• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Foreword
 Table of Contents
 The peace of the summer day
 The golden state
 Yellowstone Park
 Flowers
 Sugar-loaf Nellie
 Impressions
 A visitor
 Crowding
 Life in Norway
 The Christmas sheaf
 Bethlehem
 Our saviour
 Jairus's daughter
 The widow of Nain
 Lilies
 The Aquarium
 The prophet Elijah
 Our pet
 The selfish baby
 Tom's gold dust
 Chickie's puzzle
 Keep away from the well
 Thirsting for knowledge
 Hot Springs and Geysers
 Luther renounces Rome
 John Wesley
 The serpent
 From night to night
 The ignis fatuus
 Windsor castle
 Jerusalem
 The temple
 One of nature's noblemen
 Haman and Mordecai
 Roads over the Alps
 A wonderful walking stick
 Kindness to animals
 June
 The Apostle John
 In the streets
 The Tarsier
 The basin of the Atlantic...
 The pool of Siloam
 Buttermaking in the east
 The Argali
 Rocky Mountain scenery
 The finches
 Hang birds
 Jericho and the Jordan
 God provides
 Wing song
 Pansies
 Indian summer
 Royal children
 Stringing daisies
 Magna Charta Island
 Mothering day
 The barefoot boy
 Footsteps at the door
 The hare
 Edna's trial
 A picturesque palm
 The beauties of nature
 Indians
 Birds
 The water that's past
 Stand up
 A lost dinner
 The torn book
 A perilous position
 Apple-time
 The picnic
 Rule of life
 The useful plow
 Transformation
 That line fence
 Mother's boys
 Violet and Rover
 Holy ghost flower
 Bird of paradise
 The little bird
 Joseph's dreams
 The Prophet Elisha
 The fall of Babylon
 The falling of the stars
 True Easter
 Fingal's cave
 Maidenhood
 The lakeside
 Wycliffe and his church at...
 Mrs. Ann H. Hudson
 Water-lilies
 The pine-apple
 The tapioca plant
 Something about gold
 The sea-anemone
 The cedar
 The Dead Sea
 California fruits and flowers
 "Thanks"
 Woods in winter
 A shower
 The seed we sow
 Dead leaves
 Our baby
 Jack
 The rabbit
 Beavers and their homes
 The flaming fountain
 Seeing through water
 The dripping well of Knaresbor...
 Girls' manners
 The Chamois
 Great Canyon
 Meiringen Switzerland
 Patience and perseverance
 A lump of coal
 The light-ship
 Rural life in Palestine
 Niagara Falls
 The little haymakers
 Sweetheart mother
 John Bunyan
 In summer days
 The return
 John Milton
 The sailor boy
 The magpie
 The American osprey
 Sojourner Truth
 The palm tree
 Words and deeds
 The call of Samuel
 Geysers of the Yellowstone
 The rain-tree
 The use of any enemy
 George Whitefield
 The beautiful birds
 An ant funeral
 A narrow escape
 Keeping step
 Sabbath chimes
 The Japanese
 The wave
 The rainy day
 Pictures
 Going home
 Otocyon
 Sentence on a judge
 Pedro and his pets
 Watching one's self
 Jowler
 The Samaritan woman
 The hippopotamus
 A bird without wings
 Acquainted with the Bible
 At the well
 Over the Jordan
 Martin Luther
 The promise
 The butterfly
 No cause for envy
 The Yosemite Valley
 Baby elephants
 Butter-cups
 How marbles are made
 When we were boys
 An Oriental shepherd
 Grandpa
 Fanny's cuckoo clock
 The Journey to Emmaus
 Moses
 A song
 Wisconsin scenery
 The romance of the dells
 Dandelion
 June
 "Bimeby"
 Alpine horns
 The flower mission
 Only a crack
 The snow-storm
 I wish
 Be as thorough as you can
 One year
 Slipping away
 October
 Mozart
 Advertising
 Back Cover






Group Title: Sunshine at home : sparkling pages for the child, the youth, the parent : a family portfolio of natural history, biography, and Bible scenes
Title: Sunshine at home
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00053185/00001
 Material Information
Title: Sunshine at home sparkling pages for the child, the youth, the parent : a family portfolio of natural history, biography, and Bible scenes
Physical Description: 124, 4 p. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Review & Herald Publishing House ( Publisher )
Pacific Press ( Publisher )
Publisher: Review & Herald Publishing House
Pacific Press
Place of Publication: Battle Creek Mich
Oakland Calif
Publication Date: c1883
 Subjects
Subject: Bible stories, English -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Biography -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1883   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1883   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1883   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1883
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Michigan -- Battle Creek
United States -- California -- Oakland
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: One hundred and ninety illustrations.
General Note: Contains prose and verse.
General Note: Includes index.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00053185
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223573
notis - ALG3823
oclc - 11363937

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Foreword
        Page 3
    Table of Contents
        Page 4
    The peace of the summer day
        Page 5
    The golden state
        Page 5
    Yellowstone Park
        Page 6
    Flowers
        Page 7
    Sugar-loaf Nellie
        Page 7
    Impressions
        Page 8
    A visitor
        Page 8
    Crowding
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Life in Norway
        Page 10
    The Christmas sheaf
        Page 11
    Bethlehem
        Page 12
    Our saviour
        Page 13
    Jairus's daughter
        Page 14
    The widow of Nain
        Page 15
    Lilies
        Page 16
    The Aquarium
        Page 16
    The prophet Elijah
        Page 17
    Our pet
        Page 18
    The selfish baby
        Page 18
    Tom's gold dust
        Page 18
    Chickie's puzzle
        Page 18
    Keep away from the well
        Page 19
    Thirsting for knowledge
        Page 19
    Hot Springs and Geysers
        Page 20
    Luther renounces Rome
        Page 21
    John Wesley
        Page 22
    The serpent
        Page 23
    From night to night
        Page 24
    The ignis fatuus
        Page 25
    Windsor castle
        Page 25
    Jerusalem
        Page 26
    The temple
        Page 27
        Page 28
    One of nature's noblemen
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Haman and Mordecai
        Page 32
    Roads over the Alps
        Page 33
    A wonderful walking stick
        Page 33
    Kindness to animals
        Page 34
    June
        Page 34
    The Apostle John
        Page 35
    In the streets
        Page 35
    The Tarsier
        Page 36
    The basin of the Atlantic Ocean
        Page 36
    The pool of Siloam
        Page 37
    Buttermaking in the east
        Page 37
        Page 38
    The Argali
        Page 39
    Rocky Mountain scenery
        Page 39
    The finches
        Page 40
    Hang birds
        Page 40
    Jericho and the Jordan
        Page 41
    God provides
        Page 42
    Wing song
        Page 42
    Pansies
        Page 42
    Indian summer
        Page 42
    Royal children
        Page 43
    Stringing daisies
        Page 43
    Magna Charta Island
        Page 44
    Mothering day
        Page 44
    The barefoot boy
        Page 45
    Footsteps at the door
        Page 45
    The hare
        Page 46
    Edna's trial
        Page 46
    A picturesque palm
        Page 47
    The beauties of nature
        Page 47
    Indians
        Page 48
    Birds
        Page 48
    The water that's past
        Page 49
    Stand up
        Page 49
    A lost dinner
        Page 50
    The torn book
        Page 51
    A perilous position
        Page 51
    Apple-time
        Page 52
    The picnic
        Page 52
    Rule of life
        Page 52
    The useful plow
        Page 53
    Transformation
        Page 53
    That line fence
        Page 53
    Mother's boys
        Page 53
    Violet and Rover
        Page 54
    Holy ghost flower
        Page 54
    Bird of paradise
        Page 55
    The little bird
        Page 56
    Joseph's dreams
        Page 56
    The Prophet Elisha
        Page 57
    The fall of Babylon
        Page 58
        Page 59
    The falling of the stars
        Page 60
    True Easter
        Page 61
    Fingal's cave
        Page 61
    Maidenhood
        Page 62
    The lakeside
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Wycliffe and his church at Lutterworth
        Page 64
    Mrs. Ann H. Hudson
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Water-lilies
        Page 66
    The pine-apple
        Page 66
    The tapioca plant
        Page 66
    Something about gold
        Page 67
    The sea-anemone
        Page 67
    The cedar
        Page 68
    The Dead Sea
        Page 68
        Page 69
    California fruits and flowers
        Page 70
    "Thanks"
        Page 70
    Woods in winter
        Page 71
    A shower
        Page 71
    The seed we sow
        Page 71
    Dead leaves
        Page 71
    Our baby
        Page 71
    Jack
        Page 72
    The rabbit
        Page 72
    Beavers and their homes
        Page 73
    The flaming fountain
        Page 74
    Seeing through water
        Page 74
    The dripping well of Knaresborough
        Page 75
    Girls' manners
        Page 75
    The Chamois
        Page 76
    Great Canyon
        Page 77
    Meiringen Switzerland
        Page 78
    Patience and perseverance
        Page 79
    A lump of coal
        Page 79
    The light-ship
        Page 80
        Page 81
    Rural life in Palestine
        Page 82
    Niagara Falls
        Page 83
    The little haymakers
        Page 84
    Sweetheart mother
        Page 84
    John Bunyan
        Page 85
    In summer days
        Page 86
    The return
        Page 86
    John Milton
        Page 87
    The sailor boy
        Page 88
    The magpie
        Page 89
    The American osprey
        Page 90
    Sojourner Truth
        Page 91
        Page 92
    The palm tree
        Page 93
    Words and deeds
        Page 93
    The call of Samuel
        Page 95
    Geysers of the Yellowstone
        Page 94
    The rain-tree
        Page 96
    The use of any enemy
        Page 96
    George Whitefield
        Page 96
        Page 97
    The beautiful birds
        Page 98
    An ant funeral
        Page 98
    A narrow escape
        Page 99
    Keeping step
        Page 99
    Sabbath chimes
        Page 99
    The Japanese
        Page 100
    The wave
        Page 101
    The rainy day
        Page 101
    Pictures
        Page 101
    Going home
        Page 101
    Otocyon
        Page 102
    Sentence on a judge
        Page 102
    Pedro and his pets
        Page 103
    Watching one's self
        Page 103
    Jowler
        Page 104
    The Samaritan woman
        Page 105
    The hippopotamus
        Page 106
    A bird without wings
        Page 107
    Acquainted with the Bible
        Page 107
    At the well
        Page 108
    Over the Jordan
        Page 108
    Martin Luther
        Page 109
    The promise
        Page 110
    The butterfly
        Page 111
    No cause for envy
        Page 111
    The Yosemite Valley
        Page 112
    Baby elephants
        Page 112
    Butter-cups
        Page 113
    How marbles are made
        Page 113
    When we were boys
        Page 113
    An Oriental shepherd
        Page 114
    Grandpa
        Page 115
    Fanny's cuckoo clock
        Page 115
        Page 116
    The Journey to Emmaus
        Page 117
    Moses
        Page 117
    A song
        Page 118
    Wisconsin scenery
        Page 119
    The romance of the dells
        Page 119
    Dandelion
        Page 119
    June
        Page 120
    "Bimeby"
        Page 120
    Alpine horns
        Page 120
    The flower mission
        Page 121
    Only a crack
        Page 121
    The snow-storm
        Page 122
    I wish
        Page 122
    Be as thorough as you can
        Page 122
    One year
        Page 123
    Slipping away
        Page 123
    October
        Page 123
    Mozart
        Page 124
    Advertising
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
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I1 i .1i[ .I ... ... ... .......-.. ,"- : ':+-. -" ,+ +' ,. :- + --q '. -. 7"..%`















SNuiishiiine at Home



SPARKLING PAGES

-FOR-


1lW I I-.O'n
SH O: UT -H,




.. A[ ImiY iPORTipomo
OF-


N TUMI L HISTOIP, BIUGPlAPHY, NDI BIBLE SCEN ES,


ONE HUNDRED AND NINETY ILLUSTRATIONS.


Seatter sunshine as you go,
Little Volume, through the snow;
Or in summer's golden day,
Shower blessings on thy way.




PUBLISHED BY THE
RBVIBV & HERALD PUBLISHING H-TUSE :
BATTLE CREE, IMICH.
OR, PACIFIC PRESS, OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA.

L.Y



























EnltErEdL according to Act of CnOigrEss, ii the YEar 1BB3,
BY THE
REYIEVJ fND IEERILD PUBLISHING HOUSE,
In thE DffiuE of the Librarian if CEngrEss, at aashhinigtoii-, E,











i\!Jw e *> 4-y


























/ AA





"N" I J'-T TR lives receive coloring from everything with which we come in contact. As some colors
S'i fade, while others are enduring, so with the influences which affect us. There is noth-
..,. ing that abides with us longer than the sentiments we read. As has been said, The
"t written words, the unspoken thoughts that we have once admitted to the shrine of our
'" minds, are there forever." How important, then, that our reading be of a nature which
i-hll develop our noblest powers, tending to lift us above the fitful, unworthy pleasures of
Ihis world, and to fit us for a home in heaven!
With this aim in view,-of helping to elevate the thoughts and motives, and to cultivate a taste for
that which will feast the soul, and give eternal good,-the editor has sought to make this little volume
an aid in forming a true and noble character. Such thoughts have been carefully selected as would,
either directly or indirectly, teach some good life-lesson.
The book is designed for all. The little ones will find stories suited to their fancy, and the pictures
will help them to spend many a pleasant hour; while the older ones will find many items of interest
scattered here and there, from which they may derive instruction as well as entertainment.
May the blessing of our Father in heaven, and the sunshine of his presence, attend this little work
wherever it shall go. EDITOR.









-T:































A Bird without Wings 107 Jowler 104 The Dead Sea 69
--- ..-.--.----.-"' -1, ------
















A NarBird without Wingsow Escape . 9107 Jowler . 104 The Flower Missiona 1268
Acquaintaled with tepherd Bible . 11407 June . 34 The Dripping Well of nresboro. . 75




"A Perious Positionnner . 51 Luther Renounces Romell 210 The Fall of Babylon 4658
"Alpineturesque Palm . 47120 eep away Charta Islandthe W . 4419 The F alling of the Stars . 60
A Lump of Coal .Coope 579 KeMaidenhood, Longfellowg Step . 99 The Ignis Fatuches . .. 2540
An Ant Funeral . 71 Martindness to Animals. . 34 The Flaming Fountain. . 1074
A Narrowing . 99 Life ingen, Switzerland . 10 The FlJourney to Emmausission . 117
An Oriental Well .Shepherd . 10814 LiliMoses . 117 The Golden Side, Whittier . 62
A Wo nderful Walking-Stick . 3351 LuMother's Renounces .Rome . 53 The Lightshipare .. 8046
A Picturesque Palm . 847 Mothering Day .Island . 44 The Hippopotamusttle Bird . 5106
Baby Epple-Tiphantse George Cooper. . 112 Mozart . 124 The Little Haymakers 84
Be A Thorough as You Can. . .122 Martis. Ann H. Judsoner . 6109 The Japanese 8100
Beavers and their Homes 118 Miringenara Falls .witze . 78 The JouPalm-Tree, Whittier . 1179
Bethlehem .Well . 108 No Cause for Envy. 117 The PeLake-Side, of the Summttier Day . 56
"A Wonderful Walking-Stick . . 12033 Mothober's Boys . . 123 The Lightshipcnic . . 5280
Bird of Pardise . 55 O ne of Nature's Noblemen . 449 The Pine-Applttle Bir. . 56
aby Elep. . 4 O11 ne MozYeart . ..m. 123 The L ittle Haymakers . 374
Butter-Cups .e Thorough . 113 Mrs.Only a Crack . 64. 121 The Magpie 1189
Beavutters -Making in the air st . 73 Otocyoara . 10283 The Palm-Tree, Elihtta . 793
BethCalfornia Fruits and Flowers . 1 No Cause b ory . 71 The Peace of the Summer Day. . 5
"Bimcke's Puzzle . 120 Our Pctobet 13 The RaPicnicT 59
Birdof rdiseng . . One of Nature's Noblemen ... The Pine-Apple 66
"DandelionBirds . 1148 Oner the Jordan 13 The nPool of Siloam f . 37
Butter L-Cups 71 nly a Cracksies . 42 he PRom e .... 11
Butter-Making in the East. 46 Patiene and Perseverance ..... 79 The Sailorphet Elijah . 8817
California Fruits and Flowers .u.m. 70 Our Baby C K S.......... The Prophet Eiisha .... .... 57

Chikie's Cukoo Clock zzle . 115 Pedro and his Pe t s . ... 103 The Samaritan Woman 105
Finga s Cave S. 1 Pictures, Alice Car 101 The SeRain-Trene 96
Flrowersding Roads over the Alps 33 The Seed We ow 71








Footsteps at the Door 45 Rocky Mountain Scenery 39 The Selfish Baby 18
Dandelioght to Night . 24119 Over the Jordaildren . 43 The Serpent a .. 23
George Whitefield .. .. 96 Rule of Life 52 The Returne toemh m 1286




Geysers of the Yellowtone 94 Rural Life in Palestine . 8 The Tapiocea Plant 11966
Girls' Manner 75 Sabbath Chimes 46. 99 The Tarsier . 36
annyGod Provides .Clock . 115 edro and his etser 10374 The Samaritanle Woma . 105
Going omasCave 101 Setres Alice aryJudge 10 The Torn Book 51
eGrandpa 115 Slipping away 123 The Useful Plow 53
GrFootsteps at Canyonthe Door .. .. 77 Rocky Mo untain Scener Truth . 391 The Use of an Enemy 96
F rom Night to Night . 32 Somet Ching about Go .... The Water that's Past 9
HanGeorge Whitefield. . 4096 ne of L .fe .52 The Wave, Longfellow . 101
B r i n E-Lo37 The Propheto El j....... 17

GeyH o t Springs and Geysers . 2094 ural Lifhe in Palestiner . 8 The Yosemite Valley 112






GiHow Marbles als Ma Madnners e . 113 Thanks 70 Thirsting for Knowledge 319
ImGod Provide s 8t.... That Line Pence. . 537











Transformation 53
InGodings . 10148 The American Osprey 90 True Torn Book. 51












Indian Summer 42 The Apostle John 35 o a ..
GraIn Summer Daysdpa . 86 The Aquarium The . 5














1 wish 1 The Barefoot Boy, .hittio 45 Water-Lilies 66
Great Canyk .on . 7 The Basin of the Atlantic Ocean . 36 Whe Use of an Enemy 1196
















Jalrusl -Daughter, X. P. Willis . 14 The Beautiful Birds . 67 Wieiffe and his Church at Lutterworth 64
Jerichoama and the Jordecai . 41 The Beauties of Nature .The W water that's Past . 4
Jerusalem 26 The Butterv I4 Windsor Castle .L . 101

"John Bunyan 85 The Call of Samuel 95 Wisconsin Scenery .119
Hot Springs and Geysers C .. ... i0 Pd anehis Petsr ........ The Sosemite Valley .. ... ... 105

Howhn Marbles are .ade . 87113 The Cedar ..... Woodhirstin Winter, Longfellow ... 19
Flowers...................... .Tom's Gold-Dust .R.d. .o.v. 18
Impressions 8 That Line Fence .S.. 53
t te D. .. o c MTransformation ..... ...... 53
Indians .N ...... ....... 48 Rohe Almriean Osprey ... 90
Indian Summer 4 The Apostle John .. ...... 35

John Summer Daysy . 2286 The ChAquari 6 ioletrds and overeds .. 9354
In the St reets . 35 The ChArali . ... 39 watchingg One's Self ... .. .. 103
I wish .. ...... ......... 1 Si The Barefoot Boyu Wit.er .. .. 45 Water-Lilies .. ... ...... 66
Giack ...... ......... 71 The Basin of the Atlantic Ocean .. ... 36 When We Were Boys .. .. 113

Jericho and the Jordan 41 The Beauties of Nature 47 Wind Song ... ....... 43






' l Joseph's Dreams 56 The Christmas Sheaf, PhAoebe Cary 11 Yellowstone Park. 6 D
Great Cayn................. Sooune Trt...................TeUe fa ney.9







































Love which has its sweet beginning
T7T P9 JV Then, indeed, will peace and gladness 4
SMake the bluest skies above. HERE is many a rest on the road of life,
S\If we only would stop to take it;
S, the perfect peace and quiet Of the fair midsummer day, 0UR lives are songs. God writes the words, If the querulous heart would wake it.
As upon the rippling waters And we set them to music at pleasure; To the sunny soul that is full of hope,
Heaven's lights and shadows play. And the song grows glad or sweet or sad And whose beautiful trust ne'er faileth,
From the depths of distant woodlands As we chance to fashion the measure. The grass is green and the flowers are bright,
Hear the robin's piping call, We must write the music, whatever the song, Though the wintry storm prevaileth.
While the breezes through the tree-tops Whatever the rhyme or meter;
Croon a lullaby for all. And if it is sad, we can make it glad; Better to hope, though the clouds hang low.
Or if sweet, we can make it sweeter. And to keep the eyes still lifted ;
Far from city haunt and bustle For the sweet, blue sky will
Came we on a summer's -- -_ soon peep through
morn: When the ominous clouds
deathh the shine of heaven's are lifted.
glory o- There was never a night with-
Lingering till the week was out a day,
gone. Nor an evening without a
Ah, could hearts grow cold and morning;
selfish, __ And the darkest hour, so the
Or f forgetful of the "Best," -- proverb goes,
As in God's own grandest tem- Is the hour before the dawn-
ples \ ing.
Heart and mind sought daily Better to weave in the web of
rest _- life
A bright and golden filling,
Life must have its winter sea -A brigh a _goden ,illim-_
son ..And to do God's will with a
son, ' ready heart,
Summer cannot last for aye; -- And hands that are swift
Storms must come, and stornm- And hands that are swiftwilling,
clus olo__. 'Than to snap the delicate sil-
Brightest sunshine in the
sky --- ver threads
But the peace that aketh er-- Of our curious lives asunder,

feet,
fecV the tangled ends,
Never-dying, gladsome rest, ". And sit and grieve and won-
Only comes when there is eher: Ad. s
"ished der.
Love's sweet summer in each
breast; 'r TEn to wisdom's call while
... yet
Love which goeth on forever, -ye- -t--_- -- -.."!"
Hand in hand with charity; Z Life's sun is only dawning;
LoveHand in hand with charies not, nor =- Nor in thy tender years forget
faiLove thich wearies no, nor God's gentle voice of warn-

In its gentle sympathy ;n -- -







































Love which has its sweet beginning
T7T P9 JV Then, indeed, will peace and gladness 4
SMake the bluest skies above. HERE is many a rest on the road of life,
S\If we only would stop to take it;
S, the perfect peace and quiet Of the fair midsummer day, 0UR lives are songs. God writes the words, If the querulous heart would wake it.
As upon the rippling waters And we set them to music at pleasure; To the sunny soul that is full of hope,
Heaven's lights and shadows play. And the song grows glad or sweet or sad And whose beautiful trust ne'er faileth,
From the depths of distant woodlands As we chance to fashion the measure. The grass is green and the flowers are bright,
Hear the robin's piping call, We must write the music, whatever the song, Though the wintry storm prevaileth.
While the breezes through the tree-tops Whatever the rhyme or meter;
Croon a lullaby for all. And if it is sad, we can make it glad; Better to hope, though the clouds hang low.
Or if sweet, we can make it sweeter. And to keep the eyes still lifted ;
Far from city haunt and bustle For the sweet, blue sky will
Came we on a summer's -- -_ soon peep through
morn: When the ominous clouds
deathh the shine of heaven's are lifted.
glory o- There was never a night with-
Lingering till the week was out a day,
gone. Nor an evening without a
Ah, could hearts grow cold and morning;
selfish, __ And the darkest hour, so the
Or f forgetful of the "Best," -- proverb goes,
As in God's own grandest tem- Is the hour before the dawn-
ples \ ing.
Heart and mind sought daily Better to weave in the web of
rest _- life
A bright and golden filling,
Life must have its winter sea -A brigh a _goden ,illim-_
son ..And to do God's will with a
son, ' ready heart,
Summer cannot last for aye; -- And hands that are swift
Storms must come, and stornm- And hands that are swiftwilling,
clus olo__. 'Than to snap the delicate sil-
Brightest sunshine in the
sky --- ver threads
But the peace that aketh er-- Of our curious lives asunder,

feet,
fecV the tangled ends,
Never-dying, gladsome rest, ". And sit and grieve and won-
Only comes when there is eher: Ad. s
"ished der.
Love's sweet summer in each
breast; 'r TEn to wisdom's call while
... yet
Love which goeth on forever, -ye- -t--_- -- -.."!"
Hand in hand with charity; Z Life's sun is only dawning;
LoveHand in hand with charies not, nor =- Nor in thy tender years forget
faiLove thich wearies no, nor God's gentle voice of warn-

In its gentle sympathy ;n -- -












SIUJKHTNE._ AT' P1OM.






