feared the voice o their master.
"Whoa! haw! gee! go long!" shouted the spoiled by taking a little pains to do somebody a He was great. But there came a sound
driver at every step. Steady, Reindeer! good or give somebody a pleasure." in the air, and the cock heard it, but he
But just at that moment Reindeer accomplished never turned his head. The fact is, his
an extraordinary feat of shying, and with one
mischievous jerk Sir Johnny lay sprawling on a head was turned already. Poor fellow,
fresh, unbroken patch of snow. LITTLE SUNSHINE. it was more than turned-it was twisted.
It is very remarkable-at least the reindeer
seemed to think so-that Johnny Lapland didn't WHO is Little Sunshine? The child who does
cry or scold or call names, or something. He not pout, or frown, or say cross words, but who BETTER WHISTLE THAN WHINE.
only jumped up, laughing at the curious print his goes about the house laughing, smiling, singing, As I was taking a walk early in Sep-
figure had made in the snow. saying kind words and doing kind deeds-that
Now, it's your turn," said Johnny; and Jerry, ld is Little Snshine. Does anybody knw tember I noticed two little boys on their
somewhat foiled by the good-humor of his com- chld s Lttle Sushine. Does anybody know
panion, nothing loth, took the seat of command. Little Sunshine? Where does Little Sunshine way to school. The smaller one tumbled
On they went, past the grocer's corner and the live? and fell; and though he was not very
minister's front door and up much hurt, he began to
toward where little Katy Mil- much hurt, he began to
ler was always looking out of -__-whine in a babyish way
the window. "Jolly, and not a regular roaring
that's so, I declare! said -
Jerry; but whoa we've got boy cry, as though he
there. Johnny was tired by were half killed, but a
this time; he couldn't pull up NI- I i e ut a
hill. He wiped the sweat from -- little cross whine.
his forehead, and the two boys The older boy took
examined the new sled with I i his hand in a kind a
exceeding satisfaction. his hand in a kind and
"There's old Betsey taking fatherly way, and said:
home Miss Penny's wash," Oh, never mind, Jim-
"said Jerry, as he bobbed round ; m-- Oh, doneer ine it i m
the nearest corner just to mydon't whine it is a
see who might be coming; great deal better to
"hasn't she got atug, though, greatdeal better to
with that basket! Let's give whistle."
one little soft snow-ball-on eAnd he bean in
her back, you know."
",Let's give that great merriest way a cheerful
basket a ride," said Johnny; boy whistle.
"-you pull some and I'll pull
some. Say, will you? Mother Jimmy tried to join in
says she's real good." the whistle.
It was soon settled with "Ican'twhistleasnice
poor Betsey that the heavy whistles nice
basket should be transferred as you, Charlie," said he,
to the new sled, and that the "--
double team should, "honor my lips won't puck
bright," be dreadful careful up good."
not to spill off a single piece p "Oh, that is because
or to let a drop spatter the ha t i
clean sweet things. Of course _- you have not got all
it was more a frolic than a the whine out yet," said
task, that half-mile journey; "t
but the washwoman, reliev- Charlie; "but you try a
ed of her burden, was already minute, and the whistle
at Miss Penny's gate when the minute, and the whistle
boys arrived. will drive the whine
"And I don't know what --away."
good mothers ye belong to," way.
said Betsey, in her gratitude So he did; and the
for the help, "but it's bles- m last I saw or heard of
sed boys ye are to save such the little fellows, they
an aching from a poor wom- the little fellows, they
an's back. My blessing goes were whistling away as
with ye and the pretty bright though that
sled, and the best of good fun rnestly as though that
in your play!" as the chief end of life.
"Thank you!" returned .
Johnny. "Thank you!" re-
peated Jerry; and then the boys both concluded THE ROOSTER. THE PRECIOUS LITTLE PLANT.
"that it must be dinnr-tie, and more too. THE day was sunny and the air full of Two little girls, Bridget and Walburga, went
"Well, Johnny," said his mother, when the to a neighboring town, each carrying on her head
dinner was over and Johnny had finished the story sweet sounds from the adjoining fields. a basket of fruit to sell far money enough to buy
of his adventures. "I am glad you and Jerry got The birds were singing their merriest the family dinner.
on so well. I thought you would, my son, if you songs. The streams were running gladly Bridget fretted all the way, but Walburga only
"onlyBut didn't his fun get a spoiling, though through the meadows, and the chickens, joked and laughed. At last Bridget got out of ail
"moBut didn't his fun get a spoiling, though, he out for a holiday, were enjoying the fun patience, and said, How can you go on laughing
mother? He meant to get me mad when he out for a holiday, were enjoying the fun so? Your basket is as heavy as mine, and you are
pitched me into the snow, but I spoiled that, I of racing along the hedge, not a bit stronger. I don't understand it."
guess. He meant to make me upset him so he On a piece of rising ground stood the "Oh," said Walburga, "it is easy enough to
could give me a rubbing in the snow; I thought proud idol of the farm yard. "Cock-a- understand. I have a little plant that I put on the
I'd spoil that to. And then we' both spoiled top of my load, and it makes it so light I hardly
Aunt Betsey's back-ache, and 'twas good fun, as doodle-doo!" he crowed. "The chickens feel it. Why don't you do so too? "
good as she blessed us for. Oh, I like Jerry well will grow up large fowls, if I make noise Indeed," said Bridget, it must be a very
enough, mother; he's real strong at a pull! in the poultry-yard of the world! And precious little plant I wish I could lighten my
My dear child," said the mother, you may hens and chickens clucked and chirped, load with it. Where does it grow? Tell me.
always remember that the best way to learn to like What do you call it ? I It grows," replied Wal-
anybody, and to have a good time with him, is to and the rooster told them, Cock of the burga, wherever you plant it and give it a chance
be as kind as you can always, and when he is walk am I!" and he flapped hi: wings, to take root. Its name is Patience."






SUNSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

Johnny loaded himself upon the little new sled, wrong to do some especially pleasant thing for and made his comb swell up, and crowed
and giving command to his one-horse team, went him and with him. So you see, Johnny, there's again; and the barn-yard shuddered, for
spinning down the street directly to the deepest, more than one way to spoil things, and a great ty f d t v o t
highest drift of yesterday's snow. deal of badness-bad fun and mischief-may be they feared the voice o their master.
"Whoa! haw! gee! go long!" shouted the spoiled by taking a little pains to do somebody a He was great. But there came a sound
driver at every step. Steady, Reindeer! good or give somebody a pleasure." in the air, and the cock heard it, but he
But just at that moment Reindeer accomplished never turned his head. The fact is, his
an extraordinary feat of shying, and with one
mischievous jerk Sir Johnny lay sprawling on a head was turned already. Poor fellow,
fresh, unbroken patch of snow. LITTLE SUNSHINE. it was more than turned-it was twisted.
It is very remarkable-at least the reindeer
seemed to think so-that Johnny Lapland didn't WHO is Little Sunshine? The child who does
cry or scold or call names, or something. He not pout, or frown, or say cross words, but who BETTER WHISTLE THAN WHINE.
only jumped up, laughing at the curious print his goes about the house laughing, smiling, singing, As I was taking a walk early in Sep-
figure had made in the snow. saying kind words and doing kind deeds-that
Now, it's your turn," said Johnny; and Jerry, ld is Little Snshine. Does anybody knw tember I noticed two little boys on their
somewhat foiled by the good-humor of his com- chld s Lttle Sushine. Does anybody know
panion, nothing loth, took the seat of command. Little Sunshine? Where does Little Sunshine way to school. The smaller one tumbled
On they went, past the grocer's corner and the live? and fell; and though he was not very
minister's front door and up much hurt, he began to
toward where little Katy Mil- much hurt, he began to
ler was always looking out of -__-whine in a babyish way
the window. "Jolly, and not a regular roaring
that's so, I declare! said -
Jerry; but whoa we've got boy cry, as though he
there. Johnny was tired by were half killed, but a
this time; he couldn't pull up NI- I i e ut a
hill. He wiped the sweat from -- little cross whine.
his forehead, and the two boys The older boy took
examined the new sled with I i his hand in a kind a
exceeding satisfaction. his hand in a kind and
"There's old Betsey taking fatherly way, and said:
home Miss Penny's wash," Oh, never mind, Jim-
"said Jerry, as he bobbed round ; m-- Oh, doneer ine it i m
the nearest corner just to mydon't whine it is a
see who might be coming; great deal better to
"hasn't she got atug, though, greatdeal better to
with that basket! Let's give whistle."
one little soft snow-ball-on eAnd he bean in
her back, you know."
",Let's give that great merriest way a cheerful
basket a ride," said Johnny; boy whistle.
"-you pull some and I'll pull
some. Say, will you? Mother Jimmy tried to join in
says she's real good." the whistle.
It was soon settled with "Ican'twhistleasnice
poor Betsey that the heavy whistles nice
basket should be transferred as you, Charlie," said he,
to the new sled, and that the "--
double team should, "honor my lips won't puck
bright," be dreadful careful up good."
not to spill off a single piece p "Oh, that is because
or to let a drop spatter the ha t i
clean sweet things. Of course _- you have not got all
it was more a frolic than a the whine out yet," said
task, that half-mile journey; "t
but the washwoman, reliev- Charlie; "but you try a
ed of her burden, was already minute, and the whistle
at Miss Penny's gate when the minute, and the whistle
boys arrived. will drive the whine
"And I don't know what --away."
good mothers ye belong to," way.
said Betsey, in her gratitude So he did; and the
for the help, "but it's bles- m last I saw or heard of
sed boys ye are to save such the little fellows, they
an aching from a poor wom- the little fellows, they
an's back. My blessing goes were whistling away as
with ye and the pretty bright though that
sled, and the best of good fun rnestly as though that
in your play!" as the chief end of life.
"Thank you!" returned .
Johnny. "Thank you!" re-
peated Jerry; and then the boys both concluded THE ROOSTER. THE PRECIOUS LITTLE PLANT.
"that it must be dinnr-tie, and more too. THE day was sunny and the air full of Two little girls, Bridget and Walburga, went
"Well, Johnny," said his mother, when the to a neighboring town, each carrying on her head
dinner was over and Johnny had finished the story sweet sounds from the adjoining fields. a basket of fruit to sell far money enough to buy
of his adventures. "I am glad you and Jerry got The birds were singing their merriest the family dinner.
on so well. I thought you would, my son, if you songs. The streams were running gladly Bridget fretted all the way, but Walburga only
"onlyBut didn't his fun get a spoiling, though through the meadows, and the chickens, joked and laughed. At last Bridget got out of ail
"moBut didn't his fun get a spoiling, though, he out for a holiday, were enjoying the fun patience, and said, How can you go on laughing
mother? He meant to get me mad when he out for a holiday, were enjoying the fun so? Your basket is as heavy as mine, and you are
pitched me into the snow, but I spoiled that, I of racing along the hedge, not a bit stronger. I don't understand it."
guess. He meant to make me upset him so he On a piece of rising ground stood the "Oh," said Walburga, "it is easy enough to
could give me a rubbing in the snow; I thought proud idol of the farm yard. "Cock-a- understand. I have a little plant that I put on the
I'd spoil that to. And then we' both spoiled top of my load, and it makes it so light I hardly
Aunt Betsey's back-ache, and 'twas good fun, as doodle-doo!" he crowed. "The chickens feel it. Why don't you do so too? "
good as she blessed us for. Oh, I like Jerry well will grow up large fowls, if I make noise Indeed," said Bridget, it must be a very
enough, mother; he's real strong at a pull! in the poultry-yard of the world! And precious little plant I wish I could lighten my
My dear child," said the mother, you may hens and chickens clucked and chirped, load with it. Where does it grow? Tell me.
always remember that the best way to learn to like What do you call it ? I It grows," replied Wal-
anybody, and to have a good time with him, is to and the rooster told them, Cock of the burga, wherever you plant it and give it a chance
be as kind as you can always, and when he is walk am I!" and he flapped hi: wings, to take root. Its name is Patience."






SUNSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

Johnny loaded himself upon the little new sled, wrong to do some especially pleasant thing for and made his comb swell up, and crowed
and giving command to his one-horse team, went him and with him. So you see, Johnny, there's again; and the barn-yard shuddered, for
spinning down the street directly to the deepest, more than one way to spoil things, and a great ty f d t v o t
highest drift of yesterday's snow. deal of badness-bad fun and mischief-may be they feared the voice o their master.
"Whoa! haw! gee! go long!" shouted the spoiled by taking a little pains to do somebody a He was great. But there came a sound
driver at every step. Steady, Reindeer! good or give somebody a pleasure." in the air, and the cock heard it, but he
But just at that moment Reindeer accomplished never turned his head. The fact is, his
an extraordinary feat of shying, and with one
mischievous jerk Sir Johnny lay sprawling on a head was turned already. Poor fellow,
fresh, unbroken patch of snow. LITTLE SUNSHINE. it was more than turned-it was twisted.
It is very remarkable-at least the reindeer
seemed to think so-that Johnny Lapland didn't WHO is Little Sunshine? The child who does
cry or scold or call names, or something. He not pout, or frown, or say cross words, but who BETTER WHISTLE THAN WHINE.
only jumped up, laughing at the curious print his goes about the house laughing, smiling, singing, As I was taking a walk early in Sep-
figure had made in the snow. saying kind words and doing kind deeds-that
Now, it's your turn," said Johnny; and Jerry, ld is Little Snshine. Does anybody knw tember I noticed two little boys on their
somewhat foiled by the good-humor of his com- chld s Lttle Sushine. Does anybody know
panion, nothing loth, took the seat of command. Little Sunshine? Where does Little Sunshine way to school. The smaller one tumbled
On they went, past the grocer's corner and the live? and fell; and though he was not very
minister's front door and up much hurt, he began to
toward where little Katy Mil- much hurt, he began to
ler was always looking out of -__-whine in a babyish way
the window. "Jolly, and not a regular roaring
that's so, I declare! said -
Jerry; but whoa we've got boy cry, as though he
there. Johnny was tired by were half killed, but a
this time; he couldn't pull up NI- I i e ut a
hill. He wiped the sweat from -- little cross whine.
his forehead, and the two boys The older boy took
examined the new sled with I i his hand in a kind a
exceeding satisfaction. his hand in a kind and
"There's old Betsey taking fatherly way, and said:
home Miss Penny's wash," Oh, never mind, Jim-
"said Jerry, as he bobbed round ; m-- Oh, doneer ine it i m
the nearest corner just to mydon't whine it is a
see who might be coming; great deal better to
"hasn't she got atug, though, greatdeal better to
with that basket! Let's give whistle."
one little soft snow-ball-on eAnd he bean in
her back, you know."
",Let's give that great merriest way a cheerful
basket a ride," said Johnny; boy whistle.
"-you pull some and I'll pull
some. Say, will you? Mother Jimmy tried to join in
says she's real good." the whistle.
It was soon settled with "Ican'twhistleasnice
poor Betsey that the heavy whistles nice
basket should be transferred as you, Charlie," said he,
to the new sled, and that the "--
double team should, "honor my lips won't puck
bright," be dreadful careful up good."
not to spill off a single piece p "Oh, that is because
or to let a drop spatter the ha t i
clean sweet things. Of course _- you have not got all
it was more a frolic than a the whine out yet," said
task, that half-mile journey; "t
but the washwoman, reliev- Charlie; "but you try a
ed of her burden, was already minute, and the whistle
at Miss Penny's gate when the minute, and the whistle
boys arrived. will drive the whine
"And I don't know what --away."
good mothers ye belong to," way.
said Betsey, in her gratitude So he did; and the
for the help, "but it's bles- m last I saw or heard of
sed boys ye are to save such the little fellows, they
an aching from a poor wom- the little fellows, they
an's back. My blessing goes were whistling away as
with ye and the pretty bright though that
sled, and the best of good fun rnestly as though that
in your play!" as the chief end of life.
"Thank you!" returned .
Johnny. "Thank you!" re-
peated Jerry; and then the boys both concluded THE ROOSTER. THE PRECIOUS LITTLE PLANT.
"that it must be dinnr-tie, and more too. THE day was sunny and the air full of Two little girls, Bridget and Walburga, went
"Well, Johnny," said his mother, when the to a neighboring town, each carrying on her head
dinner was over and Johnny had finished the story sweet sounds from the adjoining fields. a basket of fruit to sell far money enough to buy
of his adventures. "I am glad you and Jerry got The birds were singing their merriest the family dinner.
on so well. I thought you would, my son, if you songs. The streams were running gladly Bridget fretted all the way, but Walburga only
"onlyBut didn't his fun get a spoiling, though through the meadows, and the chickens, joked and laughed. At last Bridget got out of ail
"moBut didn't his fun get a spoiling, though, he out for a holiday, were enjoying the fun patience, and said, How can you go on laughing
mother? He meant to get me mad when he out for a holiday, were enjoying the fun so? Your basket is as heavy as mine, and you are
pitched me into the snow, but I spoiled that, I of racing along the hedge, not a bit stronger. I don't understand it."
guess. He meant to make me upset him so he On a piece of rising ground stood the "Oh," said Walburga, "it is easy enough to
could give me a rubbing in the snow; I thought proud idol of the farm yard. "Cock-a- understand. I have a little plant that I put on the
I'd spoil that to. And then we' both spoiled top of my load, and it makes it so light I hardly
Aunt Betsey's back-ache, and 'twas good fun, as doodle-doo!" he crowed. "The chickens feel it. Why don't you do so too? "
good as she blessed us for. Oh, I like Jerry well will grow up large fowls, if I make noise Indeed," said Bridget, it must be a very
enough, mother; he's real strong at a pull! in the poultry-yard of the world! And precious little plant I wish I could lighten my
My dear child," said the mother, you may hens and chickens clucked and chirped, load with it. Where does it grow? Tell me.
always remember that the best way to learn to like What do you call it ? I It grows," replied Wal-
anybody, and to have a good time with him, is to and the rooster told them, Cock of the burga, wherever you plant it and give it a chance
be as kind as you can always, and when he is walk am I!" and he flapped hi: wings, to take root. Its name is Patience."






SUNSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

"NO!" urge me to stay longer now. I'll come again
Would ye learn the bravest thing some other day ;" and he flew back to his anxious
That man can ever do? mother and sisters. Wasn't lie a saucy bird?
Would ye be an uncrowned king,
Absolute and true?
Would ye seek to emulate THE MASTIFF AND THE BUN.
All we learn in story A friend sent us some time ago the following
Of the moral, just, and great, interesting narrative:
Rich in real glory?
Rich in real glory? "A few days ago I had occasion to call upon
Would ye lose much bitter care
a gentleman in this city at his office. Upon
In your lot below?
Bravely speak out, when and where entering I was followed by a fine mastiff of about
Bravely speak out, when and where
'Tis right to utter "No! four years of age, whom I could not but notice.
After conversing together for a short time my
Learn to speak this little word friend said to her, Go and call Joe, the watchman
In its proper place; -go placing, as he said so, a penny and an
Let no timid doubt be heard, envelope upon his desk. Encouraged, no doubt,
Clothed with sceptic grace. by the sight of these, the delighted 'Juno'-
Let thy lips without disguise for that was her name-set off without delay to
Boldy pour it out, to seek for Joe. Soon her bark was heard on
Though a thousand dulcet lies -- the stairs; and whether this were a summons to
Keep hovering about; Joe, or merely expressive of her good pleasure
For be sure our hearts would lose in escorting him up, I cannot say. She entered
Future years of woe, the office, closely escorted by Joe himself, who
If our courage could refuse seed that had been scattered. "I've come to just gave a look at us and then immediately
The present hour with "No!" take dinner with you." hastened off, as though it had been much against
Mr. Canary did not like this at all. "You've his own will that he had consented to accompany
not been invited," he squeaked out, ruffling up Juno. The command to 'go anl fetch Joe' was
A SAUCY VISITOR. his feathers and flying at Flop with all his was again repeated and obeyed, and again the
Once upon a time a mother-sparrow and her might. But the bars were between them, and reluctant Joe reappeared in company with his
three children lived in a great big maple-tree, Flop went on eating his dinner as calmly as friend. The penny was then placed inside the
which stood before a great big house, which had possible. envelope, Juno meanwhile intently watching
a broad piazza and fountain in front of it. The Then the canary became so angry that he her master's hand; and on its being presented to
mother-bird often used to talk to her children danced back and forth on his perch and screamed. her she eagerly seized it, and with a bound of
about the people who lived in the house, and Flop made another very polite bow. Oh, how joy and a flourish with her tail made off, accom-
their pets. good that hemp-seed tastes!" said he. "The 1 panied by Joe. She, however, quickly returned to
"See, Polly Dolly Adeline," she said to her rape-seed, too, is very nice,-nice as the fattest the office, this time with a bun (which she had got
oldest child, one day, "see those lazy yellow canker-worm I ever ate." from Mr. Wynne, the baker, in exchange for
canaries down there on the piazza. They have So he went on eating, looking up now and then the penny) in her mouth, which she placed on
everything they want. See how they are cod- to wink at his angry host. When he had eaten the floor, gave it a few licks with her tongue,
died, while we are left to shift for ourselves." all lie could find he made his best bow and said, and lay down with her nose close to it, guarding
"Boo-hoo!" said Polly Dolly. "I don't saucily, "Thank you, sir-thank you. Don't it with a watchful eye. IIer master then drew
think it is a bit fair." it to him, and cutting it up gave it to
"I don't either," said the youngest her bit by bit. While this was going on
of all. He was a pert little fellow. he mentioned two facts. One, that on
His name was Flop. He was so called giving her the envelope one (lay without
because, when he first began to fly, he the penny in it, she tore it up. To test
would flop over on one side. why she had done so, he did the same on
But he could fly well enough now, a subsequent day, and she again tore up
and so he said, boldly, "I mean to go the envelope. The other fact was, that
down to one of those cages and eat some when he has left the office without
of that nice seed myself. I'll let young having cut up the bun, lie has found it
Canary know that I am as good as untouched, although absent for a consid-
he." 7- cable time! These little incidents may
At these words Mrs. Sparrow was so perhaps interest and instruct some of
"frightened that she fell off the branch- our young readers wholike to hear about
but she soon flew back, and said, "Flop, dogs.
you naughty boy, don't you go! you
may get killed." THE SMOKE-HOUSE.
Cats, you know, Flop! said Polly --A man who lives in Albany, and whose
Dolly Adeline; Cats with green eyes!" business is that of a clerk, said that lie
"Pooh!" said Flop. "Who cares? had lately built a house that cost him
I'm not afraid." three thousand dollars. His friends cx-
Flop flew gaily down to the piazza pressed their wonder that he could afford
railing. Here he stopped and looked t. o build so fine a dwelling.
around, while his mother and sisters Why," said lie, "this is my smoke-
watched him in fear and trembling. house."
Nobody was on the piazza; so Flop flew --I "Ypur smoke-house! What do you
straight to one of the cages. mean? "
"How do you do, my young friend? "Why, I mean that twenty years ago
he said, saucily helping himself to the --I left off smoking."






SUNSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

"NO!" urge me to stay longer now. I'll come again
Would ye learn the bravest thing some other day ;" and he flew back to his anxious
That man can ever do? mother and sisters. Wasn't lie a saucy bird?
Would ye be an uncrowned king,
Absolute and true?
Would ye seek to emulate THE MASTIFF AND THE BUN.
All we learn in story A friend sent us some time ago the following
Of the moral, just, and great, interesting narrative:
Rich in real glory?
Rich in real glory? "A few days ago I had occasion to call upon
Would ye lose much bitter care
a gentleman in this city at his office. Upon
In your lot below?
Bravely speak out, when and where entering I was followed by a fine mastiff of about
Bravely speak out, when and where
'Tis right to utter "No! four years of age, whom I could not but notice.
After conversing together for a short time my
Learn to speak this little word friend said to her, Go and call Joe, the watchman
In its proper place; -go placing, as he said so, a penny and an
Let no timid doubt be heard, envelope upon his desk. Encouraged, no doubt,
Clothed with sceptic grace. by the sight of these, the delighted 'Juno'-
Let thy lips without disguise for that was her name-set off without delay to
Boldy pour it out, to seek for Joe. Soon her bark was heard on
Though a thousand dulcet lies -- the stairs; and whether this were a summons to
Keep hovering about; Joe, or merely expressive of her good pleasure
For be sure our hearts would lose in escorting him up, I cannot say. She entered
Future years of woe, the office, closely escorted by Joe himself, who
If our courage could refuse seed that had been scattered. "I've come to just gave a look at us and then immediately
The present hour with "No!" take dinner with you." hastened off, as though it had been much against
Mr. Canary did not like this at all. "You've his own will that he had consented to accompany
not been invited," he squeaked out, ruffling up Juno. The command to 'go anl fetch Joe' was
A SAUCY VISITOR. his feathers and flying at Flop with all his was again repeated and obeyed, and again the
Once upon a time a mother-sparrow and her might. But the bars were between them, and reluctant Joe reappeared in company with his
three children lived in a great big maple-tree, Flop went on eating his dinner as calmly as friend. The penny was then placed inside the
which stood before a great big house, which had possible. envelope, Juno meanwhile intently watching
a broad piazza and fountain in front of it. The Then the canary became so angry that he her master's hand; and on its being presented to
mother-bird often used to talk to her children danced back and forth on his perch and screamed. her she eagerly seized it, and with a bound of
about the people who lived in the house, and Flop made another very polite bow. Oh, how joy and a flourish with her tail made off, accom-
their pets. good that hemp-seed tastes!" said he. "The 1 panied by Joe. She, however, quickly returned to
"See, Polly Dolly Adeline," she said to her rape-seed, too, is very nice,-nice as the fattest the office, this time with a bun (which she had got
oldest child, one day, "see those lazy yellow canker-worm I ever ate." from Mr. Wynne, the baker, in exchange for
canaries down there on the piazza. They have So he went on eating, looking up now and then the penny) in her mouth, which she placed on
everything they want. See how they are cod- to wink at his angry host. When he had eaten the floor, gave it a few licks with her tongue,
died, while we are left to shift for ourselves." all lie could find he made his best bow and said, and lay down with her nose close to it, guarding
"Boo-hoo!" said Polly Dolly. "I don't saucily, "Thank you, sir-thank you. Don't it with a watchful eye. IIer master then drew
think it is a bit fair." it to him, and cutting it up gave it to
"I don't either," said the youngest her bit by bit. While this was going on
of all. He was a pert little fellow. he mentioned two facts. One, that on
His name was Flop. He was so called giving her the envelope one (lay without
because, when he first began to fly, he the penny in it, she tore it up. To test
would flop over on one side. why she had done so, he did the same on
But he could fly well enough now, a subsequent day, and she again tore up
and so he said, boldly, "I mean to go the envelope. The other fact was, that
down to one of those cages and eat some when he has left the office without
of that nice seed myself. I'll let young having cut up the bun, lie has found it
Canary know that I am as good as untouched, although absent for a consid-
he." 7- cable time! These little incidents may
At these words Mrs. Sparrow was so perhaps interest and instruct some of
"frightened that she fell off the branch- our young readers wholike to hear about
but she soon flew back, and said, "Flop, dogs.
you naughty boy, don't you go! you
may get killed." THE SMOKE-HOUSE.
Cats, you know, Flop! said Polly --A man who lives in Albany, and whose
Dolly Adeline; Cats with green eyes!" business is that of a clerk, said that lie
"Pooh!" said Flop. "Who cares? had lately built a house that cost him
I'm not afraid." three thousand dollars. His friends cx-
Flop flew gaily down to the piazza pressed their wonder that he could afford
railing. Here he stopped and looked t. o build so fine a dwelling.
around, while his mother and sisters Why," said lie, "this is my smoke-
watched him in fear and trembling. house."
Nobody was on the piazza; so Flop flew --I "Ypur smoke-house! What do you
straight to one of the cages. mean? "
"How do you do, my young friend? "Why, I mean that twenty years ago
he said, saucily helping himself to the --I left off smoking."






SUNSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

"NO!" urge me to stay longer now. I'll come again
Would ye learn the bravest thing some other day ;" and he flew back to his anxious
That man can ever do? mother and sisters. Wasn't lie a saucy bird?
Would ye be an uncrowned king,
Absolute and true?
Would ye seek to emulate THE MASTIFF AND THE BUN.
All we learn in story A friend sent us some time ago the following
Of the moral, just, and great, interesting narrative:
Rich in real glory?
Rich in real glory? "A few days ago I had occasion to call upon
Would ye lose much bitter care
a gentleman in this city at his office. Upon
In your lot below?
Bravely speak out, when and where entering I was followed by a fine mastiff of about
Bravely speak out, when and where
'Tis right to utter "No! four years of age, whom I could not but notice.
After conversing together for a short time my
Learn to speak this little word friend said to her, Go and call Joe, the watchman
In its proper place; -go placing, as he said so, a penny and an
Let no timid doubt be heard, envelope upon his desk. Encouraged, no doubt,
Clothed with sceptic grace. by the sight of these, the delighted 'Juno'-
Let thy lips without disguise for that was her name-set off without delay to
Boldy pour it out, to seek for Joe. Soon her bark was heard on
Though a thousand dulcet lies -- the stairs; and whether this were a summons to
Keep hovering about; Joe, or merely expressive of her good pleasure
For be sure our hearts would lose in escorting him up, I cannot say. She entered
Future years of woe, the office, closely escorted by Joe himself, who
If our courage could refuse seed that had been scattered. "I've come to just gave a look at us and then immediately
The present hour with "No!" take dinner with you." hastened off, as though it had been much against
Mr. Canary did not like this at all. "You've his own will that he had consented to accompany
not been invited," he squeaked out, ruffling up Juno. The command to 'go anl fetch Joe' was
A SAUCY VISITOR. his feathers and flying at Flop with all his was again repeated and obeyed, and again the
Once upon a time a mother-sparrow and her might. But the bars were between them, and reluctant Joe reappeared in company with his
three children lived in a great big maple-tree, Flop went on eating his dinner as calmly as friend. The penny was then placed inside the
which stood before a great big house, which had possible. envelope, Juno meanwhile intently watching
a broad piazza and fountain in front of it. The Then the canary became so angry that he her master's hand; and on its being presented to
mother-bird often used to talk to her children danced back and forth on his perch and screamed. her she eagerly seized it, and with a bound of
about the people who lived in the house, and Flop made another very polite bow. Oh, how joy and a flourish with her tail made off, accom-
their pets. good that hemp-seed tastes!" said he. "The 1 panied by Joe. She, however, quickly returned to
"See, Polly Dolly Adeline," she said to her rape-seed, too, is very nice,-nice as the fattest the office, this time with a bun (which she had got
oldest child, one day, "see those lazy yellow canker-worm I ever ate." from Mr. Wynne, the baker, in exchange for
canaries down there on the piazza. They have So he went on eating, looking up now and then the penny) in her mouth, which she placed on
everything they want. See how they are cod- to wink at his angry host. When he had eaten the floor, gave it a few licks with her tongue,
died, while we are left to shift for ourselves." all lie could find he made his best bow and said, and lay down with her nose close to it, guarding
"Boo-hoo!" said Polly Dolly. "I don't saucily, "Thank you, sir-thank you. Don't it with a watchful eye. IIer master then drew
think it is a bit fair." it to him, and cutting it up gave it to
"I don't either," said the youngest her bit by bit. While this was going on
of all. He was a pert little fellow. he mentioned two facts. One, that on
His name was Flop. He was so called giving her the envelope one (lay without
because, when he first began to fly, he the penny in it, she tore it up. To test
would flop over on one side. why she had done so, he did the same on
But he could fly well enough now, a subsequent day, and she again tore up
and so he said, boldly, "I mean to go the envelope. The other fact was, that
down to one of those cages and eat some when he has left the office without
of that nice seed myself. I'll let young having cut up the bun, lie has found it
Canary know that I am as good as untouched, although absent for a consid-
he." 7- cable time! These little incidents may
At these words Mrs. Sparrow was so perhaps interest and instruct some of
"frightened that she fell off the branch- our young readers wholike to hear about
but she soon flew back, and said, "Flop, dogs.
you naughty boy, don't you go! you
may get killed." THE SMOKE-HOUSE.
Cats, you know, Flop! said Polly --A man who lives in Albany, and whose
Dolly Adeline; Cats with green eyes!" business is that of a clerk, said that lie
"Pooh!" said Flop. "Who cares? had lately built a house that cost him
I'm not afraid." three thousand dollars. His friends cx-
Flop flew gaily down to the piazza pressed their wonder that he could afford
railing. Here he stopped and looked t. o build so fine a dwelling.
around, while his mother and sisters Why," said lie, "this is my smoke-
watched him in fear and trembling. house."
Nobody was on the piazza; so Flop flew --I "Ypur smoke-house! What do you
straight to one of the cages. mean? "
"How do you do, my young friend? "Why, I mean that twenty years ago
he said, saucily helping himself to the --I left off smoking."






SUNSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

"NO!" urge me to stay longer now. I'll come again
Would ye learn the bravest thing some other day ;" and he flew back to his anxious
That man can ever do? mother and sisters. Wasn't lie a saucy bird?
Would ye be an uncrowned king,
Absolute and true?
Would ye seek to emulate THE MASTIFF AND THE BUN.
All we learn in story A friend sent us some time ago the following
Of the moral, just, and great, interesting narrative:
Rich in real glory?
Rich in real glory? "A few days ago I had occasion to call upon
Would ye lose much bitter care
a gentleman in this city at his office. Upon
In your lot below?
Bravely speak out, when and where entering I was followed by a fine mastiff of about
Bravely speak out, when and where
'Tis right to utter "No! four years of age, whom I could not but notice.
After conversing together for a short time my
Learn to speak this little word friend said to her, Go and call Joe, the watchman
In its proper place; -go placing, as he said so, a penny and an
Let no timid doubt be heard, envelope upon his desk. Encouraged, no doubt,
Clothed with sceptic grace. by the sight of these, the delighted 'Juno'-
Let thy lips without disguise for that was her name-set off without delay to
Boldy pour it out, to seek for Joe. Soon her bark was heard on
Though a thousand dulcet lies -- the stairs; and whether this were a summons to
Keep hovering about; Joe, or merely expressive of her good pleasure
For be sure our hearts would lose in escorting him up, I cannot say. She entered
Future years of woe, the office, closely escorted by Joe himself, who
If our courage could refuse seed that had been scattered. "I've come to just gave a look at us and then immediately
The present hour with "No!" take dinner with you." hastened off, as though it had been much against
Mr. Canary did not like this at all. "You've his own will that he had consented to accompany
not been invited," he squeaked out, ruffling up Juno. The command to 'go anl fetch Joe' was
A SAUCY VISITOR. his feathers and flying at Flop with all his was again repeated and obeyed, and again the
Once upon a time a mother-sparrow and her might. But the bars were between them, and reluctant Joe reappeared in company with his
three children lived in a great big maple-tree, Flop went on eating his dinner as calmly as friend. The penny was then placed inside the
which stood before a great big house, which had possible. envelope, Juno meanwhile intently watching
a broad piazza and fountain in front of it. The Then the canary became so angry that he her master's hand; and on its being presented to
mother-bird often used to talk to her children danced back and forth on his perch and screamed. her she eagerly seized it, and with a bound of
about the people who lived in the house, and Flop made another very polite bow. Oh, how joy and a flourish with her tail made off, accom-
their pets. good that hemp-seed tastes!" said he. "The 1 panied by Joe. She, however, quickly returned to
"See, Polly Dolly Adeline," she said to her rape-seed, too, is very nice,-nice as the fattest the office, this time with a bun (which she had got
oldest child, one day, "see those lazy yellow canker-worm I ever ate." from Mr. Wynne, the baker, in exchange for
canaries down there on the piazza. They have So he went on eating, looking up now and then the penny) in her mouth, which she placed on
everything they want. See how they are cod- to wink at his angry host. When he had eaten the floor, gave it a few licks with her tongue,
died, while we are left to shift for ourselves." all lie could find he made his best bow and said, and lay down with her nose close to it, guarding
"Boo-hoo!" said Polly Dolly. "I don't saucily, "Thank you, sir-thank you. Don't it with a watchful eye. IIer master then drew
think it is a bit fair." it to him, and cutting it up gave it to
"I don't either," said the youngest her bit by bit. While this was going on
of all. He was a pert little fellow. he mentioned two facts. One, that on
His name was Flop. He was so called giving her the envelope one (lay without
because, when he first began to fly, he the penny in it, she tore it up. To test
would flop over on one side. why she had done so, he did the same on
But he could fly well enough now, a subsequent day, and she again tore up
and so he said, boldly, "I mean to go the envelope. The other fact was, that
down to one of those cages and eat some when he has left the office without
of that nice seed myself. I'll let young having cut up the bun, lie has found it
Canary know that I am as good as untouched, although absent for a consid-
he." 7- cable time! These little incidents may
At these words Mrs. Sparrow was so perhaps interest and instruct some of
"frightened that she fell off the branch- our young readers wholike to hear about
but she soon flew back, and said, "Flop, dogs.
you naughty boy, don't you go! you
may get killed." THE SMOKE-HOUSE.
Cats, you know, Flop! said Polly --A man who lives in Albany, and whose
Dolly Adeline; Cats with green eyes!" business is that of a clerk, said that lie
"Pooh!" said Flop. "Who cares? had lately built a house that cost him
I'm not afraid." three thousand dollars. His friends cx-
Flop flew gaily down to the piazza pressed their wonder that he could afford
railing. Here he stopped and looked t. o build so fine a dwelling.
around, while his mother and sisters Why," said lie, "this is my smoke-
watched him in fear and trembling. house."
Nobody was on the piazza; so Flop flew --I "Ypur smoke-house! What do you
straight to one of the cages. mean? "
"How do you do, my young friend? "Why, I mean that twenty years ago
he said, saucily helping himself to the --I left off smoking."






SUTINSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.
~--- -.--
SUMMER. up his back until he looked like a ball of down, and leaned forward, as
The pretty flowers have come again, much as to say, "I'll do it now." But when he saw the awful distance
The pretty flowers have come again *
Sbetween himself and the ground, his courage failed him, and he clung
The roses and the daisies; to his perch more tightly than ever.
And from the trees, oh, hear how plain After a while the mother-bird came back, bringing a large bug, which
The birds are singing praises I she used as a bribe for her timid .;,.lli .c, holding it under his very bill,
and then darting off in the hope that lie would follow. The youngster
chirped for the bug, but le would not fly for it; and, after many efforts,
How charming now our walks will be the old Lird, unable to resist his pleading, perched on a twig just beneath
By meadows full of clover, him and held up the bug, which you may be sure he was not slow to
Through shady lanes, where we can see seize and eat.
The little fellow now seemed to make up his mind to fly, even if he
The branches bending over! .
Sb b died in the attempt. He flapped his wings, rounded his back, and leaned
e a"-d nt: r.. ,. I:. .- hl ..- 0I i,. other-bird flew about, flutter-
"The air is sweet, the sky a b- I;.yi.1 -aI .: c I' .""n extent that the father came
"is blue, "-" i... ., t., rl!-, t'1. .'.f Ilh tree to see how they were get-
The woods with songs -h
The wod wo the s s -t ld[ [.n aI i,,st i i n ir ,i..,t to fly, and I was just ready
are ringing;
"are"- tn I. i nl '.t -i,- ;, :"'l. Iuse, when, lo! there he was
And I'm so happy, that -,r tno f o Ir I I. r,, mbling with fear, and chirp-
I, too, .. r -I.. ;. I ,1 ',ot. Oh, dear !"
Can hardly keep from wa i, ..1.1 .1 Ii. I. .. much disappointed; but the
ead,- and, looi u .....w ,..'. ,ct .I-.i- l their bug, and the lesson was
singing.
-o- repeated. Indeed it was re-
Si Y-- +~ '-peated so many times that
S I began to lose patience
A LESSON IN FLYING. with the little coward, and
Birds have their trials, as v m _ied to be full of pity for the
well as little boys and girls. t l poor, tired mother.
To be sure they don't have lHis birdship had just
to stand in a line and shout i I, eaten a bug, and the parent-
"Twice one are two" at the birds were chirping and fly-
top of their voices ; but they of a l ing around, when, with the
have to learn to fly, and I hope of helping them in
think it very likely that their labors, I stepped for-
they take singing-lessons, -.........- b llward and tapped him on the
although I am not sure as to bill with a flower-stem. The
that. b ii blow was so sudden and un-
One day last summer I expected, that before lie had
was picking flowers in the time to think lie lifted his
woods, when, happening to wings and flew to a neigh-
look up, what should I see if iih twig,wherelieclung,
perched on a twig just in I orened and delighted at
4 It he ha(I done.
front of me but a cunning A
little bird I I left him then, with his
At first I kept very quiet, '.4. E rie and mother making
lest I should frighten him 4Ri,-t uch a time over him
away; but, as he showed no '' r fathers and mothers
sign of moving, I ventured ii -.le over you when you
nearer and nearer, until I even covered him with my hand. i k your first steps.
"Why, dear me! he's nothing but a baby-bird, and can't fly,"
I said to myself; and then I sat down on a mossy mound near
by, and waited; for I knew the mother-bird was not far off, and I OUR DUMB TEACHERS.
wanted to see what was going on. .rI1Ilh ship was lying in the
It was not long before I heard a gentle whirr in the leaves over- .Ith of the Delaware, long
head, and, looking up, saw two birds circling around the twig, but r ago, now, and there
at some distance above it. Then one of them, the mother, of ..- a, very handsome black
course, drew nearer and nearer in smaller and smaller circles, at the retriever dog on board. Whom he belonged to, or whether he always
same time calling to her baby in encouraging little chirps. lived on board the ship, I know not; but there he was, very happy and
Birdie on his perch seemed very much excited, turning his head contented, and a great favorite, I dare say, with all the officers and crew.
from one side to the other in the cunningest way. But when his One day, when lie was running about the upper deck, there was a sudden
mother came close to him, only to dart off and call on him to follow, he surprise and commotion-a man had fallen into the water. The dog
looked so disappointed that I really felt as if I must comfort him. seemed to know perfectly what had happened, and though the upper deck
The mother came back very soon and resumed her lesson in flying; was fifty feet from the waves he was overboard in an instant, and took a
and very hard work she found it, too, for the little fellow was timid flying leap after the sinking man, whom lie succeeded in reaching, and they
and refused to follow her, in spite of all her coaxing and scolding. were both saved by the ship's boats.
After working a long while, she flew off, leaving her baby trembling on It was a daring jump for even a dog to make, but the noble animal seemed
his perch. I pitied the poor little fellow, he seemed so forlorn and to have no idea of fear or of shirking danger; he did the right thing at the
helpless. right moment, without fear or thought of consequences.
The little bird, left to himself, got tired at last of staying where lie People often lose the opportunity of doing good by waiting to consider
was, and made one or two efforts to fly. He flapped his wings, rounded if it is their business, or if the risk and danger are not too great.






SUTINSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.
~--- -.--
SUMMER. up his back until he looked like a ball of down, and leaned forward, as
The pretty flowers have come again, much as to say, "I'll do it now." But when he saw the awful distance
The pretty flowers have come again *
Sbetween himself and the ground, his courage failed him, and he clung
The roses and the daisies; to his perch more tightly than ever.
And from the trees, oh, hear how plain After a while the mother-bird came back, bringing a large bug, which
The birds are singing praises I she used as a bribe for her timid .;,.lli .c, holding it under his very bill,
and then darting off in the hope that lie would follow. The youngster
chirped for the bug, but le would not fly for it; and, after many efforts,
How charming now our walks will be the old Lird, unable to resist his pleading, perched on a twig just beneath
By meadows full of clover, him and held up the bug, which you may be sure he was not slow to
Through shady lanes, where we can see seize and eat.
The little fellow now seemed to make up his mind to fly, even if he
The branches bending over! .
Sb b died in the attempt. He flapped his wings, rounded his back, and leaned
e a"-d nt: r.. ,. I:. .- hl ..- 0I i,. other-bird flew about, flutter-
"The air is sweet, the sky a b- I;.yi.1 -aI .: c I' .""n extent that the father came
"is blue, "-" i... ., t., rl!-, t'1. .'.f Ilh tree to see how they were get-
The woods with songs -h
The wod wo the s s -t ld[ [.n aI i,,st i i n ir ,i..,t to fly, and I was just ready
are ringing;
"are"- tn I. i nl '.t -i,- ;, :"'l. Iuse, when, lo! there he was
And I'm so happy, that -,r tno f o Ir I I. r,, mbling with fear, and chirp-
I, too, .. r -I.. ;. I ,1 ',ot. Oh, dear !"
Can hardly keep from wa i, ..1.1 .1 Ii. I. .. much disappointed; but the
ead,- and, looi u .....w ,..'. ,ct .I-.i- l their bug, and the lesson was
singing.
-o- repeated. Indeed it was re-
Si Y-- +~ '-peated so many times that
S I began to lose patience
A LESSON IN FLYING. with the little coward, and
Birds have their trials, as v m _ied to be full of pity for the
well as little boys and girls. t l poor, tired mother.
To be sure they don't have lHis birdship had just
to stand in a line and shout i I, eaten a bug, and the parent-
"Twice one are two" at the birds were chirping and fly-
top of their voices ; but they of a l ing around, when, with the
have to learn to fly, and I hope of helping them in
think it very likely that their labors, I stepped for-
they take singing-lessons, -.........- b llward and tapped him on the
although I am not sure as to bill with a flower-stem. The
that. b ii blow was so sudden and un-
One day last summer I expected, that before lie had
was picking flowers in the time to think lie lifted his
woods, when, happening to wings and flew to a neigh-
look up, what should I see if iih twig,wherelieclung,
perched on a twig just in I orened and delighted at
4 It he ha(I done.
front of me but a cunning A
little bird I I left him then, with his
At first I kept very quiet, '.4. E rie and mother making
lest I should frighten him 4Ri,-t uch a time over him
away; but, as he showed no '' r fathers and mothers
sign of moving, I ventured ii -.le over you when you
nearer and nearer, until I even covered him with my hand. i k your first steps.
"Why, dear me! he's nothing but a baby-bird, and can't fly,"
I said to myself; and then I sat down on a mossy mound near
by, and waited; for I knew the mother-bird was not far off, and I OUR DUMB TEACHERS.
wanted to see what was going on. .rI1Ilh ship was lying in the
It was not long before I heard a gentle whirr in the leaves over- .Ith of the Delaware, long
head, and, looking up, saw two birds circling around the twig, but r ago, now, and there
at some distance above it. Then one of them, the mother, of ..- a, very handsome black
course, drew nearer and nearer in smaller and smaller circles, at the retriever dog on board. Whom he belonged to, or whether he always
same time calling to her baby in encouraging little chirps. lived on board the ship, I know not; but there he was, very happy and
Birdie on his perch seemed very much excited, turning his head contented, and a great favorite, I dare say, with all the officers and crew.
from one side to the other in the cunningest way. But when his One day, when lie was running about the upper deck, there was a sudden
mother came close to him, only to dart off and call on him to follow, he surprise and commotion-a man had fallen into the water. The dog
looked so disappointed that I really felt as if I must comfort him. seemed to know perfectly what had happened, and though the upper deck
The mother came back very soon and resumed her lesson in flying; was fifty feet from the waves he was overboard in an instant, and took a
and very hard work she found it, too, for the little fellow was timid flying leap after the sinking man, whom lie succeeded in reaching, and they
and refused to follow her, in spite of all her coaxing and scolding. were both saved by the ship's boats.
After working a long while, she flew off, leaving her baby trembling on It was a daring jump for even a dog to make, but the noble animal seemed
his perch. I pitied the poor little fellow, he seemed so forlorn and to have no idea of fear or of shirking danger; he did the right thing at the
helpless. right moment, without fear or thought of consequences.
The little bird, left to himself, got tired at last of staying where lie People often lose the opportunity of doing good by waiting to consider
was, and made one or two efforts to fly. He flapped his wings, rounded if it is their business, or if the risk and danger are not too great.






SUISHTINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

the drawing-rooom with little Smut. I could but grandmother, for fear of agitating her, but we put on her skates. She had scarfs and handker-
think of poor Nan, and the message which she summoned the gardener, who walked sentinel chiefs with her, and, tying three or four of these
had sent me. round the house all the night. No sound came together, she made a noose, which she threw over
Hark! what was that? Smut heard it, and to alarm us-no, nothing save the tumult of Ebony's head. Thus she held him, so that he
pricked up her ears. A something tapping the wind and rain, and the roar of the river. In could pull her on her skates over the ice.
against the window-a shadowy figure standing the morning we heard the gipsy cart had again Now, Ebony, let us see how fast you can
like a blot outside, disappeared, and a silence fell upon us as to the go," said Lucy. Ebony started at a full gallop,
"Miss Mabel," it said in a whisper; and fate of poor Jem. Now, after the lapse of years, and she began to sing:
somehow, I heard the softly-spoken words amid with Nan sleeping in the churchyard, and Smut e issue no tickets, we close no gate
all the tumult of wind and rain. It was Jem, under an apple-tree in the garden, Jack and I We blow no whistle, and nobody's late;
and I went to the window, often think and talk of our faithful little feline Our train is off as soon as we're in it;
"Open it, Miss Mabel," he said in a strangely friend's rescue from the river, and the things We go at the rate of ten miles a minute,
agitated voice ; and I at once obeyed and opened which it brought about. (And that is six hundred miles an hour I)-
it. For ours is an engine of one
"I'm come to warn ye. ------ --- -- -- -- one-dog power;
.Keep lights a-burning all But that dog's Ebony, bold
the night or ye'll be robbed, : and fleet,
or maybe worse," he told -- A dog, you'll find, that is hard
me, his arms on the win- to beat:
dow-sill, his head bowed, a -- So look out, stragglers and
hopeless despair on his -- tramps! Guess
hyoel despiron Yo u'd better not trifle with
swarthy face. "Do ye un- --- Y-- -- ur express!"
-"tan -:- our express
"Yes-no-what does it Hardly had Lucy finished
mean ?" I faltered in girlish SUNRISE. her song when Ebony, who
fright. .. ,i ... t.. -iri-, had been going at great
"Uncle and a lot more i- speed for some distance,
are going to break into your I -_. \ i.. -I.inl.. r ., I;, _- slipped on his haunches
house and rob it. Don't \\.,i.7 ., ..ii., nlil I.. where the ice was very
be afraid, but keep fights ..- I r.. -smooth, and, sliding along,
a-burning, that's all. Ye -" fell over on his side.
need fear no harm if ye do _1. i.1 14 ..' I.1,,.i Lucy fell, too, but she
"that." was not hurt. You good
"Will you help in. the [ I- Y -1..11 I. 1_1-i- _. ,Ebony," said she. "You
work, Jem? I asked, in a : I .. ir .... I,- ', -- have done well. But it is
dazed way. .,, !. I I .. too bad to make you play
"Not likely, missile, when '1 I,.. ..... ,, / r the part of a locomotive en-
maybe they'll kill me for V... -. ,1 .. i. l.. gine. And so, old fellow,
warning of ye." I caught 4 ii .. 7, i I will take off your harness
a glimpse of his poor, dreary -- 1. .. .. ". and let you go free."
troubled eyes in the gather- I -Then Lucy took the scarf
ing gloom; it made my from. the dog's neck, and
heart quiver. darted off alone on her
"Jem, forgive me." I skates to a part of the pond
put my hand out at the -where her brother Felix
window into the wind and -- _: =- had just had a tumble on
rain to detain him; his .. the ice. But Ebony would
jacket was dripping. But not forsake her. He kept
he shook off my hold, not close at her heels; for he
roughly or rudely, but with knew there was water un-
a despairing movement, as derneath the ice, and he
of one quite alone, with meant to be near at hand
none to understand or trust should any accident happen.


Good-bye, Miss Mabel. reached home safely in time
I shall try to mount up to for dinner.
Nan in time. Be sure I'll
never harm ye. Mind what I've told ye, and
keep the lights burning." EBONY AND LUCY. A SONG OF SIXPENCE.
But, Jem, the fowl you took, what of it? Ebony is the name of Lucy's black dog. I Sing a song of sixpence !
My words went out to him through wind and will leave you to guess why he is so called." Three girls and three boys
rain. On a bright, cold, wintry day, when no wind
I never took it; I wouldn't, and they beat was -Ii, ri;.., and the ice of the pond was smooth Went to spend their pennies
me black and blue." This was the answer which as glass, Lucy went out, followed by Ebony. On six penny toys;
came drifting in to me with a shower of rain- Such joyful barking as there was !
drops. He was gone; the dusk of evening fell Her father knew that the dog would pull her But they saw a beggar
between us, and I closed the window. out of the water if the ice should break through. Looking ill and sad,
"Well, that night we kept lights burning all But the day was so cold, there was little danger S t
over the house-Mary, Jack and I-with our from thin ice.
terrible secret between us. We never told my A bright idea occurred to Lucy when she had Gave her all they had.






SUISHTINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

the drawing-rooom with little Smut. I could but grandmother, for fear of agitating her, but we put on her skates. She had scarfs and handker-
think of poor Nan, and the message which she summoned the gardener, who walked sentinel chiefs with her, and, tying three or four of these
had sent me. round the house all the night. No sound came together, she made a noose, which she threw over
Hark! what was that? Smut heard it, and to alarm us-no, nothing save the tumult of Ebony's head. Thus she held him, so that he
pricked up her ears. A something tapping the wind and rain, and the roar of the river. In could pull her on her skates over the ice.
against the window-a shadowy figure standing the morning we heard the gipsy cart had again Now, Ebony, let us see how fast you can
like a blot outside, disappeared, and a silence fell upon us as to the go," said Lucy. Ebony started at a full gallop,
"Miss Mabel," it said in a whisper; and fate of poor Jem. Now, after the lapse of years, and she began to sing:
somehow, I heard the softly-spoken words amid with Nan sleeping in the churchyard, and Smut e issue no tickets, we close no gate
all the tumult of wind and rain. It was Jem, under an apple-tree in the garden, Jack and I We blow no whistle, and nobody's late;
and I went to the window, often think and talk of our faithful little feline Our train is off as soon as we're in it;
"Open it, Miss Mabel," he said in a strangely friend's rescue from the river, and the things We go at the rate of ten miles a minute,
agitated voice ; and I at once obeyed and opened which it brought about. (And that is six hundred miles an hour I)-
it. For ours is an engine of one
"I'm come to warn ye. ------ --- -- -- -- one-dog power;
.Keep lights a-burning all But that dog's Ebony, bold
the night or ye'll be robbed, : and fleet,
or maybe worse," he told -- A dog, you'll find, that is hard
me, his arms on the win- to beat:
dow-sill, his head bowed, a -- So look out, stragglers and
hopeless despair on his -- tramps! Guess
hyoel despiron Yo u'd better not trifle with
swarthy face. "Do ye un- --- Y-- -- ur express!"
-"tan -:- our express
"Yes-no-what does it Hardly had Lucy finished
mean ?" I faltered in girlish SUNRISE. her song when Ebony, who
fright. .. ,i ... t.. -iri-, had been going at great
"Uncle and a lot more i- speed for some distance,
are going to break into your I -_. \ i.. -I.inl.. r ., I;, _- slipped on his haunches
house and rob it. Don't \\.,i.7 ., ..ii., nlil I.. where the ice was very
be afraid, but keep fights ..- I r.. -smooth, and, sliding along,
a-burning, that's all. Ye -" fell over on his side.
need fear no harm if ye do _1. i.1 14 ..' I.1,,.i Lucy fell, too, but she
"that." was not hurt. You good
"Will you help in. the [ I- Y -1..11 I. 1_1-i- _. ,Ebony," said she. "You
work, Jem? I asked, in a : I .. ir .... I,- ', -- have done well. But it is
dazed way. .,, !. I I .. too bad to make you play
"Not likely, missile, when '1 I,.. ..... ,, / r the part of a locomotive en-
maybe they'll kill me for V... -. ,1 .. i. l.. gine. And so, old fellow,
warning of ye." I caught 4 ii .. 7, i I will take off your harness
a glimpse of his poor, dreary -- 1. .. .. ". and let you go free."
troubled eyes in the gather- I -Then Lucy took the scarf
ing gloom; it made my from. the dog's neck, and
heart quiver. darted off alone on her
"Jem, forgive me." I skates to a part of the pond
put my hand out at the -where her brother Felix
window into the wind and -- _: =- had just had a tumble on
rain to detain him; his .. the ice. But Ebony would
jacket was dripping. But not forsake her. He kept
he shook off my hold, not close at her heels; for he
roughly or rudely, but with knew there was water un-
a despairing movement, as derneath the ice, and he
of one quite alone, with meant to be near at hand
none to understand or trust should any accident happen.