__=- HIS peerless wonder-land of earth, ournation'sI:-ur --" --
is an oblong sixty-two miles in length from norn t I i..th .I
fifty-four miles in width, containing over
-' ) three thousand square miles. It has an el-
evation of about eight thousand feet above
the level of the sea, and is surrounded by
a magnificent range of snow-capped mount- -
Sains. It were useless, in a limited article
Like this, to attempt to describe in detail
such a mass of interesting natural wonders
; i''.. wded into the area of this Park. Its mount-
.mI -alleys; its basaltic cliffs and its abysmal can-
*t', v, sland-studdedlakes; its swift-flowing streams
S t h, L....a and tumble through miles of rapids, or plunge
hundrd, of feet over a succession of cataracts; its hiss- 4
ing hot springs, spouting geysers, and volcanoes and terrace-building
springs; its deposits of obsidian or volcanic glass; its fossilized for-
ests ; its wiord-like, erosive formations and monuiments,-all these
would require many pages to describe them fully, and no pen-pict-
nre could present
.. -.more than a weak







1..--.- -...~ l i~ it i *II 1
4 [.,II l. L I ll. -lt: -X

it DP etc. I-t L I-L'-.- ..,-, i t ,
i--'1 h'-''''I~k... ',,tI ,, ,,!' i. I,,..~ 1,.,.051 3 ,,tC i



i.. 1_. tI.i.-.i.Qriedmount





ticLr. -- in t11.. 'cs..rbl; and yet it is comparatively so little known as to offer a
".t It 11 r romantic and interesting exploration. It is about thirty


"ii"- .. v, t, wide. That so large a body of water, with a vertical eleva-
SLit i..I i ...r than the highest mountain peaks of the East, itself begirt
L -i.i W i honsands of feet higher, its shor-lines dotted, and doubtless
it 11.., iv ill. .1,I ,,- seething geysers, boiling hot springs, aind deposits of scoreh-
Sfeatures, is not difficult of
41 -h ll,.1-,1 .,O:es m any_ rar a, -:er s








I ..iii t 'i this page gives its a glimpse of the Yellowstone River, that
.--a -1 -..1i the Missouri which flows through Mhontana and Idaho. The
--a-b-.... "ciiry along its shores is reached by the Northern Pacific Rail-
o= o ioew extension to the Park, and one of the longest and best
q I i ,,: r. ads from East to West.
., i, I th t. irist, contemplating a trip out West, will not fail to find a
scene of interest and pleasure along the banks of this,
one of the most beautiful rivers of the world, with its
rocky canyons and the boiling springs that meet one at
every turn.
..., Beautiful homes are dotting the landscape here and
there, and ere many years have passed away the great
--_-. vYellowstone Park will be crowded with cities and towns
-_--as the once uninhabited wilderness of the great East has
become.










___._____ 1-

SUNSqNFiM AT HOMn. 7

Sof the mountain; and after we had tired ourselves
out -, ;o .., and playing hide-and-seek, or "I 'mi on
"the king's land," we used to gather about our teacher
I M .. on Table Rock, which was large enough for us all.
As we looked down on the houses and barns,
which seemed so small and far away, the teacher told
us of the days, when, instead of houses and white
people, there were only rude huts called wigwams,
.- in which Indians lived; and that right under where
iwe sat, on the very edge of the mountain, was a hol-
low in the rock, called King Phillip's Seat," because
S r he used to climb up there and sit looking down on
his possessions.
: O If I had heard only what my Sabbath-school
i.. .. ....... -,., ..- s, teacher told me, I should have been better off. But
\ 1... .. ., .. .., i.... '. .... ',...orld of ours;- others were not as careful about the truth; and I
h- ,. 0-". '. ........." '" "' "' "" 1 heard many foolish stories about wild animals and
S. ..' men living on the mountain, till I came to have a
Stately and tall, of richest hue;- great fear of the big rocks and the dark woods, and
No painter's skill can e'er portray thought they were full of bad people.
The countless beauties they display. But I cannot stop to tell you any more about
the mountain, which, in
spite of my fear, I loved
very dearly.
One day I was cross
and naughty, and would
Snot do as I was told, till
reUG A- OAF Niel- poor mother's tfae grow
J| lie! Is n't that a sad nd grieved. As
queer name for a I stood suling, Katie,
little girl to have ? our hired girl, suddenly
And how do you suppose turned round, and after
she ever came to have it? loo..ing steadily at my
Perhaps you think she sour face, cried out,
must have been very Why, this is n't our
sweet and loving to be Nellie at all! Our Nol-
called Snyar-loaf; but lie never had such a face
wait until I have told the as that. This is some
story before you make up other child."
your mind. Then, after a moment
I must tell you what more, "Oh, I know!
kiind of a place I used to sle said, "this is Sugar-
live in;: for I was Sugar- loaf Nellie, thile naughty,
loaf Nellie." bad girl who lives on
"My house," as I used the mountainn"
to call it, stood a little off It Then she began talk-
the village street; and inig to me as if I were
down at the end of the some strange child she
lot behind it towered a had never' seen before
great high mountain, aying, "Good- morning.
,..,. "'ar-loaf. ... )id you come to see our
Sometimes we children i Nellie? She isn't at
went down through the homee just now. An(l,
lot into the lane, thinking besides, we could n't let
we would climb up the her playwith a naughty
mountain-side- but we -irl and I'm afraid,
had heard so many sto- from your looks that
ries of bears and wolves, and the ugly people wlho lived oni the you are very inaughty. So you'd better go back to Sugar-loaf,
mountain, that we were sure to hear a noise in the bushes be and stay there till you can be good like our Nellie. Oh, how I
fore we had gone tfar, which made us turn and run home much wish she'd come back"
faster than we had gone. "Yes, I want my Nellie again," said mother. And they
But every summer our Sabbath-school had a picnic on the top looked at me in such a stern, strange way, that I was ready to

L 4j)










___._____ 1-

SUNSqNFiM AT HOMn. 7

Sof the mountain; and after we had tired ourselves
out -, ;o .., and playing hide-and-seek, or "I 'mi on
"the king's land," we used to gather about our teacher
I M .. on Table Rock, which was large enough for us all.
As we looked down on the houses and barns,
which seemed so small and far away, the teacher told
us of the days, when, instead of houses and white
people, there were only rude huts called wigwams,
.- in which Indians lived; and that right under where
iwe sat, on the very edge of the mountain, was a hol-
low in the rock, called King Phillip's Seat," because
S r he used to climb up there and sit looking down on
his possessions.
: O If I had heard only what my Sabbath-school
i.. .. ....... -,., ..- s, teacher told me, I should have been better off. But
\ 1... .. ., .. .., i.... '. .... ',...orld of ours;- others were not as careful about the truth; and I
h- ,. 0-". '. ........." '" "' "' "" 1 heard many foolish stories about wild animals and
S. ..' men living on the mountain, till I came to have a
Stately and tall, of richest hue;- great fear of the big rocks and the dark woods, and
No painter's skill can e'er portray thought they were full of bad people.
The countless beauties they display. But I cannot stop to tell you any more about
the mountain, which, in
spite of my fear, I loved
very dearly.
One day I was cross
and naughty, and would
Snot do as I was told, till
reUG A- OAF Niel- poor mother's tfae grow
J| lie! Is n't that a sad nd grieved. As
queer name for a I stood suling, Katie,
little girl to have ? our hired girl, suddenly
And how do you suppose turned round, and after
she ever came to have it? loo..ing steadily at my
Perhaps you think she sour face, cried out,
must have been very Why, this is n't our
sweet and loving to be Nellie at all! Our Nol-
called Snyar-loaf; but lie never had such a face
wait until I have told the as that. This is some
story before you make up other child."
your mind. Then, after a moment
I must tell you what more, "Oh, I know!
kiind of a place I used to sle said, "this is Sugar-
live in;: for I was Sugar- loaf Nellie, thile naughty,
loaf Nellie." bad girl who lives on
"My house," as I used the mountainn"
to call it, stood a little off It Then she began talk-
the village street; and inig to me as if I were
down at the end of the some strange child she
lot behind it towered a had never' seen before
great high mountain, aying, "Good- morning.
,..,. "'ar-loaf. ... )id you come to see our
Sometimes we children i Nellie? She isn't at
went down through the homee just now. An(l,
lot into the lane, thinking besides, we could n't let
we would climb up the her playwith a naughty
mountain-side- but we -irl and I'm afraid,
had heard so many sto- from your looks that
ries of bears and wolves, and the ugly people wlho lived oni the you are very inaughty. So you'd better go back to Sugar-loaf,
mountain, that we were sure to hear a noise in the bushes be and stay there till you can be good like our Nellie. Oh, how I
fore we had gone tfar, which made us turn and run home much wish she'd come back"
faster than we had gone. "Yes, I want my Nellie again," said mother. And they
But every summer our Sabbath-school had a picnic on the top looked at me in such a stern, strange way, that I was ready to

L 4j)













8 SKre Imq AT HO H0 E.


cry with shame and fright, and began to wonder if I hadn't M
changed into some one else ; and I thought I ought to live on
Sugar-loaf if I was going to be so naughty. EARLY impressions mark the course to be taken through life.
Not a word did I say; but I started off, and ran till I was out Take a fresh molded brick, and impress a leaf upon it; subject
of breath. Then I threw myself on the grass in the hollow by the brick to the kiln, and it will come back with the impression
the walnut-trees, and cried till, tired out, I fell asleep. ,. rt.,. build it in a house, and you may see it across the
When 1 woke up, I couldn't tell why I was there all alone. street. The child's mind is the moist brick ; delay not to bring
Then it all came the truth of God in
back to me, and, contact with it, that
ho artiiy ash almed of the impression may
myself. I said aloud, be lasting.
"I wont be Sugar-
loaf Nellie! I'm go-
ing backtomymam-
man to be her own
SNelli curious, I do de-
ellie always." So lare,"
I started for the Says puppy No. 1;
house, gathering "I wonder if he comes
flowers on the way. to fight,
My little maltese Or if he comes for
fun."
kitten came to meet
mc ; and I ran into "I don't see either fight
the yard, 1.1,--;,, a or fun
with thile kitten and In him," says No. 2;
waithing merrily.t "But if he once were
i hig merrilysorely tried,
W: hly, here comes No known' what he'd
our Nellie back !" do."
cricd Katie. _And
cried catie. And "Oh! oh!" says timid
(ooher eno to meet nNo. 3,
(door to mcet mnc. "I'd like to see my
"0 (m) lanina, please mother;
fbigive 0 lc; I'm so This visitor takes too
sorry! nlut I'm your much room.
orn! Belliei ow, and I'll hide behind my
brother."
I'm going to be al- brother."
ways," 1 exclaimed,
as she bent down, to .
kiss me. .
"I'nl very glad," this great
said mamma; n and world is room
then, in a few`\ whis- enough for all
p)ered words, told eri without push-
how willingly she l ing and jam-
forgave me, and that ming one an-
I must not forget to other. And yet, how
ask my heavenly painfullyy frequent
Father's .. i.. are the cries for help
also. to extricate some
How happy I was unfortunate from
then! and how wil- 4-i --- under the iron heel
lingly I went to do that has trodden on
the things I had refused to do before, and when they were done, him in securing a higher position for somebody else."
how I enjoyed holding and playing with my kitten! The rich turn their backs to the rest of humanity, and push,
This lesson sank deep into my heart, and whenever any one no matter who is hurt or crushed; sometimes glancing back-
called me Sugar-loaf Nellie (as some one was sure to do if I ward, but never turning far enough to see the misery they are
looked cross), it would remind me of the first time I heard it, causing. -Some of these down-trodden ones cry out in their an-
and how I had promised mamma then to be her own Nellie al- guish; while others, perhaps suffering as much, bear more pa-
ways, and that made me try hard to be good. tiently the loss of their treasures, with only a look of trouble.
I hope all my little friends who read this'will try always to Maany are the outcasts who have no part to act in the world's
be good, and mind their mammas, so that they will not need to great drama; but rudely thrust aside, they languish in neglect
be called by any nickname to make them ashamed of their till they are released by death. B3ut most fortunate of all is the
naughtiness. middle-man. Too far away to feel the crushing weight of the













8 SKre Imq AT HO H0 E.


cry with shame and fright, and began to wonder if I hadn't M
changed into some one else ; and I thought I ought to live on
Sugar-loaf if I was going to be so naughty. EARLY impressions mark the course to be taken through life.
Not a word did I say; but I started off, and ran till I was out Take a fresh molded brick, and impress a leaf upon it; subject
of breath. Then I threw myself on the grass in the hollow by the brick to the kiln, and it will come back with the impression
the walnut-trees, and cried till, tired out, I fell asleep. ,. rt.,. build it in a house, and you may see it across the
When 1 woke up, I couldn't tell why I was there all alone. street. The child's mind is the moist brick ; delay not to bring
Then it all came the truth of God in
back to me, and, contact with it, that
ho artiiy ash almed of the impression may
myself. I said aloud, be lasting.
"I wont be Sugar-
loaf Nellie! I'm go-
ing backtomymam-
man to be her own
SNelli curious, I do de-
ellie always." So lare,"
I started for the Says puppy No. 1;
house, gathering "I wonder if he comes
flowers on the way. to fight,
My little maltese Or if he comes for
fun."
kitten came to meet
mc ; and I ran into "I don't see either fight
the yard, 1.1,--;,, a or fun
with thile kitten and In him," says No. 2;
waithing merrily.t "But if he once were
i hig merrilysorely tried,
W: hly, here comes No known' what he'd
our Nellie back !" do."
cricd Katie. _And
cried catie. And "Oh! oh!" says timid
(ooher eno to meet nNo. 3,
(door to mcet mnc. "I'd like to see my
"0 (m) lanina, please mother;
fbigive 0 lc; I'm so This visitor takes too
sorry! nlut I'm your much room.
orn! Belliei ow, and I'll hide behind my
brother."
I'm going to be al- brother."
ways," 1 exclaimed,
as she bent down, to .
kiss me. .
"I'nl very glad," this great
said mamma; n and world is room
then, in a few`\ whis- enough for all
p)ered words, told eri without push-
how willingly she l ing and jam-
forgave me, and that ming one an-
I must not forget to other. And yet, how
ask my heavenly painfullyy frequent
Father's .. i.. are the cries for help
also. to extricate some
How happy I was unfortunate from
then! and how wil- 4-i --- under the iron heel
lingly I went to do that has trodden on
the things I had refused to do before, and when they were done, him in securing a higher position for somebody else."
how I enjoyed holding and playing with my kitten! The rich turn their backs to the rest of humanity, and push,
This lesson sank deep into my heart, and whenever any one no matter who is hurt or crushed; sometimes glancing back-
called me Sugar-loaf Nellie (as some one was sure to do if I ward, but never turning far enough to see the misery they are
looked cross), it would remind me of the first time I heard it, causing. -Some of these down-trodden ones cry out in their an-
and how I had promised mamma then to be her own Nellie al- guish; while others, perhaps suffering as much, bear more pa-
ways, and that made me try hard to be good. tiently the loss of their treasures, with only a look of trouble.
I hope all my little friends who read this'will try always to Maany are the outcasts who have no part to act in the world's
be good, and mind their mammas, so that they will not need to great drama; but rudely thrust aside, they languish in neglect
be called by any nickname to make them ashamed of their till they are released by death. B3ut most fortunate of all is the
naughtiness. middle-man. Too far away to feel the crushing weight of the













8 SKre Imq AT HO H0 E.


cry with shame and fright, and began to wonder if I hadn't M
changed into some one else ; and I thought I ought to live on
Sugar-loaf if I was going to be so naughty. EARLY impressions mark the course to be taken through life.
Not a word did I say; but I started off, and ran till I was out Take a fresh molded brick, and impress a leaf upon it; subject
of breath. Then I threw myself on the grass in the hollow by the brick to the kiln, and it will come back with the impression
the walnut-trees, and cried till, tired out, I fell asleep. ,. rt.,. build it in a house, and you may see it across the
When 1 woke up, I couldn't tell why I was there all alone. street. The child's mind is the moist brick ; delay not to bring
Then it all came the truth of God in
back to me, and, contact with it, that
ho artiiy ash almed of the impression may
myself. I said aloud, be lasting.
"I wont be Sugar-
loaf Nellie! I'm go-
ing backtomymam-
man to be her own
SNelli curious, I do de-
ellie always." So lare,"
I started for the Says puppy No. 1;
house, gathering "I wonder if he comes
flowers on the way. to fight,
My little maltese Or if he comes for
fun."
kitten came to meet
mc ; and I ran into "I don't see either fight
the yard, 1.1,--;,, a or fun
with thile kitten and In him," says No. 2;
waithing merrily.t "But if he once were
i hig merrilysorely tried,
W: hly, here comes No known' what he'd
our Nellie back !" do."
cricd Katie. _And
cried catie. And "Oh! oh!" says timid
(ooher eno to meet nNo. 3,
(door to mcet mnc. "I'd like to see my
"0 (m) lanina, please mother;
fbigive 0 lc; I'm so This visitor takes too
sorry! nlut I'm your much room.
orn! Belliei ow, and I'll hide behind my
brother."
I'm going to be al- brother."
ways," 1 exclaimed,
as she bent down, to .
kiss me. .
"I'nl very glad," this great
said mamma; n and world is room
then, in a few`\ whis- enough for all
p)ered words, told eri without push-
how willingly she l ing and jam-
forgave me, and that ming one an-
I must not forget to other. And yet, how
ask my heavenly painfullyy frequent
Father's .. i.. are the cries for help
also. to extricate some
How happy I was unfortunate from
then! and how wil- 4-i --- under the iron heel
lingly I went to do that has trodden on
the things I had refused to do before, and when they were done, him in securing a higher position for somebody else."
how I enjoyed holding and playing with my kitten! The rich turn their backs to the rest of humanity, and push,
This lesson sank deep into my heart, and whenever any one no matter who is hurt or crushed; sometimes glancing back-
called me Sugar-loaf Nellie (as some one was sure to do if I ward, but never turning far enough to see the misery they are
looked cross), it would remind me of the first time I heard it, causing. -Some of these down-trodden ones cry out in their an-
and how I had promised mamma then to be her own Nellie al- guish; while others, perhaps suffering as much, bear more pa-
ways, and that made me try hard to be good. tiently the loss of their treasures, with only a look of trouble.
I hope all my little friends who read this'will try always to Maany are the outcasts who have no part to act in the world's
be good, and mind their mammas, so that they will not need to great drama; but rudely thrust aside, they languish in neglect
be called by any nickname to make them ashamed of their till they are released by death. B3ut most fortunate of all is the
naughtiness. middle-man. Too far away to feel the crushing weight of the












rN __













































NIE












0 SUNSqINm AT PIOMEr.


rich or the woes of the poor, he sits at ease, beholding but not travelers. Frequent along the roadside are the village churches.
comprehending the distress about him. In the parish register great events are doubtless recorded. Some
How happy will be the day when in a "better land than this" old king was christened or buried in that church ; and a little
the "iron heel" shall be no more, all sorrow shall cease, and that sexton, with a rusty key, shows you the baptismal font or the
blissful equality be reached which makes humanity brothers! coffin. In the churchyard are a few flowers and much green
grass, and daily the shadow of the
church spire, with its tapering finger,
counts the graves. Near the church-
yard gate stands a poor-box, fastened
to a post by iron bands, and secured by
Sa padlock, with a sloping roof to keep
d off the rain. If it be Sunday, the peas-
o i ants may be seen- wending their way to
the church, where their beloved pastor
S- talks to them of holy things, and leads
S ---- them to the Good Shepherd and to the
pleasant pastures of the heavenly land.
Here there is no long and lingering
spring, unfolding leaf a eisd blossom one
by one; no lingering autumn pompous
with many-colored leaves and the glow
of Indian summer. But winter and
summer pass into each other in a won-
derful way. The quail has hardly
_---_ ceased piping in the corn, when winter,
from the folds of' trailing clouds, sows
broadcast over the land, snow, icicles,
and rattling hail. Erelong the sun
hardly rises above the horizon, or does
not rise at all. The moon and the
stars shine through the day, and pleas-
antly under the silver moon, and under
the silent stars, ring the steel shoes of
the skaters on the frozen sea, and voices,
and the sound of bells.
And again, in a day, as it were, the
glad, leafy summer, full of blossoms and
the songs of nightingales, is come. The
sun does not set till ten o'clock at night;
and the children are at play in the
street an hour later. The windows are
all open. and you may sit and read till
midnight without a candle. ]How beau-
tiful is the summer night, which is not
night, but a sunless yet unclouded day,
F descending upon earth with dews and shadows, and refreshing
coolcness How beautiful the long, mild twilight, which like a
11I;I '; is something patriarchal silver clasp unites to-day with yesterday How beautiful the
I11 lingering about rural life silent hour, when Morning and Evening thus sit together, hand
_.. N orway and Sweden. Al- in hand, beneath the starless sky of midnight From the church
".'i most primeval simplicity reigns lower the *. I! tolls the hour with a soft, musical chime; and
over that Northern land. You the watchman, whose watch-tower is the belfry, blows a blast
pass out from the gate of the town, and from his horn for each stroke of the hammer, and four times, to
as if by magic, the scene changes to a wild, woodland landscape. the four corners of the heavens, in a sonorous voice he chants:
Around you are forests of fir. Overhead hang the long, fan-like
branches, trailing with moss, and heavy with red and blue cones. Ho! watchman, ho! Twelve is the clock!
Underfoot is a carpet of leaves ; and the air is warm and balmy. God keep our town from fire and brand,
And hostile hand! Twelve is the clock! "
On a stone bridge you cross a little silver stream, and come at
once into a pleasant and sunny land of farms. The peasants From his place in the belfry he can see the sun all night long;
take off their hats as you pass, and cry, God bless you! and farther north the village priest stands at his door in the
The houses in the x II ',,. -, and smaller towns are built of hewn warm midnight, and lights his pipe with a common burning-
timber, and for the most part painted red. In many villages glass; and as he looks out into the still churchyard, he says in
there are no taverns, and the peasants take turns in receiving his heart, "How quietly they rest, all the departed! "













SUNSHTNEII AT HOMK. 11


"""I1 '" Yea, father, yea; and tell me this,"- Hans! "-the startled father cries;
T- P W TVtk } ttp-t Her words came fast and wild,- And the mother sobs,"My boy !"
S, Are not a thousand sparrows less
o W, good-wife, bring your precious hoard," To him than a single child 'Tis a bowed and humbled man they greet,
The Norland farmer cried; With loving lips and eyes,
" "And heap the hearth, and heap the board, Even though it sinned and strayed from Who fain would kneel at his father's feet,
For the blessed Christmas-tide. home ?" But he softly bids him rise;
The father groaned in pain
"And bid the children fetch," he said, As she cried, Oh, let our brother come And he says, "I bless thee, O mine own;
"The last ripe sheaf of wheat, And live with us again Yea, and thou shalt be blest I"
While the happy mother holds her son
And set it on the roof overhead, "I know he did what was not right," Like a baby on her breast.
That the birds may come and eat. Sadly le shook his head;
"And this we do for His dear sake, "If he knew I longed for him to-night, Their house and home again to share
He would not come," he said. The Prodigal has come I
The Master kind and good, And now there'll be no empty chair,
Who, of the loaves he blest and brake, He went from me in wrath and pride ; Nor empty heart in their home.
Fed all the multitude." God shield him tenderly i
For I hear the wild wind cry outside, And they think, as they see their joy and .
Then Fredrikka, and Franz, and Paul, Like a soul in agony." pride
"When they heard their father's words, Safe back in the sheltering fold,
Put up the sheaf, and one and all "Nay, it is a soul Oh, eagerly Of the child that was born at Christmas-tide
Seemed merry as the birds. The maiden answered then; In Bethlehem of old.
And, father, what if it should be he,
Till suddenly the maiden sighed, Come back to us again 1" And all the hours glide swift away
The boys were hushed in fear, With loving, hopeful words,
As, covering all her face, she cried, She stops-the portal open flies; Till the Christmas sheaf at break of day
If Hans were only here Her fear is turned to joy : Is alive with happy birds.

And when, at dark, about the hearth
They gathered still and slow,
You heard no more the childish mirth
So loud an hour ago.

And on their tender cheeks the tears
Shone in the flickering light;
Foi they were four in other years
Who are but three to-night.

And tears are in the mother's tone;
As she speaks, she trembles, too,
"Come, children, come, for supper's done,
And your father waits for you."

Then Fredrikka, and Franz, and Paul,
Stood each beside his chair; -
The boys were comely lads and tall, -,
The girl was good and fair.

The father's hand was raised to crave
A grace before the meat,
When the daughter spake, her words were
brave,
But her voice was low and sweet: .

"Dear father, should we give the wheat
To all the birds of the air ? _
Shall we let the kite and the raven eat
Such choice and dainty fare ?

For if to-morrow from our store
We drive them not away,
The good little birds will get no more i _
Than the evil birds of prey."

"Nay, nay, my child," he gravely said,
You have spoken to your shame, -------
For the good, good Father overhead
Feeds all the birds the same.

He hears the ravens when they cry,
He keeps the fowls of the air;
And a single sparrow cannot lie
On the ground without his care."













42 S UNSFHIm AT HIOME..


SF TU 1- t1 F 4 J children till the inni was full. Friends long parted had fouinl
J_ rest in many a home; but here come the ones who had been
I city in the cut is now a small, unwalled village called watched y all Heaven with intense interest every step of the
I; I ,t-lahll, contaiiinig about three thousandii inhabitants way; who had been accompanied by a royal guard of angels as
Sca llin g t h e m s e lv e s ( 1 ...- T h e L a t in m o n a s t e r y is n o o t h e r c o m p a n y t r a v e lin g in a ll t h e la n d h a d b e e n N o k in d
(A its only important public friend opens his doors to them,
____ building. It incloses the -- t wary and ill they uncom-
supposed place of ouri plai-ningl- lie down in a manger,
Lord's nativity. --- their only conpaliolns the beasts
IBethlelhem signifies House of of tle stall. Well, it ma be
Bread," probably taking its naie Heaven had more sympathy with
from the great fertility of the --- l sinless animals than with lhe
surrounding country. It is situa- cruel jealousy and selfishness and
ted in tlie land of.Judea, six miiles -',", hypocrisy (of man. At least, the
south by west of Jerusalem. lThe 1 O" 'ldear Saviour showed us all that
traveler from Jerusalem passes- e high Commanider of Heaven
through a deep valley, then wend- has a meek aln lowly spirit. Let
ing his way up tlhe hill on the top --: u always remember that the
of which lies Bethlehbem, sud- ..s.eet babl of' Bethle eli, nowt
denly the city in its enchanting highly exalted," still hath re-
loveliness bursts upon his view. aspect nto lowly, t the
-' spet iuiito the lowly, bit the
It is built of pure white marble. proud lie knoweth afar otf."
Anciently the hills around it were At length the gates were shut
terraced and clothed with vines, fig-trees, and almonds, while and Bethlehem slept. But the hour had at last come which for
the :.lj i. i valleys bore rich crops of grain. From its higher so many ages haid been the hope of Israel," ,'i(! which Satan
points the eye takes in at one view "the mountains that are round had feared and hated. ': A multitude of the heavenily host sped
about Jerusalem," the nearer deep and luxuriant v i11. and the their way from the battlements of heaven, and pausing on tireless
far-distant mountains in the land of M1.. Everything around wings hovered witli wondering joy over the city honored above
it is '. ni;,1 andI sacred. Bethlehem is about four thousand every other on earth as the birth-place of "thie King of kings."
years old, and was IHeaven, earth, and
the home of many ....... be_.. to_1 hell met that night
of whom we read in ll a ui l the hills of'
the Bible. Its first et-- hleem.
"- ;--- TU -_--- -- 2 -- -. ..---- -;A d o i ofe i.
introduction to us is And so it often is.
in a scene of deep e While mankind is
mnouruiig, whe..n_ Ra lost in unconscious
chel, the belov ed slumber, the most
wif-e of Jachib, died d l important nld start-
and was buried her(. ling events are fiul-
After a lime it wit- filling. As the Say-
nessed the marriage t iour came at exactly
Iof the faithful IRuth, the lime predicted
one of its aIl(pted hundreds of years
children, to B o az, before,so unerringly
gr-andflather of i -- -- w ill nll prophecies of
Davild who was born the sacred -Word
in this lovely place. be fulfilled; and he
1015 years after the is most hal py who
death of'this worthy - has come so near the
kii, a decree went great Disposer ,of
forth from the Ro- -_- evenuts as to fill
mail emllperor unldr i himn a all times
whose rul e hIoly ---defense and a
Landllhadfallen,that :- 4 refuge."
"all time -orldshould I- __ And the life of
be taxed," and every ('Ii ... on earth, so
one must go to his birth-place to be enrolled for this purpose. lowly and yet so beautiful at its commencement, continued thus
The whole country now began to nimve, some going one way till its glorious ending. Walking with the Iiuiblbamilnd sorrowing,
and some another. Joseph and Mary, in their new home in Naz- seeking neither wealth nor honor, he trod the hills of Bethlehem
areth seventy miles away, must with the rest obey the law, anid as a man. And now, listening with batted breath, we may hear
undertake the long journey. Very weary they at last approached his footsteps echcloing down the ages, till to-day they bring to us
the home of their childhood. Bethlehem had welcomed her the same blessings that then fell on the waiting people.














S UNS pITm AT' HIOMKn. 13


... Or wearily walking, or scantily fed,
-'.'-[ ~ Or breaking to thousands the life-
''-- giving bread;
------ Or talking with friends by the
Quieter way,
Or kneeling alone at the close of
Sthe day.

SJ Sil l aI Thus, Saviour, I see thee, I follow
"1 ,ot .,,e, thee now,
*1 -I_ tl.K ''eX,[et- lI press with the crowds o'er the
Bdr M street-strewing bough,
---,xI i, ,l And join the loud shout as thy tri-
!l orumphs begin,
SH leHosanna ,! osanna Messiah
comes in !

But, ah what is this that opposes
my song ?
Thou groanest for sorrow, they hoot
thee along;
w t The sun hides in sadness the light
S' of his fires,
Proud Salem exults as her prophet
P expires.


-- King of all glory, exalted on high,
SThe Prince of the earth and the
Lord of the sky,
And solemn the sound in that wilderness given, Whom worlds upon worlds, and bright angels
As dovelike and still falls the Spirit from Heaven. obey,
PrART I. ouhdst be thy dwelling, thy garments the
PT 0(, wild was the desert, and long were the hours Could dust be thy dwelling, thy garments the
JESUS of Nazareth, man among men, Thou didst watch with the beasts in their deso- clay ?
Let hie sing of thee now as tley gazed on late bowers; 0, how shall I credit the wonderful tale-
thee then; And crafty the foe on thy vigils that stole, Nay, how shall I live if my confidence fail
Roll back the long ages of strife and of care, And stern was the battle that harassed thy soul. My hope for all time on this anchor I throw,
And. show moe thy life---one sweet oasis there.
But bright as the sun was the glory that streamed. That the Maker of man was a mortal below.
It comes, the glad vision, it bursts on my view, Effulgent andfair while thy chosen ones'dream'd; Ah, little they thought as they led thee along
Lo, the bright morning star from its ocean of blue, And sweet to their soul as a moment of heaven, The taunt and the gaze of the insolent throng;
And bark front afar the sweet symphonies ring, One glimpse of that cloud ere it parted was Those hands which they bound in a moment
'Tis the harbinger angels that herald their King. given ; had hurled

Fair star of the morning, I follow thy ray, Or calming the billows, or treading the wave, To death and to darkness this impotent world.
0 show me the place where the Holy One lay. Or calling the dead from the depths of the grave; Ah, little they thought as they lashed thee again,
Lo, clasped by a maiden in lowliest guise, Rejoicing all pains and all sickness to cure, That the stripes which they gave were the heal-
All helpless the Lord of the universe lies. Rebuking the proud and enriching the poor; in of men ;

I come with the shepherds at dawning of morn
And worship the King to Jerusalem born
I travel from far with the sages of old,
And bring thee the incense, the myrrh, and the
gold. --
Bright babe in the meadows, I watch thee at -
play -
With the flowers, fairer far and more lovely :
than they ;" -- R:
The years of thy childhood, how sweetly they I
ran, -
Increasing in favor with God and with man.

Set down in the temple, thyself more divine,
Great building of God, true Shekinah and
shrine;
Lo, scribes come around thee with wonder and .
joy,
And hang on the lips of the marvelous boy.

Though pure as the sunlight, yet sprinkled to *7 v r

Ssave,ead is washed by the mystical wave
Thy meek head is washed by the mystical wave ;













4 4 SUNSHKINE AT IOMK.


Or deemed, as they mocked thee with purple Till, vanished each vista of star-studded night, Thou Light never fading, thou Sun ever fair,
and reed, The broad gates of Heaven burst full on his sight. O beam on my spirit, O grant me my prayer :
How royal thy state, and how mighty thy meed. By faith to behold thee, in love to obey,
Yet fairer that crown though with pain it be royal the welcome was anthemed thee then With hope to adore thee in infinite day.
Yet fairer that crown though with pain it be e id
tied, Returning in triumph, Redeemer of men;
tied,
Than garl s of b y or t s of p e And glorious the throne by thy feet to be trod, -
Than garlands of beauty or turbans of pride;
And richer that robe, though but mirth it in- Sitting down in thy brightness the fellow of God.
spire, So ever thou wert ere the mountains were made,
Than Solomon's glory or Csesar's attire. .1
Than Solomon's glory or Csar attire. Or the dust of the earth in its order was laid; ; .IRESHLY the cool breath of the coming eve
O lighten my vision, O brighten the gloom, Thy name all eternal what tongue shall record, Stole through the lattice, and the dying
Draw back the dark veil from the cross and the The word and the wisdom, the arm of the Lord. , girl
tomb ; Felt it upon her forehead. She had lain
So lordly he riseth high triumphs to tell, So ever thou wert ere the stars and the sun Since the hot noontide in a breathless trance -
O'ercoming the sharplss of death and of hell. Their courses sublime in the ether begun; Her thin, pale fingers clasp'd within the hand
Of the heart-broken Ruler, and her breast,
Like the dead marble, white and motionless.

SThe shadow of a leaf lay on her lips,
And, as it stirred with the awakening wind,
The dark lids lifted from her languid eyes,
And her slight fingers moved, and heavily
She turned upon her pillow. He was there-
The same loved, tireless watcher, and she looked
Into his face until her sight grew dim
With the fast falling tears; and with a sigh
Of tremulous weakness murmuring his name,
She gently drew his hand upon her lips
And kiss'd it as she wept.

The old man sunk
Upon his knees, and in the drapery
Of the rich curtains buried up his face;
And when the twilight fell, the silken folds
Stirr'd with his prayer, but the slight hand lie
held
Had ceased its pressure; and he could not hear,
In the dead utter silence, that a breath
Came through her nostrils; and her temples
gave
To his nice touch no pulse ; and at her mouth
He held the lightest curl that on her neck
Lay with a mocking beauty, and his gaze
Ached with its deadly stillness.


It was night-
And, softly, o'er the Sea of Galilee,
Danced the breeze-ridden ripples to the shore,
Tipp'd with the silver sparkles of the moon.
The breaking waves played low upon the beach
Their constant music, but the air beside
Was still as starlight, and the Saviour's voice,
In its rich cadences unearthly sweet
Seem'd like some just-born harmony in the air,
Waked by the power of wisdom. On a rock,
With the broad moonlight falling on his brow,
He stood and taught the people.

At his feet
Lay his small scrip, and pilgrim's scallop-shell,
_"_- "" -2 And staff-for they had waited by the sea
Till lie came o'er from Gadarene, and pray'd
Aud there where the olive hangs da;tk o'er the Heaven's hosts as the lightning flew swift at thy For his wont teachings as he came to land.
ways word, His hair was parted meekly on his brow,
He blesses and parts while his worshipers gaze; High worship was thine from the angels of God. And the long curls from off his shoulders fell,
No ladder of light doth his footsteps require, As he leaned forward earnestly, and still
No chariot appeareth, no horses of fire. And so shalt thou reign when this perishing mold The same calm cadlence, passionless and deep-
Shall part like a garment all withered and old ; And in his looks the same mild majesty-
I But angels hang round him in rapture and love, And so shalt thoulivethoughplanets and spheres And in his mien, the sadness mnix'd with power
As they mount the long road to the region above; Die out like dim suns in the last of the years. Fill'd them with love and wonder.












SerTJNSITKE AT HPo{M. 45

Suddenly, They pass'd in. Ye know by the travail of anguish and pain,
As on his words entrancedly they hung, The spice-lamps in the alabaster urns The desolate grief of the widow of Nain.
The crowd divided, and among them stood Burn'd dinly, and the white and fragrant smoke
Jairus the Ruler. With his flowing robe Curl'd indolently on the chamber walls. As He who was first of the wayfaring men
Gather'd in haste about his loins, he came, The silken curtains slumber'd in their folds- Advanced, the mute burden was lowered, and
And fixed his eyes on Jesus. Closer drew Not even a tassel stirring in the air- then
The twelve disciples to their Master's side; And as the Saviour stood beside the bed,
And silently the people shrunk away, And pray'd inaudibly, the Ruler heard
And silently the people shrunk away, The quickening division of his breath -----'
And left the haughty Ruler in the midst alone. e e n rof his reath -
As he grew earnest inwardly. There came
A moment longer on the face A gradual brightness o'er his calm, sadface; '
Of the meek Nazarene he kept his gaze, And, drawing nearer to the bed, he moved '
And, as the twelve look'd on him, by the light The silken curtains silently apart, --. :,,,
Of the clear moon they saw a glistening tear And looked upon the maiden.' .' '
Steal to his silver beard ; and drawing nigh Like a form
Unto the Saviour's feet, he took the hem Of matchless sculpture in her sleep she
Of his coarse mantle, and with trembling hands lay-
Press'd it upon his lips, and murmured low, The linen vesture folded on her breast,
Master! my daughter."- . And over it her white transparent hands, -. '"i -".
The blood still rosy in their tapering nails; -_': .
The same silvery light A line of pearl ran through her parted lips, -. -- -
That shone upon the lone rock by the sea, And in her nostrils, spiritually thin,
Slept on te uler's lofty capitals, The breathing curve was mockingly like As lie touched the white grave-cloths that cov-
As at the door he stood and welcomed in life ; ered the bier,
Jesus and his disciples. All was still. And round beneath the faintly tinted skin The bearers shrank back, but the mother drew
The echoing vestibule gave back the slide Ran the light branches of the azure veins ; near.
Of their loose sandals, and the arrowy beam And on her cheek the jet lash overlay,
Of moonlight, slanting to the marble floor, Matching the arches pencil'd on her brow. Her snow sprinkled tresses had loosened their
Lay like a spell of silence in the rooms, Her hair had been unbound, and falling loose strands,
As Jairus led them on. Upon her pillow, hid her small round ears Great tears fell unchecked on the tightly-clasped
In curls of glossy blackness, and about hands ;
S. Her polished neck, scarce touching it, they But hushed the wild sobbing, and stifled her
hung, cries,
'i'' ", i Like airy shadows floating as they slept. As Jesus of Nazareth lifted his eyes.
ii '::'" ': 'T was heavenly beautiful.
Eyes wet with compassion, as slowly they fell,-
S. The Saviour raised Eyes potent to soften grief's tremulous swell,
IPA i Her hand from off her bosom, and spread As sweetly and tenderly, Weep not," lie said,
": -. 'i out And turned to the passionless face of the dead.
p The snowy fingers in his palm, and said,
I -The snowy fingers in hiis palm, and said, White, white gleamed his forehead, loose rip-
"".: [aiden! Arise! "--and suddenly a flush
A. Shot o'er her forehead, ahd along her lips pled the hair,
And through her check te rallied colo Bronze-tinted, o'er temples transparently fair;
through her cheek the rallied color And a glory stole up froni the earth to the skies,
i rI And the still outline f her graceful for As lie called to the voiceless one, Young man,
An the still outline of her graceful fr arise! "
Stirred in the linen vesture; and sheit
SI ; clasped The hard, rigid outlines grew fervid with breath,
-A The Saviour's hand, and -.. her dark The dull eyes unclosed from the midnight of
eyes death;
-- Full on his beaming countenance---arose Weep, weep, happy mother, and fall at his feet;
Life's dull, blighted promise grown hopeful and
sweet.
r.". WJT.tflX. io P t &AI' The morning had passed, and the midday heat
1TT dus t i sJl' Te burned;
'HE dust on their sandals lay heavy Once more to the pathway the wayfarers turned.
S and white, The conqueror of kings had been conquered
-. Their garments were damp with the again,-
-. tears of the night, There was joy in the house of the widow of Nain.
"Their hot feet aweary, and throbbing with
pain,
With hushing steps As they entered the gates of the city of Nain. SPEAK gently to age, a weary way
He trod the winding stair; but ere he touch'd Is the rough and toilsome road of life;
The latchet, from within a whisper came, But lo on the pathway a sorrowing throng As one by. one its joys decay,
Trouble the Maaster not-for she is dead!" Pressed, mournfully chanting the funeral song, And its hopes go out 'mid lengthened strife;
And his faint hand fell nerveless at his side, And like a sad monotone, ceaseless and slow, Oh many a word in kindness spoken,
And his steps falter'd, and his broken voice The voice of a woman came laden with woe. Has healed a heart that was well-nigh broken.
Choked in its utterance; but a gentle hand Speak kindly to all, for there's nothing lost
Was laid upon his arm, and in his ear What need, stricken mothers, to tell how she By gentle words ; to the heart and ear
The Saviour's voice sank thrillingly and low, wept ? Of the aged and weary they're often dear,
She is not dead, but sleepeth." Ye read by the vigils that sorrow hath kept, And they nothing cost.
0 - - - -












r4 6 STJHITmN. AT' HOmI.