Good-bye, Miss Mabel. reached home safely in time
I shall try to mount up to for dinner.
Nan in time. Be sure I'll
never harm ye. Mind what I've told ye, and
keep the lights burning." EBONY AND LUCY. A SONG OF SIXPENCE.
But, Jem, the fowl you took, what of it? Ebony is the name of Lucy's black dog. I Sing a song of sixpence !
My words went out to him through wind and will leave you to guess why he is so called." Three girls and three boys
rain. On a bright, cold, wintry day, when no wind
I never took it; I wouldn't, and they beat was -Ii, ri;.., and the ice of the pond was smooth Went to spend their pennies
me black and blue." This was the answer which as glass, Lucy went out, followed by Ebony. On six penny toys;
came drifting in to me with a shower of rain- Such joyful barking as there was !
drops. He was gone; the dusk of evening fell Her father knew that the dog would pull her But they saw a beggar
between us, and I closed the window. out of the water if the ice should break through. Looking ill and sad,
"Well, that night we kept lights burning all But the day was so cold, there was little danger S t
over the house-Mary, Jack and I-with our from thin ice.
terrible secret between us. We never told my A bright idea occurred to Lucy when she had Gave her all they had.






SUISHTINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

the drawing-rooom with little Smut. I could but grandmother, for fear of agitating her, but we put on her skates. She had scarfs and handker-
think of poor Nan, and the message which she summoned the gardener, who walked sentinel chiefs with her, and, tying three or four of these
had sent me. round the house all the night. No sound came together, she made a noose, which she threw over
Hark! what was that? Smut heard it, and to alarm us-no, nothing save the tumult of Ebony's head. Thus she held him, so that he
pricked up her ears. A something tapping the wind and rain, and the roar of the river. In could pull her on her skates over the ice.
against the window-a shadowy figure standing the morning we heard the gipsy cart had again Now, Ebony, let us see how fast you can
like a blot outside, disappeared, and a silence fell upon us as to the go," said Lucy. Ebony started at a full gallop,
"Miss Mabel," it said in a whisper; and fate of poor Jem. Now, after the lapse of years, and she began to sing:
somehow, I heard the softly-spoken words amid with Nan sleeping in the churchyard, and Smut e issue no tickets, we close no gate
all the tumult of wind and rain. It was Jem, under an apple-tree in the garden, Jack and I We blow no whistle, and nobody's late;
and I went to the window, often think and talk of our faithful little feline Our train is off as soon as we're in it;
"Open it, Miss Mabel," he said in a strangely friend's rescue from the river, and the things We go at the rate of ten miles a minute,
agitated voice ; and I at once obeyed and opened which it brought about. (And that is six hundred miles an hour I)-
it. For ours is an engine of one
"I'm come to warn ye. ------ --- -- -- -- one-dog power;
.Keep lights a-burning all But that dog's Ebony, bold
the night or ye'll be robbed, : and fleet,
or maybe worse," he told -- A dog, you'll find, that is hard
me, his arms on the win- to beat:
dow-sill, his head bowed, a -- So look out, stragglers and
hopeless despair on his -- tramps! Guess
hyoel despiron Yo u'd better not trifle with
swarthy face. "Do ye un- --- Y-- -- ur express!"
-"tan -:- our express
"Yes-no-what does it Hardly had Lucy finished
mean ?" I faltered in girlish SUNRISE. her song when Ebony, who
fright. .. ,i ... t.. -iri-, had been going at great
"Uncle and a lot more i- speed for some distance,
are going to break into your I -_. \ i.. -I.inl.. r ., I;, _- slipped on his haunches
house and rob it. Don't \\.,i.7 ., ..ii., nlil I.. where the ice was very
be afraid, but keep fights ..- I r.. -smooth, and, sliding along,
a-burning, that's all. Ye -" fell over on his side.
need fear no harm if ye do _1. i.1 14 ..' I.1,,.i Lucy fell, too, but she
"that." was not hurt. You good
"Will you help in. the [ I- Y -1..11 I. 1_1-i- _. ,Ebony," said she. "You
work, Jem? I asked, in a : I .. ir .... I,- ', -- have done well. But it is
dazed way. .,, !. I I .. too bad to make you play
"Not likely, missile, when '1 I,.. ..... ,, / r the part of a locomotive en-
maybe they'll kill me for V... -. ,1 .. i. l.. gine. And so, old fellow,
warning of ye." I caught 4 ii .. 7, i I will take off your harness
a glimpse of his poor, dreary -- 1. .. .. ". and let you go free."
troubled eyes in the gather- I -Then Lucy took the scarf
ing gloom; it made my from. the dog's neck, and
heart quiver. darted off alone on her
"Jem, forgive me." I skates to a part of the pond
put my hand out at the -where her brother Felix
window into the wind and -- _: =- had just had a tumble on
rain to detain him; his .. the ice. But Ebony would
jacket was dripping. But not forsake her. He kept
he shook off my hold, not close at her heels; for he
roughly or rudely, but with knew there was water un-
a despairing movement, as derneath the ice, and he
of one quite alone, with meant to be near at hand
none to understand or trust should any accident happen.


Good-bye, Miss Mabel. reached home safely in time
I shall try to mount up to for dinner.
Nan in time. Be sure I'll
never harm ye. Mind what I've told ye, and
keep the lights burning." EBONY AND LUCY. A SONG OF SIXPENCE.
But, Jem, the fowl you took, what of it? Ebony is the name of Lucy's black dog. I Sing a song of sixpence !
My words went out to him through wind and will leave you to guess why he is so called." Three girls and three boys
rain. On a bright, cold, wintry day, when no wind
I never took it; I wouldn't, and they beat was -Ii, ri;.., and the ice of the pond was smooth Went to spend their pennies
me black and blue." This was the answer which as glass, Lucy went out, followed by Ebony. On six penny toys;
came drifting in to me with a shower of rain- Such joyful barking as there was !
drops. He was gone; the dusk of evening fell Her father knew that the dog would pull her But they saw a beggar
between us, and I closed the window. out of the water if the ice should break through. Looking ill and sad,
"Well, that night we kept lights burning all But the day was so cold, there was little danger S t
over the house-Mary, Jack and I-with our from thin ice.
terrible secret between us. We never told my A bright idea occurred to Lucy when she had Gave her all they had.





SUTNTSHINE FOR LITTLE CHILDREN.

Down the sharp rocks, across the brook,

And through a bog they ramble:

They find some berries, big and blue,

Outpeering from a bramble.


"These dreadful running blackberry-vines !"

Says Dick; "they are so prickly!
I will not stop; some better place

We surely shall find quickly."

Through the long field they wandering stray,

In the hot sunshine going:
"Beneath the wood-lot trees," says Tom,

"BLUEBERRYING. "There must be nice ones growing."

THE grass is scorching in the sun- And so they find them thick and ripe;
'Tis summer's hottest weather- But, from among them darting,
But Dick and Tom start bravely forth A hissing adder lifts its head,
For blueberries together. And, suddenly upstarting,
Their tin pails glitter in the light, The frightened boys drop both their pails,

The dippers in them rattle, The berries from them spilling.

As up the long green lane they go "Let's hurry home," says Tom.-Says Dick,
Among the browsing cattle. I'm sure that I am willing."


Close underneath the pasture fence So back they come with tattered clothes,
They find some scattered bushes. Scratched, sunburnt, soiled, and tired;
"There is some better place beyond," "To go again," says pouting Tom,
Says Dick; and on he pushes "I never could be hired."
O'er tangled brake, o'er stumbling stones, "Oh dear! oh dear! oh dear!" cries Dick,
And up some steep black ledges, A doleful little fretter,

Where thick the blueberry-bushes grow "We've lost each good place we have had
Along the rocky edges. By looking for a better !"


"But these are very dry and small,"
Says Tommy; "I would rather
Look 'round and find some better place,
A\nd larger berries gather..'












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