ILIES washed by dews of night, _
Pure as snow of clearest white;
SBending from their slender stems, l.l
Meet the kiss the sunbeam sends;
Fragrant as the blushing rose,--
Sweetest flower the summer knows.



' -WH^W .

T is very interesting to study the various plant s and ani- '
mals which God inll his wisdom has created, and to observed rl"
Sth eir m an ners and h habits; for botanists tell us th at plants,
: as awel as animals, do have habits. To do this most sue- -'- -
cessfully we must go to their homes, for there only do \ we
find them really in a natural state. nut this is not always O
practicable--few can traverse foreign lands, few can go to the i
depths of' the sea or to the heart of old tropical forests, and
many not even to the lakes and -
woods of their ownl country, -
... 1. 1,1 eo devised various-
..- I, inning rare plants
.I i........ features where, A-(
\ I.. ,admired and std- -' .g e
i i .11 Thus we have the
-! 11f ^ 1 1 ndl zoblogical g'ar om-
,i .. I, .0 one may go and ---
1, I;1- .i.-d animals from cv-
i. I" L., ihe world; and con-
Sa i....... ganid "reen-housos,
h. p.... plantss a"ld flowers Our 1)icturo represents a small though very beautiful fiesh-water
.I I...- fom simple hom- aquarium, such as mihit find room upon the table of any of our

I of the the tropics, an orditnty room. A very large one-said to be the largest in
Ofs to the tro pic st.th -rore bo soes. the alutrium itse io aietain
'Jl;i is all very siee ; the world-was created in Regent's Park, London, in 1853. It
.,,..1 though it is not of is a glass building some sixty by twenty-five feet, and is in the
,:..,'se as pleasant as finm of a l,:alltl. 1rm:tm. The walls are of thick plate glass. It
.... e tlhem in the free- is divided into differentt compartment ts, or tanks, some of which
"'.., of their wild stt e, are supplied with salt-water nd aquatic plants and animals, and
;i- much batter than others with fresh. The flfrmer are furnishe(l with sand, gravel,
not to see rocks, and seaweed, to imitate the rock-pools left on the sea-
"them at all. shore by a receding tide.
Though requiring some intelligence and considerable skill ana
S care in its tmanaglemCot, an aquarium is certainly a very beauti-
full ornament, and at the same time furnishes an ever-changing
"those "h' a vonnume for study. To the student of m'atural history it presents
those which
live in t(h1 an opportunity for the close observation of the habits of the oc-
] t e qi oupants of the waters, such as is afforded in no other way, while
Shar new source of amusement is furnished continually in watching
Srhaps "s"t difficult
t,,proset il their by one's own fireside the maneuvers of animals whose haunts are
t, itural state. The ordinarily the obscure recesses of oceans, rivers, and ponds.
s eviMuch night be said about the manner of arranging and con-
s..... i one device by
Sducting both a fresh and sea-water aquarium, but probably it
SI m. are kept aliveo smimm
/ .... on to be watched would be of little service to most who will road this, and must
.. -,I. 1. Aquaria are of therefore be tedious. The principal thing is to maintain a
1 uI I. .1. A(Iuaria are ol'
/ and shpes, a proper equilibrium between the plants and animals, otherwise
the animals must soon die.
i ep and eeap, o One or more of these miniature seas is usually found in every
S. l., .I. .,d expensive, ac- floral or horticultural garden ; and when you visit such a place,
I. ., I t he taste and means t
m be sure to take a look at the aquarium, and see what you canl
learn.












r4 6 STJHITmN. AT' HOmI.




ILIES washed by dews of night, _
Pure as snow of clearest white;
SBending from their slender stems, l.l
Meet the kiss the sunbeam sends;
Fragrant as the blushing rose,--
Sweetest flower the summer knows.



' -WH^W .

T is very interesting to study the various plant s and ani- '
mals which God inll his wisdom has created, and to observed rl"
Sth eir m an ners and h habits; for botanists tell us th at plants,
: as awel as animals, do have habits. To do this most sue- -'- -
cessfully we must go to their homes, for there only do \ we
find them really in a natural state. nut this is not always O
practicable--few can traverse foreign lands, few can go to the i
depths of' the sea or to the heart of old tropical forests, and
many not even to the lakes and -
woods of their ownl country, -
... 1. 1,1 eo devised various-
..- I, inning rare plants
.I i........ features where, A-(
\ I.. ,admired and std- -' .g e
i i .11 Thus we have the
-! 11f ^ 1 1 ndl zoblogical g'ar om-
,i .. I, .0 one may go and ---
1, I;1- .i.-d animals from cv-
i. I" L., ihe world; and con-
Sa i....... ganid "reen-housos,
h. p.... plantss a"ld flowers Our 1)icturo represents a small though very beautiful fiesh-water
.I I...- fom simple hom- aquarium, such as mihit find room upon the table of any of our

I of the the tropics, an orditnty room. A very large one-said to be the largest in
Ofs to the tro pic st.th -rore bo soes. the alutrium itse io aietain
'Jl;i is all very siee ; the world-was created in Regent's Park, London, in 1853. It
.,,..1 though it is not of is a glass building some sixty by twenty-five feet, and is in the
,:..,'se as pleasant as finm of a l,:alltl. 1rm:tm. The walls are of thick plate glass. It
.... e tlhem in the free- is divided into differentt compartment ts, or tanks, some of which
"'.., of their wild stt e, are supplied with salt-water nd aquatic plants and animals, and
;i- much batter than others with fresh. The flfrmer are furnishe(l with sand, gravel,
not to see rocks, and seaweed, to imitate the rock-pools left on the sea-
"them at all. shore by a receding tide.
Though requiring some intelligence and considerable skill ana
S care in its tmanaglemCot, an aquarium is certainly a very beauti-
full ornament, and at the same time furnishes an ever-changing
"those "h' a vonnume for study. To the student of m'atural history it presents
those which
live in t(h1 an opportunity for the close observation of the habits of the oc-
] t e qi oupants of the waters, such as is afforded in no other way, while
Shar new source of amusement is furnished continually in watching
Srhaps "s"t difficult
t,,proset il their by one's own fireside the maneuvers of animals whose haunts are
t, itural state. The ordinarily the obscure recesses of oceans, rivers, and ponds.
s eviMuch night be said about the manner of arranging and con-
s..... i one device by
Sducting both a fresh and sea-water aquarium, but probably it
SI m. are kept aliveo smimm
/ .... on to be watched would be of little service to most who will road this, and must
.. -,I. 1. Aquaria are of therefore be tedious. The principal thing is to maintain a
1 uI I. .1. A(Iuaria are ol'
/ and shpes, a proper equilibrium between the plants and animals, otherwise
the animals must soon die.
i ep and eeap, o One or more of these miniature seas is usually found in every
S. l., .I. .,d expensive, ac- floral or horticultural garden ; and when you visit such a place,
I. ., I t he taste and means t
m be sure to take a look at the aquarium, and see what you canl
learn.












SUNSHI IM AP HOME, 7I


TK9 P^'PJ' T ELJlAlllp heathen who had been brought up to worship the idol Baal.
..._ She had made her husband an idolater, and together they had
,j"NE of the most interesting histories spoken of in the influenced the children of Israel to give up the worship of God
.L, Old Testament is that of the prophet Elijah. Who he and become worshipers of Baal. This displeased God, and he
"' was, and whence he came, we know not ; of his parent- sent Elijah to tell the king that there was to be a great famine
age or early home training, nothing is said. lie is sud- in the land; "there shall not be dew nor rain these years, but
denly introduced in the seventeenth chapter of 1 Kings, according to 'my word." This probably meant that there should
where he is represented as a middle-aged man, well be no rain until the prophet prayed for it.
known to his countrymen. His name, Elijah, means, Elijah's message to the king made him very angry, but God
" whose God is Jehovah." IHe is called "Elijah the Tishbite," found a safe hiding-place for Elijah by the brook Cherith, where
which is supposed to refer to the name of his birthplace. God Ahab in all of his searching never thought to look for him.
has been pleased to cover up the previous history of his life, and When he was thirsty, he drank from the brook and the dark-
with all our studying we cannot uncover it. winged ravens brought him flesh and bread in the morning, and
Ahab was king of Israel at the time Elijah made his appear- the same in the evening. When the brook dried up, God sent
Sanco. bH was a very wicked king, and his wife, Jezebel, was a this prophet to Zarephath, where he had commanded a widow
to sustain him. Although
she had food for but one

during all the famine, her
___ __provisions supplied them all,
--__ _oir God performed a miracle
every day, so that her meal
Wasted not, and her cruise
of oil did not fail.
F-_.-__- But the time came when
____Elijah, obedient to God's
word, must show himself to
____ _.--_ -Ahab. God wished to bring
his people back from idola-
try, and he sent Elijah to do
the work of proving whether
Jehovah or Baalwas the true

Sing was Mt. Carmel.
_The__ T parties who were to
act in deciding this contest
_____ _---___ -were the prophets of Baal on
___ one side, and Ellj h1 alone on
__ _____ ___-_ _the other side.
__ __ Turn to your Bibles and

read the interesting account
of' God's proving by fire that
lie was the true God. The
people were convinced, and
fell upon theirfacesackniowl-
edging that Jehovah was
the true God. Afterward,
the prophets of Baal were
slain, and in answer to Eli-
jah's prayer, there was an
abundance ofrain. When the
work of Elijah was done, lie
accompanied Elisha to the
Jordan. Arriving at the
banks of the river, Elijah
smote the waters with his
mantle, and both passed over
on dry ground; and as they
went, a chariot and horses
of fire appeared, arind parted
them, and Elijah was taken
3 up in a whirlwind to heaven.












18 SxUNSPINE. AT P 10 mm.


Slaying a solid foundation for the future.
S"Certainly," said his uncle, "ceor- I
HIS is our dog, and we call him Fritz, tainly; that boy, I tell you, knows how
Because he is always so full of his tricks, to take -are of his gold-dust."
Barking at this or whining for that, "Gold-dust?" Where did Tom get
Chasing the chickens or teasing the cat. gold-dust? He was a poor boy. lie
One little bundle of mischief he is, had not been to California. lIe never
Making us laugh with his comical phiz; was a miner. When did he get gold-
Many's the trick lie has played off onl me, s he
But if he should die, how sorry I'd be! dust ? Ah he has seconds and in-
utes, and these are the gold-dust of -
time,-specks and particles
of time which boys and girls
and grown-up people are apt
to waste and throw away.
Tom knew their value. HIis
father, our minister, had taught
him that every speck and par-
ticle of time was worth its L [ like to know how it happened.
in ol and I can't understand it a bit;
wtoog care of ihgm ht if tsny A moment ago I was curled up so,
There was naught I could do but pick.
were. No idle minutes hung
on his hands, ready to be filled So I picked and picked, and by and by,
with mischief or bad thoughts There came a great crashing sound;
or deeds. And in the long win- And first thing I knew the shell was in two,
ter evenings, when his uncle And I standing safe on the ground.
looks over to see what Tom is
doing, he never finds a story-
book in his hand; it is always A CERTAIN writer says, "Books, like
a school-book or something that will help friends, should be few and well chosen."
4 him in his work. So it is that Tom takes We further add, good friends, like good
LEASE, baby," says young Rover, care of his gold-dust. books, are worth preserving.
One little bite for me;
The cake is such a big one, ., .''i ... ..
And full as it can be I1;1iii i,'; I ..
Of plumbs that would taste splendid' .
To such a dog, you see. I
No, no," says selfish baby, I Ii : i'I ',I --
"This cake is very nice, P II 'Ii I h
I cannot let you have a bit ti i ,l III '
Of it at any price. 'i,, I ,
My mamma knows how much I need, Il ',,, .
She gave me all the slice." II i I

Then eat it," says wise Rover, Il 'I'- I
"I know 'twill make you sick, II ,-.' '-
And I shall be revenged on you Iji jI 'I
In that way very quick; ii
For too much cake will punish you ''
As surely as a stick. -- ....
"And, baby, you will learn at last, 1 "-
What all learn soon or late, '
That only sad unhappiness Nail
On selfishness can wait;
For kindly angels never come _-_ "
To children through that gate." N




,IHAT boy knows how to take care of
his gold-dust," said Tom's uncle often -_. .__- -
to himself; and sometimes aloud. -----
Tom went to college, and every account ____ __
they heard of him he was going ahead, XI___,_L NM "wKA,
,y ea d M/ A 2N












18 SxUNSPINE. AT P 10 mm.


Slaying a solid foundation for the future.
S"Certainly," said his uncle, "ceor- I
HIS is our dog, and we call him Fritz, tainly; that boy, I tell you, knows how
Because he is always so full of his tricks, to take -are of his gold-dust."
Barking at this or whining for that, "Gold-dust?" Where did Tom get
Chasing the chickens or teasing the cat. gold-dust? He was a poor boy. lie
One little bundle of mischief he is, had not been to California. lIe never
Making us laugh with his comical phiz; was a miner. When did he get gold-
Many's the trick lie has played off onl me, s he
But if he should die, how sorry I'd be! dust ? Ah he has seconds and in-
utes, and these are the gold-dust of -
time,-specks and particles
of time which boys and girls
and grown-up people are apt
to waste and throw away.
Tom knew their value. HIis
father, our minister, had taught
him that every speck and par-
ticle of time was worth its L [ like to know how it happened.
in ol and I can't understand it a bit;
wtoog care of ihgm ht if tsny A moment ago I was curled up so,
There was naught I could do but pick.
were. No idle minutes hung
on his hands, ready to be filled So I picked and picked, and by and by,
with mischief or bad thoughts There came a great crashing sound;
or deeds. And in the long win- And first thing I knew the shell was in two,
ter evenings, when his uncle And I standing safe on the ground.
looks over to see what Tom is
doing, he never finds a story-
book in his hand; it is always A CERTAIN writer says, "Books, like
a school-book or something that will help friends, should be few and well chosen."
4 him in his work. So it is that Tom takes We further add, good friends, like good
LEASE, baby," says young Rover, care of his gold-dust. books, are worth preserving.
One little bite for me;
The cake is such a big one, ., .''i ... ..
And full as it can be I1;1iii i,'; I ..
Of plumbs that would taste splendid' .
To such a dog, you see. I
No, no," says selfish baby, I Ii : i'I ',I --
"This cake is very nice, P II 'Ii I h
I cannot let you have a bit ti i ,l III '
Of it at any price. 'i,, I ,
My mamma knows how much I need, Il ',,, .
She gave me all the slice." II i I

Then eat it," says wise Rover, Il 'I'- I
"I know 'twill make you sick, II ,-.' '-
And I shall be revenged on you Iji jI 'I
In that way very quick; ii
For too much cake will punish you ''
As surely as a stick. -- ....
"And, baby, you will learn at last, 1 "-
What all learn soon or late, '
That only sad unhappiness Nail
On selfishness can wait;
For kindly angels never come _-_ "
To children through that gate." N




,IHAT boy knows how to take care of
his gold-dust," said Tom's uncle often -_. .__- -
to himself; and sometimes aloud. -----
Tom went to college, and every account ____ __
they heard of him he was going ahead, XI___,_L NM "wKA,
,y ea d M/ A 2N












18 SxUNSPINE. AT P 10 mm.


Slaying a solid foundation for the future.
S"Certainly," said his uncle, "ceor- I
HIS is our dog, and we call him Fritz, tainly; that boy, I tell you, knows how
Because he is always so full of his tricks, to take -are of his gold-dust."
Barking at this or whining for that, "Gold-dust?" Where did Tom get
Chasing the chickens or teasing the cat. gold-dust? He was a poor boy. lie
One little bundle of mischief he is, had not been to California. lIe never
Making us laugh with his comical phiz; was a miner. When did he get gold-
Many's the trick lie has played off onl me, s he
But if he should die, how sorry I'd be! dust ? Ah he has seconds and in-
utes, and these are the gold-dust of -
time,-specks and particles
of time which boys and girls
and grown-up people are apt
to waste and throw away.
Tom knew their value. HIis
father, our minister, had taught
him that every speck and par-
ticle of time was worth its L [ like to know how it happened.
in ol and I can't understand it a bit;
wtoog care of ihgm ht if tsny A moment ago I was curled up so,
There was naught I could do but pick.
were. No idle minutes hung
on his hands, ready to be filled So I picked and picked, and by and by,
with mischief or bad thoughts There came a great crashing sound;
or deeds. And in the long win- And first thing I knew the shell was in two,
ter evenings, when his uncle And I standing safe on the ground.
looks over to see what Tom is
doing, he never finds a story-
book in his hand; it is always A CERTAIN writer says, "Books, like
a school-book or something that will help friends, should be few and well chosen."
4 him in his work. So it is that Tom takes We further add, good friends, like good
LEASE, baby," says young Rover, care of his gold-dust. books, are worth preserving.
One little bite for me;
The cake is such a big one, ., .''i ... ..
And full as it can be I1;1iii i,'; I ..
Of plumbs that would taste splendid' .
To such a dog, you see. I
No, no," says selfish baby, I Ii : i'I ',I --
"This cake is very nice, P II 'Ii I h
I cannot let you have a bit ti i ,l III '
Of it at any price. 'i,, I ,
My mamma knows how much I need, Il ',,, .
She gave me all the slice." II i I

Then eat it," says wise Rover, Il 'I'- I
"I know 'twill make you sick, II ,-.' '-
And I shall be revenged on you Iji jI 'I
In that way very quick; ii
For too much cake will punish you ''
As surely as a stick. -- ....
"And, baby, you will learn at last, 1 "-
What all learn soon or late, '
That only sad unhappiness Nail
On selfishness can wait;
For kindly angels never come _-_ "
To children through that gate." N




,IHAT boy knows how to take care of
his gold-dust," said Tom's uncle often -_. .__- -
to himself; and sometimes aloud. -----
Tom went to college, and every account ____ __
they heard of him he was going ahead, XI___,_L NM "wKA,
,y ea d M/ A 2N












18 SxUNSPINE. AT P 10 mm.


Slaying a solid foundation for the future.
S"Certainly," said his uncle, "ceor- I
HIS is our dog, and we call him Fritz, tainly; that boy, I tell you, knows how
Because he is always so full of his tricks, to take -are of his gold-dust."
Barking at this or whining for that, "Gold-dust?" Where did Tom get
Chasing the chickens or teasing the cat. gold-dust? He was a poor boy. lie
One little bundle of mischief he is, had not been to California. lIe never
Making us laugh with his comical phiz; was a miner. When did he get gold-
Many's the trick lie has played off onl me, s he
But if he should die, how sorry I'd be! dust ? Ah he has seconds and in-
utes, and these are the gold-dust of -
time,-specks and particles
of time which boys and girls
and grown-up people are apt
to waste and throw away.
Tom knew their value. HIis
father, our minister, had taught
him that every speck and par-
ticle of time was worth its L [ like to know how it happened.
in ol and I can't understand it a bit;
wtoog care of ihgm ht if tsny A moment ago I was curled up so,
There was naught I could do but pick.
were. No idle minutes hung
on his hands, ready to be filled So I picked and picked, and by and by,
with mischief or bad thoughts There came a great crashing sound;
or deeds. And in the long win- And first thing I knew the shell was in two,
ter evenings, when his uncle And I standing safe on the ground.
looks over to see what Tom is
doing, he never finds a story-
book in his hand; it is always A CERTAIN writer says, "Books, like
a school-book or something that will help friends, should be few and well chosen."
4 him in his work. So it is that Tom takes We further add, good friends, like good
LEASE, baby," says young Rover, care of his gold-dust. books, are worth preserving.
One little bite for me;
The cake is such a big one, ., .''i ... ..
And full as it can be I1;1iii i,'; I ..
Of plumbs that would taste splendid' .
To such a dog, you see. I
No, no," says selfish baby, I Ii : i'I ',I --
"This cake is very nice, P II 'Ii I h
I cannot let you have a bit ti i ,l III '
Of it at any price. 'i,, I ,
My mamma knows how much I need, Il ',,, .
She gave me all the slice." II i I

Then eat it," says wise Rover, Il 'I'- I
"I know 'twill make you sick, II ,-.' '-
And I shall be revenged on you Iji jI 'I
In that way very quick; ii
For too much cake will punish you ''
As surely as a stick. -- ....
"And, baby, you will learn at last, 1 "-
What all learn soon or late, '
That only sad unhappiness Nail
On selfishness can wait;
For kindly angels never come _-_ "
To children through that gate." N




,IHAT boy knows how to take care of
his gold-dust," said Tom's uncle often -_. .__- -
to himself; and sometimes aloud. -----
Tom went to college, and every account ____ __
they heard of him he was going ahead, XI___,_L NM "wKA,
,y ea d M/ A 2N












S1 IN SHPITN P A.r H om r. 19 4


JKf~fD NyT Y RV TI+f "3NFNa*
C. / :.-- POUND the house where Earl and Lin- -
ime Winslow lived, were nice shade_ -
a -'? trees, and on two sides was the large --
old orchard, with its bent and gnarled
""" apple-trees. Beyond the orchard were --
I.- meadows, where the children went to.
i/- "-- _. thlier violets and hunt birds' nests; and still
I. .,...I. v-., ., the woods, where early in the spring they--
!/ went with their father to the sugar-camp. --
So the children had many nice places to play. Earl was
eight years old, while Linnio was only five; and he was very_ --
proud that his mother should trust him to take little sister with ---
him to play in the fields and orchard. But time and again the _--_
mother had said to them as they went out to play, "Now be
sure to keep away from the old well; you might fall in But
one (lay as they were at play in the back side of the garden,
Earl began to wish he could go through the fence where the -
well was. lie had been there with father many times, and had
never fallen in; and was n't he big enough to take care of Liln-
nie? So he unfistened the gate, and leading the little girl by f
the hand, he disobeyed his mother and went on to the forbidden .
ground. He had not intended to go very near the well; but -- .-
after a while he crept cautiously up and peeped over the top of ----- -
the curbing. And as Linnie came up beside him, he put his -
arm about her, and together they stood looking at the mossy
stones and watching the reflection of their faces in the water.
They were very much interested, and leaned over farther and
farther, when all at once-they never knew how-Linnie lost
her footing and went over-down, down into the dark water! T f TJ T .
E ,1 -. cries soon brought his father and the hired men, who >
were working in a field near by. When they found what had s R. EDWARD S. MORRIS, a returned missionary, tells
happened, the father got into the large bucket, and the men let the touching story of an African boy as follows :-
him down. Linnie was just rising for the last time; and reach- "A little native boy came to me, bowing low, but with
ing down his strong arms, he took her out of the water, and his eyes firmly fixed upon me. I said, 'What do you want?'
they were soon drawn up. The In broken, disjointed English-the best the
little girl was cold and white, and little fellow could utter-and pointing to the
"Erl thought she was dead. But ship, he said, 'You God-man take me big
after they had worked over her America, big ship.' 'What for?' I asked.
some time, she opened her blue He answered, 'Me learn big English you.'
eyes and finally began to breathe. "In consequence of my then enervated
Then they carried her into the condition from overwork, I was forced to say
house to mother who had been A. 'No' to the little fellow. I did not say it
busy getting supper and knew harshly, but in mild and gentle accents;
nothing of what had happened. whereupon he immediately drew forth from
Earl's joy knew no bounds when the folds of a cloth around him, two little
his little sister could sit up and leopards, alive, with unopened eyes, and pre-
talk to him once more. lIe was senting them said, Me give him; you take
so sorry for what he had done Ihat me big America, big ship, learn big English.'
his father and mother thought he Think of it, readers; the mother leopard must
had been punished enough; and to his knowledge have been near when he
they all were so thankful to have captured her kittens; still, that hungry,
their little girl back alive that no thirsting child risked his life to earn a pas-
one said much to him about his sage to America, when be might have earned
fault. But he learned a lesson it much easier; but he wanted to show me
that day which he has never for- not only his bravery, but his burning desire
gotten, aind always says that he, for knowledge.
as well as his little sister, fell into And there are hundreds of thousands more
a well that day, though it was in that country burning for an education;
not a well of water. Do any of '" and they should be taught not only big En-
you know what well it was? glish," but about God and the way to Heaven.

L%












S1 IN SHPITN P A.r H om r. 19 4


JKf~fD NyT Y RV TI+f "3NFNa*
C. / :.-- POUND the house where Earl and Lin- -
ime Winslow lived, were nice shade_ -
a -'? trees, and on two sides was the large --
old orchard, with its bent and gnarled
""" apple-trees. Beyond the orchard were --
I.- meadows, where the children went to.
i/- "-- _. thlier violets and hunt birds' nests; and still
I. .,...I. v-., ., the woods, where early in the spring they--
!/ went with their father to the sugar-camp. --
So the children had many nice places to play. Earl was
eight years old, while Linnio was only five; and he was very_ --
proud that his mother should trust him to take little sister with ---
him to play in the fields and orchard. But time and again the _--_
mother had said to them as they went out to play, "Now be
sure to keep away from the old well; you might fall in But
one (lay as they were at play in the back side of the garden,
Earl began to wish he could go through the fence where the -
well was. lie had been there with father many times, and had
never fallen in; and was n't he big enough to take care of Liln-
nie? So he unfistened the gate, and leading the little girl by f
the hand, he disobeyed his mother and went on to the forbidden .
ground. He had not intended to go very near the well; but -- .-
after a while he crept cautiously up and peeped over the top of ----- -
the curbing. And as Linnie came up beside him, he put his -
arm about her, and together they stood looking at the mossy
stones and watching the reflection of their faces in the water.
They were very much interested, and leaned over farther and
farther, when all at once-they never knew how-Linnie lost
her footing and went over-down, down into the dark water! T f TJ T .
E ,1 -. cries soon brought his father and the hired men, who >
were working in a field near by. When they found what had s R. EDWARD S. MORRIS, a returned missionary, tells
happened, the father got into the large bucket, and the men let the touching story of an African boy as follows :-
him down. Linnie was just rising for the last time; and reach- "A little native boy came to me, bowing low, but with
ing down his strong arms, he took her out of the water, and his eyes firmly fixed upon me. I said, 'What do you want?'
they were soon drawn up. The In broken, disjointed English-the best the
little girl was cold and white, and little fellow could utter-and pointing to the
"Erl thought she was dead. But ship, he said, 'You God-man take me big
after they had worked over her America, big ship.' 'What for?' I asked.
some time, she opened her blue He answered, 'Me learn big English you.'
eyes and finally began to breathe. "In consequence of my then enervated
Then they carried her into the condition from overwork, I was forced to say
house to mother who had been A. 'No' to the little fellow. I did not say it
busy getting supper and knew harshly, but in mild and gentle accents;
nothing of what had happened. whereupon he immediately drew forth from
Earl's joy knew no bounds when the folds of a cloth around him, two little
his little sister could sit up and leopards, alive, with unopened eyes, and pre-
talk to him once more. lIe was senting them said, Me give him; you take
so sorry for what he had done Ihat me big America, big ship, learn big English.'
his father and mother thought he Think of it, readers; the mother leopard must
had been punished enough; and to his knowledge have been near when he
they all were so thankful to have captured her kittens; still, that hungry,
their little girl back alive that no thirsting child risked his life to earn a pas-
one said much to him about his sage to America, when be might have earned
fault. But he learned a lesson it much easier; but he wanted to show me
that day which he has never for- not only his bravery, but his burning desire
gotten, aind always says that he, for knowledge.
as well as his little sister, fell into And there are hundreds of thousands more
a well that day, though it was in that country burning for an education;
not a well of water. Do any of '" and they should be taught not only big En-
you know what well it was? glish," but about God and the way to Heaven.

L%













ji!L 20 SrjNa^HJiNI A'P HIOMEI. ||




THE famed Mammoth Hot Springs are .
situated in the northwestern portion of
", Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, close to the
roman tic ally beautiful Gardin er River.
: Th are entirely surrounded by high and
Ibeautifil mountains, which give a charming
landscape picture to their situation. Two
views of them are presented on this page. ..
They are within a few miles of Mount Ev- 't "' ,
arts and Bunsen's Peak. In this vicinity are found remnants of .,,i' ..
enormous terraces, originated from deposits by evaporation .:..c .
from the heavily impregnated waters of the springs in that ..l
neighborhood.
As we see the wonderful works of the hand of our Father
in IIeavenl, do not 1 our hearts burn within us" as we almost i
hear his voice speaking to us through the ripples of the river,
the roar of the rushing torrent, or the murmur of the leafy ~ I p
temples above us
Geyser is a term applied to the eruptive thermal springs and w I .. 1
in various parts of the earth's surface in evident connection with I -.' y i.. I. a is, -i
at work below. The geysers in the Yellowstone region are prolt ..- I.I N,-I .!-
dlrful of all, but the best known group is, in Iceland, about oevonw.- i- I ... 1-: 1: -
iavik, sixteen miles norlth of '.rII,..Ii, and within fight of the vol .. i! 'i'h .
are two, respectively called the Greaft Geyser and the Stro7r, (i. c.. 1 o. ..I. ;.h II 1 .!1 ...... I.
a hundred yards apart. The latter is an irregul-e : a e ...LLn U I,'111m t .1- ;ht I
S ini diameter, down which one may generally safely look, when he sees the water
I-;* ".- noisily working in a narrower passage about twenty feet below. If, by throwing in a sufficient quantity of turf,
he can temporarily choke this gullet, the water will in a few minutes overcome the resistance, and, so to
*B 'speak, perform an eruption with magnificent effect, bursting up sixty feet into the air, brown with the
"turf that has beon infused into it, and diffusing steam in vast volumes
a ._round. The appearance of the Great Geyser is considerably different.
On the summit of a mount which rises about fifteen feet above the sur-
rounding ground, is a circular pool or cup of hot water, seventy-two feet
across at its g-reatest diameter, and about four feet deep, being formed
entirely of silicious crust of a dull gray color. At the edge this water

Ihigher. From the center descends a pit, up which a, stream of highly-
heated water is continually but slowly ascending, the surplus finding its
way out by a small channel in the edge of the cup, and trickling down
4 the exterior of the crusty ominencer. few hours the water, with
a rumbling noise, rises tumultuously through the pit in jets for a few feet
above the surface of the pool; by and by it subsides, and all is quiet
again. Once a day, however, or thereabouts, this tumult ends in a ter-
rible paroxysm, which lasts perhaps a quarter of an hour, and during
which the water is thrown in repeated jets from sixty to eighty feet high,
mingled with such volumes of steam as obscure the country for half a
,. mile around. When quiet is restored, the chalice, and perhaps twenty
feet of the pit, are found empty, and the visitor obtains, so iar, a sight of
.the internal arrangements and structure of the geyser. In a little time
the water reaseends to its usual level, and there remains for the next day
S or two, with only those minor disturbances which have been described.
If a visitor beo tolerably near on the windward side, lie may catch glimpses
"- "of this grand spectacle,-the eruption of a water-volcano, it may be
-_. -- tormed,-and he must needs be charmed with the beautiful jets as they
curve outward and fall, as well as impressed by the sublimity ofthe -whole
scone. The water of the Great Geyser contains soda in varioivs forns;
4- .. but the chief ingredient is a charge of about thirty-one granlnes of silica
to six gallons. This forms the incrustations around the pools, reaching
-. ,, 'to the bulk of a little hill in the case of the Great Geyser. The small cut
at the head of this article is a picture of a geyser in Yellowstone Park.












1| T ^ 8 AI~ 9~ 9T H O 21 [

lfrTfTr.- 1t0 pope as the head of that Church. Copies of the document were
-- posted in the towns and by the roadsides. Luther received it
l, ce a all very calmly, for he had lost all confidence in the Romish
"E celebrated university in which Church ; and in this he had the sympathies of the larger part of
the Reformation may be said to the common people and of many of the students and professors.
have been born, was founded Notwithstanding the sacredness which had always been at-
at Wittemberg, Germany, in tached to the papal bull by the adherents of the Iomish Church,
1502, by Frederic, Elector of Sax- Luther boldly declared his intention of burning this document;
ony. The universities of that day and, finally, on the morning of the 10th of December, 1520, in
were usually colnncted with some one of the market-places of Wittemberg, occurred the scene rep-
3 of the various monastic orders, resented in our picture,-such a bonfire as is kindled but once
""' and the monks wNere the instruct- in centuries. Crowds of people gathered to witness the strange
'Oi ors of the students who resorted spectacle n, women, and children from the tow; and s-
them. Frederic had selected sectacle, men, womueni, and children ite t wwn ann stu-
Sto them. Frederic had selected dents, professors, and learned doctors from the university. A
SSt. Augustine as the patron saint master of arts of some reputation lighted the pile of fagots, and
l of this new Wittemberg school, and it was then threw on it the decretals and other false epistles of the
Therefore under the care of the Augustinian Romish Church, which for centuries had propped up the edifice
brotherhood. of lies. And when the flames which consumed them had passed
K Luther, the man destined to be the father of the away, Dr. Luther himself, stepping forward, solemnly laid the
Reformation, who, in the midst of his university course at Erfrllih, pope's bull of excommunication on the fire, saying amidst the
had suddenly decided to leave all and enter the Augustinian breathless silence: "As thou hast troubled the Lord's saints,
monastery, was now one of the most devoted of the monks, may the eternal fire destroy thee." Not a word broke the silence
Ile had, however, never given up the studious habits acquired until the crackle and gleam of those symbolic flames had ceased,
at the university, and during the three years spent in the and then gravely but joyfully the crowd returned to their
dreamy quiet of the cloister, had made rapid progress in his homes. Yet the light of that fire went not out with the dying
study of divinity as well as of the Greek and Hebrew languages. embers, but has shone on and on, and still shines, growing
Thus by his studious and consistent course he won the universal brighter and brighter with each succeeding century.
esteem of the f ';i'3 o Accordingly, in
1508, the quiet mondk wasrr, m ch o his suir-
prise, called to leave Erfurlth and go to Wit-
te-mberg to accept a professorship in the new ,
university. A few years sufficed to make
Luther the great man of Wo!I,.. Ir.. and a
few more, of Germaany.
The university .- grow inll favor and popular-
ity, and Wittembeirg was fast becoming the
center of scholarship as well as of religious
interest in Germany. Little by little Luther-
had been letting go of the darkness of papal
error; ani as fast as hie saw the new light,
he did not hesitate to give it to the common
people as well as to the university students.
By thus exposing the corruption of the Rom-
ish Church lihe of course roused the anger of
the pope andl his cardinals; and time after
time was the brave man summoned to an-
swer betfre kings and prelates for the truths
which li so boldly proclaimed. Again aunt
again was lie entreated and commanded to
recant, aind threatened with imprisonment,
banishment, excommunication, and even
death, if he did not do so; but lie swerved
not from his principles. The character and
purpose of his life are well expressed in his
words when called to answer before the em-
peror, "I Here I stand ; I cannot do otherwise;
God help me. Amen!"
At last, in 1520, the pope, Leo X., issued
against Luther the bull of excommunication
so long threateiied, which was a deocre shut-
ting him off from all the rights and privi-
o leges of the (' 1.... and venting against him -
"the extreme wrath and abhorrence of the












S NH AT 2OMS.


nations. While in America, he was often in straightened cir-
Scumstances as to means, but not, as he says, without peace,
SI I eminent man was born at Epworth, England, June health, and contentment." In going about his mission work, he
1; 1703, and died in London, March 2, 1791, in the often had to wade through swamps and swim across rivers to
ht y-ighth yr of his age. it get to his appointments, letting his clothes dry as he traveled.
I b_hty-cighth year of his age. It is generally I,,
lnoll that this excellent divine was the lur of the After a brief stay in this country, he recrossed the Atlantic to
-c I known that this excellent divine was the founder of the
people called : II.. As might be inrred from the pict- England, which became the scene of his life-long labors.
people called ii....lr.- As might be inferred from the pict-
ure, Mr. Wesley was a person of genial disposition, though In the year 1739, Mr. Wesley, imitating the example of
from his earliest youth le was of a serious turn of mind, and George Whitefield, began the practice of open-air preaching.
felt that Providence had some important work for him to do. It was near the same time, also, that he felt the Lord had re-
In early life he had the advantages of a liberal education. valued himself with now power to his soul, while listening to
At the age of twenty-three he was Greek lecturer in Lincoln the reading of Luther's Preface to the Epistle to the Romans."
College; and shortly after, lie graduated as master of arts. He About this period, lay preaching was established among the peo-
had previously been ordained as a deacon. Not far from this ple called Methodists, and the labors of Wesley and his associ-
time, lie began to assist his father as curate; and a little later, rates began to assume the form of a schism in the church. As he
he was regularly ordained as priest in Ithe Clhurch of i..h-land. was now excluded from the pulpits of the Church of England,
he held divine worship in a large building
at Moorsfields, among the colliers and
others, which, from the fact of its having
S, once been used as a foundry, was after-
i' i i ---' ---- ward known as the Foundry Church."
This building was subsequently made over

S., .- :- later operations. In the cut, Wesley is
qII'i'ii 'i' ---, III i 'Z) seen preaching from his father's grave in
10 L Epworth, after being refused the privilege
:' .; -- '" K '^ of speaking in the state church. His text
S- / was, "The kingdom of God is not meat
"'''i'' and drink; but righteousness, and peace,
and joy in the Holy Ghost." Ile says,
r i At six in the evonilng 1 camo, and found
V, such a congregation as I believe Epworth
S. .t -- .. never saw before."
"Mr. Wesley now made long journeys to
p various parts of Great Britain, warning
S people of all classes to flee from "the
Swath to come." Ile usually preached
S-e s twice a day on week days, and often as
Sd many as four times on Sundays. At
3 M W Kensington Common he once spoke to an
... _o- "a assembly of twenty thousand persons.
",, This faithful servant of God devoted
I' M." a himself to the work of the gospel with a
I, .. ... a zeal which is almost unparalleled. It is
I ... said by his historian, Doctor Whitehead,
,, -i- I that for fifty consecutive years not an in-
SA, stance can be found in which the severest
Il weather kept himn from his labors for a
single day He usually journeyed on
horseback, seldom traveling less than
*',n 1.forty miles a day. He spent sixty-five
years in the ministry, going from place to
place, convincing gainsayors, warning sin-
Some two years after, he went to Oxford College, where he on- nrs, comforting the mourning ones, and building up those that
tered with great ardor into a religious association of students, believed. It is estimated that in his lifetime he traveled two
his brother, ('I .,i. -. Wesley, and George Whitefield being prom- hundred and seventy thousand miles, and preached over forty
inent members, and to whom, for their zeal and order in relig- thousand sermons, besides his numerous addresses, exhortations,
ious duties, the term Methodists began to be applied. and prayers. As one has observed, If we consider his abun-
Int 1735 Mr. Wesley came to America with General Ogle- dant labors, we may well say that Mr. Wesley lived two or three
thorpe, to found a mission among the Indians, and to preach to lives."
the colonists. Here he established large and flourishing conigre- His industry also was unequaled, except by the apostles them-

L












IS USNTIR AT' HlOM. 23


solves. He usually rose at four in the morning, and worked T_ ]T T
with a will till eight at night, in .pr'. 'l.. reading, writing,
meeting the people, traveling, and administering to the spiritual I7 II LRE is hardly a creature now in existence for which
and temporalwants of the sick. lis benevolence was unbounded. I 1,. human race, as a whole, has such a shrinking ab-
IIe literally gave away all that he had, and to the last kept his I...rence as for the snake. Wily and sly, he is shunned
resolution to die poor. His income was not large, but it is esti- and dreaded by all. Many of the species are entirely
mated that he gave away in charity, during his lifetime, one hun- harmless, and we can scarcely tell why we dislike them so; but
dred and fifty thousand dollars. there are others whoso least bite is deadly poison.
In his social life, Wesley was lively and agreeable. He had There are no very large snakes in this country, and only a
great talent for making himself pleasant in company. He was few kinds that are dangerous; but nearer the equator they grow
polite and attentive, and talked a
great deal where he saw it was ex-
petted. Frequently he received in- -
vitations from the best families, Tn '
who wished to show him respect,
and who expected to hear him eon-
verse on various subjects, religious t
and otherwise. He had seen mudh
of the world in his travels, and be-
ing "a great reader, his mind was
stored with an infinite number of .
anecdotes, which, with his agree-
able manners, made his conversa- ;. fo t-s
tion very entertaining. In private
life, amono his friends, his manners
were particularly sprightly aind
pleasant. And this was as con-
spicuous at nearly ninety years of .
age, as when at young man of -t h
twenty. His temperance princi-
ples he carried to great length. -
But while he never urged these
views upon others, lie insisted upon
the right of being judge of what b
he deemed best for himiself'. ". ...-
Mr. Wesley was a great scholar, "O
being well read in the classics, and
thoroughly conversant with the dead languages. When be was to an immense size, and many of them are very poisonous.
unable to quote a text from the English New Testament, he They are a great terror to other creatures, an well as to man.
was seldom at "a loss to repeat it in the Greek. He was also a They especially delglight in destroying the eggs of birds, and in
proficient in many modern tongues. The science of logic he stud- eating their young. How terribly this poorly, mother-bird ill the
ied with great care. This enabled hin to reason correctly, to con- picture must feel to see her cosy little home invaded, and her
prehend things clearly, and to judge truly. In r ..1;,,- he made sweet ...II carried off', without being able to drive the rob-
accurate notes of men and things, and transcribed them into ber away, or to defend her brood See how terrified she looks.
his journal, which has often been printed. He also held fro- We can alhnost hear her cries of distress. And there comes the
quent correspondence with the great men of his day,-withi father-bird to help her; but I lear they will not be able to
bishops, hand critics, and lords. frighten his snakeship away from the dainty repast lie has
For preaching the doctrine of' free grace, Wesley was oftei promised himself
persecuted and mobbed, but a kind Providence spared his life, The first account -we have of the snake, or serpent, was in
sonimetimnes when in the very jaws of death itself. This persecun- the garden of Eden. It was in the firm of a serpent hat Satan
tion and injury lie bore not only without anger, but without ainy came to Eve one day inl the garden, when she hadl wandered
apparent notice. Though looked upon as a schismatic by the away from her husba(l, anlld stood gazing "at the tenimping fruit
Eughlsh State Church, this holy man died in her connection, be- of' the tree of knowledge of good and evil. The Lord may
loved by his own people and respected by his enemies. The have told Eve to stay by herr husband ; for then the devil would
last four days of his earthly existence were spent in praising not so easily have been able to lead either one of them astray.
the Lord. As she looked at the fruit, she wondered why God should tell
them not to eat of' it; for it looked vecry lice, anld shle colll iot
see why it was not a-; good as that of any other tree ill the gar-
WHATEVER be the cause of happiness may be made likewise deln. But God hald s'id: Thou shalt inot cat oft it,, for iii the
the cause of' misery. The medicine which, rightly applied, has day thou latest thereof thou :-halt surely die,"' and God cannot
power to cure, has, when rashness or ignorance prescribes it, lie.
the same power to destroy. Eve had not been gazing long before the serpent appeared












24 S r'iI TMn AT FHOeM.


and spoke to her, and asked if God had said they should not bearing his victims down into the dark grave ever since. For
eat of every tree in the garden. If Eve had only thought a over six thousand years the people of the earth have been grow-
moment, she would have known that this was Satan; but it was ing worse and worse, and wickedness has come to be so com-
so strange to hear a serpent talk that her curiosity was aroused, mon that it does not seem so terrible as it did once. But this
and she answered the question, instead of running away, and will not always last. By and by the Restorer will come, and
told him they were allowed to eat of all but the one before her. take those who have loved him and kept all the commandments
to his beautiful home in heaven. Then this earth
S. will be purified, and will all be beautiful, like the
"- --" -- -:=-- garden of Eden, and the children of God will
S have homes here, and live forever. Then they
will again have a right to eat of the tree of life,
"' 7 -':---- and that will keep them from death. Then the
en*-!v : .P ~ .i earth will be restored to its first beauty, and sin
S... 'will not be known. Everything will be pure
Quieand lovely as when it first left the lhan of its
Sr d _-- -e s- Creator.


--'_-- -MO Gft T T9 MOc,+qT.
Sw .t one who, walking in a forest, sees
a -d th fate A lovely landscape throu hi the parted trees,
"h -- Then sees it not, for boughs that intervene
Ss--- -- Or as we see the moon sometimes revealed
0. o Through drifting clouds, and then again con called,
So I behold the scene.
Again the tossing boughs shut out the scene,
Again the drifting vapors intervene,
Of that one she told him, God hath said, Ye shall not eat of And the moon's pallid disk is hidden quite.
it, neither shall ye touch it, lost ye die." To this, Satan imme- The meadow brook, that seemeth to stand still,
diately responded, Ye shall not surely die." Quickens its current as it nears the mill;
In le vel places, and so dtun:lappets,
eatAnd so the stream of Time that liwgereth
This was the first lie ever told. Jesus said, Satan is a liar, In level places, and so dull appears,
and the father of it," referring to this very lie le told to Eve in ERuns with a swifter current as it nears
Eden. The gloomy mills of Death.
When Eve saw that the tree seemed to be good for food, she of cud i
took some too, and ate it; and when she saw Adam, she offered Sometimes the setting sun breaks out again,
him some of the fruit to eat. Adam doubtless know at once
that it was Satan who had taken the form of a serpent, and
'tempted Eve to sin against God. IIe was very sad; because --
he knew that Eve would have to be punished, and his love -: -
for her was so great that lie resolved to eat the fruit, and -
share the consequences with her.
There was great sorrow in heaven when it was known that -
Adam and Eve had (lisobeycd God; and the loving Father ."-
said they must leave their beautiful lihome. So lie came down
to tell them what shoulL come upon them. 110 first pro-
nounced a curse upon the serpent, compelling him to crawl
on the ground forever, and saying lie should be trodden un-
der foot and despised by every ono; and it has been so ever
since.
Adam and Eve were driven from tile garden, and so they
coulil not cat of tie tre of liifo ay longer. While they could f.
eat of its leaves Mnrd fruit, they were kept always young '-
and strong. If they had continued to eat of it, they would-- --
never have been sick, and would never have died. As soon
as they were shut away from the tree, the worn particles of
their bodies began to decay and die. Soon these particles wasted And, touching all the darksome woods with light,
faster than their food could ma'.ke new ones, and then they be- Smiles on the fields, until they laugh and sing;
gain to grow old, and finally they died, and were buried in the Then, like a ruby from the horizon's ring,
earth from which they were taken. So what the Lord had Drops down into the night.
said came to pass; for in the very day that they ate of the fruit
they began to die. ANY man can pick up courage enough to be heroic for ain hour;
This is how death first came into the world, and he has been to be patiently heroic daily is the test of character.













S I eNHmTN A'r PloMrr. 25


S T4PE 14 'N TA T 4[ 4[S This is a striking illustration of the experience of many who
T- cJW' G F T !. seek so earnestly for the pleasures of this world. Infatuated by
HIS singular light, frequently seen in marshy places, the weird flame, they press eagerly on toward the glittering
differs so much from common lights that it has received prize, which is ever just beyond their reach; and finally, when
the name of Foolish Fire. seemingly within their grasp, the
It is also called "Will-o'- false light will vanish entirely.
the- wisp," and "Jack- A VP- c t o is thus enticed from the
with-a-lantern.' path of right, will find at last
It is a pale, bluish- that he is, like the traveler, led
colored flame, and oener- a -way but to perish.
ally appears a little after sunset I -
Sometimes it shines steadily all
night, at other times disappear irsT
and returns after short intervals.
It floats in the air abont two or HIS grand old building is
three feet from the ground, and the favorite country res-
travels away from any one who idence of the British sov-
attempts to approach it. e reigns. It is built oil
The ignis fatuas is of frequent the top of a ill, overlookingt the
occurrence in Northern Europe, -- town of Windsor, and command-
but is seldom seen in this country. ing a fine view of the Piver
In t one place in Miassachuset ts itt Thames. Oie this hill, William
has appeared several I ines. Once thie Conqueror built a fortress,
it was seen about t1en o'eloclk ini which was greatly enlarged by
the a n. and wNas as large and Henry I. King Edward III. on-
brilliant as the light of a lanterm. S e tircly rebuilt the castle, except
It passed tip the road thewo or thlrm three of the towers at the west
rods distant faoum the pers(onIIs who nad of the lower yard. Many in-
saw it, and did not vanish until it provements and alterations were
had floated sonic forty or fifty rods. Just below the place where made in the castle by the successors of Edward III. In the
this light started, was a low )piece of ground. The weeds on reign of Queen Elizabeth, a terrace was made on the north side
this ground had been pulled, and piled in heaps; and it was of the castle; this has since been enlarged. The interior of the
supposed that the gas rising firom these decayed woods produced castle was greatly improved by ( I ii II. The buildings alone
the light. Indeed, it has been clearly ascertained that the gas now cover twelve acres.
arising from deeayinig matter sometimes takes fire on coming in Between the two wards of the castle is the keep, or Round
contact with the air, allnd thus produces this strange light. Tower, which is about three hundred feet in circumference and
III former times is built oni the top
this light was an ll- of a high, artifi-
object of superst i- -- cial mound. III
tioni, and was be- this tower many
-JI
liev~ed to be pro- royal prisoners
duced by some have been con-\
evil spirit, in its i4 E o La41 II filled, among oth-
attempts to lead ors, King James
the benightod f I.ofScotland. St.
traveler to his do- eorge's chapel,
struction. There or the collegiate
are instances on churcllh of Wind-
record, of travel- sor, is the largest
ers, who, mnistak- and most elegant
ing this flame for of the three royal
a lamp, have fol- chapels of Eng-
lowed it until de- --- land. Connected
coycd into some with this chapel
swampy spot is large vault,
where they pei- in which several
ished. kings and queens
The mani in the and other mem-
picture is endeav- bers of the royal
oring to approach one of these lights. It is in the might. Se, family lie buricm The castle is surrounded by the "Little
he is now wading in the water. Soon the deceptive light will Park," which is about four miles in circumference and contains
disappear, and he will be left in the marsh, perhaps to die. some five hundred acres. Oi the south side of the castle, con-













S I eNHmTN A'r PloMrr. 25


S T4PE 14 'N TA T 4[ 4[S This is a striking illustration of the experience of many who
T- cJW' G F T !. seek so earnestly for the pleasures of this world. Infatuated by
HIS singular light, frequently seen in marshy places, the weird flame, they press eagerly on toward the glittering
differs so much from common lights that it has received prize, which is ever just beyond their reach; and finally, when
the name of Foolish Fire. seemingly within their grasp, the
It is also called "Will-o'- false light will vanish entirely.
the- wisp," and "Jack- A VP- c t o is thus enticed from the
with-a-lantern.' path of right, will find at last
It is a pale, bluish- that he is, like the traveler, led
colored flame, and oener- a -way but to perish.
ally appears a little after sunset I -
Sometimes it shines steadily all
night, at other times disappear irsT
and returns after short intervals.
It floats in the air abont two or HIS grand old building is
three feet from the ground, and the favorite country res-
travels away from any one who idence of the British sov-
attempts to approach it. e reigns. It is built oil
The ignis fatuas is of frequent the top of a ill, overlookingt the
occurrence in Northern Europe, -- town of Windsor, and command-
but is seldom seen in this country. ing a fine view of the Piver
In t one place in Miassachuset ts itt Thames. Oie this hill, William
has appeared several I ines. Once thie Conqueror built a fortress,
it was seen about t1en o'eloclk ini which was greatly enlarged by
the a n. and wNas as large and Henry I. King Edward III. on-
brilliant as the light of a lanterm. S e tircly rebuilt the castle, except
It passed tip the road thewo or thlrm three of the towers at the west
rods distant faoum the pers(onIIs who nad of the lower yard. Many in-
saw it, and did not vanish until it provements and alterations were
had floated sonic forty or fifty rods. Just below the place where made in the castle by the successors of Edward III. In the
this light started, was a low )piece of ground. The weeds on reign of Queen Elizabeth, a terrace was made on the north side
this ground had been pulled, and piled in heaps; and it was of the castle; this has since been enlarged. The interior of the
supposed that the gas rising firom these decayed woods produced castle was greatly improved by ( I ii II. The buildings alone
the light. Indeed, it has been clearly ascertained that the gas now cover twelve acres.
arising from deeayinig matter sometimes takes fire on coming in Between the two wards of the castle is the keep, or Round
contact with the air, allnd thus produces this strange light. Tower, which is about three hundred feet in circumference and
III former times is built oni the top
this light was an ll- of a high, artifi-
object of superst i- -- cial mound. III
tioni, and was be- this tower many
-JI
liev~ed to be pro- royal prisoners
duced by some have been con-\
evil spirit, in its i4 E o La41 II filled, among oth-
attempts to lead ors, King James
the benightod f I.ofScotland. St.
traveler to his do- eorge's chapel,
struction. There or the collegiate
are instances on churcllh of Wind-
record, of travel- sor, is the largest
ers, who, mnistak- and most elegant
ing this flame for of the three royal
a lamp, have fol- chapels of Eng-
lowed it until de- --- land. Connected
coycd into some with this chapel
swampy spot is large vault,
where they pei- in which several
ished. kings and queens
The mani in the and other mem-
picture is endeav- bers of the royal
oring to approach one of these lights. It is in the might. Se, family lie buricm The castle is surrounded by the "Little
he is now wading in the water. Soon the deceptive light will Park," which is about four miles in circumference and contains
disappear, and he will be left in the marsh, perhaps to die. some five hundred acres. Oi the south side of the castle, con-












26 SB ITMr AT PIOMK.

nected with Little Park" by a long avenue of trees, is the
" Great Park," which is eighteen miles in circumference. It
abounds with beautiful forest scenery, and is well stocked with .V ERUSALEM1 is "beautiful for situation, the joy of the
deer. In this park is a beautiful lake, called Virginia Water, ,l whole earth." Ps. 48: 2. It is on the central table-land
on the bank of which is the Royal Fishing Temple. At the end v of Judea, nearly surrounded by deep valleys or ravines;
of the lake the water forms a beautiful cascade, near which is L ," two lesser ones divide the city into three parts. Zion,
an artificial ruin, formed of marble and other material brought the highest and strongest part of the city, is in the south-
from Greece. West of the Great Park" lies Windsor Forest, east. It formerly conta-ined the citadel, the king's pal-
which is fifty-six miles in circumference. ace, and the tombs of the kings. NMotiah, the sacred hill,
This home of the royal family is indeed a beautiful place, and was north-east of Zion, while Aera lay on the north. Jerusalem





-- --:_ _-- -_ -. -_- --- _. _--- -_- "_--- _---. ..







_I .-- -------_-








Y 4"- 'Nl.'. "







-u i __i'' '








it might seem that in such a pleasant spot there could be no un- had three walls built at different times, in which were lofty
happiness. But all down the rolling years, many have been towers of great strength and magnificence. On the east of Je-
the sad and aching hearts shut up in the walls of the old castle. rusalem, stretching from north to south, is the mount of Olives.
Strange and thrilling stories are related of the secrets of the On the north-east of Moriah, at the foot of the mount of Olives,
ancient palace ; and could the old walls speak, they might is Gethsemane. In fact, all around and within this most illus-
doubtless tell stranger and sadder stories than pen or tongue trious city on the face of the earth, are the names of places as
have revealed. Those of royal birth are sometimes envied; but familiar to us as household words. Elegant, rich, beautiful Jeru-
they have their sorrows as well as other people, and their lives salem Its great glory has departed, while the desolate mount-
are too often far from happy. ains around it witness from age to age the surety of the word of
Few of us will ever enter an earthly palace; but all may be the Lord. She who sat among them as a queen has been many
heirs of a home more glorious than any royal palace. In the times captured, ravaged, and razed to the ground. She has been
city of God are many mansions ; no royal grounds can corn- ploughed as a field, to show her utter desolation and perfect sub-
pare with the "garden of the Lord; and best of all, in that section to the conqueror.
beautiful home will be neither sorrow nor crying. Modern Jerusalem is in the possession of the Turks, who have












S1 1UJ FH xim Ie. sAT 1iOME 27


built a grand church, called the Mosque of Omar, on the site of laver and the altar of burnt offerings. (In the cut this altar is
the ancient temple, and eight or ten other mosques in different erroneously placed in the court of the Israelites.) Between the
parts of the city. It has a population of about twelve thousand, court of the Gentiles and that of the Israelites, on the east, was
two-fifths of whom are Mohammedans, and the rest Jews and the court of the women, which was the place where the Jews
Christians in about equal numbers. Both of the latter are de- went for ordinary worship, and beyond which women might not
graded and ignorant. Every year, in the month of April, when go unless they had sacrifices to offer.
the passover used to be celebrated, many thousands of pilgrims There were two ranges of porticoes,or covered walks, around
from other countries make a flying visit to the sacred places, the temple; one outside of the court of the Gentiles, was very
In a small area near the western wall of Moriah the Jews gather, rich, having one hundred and sixty-two columns of dazzling white
especially on their sacred days, to weep and wail over the city marble, supporting a cedar ceiling of the most exquisite work-
that is no longer their own. manship. The other, surrounding the inner court, had smaller



























Tfti TJM'PE columns, but was equally magnificent. There were ten gates
leading into the temple courts. Nine of these were richly
HE temple at Jerusalem has been called the most beauti- adorned with gold and silver. The tenth, called the Beautiful
ful building that was ever constructed. The first one Gate, was Corinthian brass of the finest workmanship. It
was built by King Solomon, a thousand years before was eighty-seven feet high, and its door seventy feet high;
Christ. The foundation walls were in places five hun- while the doors of the others were fifty-two feet high and half
dred and twenty-five feet deep, and some of the stones as wide.
used were seventy feet square. The temple was of the The great gateway Nicanor opened into the court of the
same proportions as the tabernacle, only much larger. priests. It was one hundred and thirty-two feet high, and
It was built of white marble, exquisitely wrought and polished, forty-three wide. Through its spacious arch could be seen the
and the holy and most holy places were covered inside with Golden Gate of the temple. Over this gate hung a golden
plates of gold. The house of God was adorned everywhere with vine which had bunches as large as a man : the grapes were
representations of angels. precious stones and the leaves were of solid gold.
Solomon's temple retained its first glory but thirty-three No such glory is to be found in any edifice on earth now. It
years, when, on account of the sinfulness of God's professed peo- seems as though God would give man as nearly as possible some
ple, it was plundered by Shishak, king of Egypt, and was utterly little representation of Heaven ; but glorious as was this struct-
destroyed by Nebuchadnezzar, B. c. 588. The ark and the ure, it can bear no comparison with the richness of that celestial
mercy seat, made by Moses, were forever lost. abode. There the entire foundation is of precious stones, some
In B. c. 17, King Herod tore down the second temple, and on delicate, some most richly colored, all blending into one grand
its foundation he built another, "which was the admiration and glory; while the super-structure is of a material so different and
the envy of the world." It was entirely surrounded by three probably far surpassing anything found on earth, that the
courts, or yards. That of the Gentiles, around the outside, cov- prophet could only compare it to transparent gold. The open
ered over fourteen acres. It was from this place that the Say- courts of the earthly temple, paved with many-colored marbles,
iour drove the money changers, and those who sold animals for could but faintly have represented the glory of the colors re-
sacrifice to persons who came from a distance, and could not bring elected from the streets paved with this gold; while the light
Their offerings with them. Next within this was the court of the emanating from God and the Lamb illuminates it, making the
Israelites, and inside was that of the priests, in which were the entire place radiant beyond all conception.











H ~28 S UNrHiN AT HOWIR.

The sanctuary which Moses built in the wilderness was as enly. The sinner brought the offering for his sin to the door of
glorious as human hands could make it. The building itself, the tabernacle. There lie laid his hanid on its head, confessing
and all its furniture, looked like massive gold, being either made his sin, and in this way transferring it in figure to the animal.
of solid gold, or covered with plates of it. The veil which By laying his hand on the animal's head, be virtually said, For
separated its two apartments and formed its outer door-way my sins I am worthy to die the death which this innocent creat-
and the ceiling, were of fine linen, embroidered in blue, purple, lre is soon to suffer. Then lie killed it; its body was burned
and scarlet colors, representing angels and flowers, to make it just outside tihe door of the tabernacle, except some parts re-
as nearly as possible like heaven, where are multitudes of flow- served for the priests, who bore a portion of
ers and angels. Lights, which were always burning within, it into the holy place. Thus the sin was fig-
were reflected gorgeously indeed on all sides of the golden & ". uratively left in the sanctuary.
building; while the whole was perfumed with the rich and J. Every day in the year this was done, iths
costly fragrance kept burning day and night on the altar of in- -__ defiling that holy building with the sins of
cense. It is said that the .-, ..... extended for miles around i God's repentant people. On the last day of
lihe tabernacle. "r the year came a most solemn ceremony to
The first,or holy place,contained three articles of furniture, close up the year's labors. It night be called
the candlestick, with seven !branches, the table of shew-bread, The Ark a balancing of the accounts of the sinner
and the altar of incense. The most holy, or inner room had with his Creator. This was the great (lay of atonement, or the
but one article of furniture. This was far the most precious of day of judgment ; and any who should refuse to observe it by
anything in the tabernacle; it wvas a chest, called the ark. The fI-i;,,. faithful heart-searching, and ..... -i. .. of his sins, im-
ark was very precious, because it contained the tables of stone ploring God's forgiveness, were cut off from his people.
which the Lord gave to M... when he was with him oin Mount On this day, while all the people were without, anxiously
Sinai. Upon these tables, God had written his own holy law, praying, f. .i;.._ God would manifest his wrath on account of
the ten commandments. The ark was covered with a tightly- their sins, the high priest went into the most holy place, which
fitting lid of pure gold, called the mercy-seat. The tables of no one could enter on any other day without dying. lHe took
stone, covered ,with the mercy-seat, showed that God has united with him the blood of an animal, which lie sprinkled upon and
the law and the gospel, and we should accept both. Upon each before the ark containing God's law. He did this because the
1end of the mercy-seat stood a cherub, beaten out of solid gold. broken law calls for death; and blood, the symbol of death, is
here brought to it. Then the high priest bore from the sanctu-
ary, in himself in figure, all the sins which had been accumulat-
ing in it during the year, leaving the glorious building holy
again. Now the blood of beasts could never really take away
sin; the death of all the animals that ever lived could not sat-
isfy the law for one transgression.
All this round of yearly
sacrifice represented the
Candlestick. Table of Shew-broad. Altar of Incense. work of Christ. First he
died on Calvary like a lamb
These angels, with wings stretched out over the ark, looked .! I i acifie, tha he
!. t' '*I in sacrifice, then he .
down upon it, representing the interest which heavenly beings sce n oil shaci tan en-
po S .-' ascended on high, and en-
take ini our salvation. Between these angels over the merey- termed the holy place of the
te Ld ws tetered the holy place of the
seat appeared a glorious light, called the Shekinach., which showed satar Th
heavenly sanctuary. There
the Lord was there,.
lie remained, -0-; .I.; as
God said that every soul that sinned, that is, broke one of the merciful aid faithful
the commandments contained in the ark, should die. Alas! all h Priest of his people till
have sinned, but Jesus gave his life that every one who would th time hs pae pe tbll '
accept and obey him might escape this sentence of death. poid .. \
Christ did not die as soon as man began to sin. God in his il h.
"heavenly sanctuary should
dom saw fit to symbolize the death of Christ for a certain length i cleansed (or released) .
of time by the death of animals. Thus it came about that in from all the sins which had
order to represent Christ's death and his subsequent work, the ever bee confessed to i
ber Ien confessed to God S.
earthly sanctuary was built, and its typical service was insti- This is the great and fill
tuted to be a shadow of what our Saviour would do. When the day of Judgment, or alone-
real ..'n _,, Je-us himself, came and died, there was no longer ment.
any necessity of that which represented him, so it was done On the earthly day of -
away, and the law regulating these things came to an end,- atonement two goats were --- --
was nailed to the cross. (Stone could not be nailed to wood, so brought; the lots were east,
it was not the law on the tables of stone which was nailed to the one for the Lord, and the
cross and passed away; neither was that law a shadow of' Jesus.) other for the scapegoat. The Lord's goat was offered in sacri-
There is a sanctuary in heaven, where Jesus is our High flee after the high priest had offered its blood in the sanctuary,
Priest. Thle one on earth was not only made like it, but its receiving himself in figure the sins from the sacred building. He
services represented the work of Christ in heaven. By under- then came out, and confessed them over the head of the scape-
Sstanding the earthly, therefore, we shall know about the heav- goat, which was sent by the hand of a fit man into the wilder-


Ni\












S N^rsIKE AT PHOME. 291

ness. In the end of Christ's work in the heavenly sanctuary,
his blood will be applied to make a final atonement for the sins -
of God's people. Then all the sins ever committed by the hu- "--"
man family will be placed upon the head of the one who has -T ,h, -
caused them., i. e., the devil, and he will be sent away into the
land of f.. .-r ,i.... no more to trouble the children of men. '
Sin is thus forever put away.
According to the word of God, which alone has power to ./ I
give us any light on this grand and important subject, Christ
has already entered the most holy place in the heavenly temple, came in collision with an iceberg so high that its top could not
where John, as recorded in the Revelation, saw the ark, show- be seen from the masthead. The ship was so wrecked and
ing that the law it contains is binding still after the worldly crushed by this floating mountain that they expected every mo-
sanctuary has given place to the heavenly. The great plan of ment to see it sink. It was only with the greatest difficulty
salvation is being completed. Those who desire a part in Christ's that they freed themselves from their perilous position, and set
closing ministration will do well to remember the earnest, faith- sail for Ireland, where they repaired damages, and joined a con-
ful work required of God's people on the day of atonement. voy of English merchant ships bound for the Baltic Sea.
After a severe storm, in which many vessels were wrecked,
they separated from the convoy, and proceeded on their voyage
'O OQf S' AT jS' i alone. Soon, however, they were captured by Danish privateers,
"and taken to Copenhagen, where their ship and cargo were con-
WIAT is noble ?-'Tis the finer demned because of their intercourse with the English. Previ-
Portion of our mind and heart ous to their examination in court, the ship owner promised that
Linked to something still diviner if the seamen would t. -I; fy 11.., i their route had been direct from
Than mere language can im- New York to Copenhagen, they should each receive a handsome
"Ever prompting, ever seeing, reward. Some of the sailors would not agree to this, and among
S'; ;.--Some improvement yet to plan the number, our cabin-boy. He was the first to be examined,
S .i'.'' "'\N To uplift our fellow-being, and before being sworn he was asked if he understood the nat-
1 And, like man, to feel for man. ure of an oath. He said he did, and they showed him a box-
W / like machine used for cutting off' the thumb and first two fingers
S. What is noble ?-That which
S W places of the right hand of every one who should swear falsely. He
Truth in its enfranchised will then gave a truthful statement of their wreck and subsequent
Leaving steps, like angel-traces.
f That mankind may follow still!
-'. i I E'en though scorn's malignant .-
,,glances /
S .1 Prove him poorest of his clan.
S t '. He's the noble who advances
SF, freedom, and the cause of
L, ".' S\'l n- man.-Swain. .

(,'' '"', -" CAPTAIN JOSEPH BATES Was
one of nature's noblemcn. -
lie was born in 1792, and
S- lived to be eighty years old.
/. F F iFrom an early age he pos-
i sessed an ardent love for the
sea, and much desired to be
". .-. a sailor. But his parents op-
S' posed it strongly; and "to
"I, "cure the boy," they let him i.
i" r ` -- take a short trip from New A".
S..r -.. Bedford, his home, to Bos-
ton, on board his uncle's boat. W "i
'ir JikI',,.. 1But this only increased the .
"I' difficulty, for the life just
...- -uited him, and finally his
parents gave their consent,
and he went on board a ship stop in Ireland for repairs. As a party of his comrades were
bound for London. This trip out walking that evening, they passed by. the jail, and some of
was ended with safety, and the prisoners held their hands through the bars to show how
L,. the next year he again em- they had been mutilated by that little machine. Here among
barked, this time for Arch- strangers, with everything taken from him but the clothes he
.-- angel in Russia. Here they wore, ended his Russian voyage.












30 S5rUNpK AT PHOMh.


Before winter set in he sailed to Prussia, and from there to been signed; and when it was ratified by President Madison, the
Ireland. Soon after his arrival here he went across the Irish following February, they looked for immediate release. This
Sea to Liverpool, where a "press-gang" entered his boarding- the British Government refused to do; and, on account of the
house, claiming him as a subject of King George III.; and al- neglect of the United States agent, they remained there until
though he produced papers to show that he was a citizen of the April 27, 1815, just five years from the time our hero was im-
United States, he was dragged to a place of confinement, and pressed into unwilling service, half of this time having been
then impressed on board a British man-of-war, where he was spent in service as a prisoner of war.
confined with many others in like circumstances. Taking ad- Upon being released, Bates, with two hundred and eighty
vantage, one day, of the absence of many of the officers and others, was placed on board a cartel bound for the United States.
crew, they made an attempt to escape by breaking the bars and When they had been out at sea several days, they learned that
bolts in the port-holes. Unfortunately for them, their plan was the cartel was chartered for South Carolina, hundreds of miles
discovered and they were severely flogged, and the next day farther than they wished to go; for they were all New England
transferred to a large stationary ship. men. They urged the captain to land them nearer their homes,
On this monstrous floating castle fifteen hundred seamen but all in vain ; and finally they took the ship out of the hands
were confined. Here he again attempted to escape, but was of its captain, appointed another one, and landed in New Lon-
brought back and placed on a ship of war which was going to don, Connecticut, from whence they could easily reach their
join the British squadron in the Gulf of Lyons, there to unite homes, leaving the cartel to proceed on its way unmolested.
with the Spanish fleet in war with France. This ship was out With joy his parents welcomed him home after an absence of
for a three years' station, and for that length of time he re- over six years, and they were especially rejoiced to find that he
mained on it, imperiled by numerous engagements with the on- had come unscathed from the scenes of vice and wickedness
emy, and by levanters," or gales of wind, common in those with which he had been so long surrounded.
seas. Here he made several attempts to escape, but none were His stay at home was not long. In a short time he engaged
successful, and each time he was severely punished, as second mate on a voyage to Russia, and had a prosperous trip.
Several times he had writ- Later, when on the return
ten home for aid; but as the 0- voyage from South America,
letters were submitted to the his life seems to have been
inspection of the lieutenant be- spared by the intervention of
fore being mailed, only one ---Providence. They stopped at
reached its destination. From ---- -the French island of Martinico;
this his father learned of his and having displeased the com-
situation, and by appealing to modore in some trifling matter,
James Monroe, who was then they were ordered to leave the
President of the United States, harbor, which they had hardly
he obtained papers demanding n-done when an equinoctial gale
his release. These were sent _n arose, and devastated the ship-
to the consul and to the comr- ping still in the harbor so much
mander-in-chief of the squad- that only two vessels out of
ron; but as they were unwil- nearly one hundred were saved.
ling to release him, and the law was slow to act, the case still On his next visit home he was married to Miss Prudence
hung in uncertainty when the war of 1812 broke out. As the Nye, in February, 1818. Six months later he went as chief
cause of this difficulty between King George III. and the United mate on a ship for Gottenberg, Sweden. While crossing the
States was the impressment and seizure of American seamen, Gulf Stream on the homeward trip, a violent storm arose, and
those that were already in seizure were required either to take for days and weeks they were tossed on a tempestuous sea,
up arms in defense of the English against their own country, or sometimes riding the wave, sometimes wallowing in its trough,
to become prisoners of war. and momentarily expecting to be drowned. To add to their
Preferring the latter to the former course, Joseph Bates, terror, the ship sprung aleak; and only by throwing over part
with about seven hundred others, was locked up on board an of their burden, and pumping constantly, was it kept from sink-
old hulk seventy miles from London. Here their condition was ing. Their provisions gave out, and had they not been supplied
wretched indeed, without proper food, water, or air, and very frequently by passing ships, they must have perished. Finally,
much crowded. The officers and sailors placed over them were after futile attempts to cross the stream in their damaged condi-
coarse, blasphemous men, brutal in the extreme; and it is almost tion, they were compelled to sail southward to the West Indies,
miraculous that, with the uncertainty of his fate, Bates did not where they anchored for repairs. They had been out from Got-
become contaminated with the atmosphere of' vice everywhere tenberg one hundred and twenty-two days, less than one-third
around him. Plans for escape were again laid, and eighteen men that time being required for a voyage. Repairs were soon made,
escaped before it was discovered. The guards finally became so and he once more sailed for home, this being his third visit home
alarmed for their own safety and that of the ship, that they sent in ten years.
their outraged prisoners to Dartmoor prison, in England, where It was during this voyage that his mind was first impressed
they were confined with six thousand others. with the evidences of God's protection; and he firmly believed
In this dreary place, shut in from the outside world by a that it was in answer to prayers made in their hours of distress
massive stone wall broad enough for hundreds of soldiers to walk that they were rescued. This, he said, was the most remarkable
L on guard, hope almost deserted them; but at last, in December, voyage he ever made or ever heard of.
S1814, the cheering news reached them that a treaty of peace had Several trips succeeded this one, and on the third one he was












S IJm IT-E AST HOMImE. 31

made commander, or captain, of a new ship fitted up by its men were converted. This voyage ended his sea-faring life.
owners for this purpose. He sailed to South America; and He then began to devote his time and means to moral re-
while on this trip he voluntarily pledged himself to abstain from forms, and labored ardently and successfully in the cause of tem-
all intoxicating liquors ; for he began to see the injurious results perance, of which he was almost the first advocate. In this and
which their continued use produced upon others. In this work the suppression of slavery, which was being agitated then, he
of reform he found himself entirely alone, and often he was continued about twelve years, when he first became acquainted
placed in embarrassing positions. The temperance subject had with the doctrines advocated by the renowned Wm. Miller. He
not been agitated much then, and consequently those who ab- examined them carefully, and becoming convinced of their con-
stained from liquor were regarded as foolish and fanatical. He formity to Scripture, he adopted them, and soon after began
also discarded tobacco in every form, and became a strong advo- lecturing. He labored suc-
cate of temperance principles, although derided, and looked upon cessfully as a speaker and
by his associates as an extremist. Here he made great efforts writer, and employed his
to overcome the habit of swearing, into which a checkered life means and energies in the
of sixteen years as a sailor had thrown him; and here, too, he cause of Bible truth and re-
commenced to read the Bible, a book with which he had had lit- form for a period of thirty-
tie acquaintance heretofore, although he had always held it in t wo years.
the highest reverence. During a subsequent voyage he dis- Elder Bates, or Father
carded cider, and then began his first religious investigations, .Bates," as he was familiarly
and he experienced the first longings he had ever known to lead called, was universally beloved
a C'li i ,i.1, life. One of his sailors was taken ill, and died on by the people of his choice,
the passage; and this so solemnly affected his mind in regard to and greatly respected by all
the uncertainty of life, and the necessity of a constant prepara- with whom he came in con-
tion, that he made a covenant with God that he would ever after tact. His eminently useful
serve him. On this trip he was absent from home twenty i life terminated in 1872, and
months, and in all that time he met with only two converted he now rests by the side of
persons. These meetings were indeed privileges, as he had his companion in "Poplar
greatly desired to converse with some one on the subject of re- Hill Cemetery," Monterey,
ligion. When in port, he daily sought a grove or retired spot, Mich., awaiting the glad peal
in which to commune with God; but while on board, it was al- I- of' the Archangel's trump,--
most impossible to find a secluded place for that purpose. an event which he ever con-
He lengthened his stay at home this time so that he might template with unspeakable
have an opportunity to attend religious meetings. Revival serv- joy.
ices were being held some twenty miles away, and by attend- -
ing these he was greatly encouraged and strengthened. His You ask," said the famous
parents were Congregationalists, and he had been sprinkled in William, prince of Orange, to
infancy; but this did not agree with his belief, and so he united L Sonoy the governor, "if I
with the Christian church by immersion in the spring of 1827. have entered into a treaty, or
Again his attention was directed especially to the temperance made a contract for assistance,
work, and by earnest solicitation he succeeded in inducing a with any powerful king? I
number of the influential men of the town to join him in an or- answer that, before I ever
ganization called the Fair Haven Temperance Society." This took up the cause of the op-
was the first temperance society ever known to have been or- pressed Christians in the
ganized in the United States. Weekly meetings were held, and provinces, I had entered into
the Society became exceedingly popular. All classes crowded I a close alliance with the King
to hear on the subject, and hundreds of converts pledged them- of kings, and I am firmly con-
selves to its constitution. From this other societies were formed vinced that all who put their
in adjacent towns, and soon a County Temperance Society was trust in him will be saved by
organized, and the Massachusetts State Temperance Society fol- his almighty hand." After-
lowed,-all the result of Captain Bates's untiring labor. Then -'I ward, when offered every
came the children's Cold Water Army," nearly three hundred personal and family favor if
children from Fair Haven joining it; while temperance tracts and he would but give over his
papers were multiplied throughout the land. life-long endeavors to secure
During his next voyage he put in practice the principles he religious freedom to the poor
had learned, holding morning and evening prayers on ship board, Netherlanders, the brave
and instituting many reforms, among which was the prohibition prince replied, "I regard
of intoxicating drinks, swearing, and Sabbath-breaking. A few the welfare and security of
well-chosen books were placed on board, to which all had ac- the public before my own,
cess, and good papers were freely distributed. At first the crew having already placed my
were inclined to consider this an intrusion on their privileges, particular interests under my
but were soon convinced of the wisdom and justice of the course, foot, and am still resolved
Sand only one, throughout the whole voyage, violated the rules. to, so long as life shall en-
Through this and by his counsels and example, two of the dure."












32 SUNSHINE X F, r H(D IV[MOM.

cred. Now Mordecai was greatly distressed at this, and clothing
J-FfrfvyAJt cfrJ frQRtf. himself with sackcloth and ashes, wept bitterly.
On a certain night, sleep departed from the eyes of the king,
MONG- all the narratives of the Bible, that of IIaman and so he commanded that the book of the chronicles of the kings
Mordecai is one of the most interesting. Among the un- be brought and read before him. And among other things they
fortunate Jews who were carried away captive by Nob- read the record of the wicked conspiracy of the king's two serv-
uchadnezzar, king of Babylon, was 31....A I. and an or- ants, and of Mordecai's fhithfullness in preventing its execution.
phan girl, his cousin Esther, whom he had adopted after the Immediately he inquired what honor had been done to him for
death of her par- this. He was an-
ents. She was ex- swered, Noth-
ceedingly fair and ing." Haman at
beautifull. After a --- this moment came
time, cireumstan- into the court, and
cesocecurredwhich ---.--.- the king said to
-the l-. said to_
brought Estherin- i--him, "What shall
to the royal palace, be done unto the
and she was made ----'-- man whom the
queen. Notwith- W. i king delirhteth to
standing a change ".1i honor?" Now l[a-
of her fortune and .man in his pride
great promotion, thought that he
Mordecai did not was the person the
lose his care and king would most
interest for her, delight to honor,
but came every so he -.i-. a-, 1 a
day and sat at great p(iblie eere-
the k ing' s gate, mony as illustra-
so that he might ted in the engrav-
know how she did. Iing. Thentheking
For some reason, told him to make
two of the king's haste and do as
servants had plot- he had suggested,
ted treason against even to Mordoecai
him, and hrd do- the Jew. Cha-
termined to titke grined and humili-
his life. The mat- ated, he obeyed the
ter became known f' 1 king's command
to Mordecai, who N, ianid then returned
informed Queen to his house where
Esther of it, and he had ercted a
she carried the in- gallows fifty eu-
formation to the --A bits high onl which
king. Ie caused _ to hang Mordecai.
the menl to be f. Afr three days
tried, and they --of fasting and ear-
were found guilty, nest prayer, Queen
and vere both Esther went in to
hung. Thus was ...the khil n 'in
the life of the kin -- vited him ad i-
preserved through manl to a banquet
the faithfulness of which she had pre-
Mordecai. A ruc- pared. While in
ord of the transac- the midst of the
tion was made in the book of the chronicles of the kings. festivities, she told the king of the great injustice and wicked-
Among those who wore in the king's service was one liaman. ness of the calamities that were about to befall her people, and
The king promoted him, and also made a decree that the peo- pleaded most earnestly that the decree for their destruction
ple should bow down and do him reverence. But Mordecai might be revoked.
refused to do this, and when HIamian saw it, he was very an- The king inquired who was the author of all this. '" It is this
gry and resolved to punish him, and not him alone, but to wicked Haman," replied Esther. Then was the king very an-
wreak his vengeance upon his people, the Jews, who were gry, and when one of his servants informed him of the gallows
scattered throughout the kingdom. Accordingly he went to prepared for M1lordecai, he commanded that they hang Haman
the king with falsehoods concerning the Jews, and obtained a do- himself thereon; and they did so. And thus the Jews were
cree from him that on a certain day they should all be massa- saved, and Mordecai received great honors.












SuX HmSPIKm AT IHoME. 33

Ri:0Ac (rii/[P TfP 'A- ^ ]have to leap by the aid of long poles. These fissures will sonic-
P' times become filled with light snow, so that they are not seen,
until the foremost of the party sets his foot on it, when he will
i, F all the interesting places on the earth, travelers like inst. tly sink down, down, out
best to linger in the sunny valleys of the Alps, and to of sight, and beyond the help
climb their majestic, snow-covered summits. There lie comrades. To provide
of his comrades. To provide
S1; : all along the chain many beautiful valleys, where, against these dangers, a narty
I,.!. walled in by these everlasting bulwarks, whose glisten of Alpine travelers always at-
'o ing tops are ever in view, dwells many a happy peasant, tach themselves to one another
tilling his soil by day, and at night calling to the fold by means of a lohng rope, so that
his flocks from their pasturage on the mountains. In these val- if one falls, the Dthers can pull
leys grow the world-renowned Alpine flowers, and through them hin back. They each carry a
rushing streams carry to the broad rivers beyond, the melted long, sharp pole to help them
snow and ice from the heights above, up the steep rocks, and with
But all about the Alps is not thus fair and lovely. .There are this they also try the treacher-
other scenes which, though grand to behold, are fraught with ous snow ahead the t
perils that make the hearts of brave men stand still. Far above But there are still greater
But there are still greater
the valleys are precipices so high that no sounds from below can dangers among tesins, f which hve o power
n dangers among these mountains, from which mnen have no power
possibly be heard at their summits, which often hang over the to save th el. The m s of ice ad sow which acm-
1 to save themselves. The masses of ice and snow which accum-
valley below like vast shelves. Sometimes these precipices will ulat o te eights, become so eat that th force slowly
ulato on the heights, become so great that they are forced slowly
rise one above another, leaving only a narrow ledge between, down the mountain sides before they become melted, forming
covered with ice and snow. Along here where one false step what are often cll riv of ice. huge mss il
what are often called rivers of ice. 1 'I. -* huge masses will
would be instant death, the people who live in the mountains descend grually till they rch te edge of the eciic, and
have to travel in going from valley to valley, or when in search sdelscnd graall ty hey reach the edg tht even a vice, or
f gm f o h s a o o e o so delicately are they sometimes poised that even a voice or the
of game for food. As the ledges are often composed entirely of tinkle of a small bell will be enough to hurl them downward.
ice to the depth of several feet, the rays of the sun will sometimes e h b b a m
cause great cracks, or fissures, to open, over which travelers Du ring the present center there have been buit two of whi
"sixteen good roads across the mountains, all but two of which
Scan be traveled with carriages.
--- "-- One of the best of these was built by Napoleon Bonaparte.
S"- -- It is thirty miles in length, eighteen feet wide, and 6,773 feet
S '_ -- above the level of the sea. The bridge shown in the cut is
S' ,probably a rustic one built by the inhabitants for their own use.
--The long public roads across the mountains are built by some
'2 "; ( government.
No description call do justice to the beauty and grandeur of
the Alpine scenery, and though volumes have been written on
S". 'the subject, every traveler must feel that "the half has never
", ... .. i been told."




I1 '.. *: E have received (says Nature) from Messrs. Eberstein,
of Dresden, a specimen of' an interesting walking-stick
I.,---J for naturalists or tourists. The stick is a perfect mhul-
tur in parvo, and contains quite a museum of scientific instru-
ments. The handle alone contains a compass, a double magnify-
ing glass or pocket microscope, and a whistle. Below it there
l is a thermometer on one side of' the stick, and a sand-glass on
S' the other. The body of the stick is partly hollow, and its in-
terior holds a small bottle, which is intended to contain chloro-
S. form or ether for killing insects. Along the outside of the body
"there is a half-meter measure, showing decimeters and centi-
,., meters. Near the end of the stick a knife blade may be opened,
'. '-" which serves for cutting off objects which cannot be reached by
"hand. At the extreme end a screw may hold in turn a spade
(for botanists), a hammer (for geologists), a hatchet, or a strong
spike, which would be of great use on glaciers. The whole is
neatly finished in black polished wood.

PLEASANT words are as an honey-comb, sweet to the soul, and
-- -" health to the bones.

-- ---111I ~Ti/-oi~












SuX HmSPIKm AT IHoME. 33

Ri:0Ac (rii/[P TfP 'A- ^ ]have to leap by the aid of long poles. These fissures will sonic-
P' times become filled with light snow, so that they are not seen,
until the foremost of the party sets his foot on it, when he will
i, F all the interesting places on the earth, travelers like inst. tly sink down, down, out
best to linger in the sunny valleys of the Alps, and to of sight, and beyond the help
climb their majestic, snow-covered summits. There lie comrades. To provide
of his comrades. To provide
S1; : all along the chain many beautiful valleys, where, against these dangers, a narty
I,.!. walled in by these everlasting bulwarks, whose glisten of Alpine travelers always at-
'o ing tops are ever in view, dwells many a happy peasant, tach themselves to one another
tilling his soil by day, and at night calling to the fold by means of a lohng rope, so that
his flocks from their pasturage on the mountains. In these val- if one falls, the Dthers can pull
leys grow the world-renowned Alpine flowers, and through them hin back. They each carry a
rushing streams carry to the broad rivers beyond, the melted long, sharp pole to help them
snow and ice from the heights above, up the steep rocks, and with
But all about the Alps is not thus fair and lovely. .There are this they also try the treacher-
other scenes which, though grand to behold, are fraught with ous snow ahead the t
perils that make the hearts of brave men stand still. Far above But there are still greater
But there are still greater
the valleys are precipices so high that no sounds from below can dangers among tesins, f which hve o power
n dangers among these mountains, from which mnen have no power
possibly be heard at their summits, which often hang over the to save th el. The m s of ice ad sow which acm-
1 to save themselves. The masses of ice and snow which accum-
valley below like vast shelves. Sometimes these precipices will ulat o te eights, become so eat that th force slowly
ulato on the heights, become so great that they are forced slowly
rise one above another, leaving only a narrow ledge between, down the mountain sides before they become melted, forming
covered with ice and snow. Along here where one false step what are often cll riv of ice. huge mss il
what are often called rivers of ice. 1 'I. -* huge masses will
would be instant death, the people who live in the mountains descend grually till they rch te edge of the eciic, and
have to travel in going from valley to valley, or when in search sdelscnd graall ty hey reach the edg tht even a vice, or
f gm f o h s a o o e o so delicately are they sometimes poised that even a voice or the
of game for food. As the ledges are often composed entirely of tinkle of a small bell will be enough to hurl them downward.
ice to the depth of several feet, the rays of the sun will sometimes e h b b a m
cause great cracks, or fissures, to open, over which travelers Du ring the present center there have been buit two of whi
"sixteen good roads across the mountains, all but two of which
Scan be traveled with carriages.
--- "-- One of the best of these was built by Napoleon Bonaparte.
S"- -- It is thirty miles in length, eighteen feet wide, and 6,773 feet
S '_ -- above the level of the sea. The bridge shown in the cut is
S' ,probably a rustic one built by the inhabitants for their own use.
--The long public roads across the mountains are built by some
'2 "; ( government.
No description call do justice to the beauty and grandeur of
the Alpine scenery, and though volumes have been written on
S". 'the subject, every traveler must feel that "the half has never
", ... .. i been told."




I1 '.. *: E have received (says Nature) from Messrs. Eberstein,
of Dresden, a specimen of' an interesting walking-stick
I.,---J for naturalists or tourists. The stick is a perfect mhul-
tur in parvo, and contains quite a museum of scientific instru-
ments. The handle alone contains a compass, a double magnify-
ing glass or pocket microscope, and a whistle. Below it there
l is a thermometer on one side of' the stick, and a sand-glass on
S' the other. The body of the stick is partly hollow, and its in-
terior holds a small bottle, which is intended to contain chloro-
S. form or ether for killing insects. Along the outside of the body
"there is a half-meter measure, showing decimeters and centi-
,., meters. Near the end of the stick a knife blade may be opened,
'. '-" which serves for cutting off objects which cannot be reached by
"hand. At the extreme end a screw may hold in turn a spade
(for botanists), a hammer (for geologists), a hatchet, or a strong
spike, which would be of great use on glaciers. The whole is
neatly finished in black polished wood.

PLEASANT words are as an honey-comb, sweet to the soul, and
-- -" health to the bones.

-- ---111I ~Ti/-oi~












34 SmSHOiNm AMT HOMS.


KT|<^ PJE T<^ ^NIWLS.P ti not fit to be in good
-1.,)'JN PO J V f'Y* j company Any one
llESE children seem to be very anxious to feed the tliinldu who takes delighlt in
a,' nials that thrust their heads over the door to receive "absi'ng animals is in-
what is offered to them. No doubt the ,pasture where deel without kind feel-
they roam gives them plenty of good good -rass, and such h's, anld his company
food as they like, but they love to be noticed, and they should shunned, un-
will eat the grass out of the children's hands, even if less h e l anges his
they are not very hungry. And it is sport for the 'ays.
children to see them feed out of their hands. So they eagerly There is a society or-
pull up the grass to give them. ganized in this country,. .
How much better it is to treat the dumb creatures thus, than that has tor its object
to whip and abuse them as some people do! Animals should be the prevention of cru- ,
treated with kindness, and when they are thus treated, they elty to animals, and it .
will act kindly in return, unless they are very ugly. The horse is a very good thing lin -
and cow are of great use to us, and they deserve kind treatment. some cities and towns, -, 1
It is very wrong to torment them or to keep food away from where animals are so ---.
them. God has given them to us. to help make our homes often abused. I do not i------ ---'
pleasant, our work easy, and to supply nany many wants of our lives. know as it is necessary
And in return for these things, he wants us to treat them to belong to such a so- ~,-
kindly, and to take good care of them. city in order to have
Thcdisposition of many a boy is seen in the way he treats a care for these creat- '
dumb animals. If he abuses them, and treats them unkindly, ures, for it is something ;... -
you may be pretty sure that he is a hard-hearted boy, and one that all can attend to if
they will.
Some animals know pretty well when they are
abused. A short time since, a friend told me of a
horse that he knew that did not like to work it'
she was whipped. One day a man was driving
her before a wagon, when he struck her with the
whip for no cause. She at once stopped, and
would not go on. The driver went up to her
head, and rubbed her nose, and told her that he
was very sorry that he lhad struck her, and
asked her to forgive him, and lie promised lie
would not strike her again. Then lie seated him-
self in the wagon, and took up the lines, and the
horse trotted of as nicely as could be. If all chil-
dren were taught to feed and pet the dumb ani-
-- als as these children in the picture are doing,
they would grow up with kinder hearts, and there
would not be so many rough, cruel men in the
world.




"UNE is the glad fruition of the year, the
fulfillment of the promises. She sits as a
queen upon her throne, and leaves llS
grieving at the shortness of' her reign.
The poet throws his pen aside after a vain
effort to portray her beauty in a sonnet;
and the artist, having exhausted all the
colors on his palette, finds himself at a loss-the
wonderful tints, the r.. I1.I. glory, are still in the
possession of June, the Summer Queen.


___ NHow beautiful is God's truth! How rich are
______ the treasures of his thoughts How straight the
ways of his law How glorious the end of those
who delight in his precepts !












34 SmSHOiNm AMT HOMS.


KT|<^ PJE T<^ ^NIWLS.P ti not fit to be in good
-1.,)'JN PO J V f'Y* j company Any one
llESE children seem to be very anxious to feed the tliinldu who takes delighlt in
a,' nials that thrust their heads over the door to receive "absi'ng animals is in-
what is offered to them. No doubt the ,pasture where deel without kind feel-
they roam gives them plenty of good good -rass, and such h's, anld his company
food as they like, but they love to be noticed, and they should shunned, un-
will eat the grass out of the children's hands, even if less h e l anges his
they are not very hungry. And it is sport for the 'ays.
children to see them feed out of their hands. So they eagerly There is a society or-
pull up the grass to give them. ganized in this country,. .
How much better it is to treat the dumb creatures thus, than that has tor its object
to whip and abuse them as some people do! Animals should be the prevention of cru- ,
treated with kindness, and when they are thus treated, they elty to animals, and it .
will act kindly in return, unless they are very ugly. The horse is a very good thing lin -
and cow are of great use to us, and they deserve kind treatment. some cities and towns, -, 1
It is very wrong to torment them or to keep food away from where animals are so ---.
them. God has given them to us. to help make our homes often abused. I do not i------ ---'
pleasant, our work easy, and to supply nany many wants of our lives. know as it is necessary
And in return for these things, he wants us to treat them to belong to such a so- ~,-
kindly, and to take good care of them. city in order to have
Thcdisposition of many a boy is seen in the way he treats a care for these creat- '
dumb animals. If he abuses them, and treats them unkindly, ures, for it is something ;... -
you may be pretty sure that he is a hard-hearted boy, and one that all can attend to if
they will.
Some animals know pretty well when they are
abused. A short time since, a friend told me of a
horse that he knew that did not like to work it'
she was whipped. One day a man was driving
her before a wagon, when he struck her with the
whip for no cause. She at once stopped, and
would not go on. The driver went up to her
head, and rubbed her nose, and told her that he
was very sorry that he lhad struck her, and
asked her to forgive him, and lie promised lie
would not strike her again. Then lie seated him-
self in the wagon, and took up the lines, and the
horse trotted of as nicely as could be. If all chil-
dren were taught to feed and pet the dumb ani-
-- als as these children in the picture are doing,
they would grow up with kinder hearts, and there
would not be so many rough, cruel men in the
world.




"UNE is the glad fruition of the year, the
fulfillment of the promises. She sits as a
queen upon her throne, and leaves llS
grieving at the shortness of' her reign.
The poet throws his pen aside after a vain
effort to portray her beauty in a sonnet;
and the artist, having exhausted all the
colors on his palette, finds himself at a loss-the
wonderful tints, the r.. I1.I. glory, are still in the
possession of June, the Summer Queen.


___ NHow beautiful is God's truth! How rich are
______ the treasures of his thoughts How straight the
ways of his law How glorious the end of those
who delight in his precepts !












S U +nSHNm A-T PoM. 35

building called the Monastery of St. John, as seen in the picture.
T 9N T Tr JM Half- down this till is a natural grotto overlooking the sea,
"" and John, sons of Zeb e and S where tradition tells us John saw the wonderful vision recorded
i MES and John, sons of Zebcdee and Salome, .
in the book of Revelation.
were among the most favored of our Lord's dis-
ciples. Their father was a fisherman, living at John afterward returned to Ephesus, where he lived to a very
Bethsaida on the shore of the Sea of Galilee, great age, so that he could scarcely go to the assembly of the
and his sons followed his occupation until our church without being carried there by his disciples. Being no-
SLord, at the beginning of his ministry, called unable to make long discourses, his custom was to say in all
them to follow him, and become "fishers of meetings, "Little children, love one another." And when they
men." They then left their father and the nets, wondered at the frequent repetition of these words, he was wont
and with Simon Peter and Andrew his brother, to answer: This is what the Lord commands you; and this,
accompanied Jesus on his travels. In the Bible if you do it, is sufficient." It is thought that he died about 100
record of the choosing of the twelve apostles, the A. D., and was buried near the city of Ephesus, as several an-
names of Peter, James, and John are mentioned cient historians speak of his tomb as being there in their day.
first, and these three seem to have enjoyed
special honors and privileges. They alone
witnessed the transfiguration of( -I-, and
they alone saw his agony in the garden. James
and John were especially zealous for their Master, --- -
and it was probably on this account that he surnamed --- --. -
them Boanerges, which is, The sons of thunder." -- -
John is supposed to have been the youngest of -
the twelve apostles, and for him Jesus seems to -
have had an 'special affection, for he is four times -
referred to in the sacred record as "the disciple '-
wholm Jesus loved." At the last supper he "was --- -
leaning on Jesus' bosom ; lie was present during
the Saviour's trial and crucifixion ; and as lie was
standing at the foot of the cross, Jesus committed -- -
his mother to his care, and from that hour that -
disciple took her unto his own home'." Learning .
of' the resurrection from the lips of' Mary d, a- '
line, he ran to lhe sepulchre in company with Peter \:' i
to verify the joyful news with his own eyes. Again, .
after a night of fruitless toil on the Sea of Galilee, 4 :
lie was the fir st to recognize the Saviour "in the .: i
imoringe on the shore.'' After the porilng out of :...." .. "
the Holy (llhost onI the day of Plentecost, Peter and
John seem to have been much together, preaching .
in the fotmple, healing the sick, and carrying the
news of salvation through Christ to those outside of i
Jerusalem. Twice they were imprisoned toget her,i
and once "the angel of the Lord by night opened ..: _.
the prison floors and brought then forth." Iin the
midst of these persecutions, the life ofi John was
saddened by the martyrdom of his brlulother James,
who was the first of the twelve to suffer death i in i
the service of his Master.
John remained in Jerusalem for many years, a
pillar of the church there. Ile at length removed to Ephesus, te
though at just what time is uncertain. Here lie spent many
years in laboring among the churches of Asia Minor. Under GENTrLEMAN visited an unhappy iman in jail awaiting his trial.
the cruel persecution of Christians by the Emperor Domitian, Sir, said the prisoner, I 1 had a good home education.
the life of John was sought in many ways. It is said that at k My street education ruined me. 1 used to slip out of the
one time he was cast into a caldron of boiling oil, but was mir- hotise and go off with the boys in the street. Ini the street I
aculously preserved from injury. lIe was afterward banished to learned to lounge ; in the street I learned to swear ; in the street
the Isle of Patmos, where lie he was put to hard labor in the mines. I learned to smoke ; in the street I learned to gamble ; i the
Patinos is a rocky, desolate island rising out of the Archipelago, street 1 learned to pilfer and do all evil. Oh, sir it is in the street
or Egean Sea. It is about twenty-eight miles in circumference, that the devil lurks to work the ruin of the young."
with bold, deeply indented shores, and was used by the Iomans Boys, remember this when you find yourselves standing under
as a place of banishment for criminals. The principal town is the street-lamp with nothing to do, and find your way home as
situated on a high and steep hill, now crowned by a fortress-like quick as possible,-to your study or to work.












S U +nSHNm A-T PoM. 35

building called the Monastery of St. John, as seen in the picture.
T 9N T Tr JM Half- down this till is a natural grotto overlooking the sea,
"" and John, sons of Zeb e and S where tradition tells us John saw the wonderful vision recorded
i MES and John, sons of Zebcdee and Salome, .
in the book of Revelation.
were among the most favored of our Lord's dis-
ciples. Their father was a fisherman, living at John afterward returned to Ephesus, where he lived to a very
Bethsaida on the shore of the Sea of Galilee, great age, so that he could scarcely go to the assembly of the
and his sons followed his occupation until our church without being carried there by his disciples. Being no-
SLord, at the beginning of his ministry, called unable to make long discourses, his custom was to say in all
them to follow him, and become "fishers of meetings, "Little children, love one another." And when they
men." They then left their father and the nets, wondered at the frequent repetition of these words, he was wont
and with Simon Peter and Andrew his brother, to answer: This is what the Lord commands you; and this,
accompanied Jesus on his travels. In the Bible if you do it, is sufficient." It is thought that he died about 100
record of the choosing of the twelve apostles, the A. D., and was buried near the city of Ephesus, as several an-
names of Peter, James, and John are mentioned cient historians speak of his tomb as being there in their day.
first, and these three seem to have enjoyed
special honors and privileges. They alone
witnessed the transfiguration of( -I-, and
they alone saw his agony in the garden. James
and John were especially zealous for their Master, --- -
and it was probably on this account that he surnamed --- --. -
them Boanerges, which is, The sons of thunder." -- -
John is supposed to have been the youngest of -
the twelve apostles, and for him Jesus seems to -
have had an 'special affection, for he is four times -
referred to in the sacred record as "the disciple '-
wholm Jesus loved." At the last supper he "was --- -
leaning on Jesus' bosom ; lie was present during
the Saviour's trial and crucifixion ; and as lie was
standing at the foot of the cross, Jesus committed -- -
his mother to his care, and from that hour that -
disciple took her unto his own home'." Learning .
of' the resurrection from the lips of' Mary d, a- '
line, he ran to lhe sepulchre in company with Peter \:' i
to verify the joyful news with his own eyes. Again, .
after a night of fruitless toil on the Sea of Galilee, 4 :
lie was the fir st to recognize the Saviour "in the .: i
imoringe on the shore.'' After the porilng out of :...." .. "
the Holy (llhost onI the day of Plentecost, Peter and
John seem to have been much together, preaching .
in the fotmple, healing the sick, and carrying the
news of salvation through Christ to those outside of i
Jerusalem. Twice they were imprisoned toget her,i
and once "the angel of the Lord by night opened ..: _.
the prison floors and brought then forth." Iin the
midst of these persecutions, the life ofi John was
saddened by the martyrdom of his brlulother James,
who was the first of the twelve to suffer death i in i
the service of his Master.
John remained in Jerusalem for many years, a
pillar of the church there. Ile at length removed to Ephesus, te
though at just what time is uncertain. Here lie spent many
years in laboring among the churches of Asia Minor. Under GENTrLEMAN visited an unhappy iman in jail awaiting his trial.
the cruel persecution of Christians by the Emperor Domitian, Sir, said the prisoner, I 1 had a good home education.
the life of John was sought in many ways. It is said that at k My street education ruined me. 1 used to slip out of the
one time he was cast into a caldron of boiling oil, but was mir- hotise and go off with the boys in the street. Ini the street I
aculously preserved from injury. lIe was afterward banished to learned to lounge ; in the street I learned to swear ; in the street
the Isle of Patmos, where lie he was put to hard labor in the mines. I learned to smoke ; in the street I learned to gamble ; i the
Patinos is a rocky, desolate island rising out of the Archipelago, street 1 learned to pilfer and do all evil. Oh, sir it is in the street
or Egean Sea. It is about twenty-eight miles in circumference, that the devil lurks to work the ruin of the young."
with bold, deeply indented shores, and was used by the Iomans Boys, remember this when you find yourselves standing under
as a place of banishment for criminals. The principal town is the street-lamp with nothing to do, and find your way home as
situated on a high and steep hill, now crowned by a fortress-like quick as possible,-to your study or to work.













36 S e AT Hoiv.mj.

TJ_, Tm' and skips among the branches with quick little leaps that have
T been likened to the hopping of a frog. In order to give the
-TE( i,;1 it asserted that the curious little animal ropre- little creature a firmer hold of the boughs about which it is con-
'\ .. Lcod here had been created with a view to staring stantly l:;1.i;._- the fingers and toes have at their extremities,
,other animals out of countenance, it would not be and at the top, short triangular nails, or claws, all of which are
i- -- I id to believe it. Were such great, round, staring portrayed in the accompanying picture. The backs of the
eyes ever seen in any other creature ? hands are covered with soft, downy fur, resembling the hair
The Tarsier belongs to the lemur family, and hence is dis- with which the tail is furnished. Excepting on the hands and
tinctly related to the monkey. Seeing the little fellow in his tail, the fur is very thick and of a woolly character, but at the
proper home among the branches of the trees, le might be mis- root of the tail, and at the wrists and ankles, it suddenly changes
taken for the Galago, to which he bears some outward resem- to the short, downy covering.
balance. Closer inspection, however, will discover several strongly
marked points of difference, chief among which are the ears, -
which are smaller; the eyes, which are larger; and the tail,
which is less furry, being almost hairless except at the extremity, T'-- A0 F TI-{ AT ^AT T t y/j.
where there is a small tuft of fur. But the most remarkable
difference between the two animals lies in the hands, which a I-ll: basin of the Atlantic Ocean is a long trough, separat-
glance at the illustration will show to be so large as to be on- i .g the old world from the new, and extending probably
tirely disproportioned to the size of the rest of the animal. This ij from polo to pole. This ocean furrow was probably scored
curious prodigality in the matter of hands is the result of a great into the solid crust of our planet by the Almighty hand, that
elongation of the bones forming the tarsus, or back of the hands there the waters which he called seas might be gathered to-
and feet. It is from this peculiarity that the animal receives its gather, so as to let the dry land appear, and fit the earth for
name of Tarsier, which serves to indicate that the elongation of the habitation of man. From the top of Chimborazo to the
the tarsus is its most striking feature. It will thus b1 seen that bottom of the Atlantic, at the deepest place yet reached by the
however odd the name may seem at the first hearing, it is both plummet in the Northern Atlantic, the distance in a vertical
line is nine miles. Could the waters of
the Atlantic be drawn off, so as to ex-
Sosi e to view this great sea-gash which
separates continents and extends from
.--: .. the Arctic to the Antarctic, it would proe-
.' w sent a scene the most rugged, grand, and
"e imposing. The very ribs of the solid
ad T .: earth, with the foundations of the sea,
--..t would be brought to light, and we should
"".oe is. a' have presented to us at one view, in the
Sa eempty cradle of the ocean, a thousand
.. \ fearful wrecks, with that fearful array of'
[ g- bac '-k o. t" af(disa dead men's skulls, great anchors, hieaps
t t of pearls, and inestimable stores, which,
in the poet's eye, lie scattered in the
bottom of the sea, making it hideous with
"";.. sights of ugly death." The deepest part
e- of the North Atlantic is probably some-
Swhere between the Bermudas and the
Grand Banks. The waters of the Gulf
.- of Mexico are held in a basin, about a
-- tmtile deep in the deepest part. There is,
-- ,,at the bottom of the sea, between Cape
Race, in Newfoundland, and Cape Clear,
Iin Ireland, a remarkable steppe, which is
already known as the telegraphic plateau.
sensible and pertinent, traits which do not always, or even fre- The great circle distance between these two shore lines is 1600
quently, distinguish the La tin-derived names of objects in nat- miles; the sea along this route is probably no more than 10,000
rural history. This strange development is even greater in the feet deep.
hind paws than in the fore paws. --- %. --
The Tarsier is a native of Borneo, Celebes, the Philippine
Islands, and Banca. From the latter locality it is sometimes No words can express 'how much the world owes to sorrow.
called the Banca Tarsier. It is also known as the Podji. The Most of the Psalms were born in a wilderness. Most of the
color of the Tarsier is a grayish brown, with a slight olive tint epistles were written in a prison. The greatest thoughts of the
washed over the body. A stripe of deeper color surrounds the greatest thinkers have all passed through fire. Take comfort,
back of the head, and the face and forehead are of a warmer afflicted Christian i When God is about to make pre-eminent
brown than the body and limbs. It is a tree-inhabiting animal, use of a man, he puts him in the fire.













36 S e AT Hoiv.mj.

TJ_, Tm' and skips among the branches with quick little leaps that have
T been likened to the hopping of a frog. In order to give the
-TE( i,;1 it asserted that the curious little animal ropre- little creature a firmer hold of the boughs about which it is con-
'\ .. Lcod here had been created with a view to staring stantly l:;1.i;._- the fingers and toes have at their extremities,
,other animals out of countenance, it would not be and at the top, short triangular nails, or claws, all of which are
i- -- I id to believe it. Were such great, round, staring portrayed in the accompanying picture. The backs of the
eyes ever seen in any other creature ? hands are covered with soft, downy fur, resembling the hair
The Tarsier belongs to the lemur family, and hence is dis- with which the tail is furnished. Excepting on the hands and
tinctly related to the monkey. Seeing the little fellow in his tail, the fur is very thick and of a woolly character, but at the
proper home among the branches of the trees, le might be mis- root of the tail, and at the wrists and ankles, it suddenly changes
taken for the Galago, to which he bears some outward resem- to the short, downy covering.
balance. Closer inspection, however, will discover several strongly
marked points of difference, chief among which are the ears, -
which are smaller; the eyes, which are larger; and the tail,
which is less furry, being almost hairless except at the extremity, T'-- A0 F TI-{ AT ^AT T t y/j.
where there is a small tuft of fur. But the most remarkable
difference between the two animals lies in the hands, which a I-ll: basin of the Atlantic Ocean is a long trough, separat-
glance at the illustration will show to be so large as to be on- i .g the old world from the new, and extending probably
tirely disproportioned to the size of the rest of the animal. This ij from polo to pole. This ocean furrow was probably scored
curious prodigality in the matter of hands is the result of a great into the solid crust of our planet by the Almighty hand, that
elongation of the bones forming the tarsus, or back of the hands there the waters which he called seas might be gathered to-
and feet. It is from this peculiarity that the animal receives its gather, so as to let the dry land appear, and fit the earth for
name of Tarsier, which serves to indicate that the elongation of the habitation of man. From the top of Chimborazo to the
the tarsus is its most striking feature. It will thus b1 seen that bottom of the Atlantic, at the deepest place yet reached by the
however odd the name may seem at the first hearing, it is both plummet in the Northern Atlantic, the distance in a vertical
line is nine miles. Could the waters of
the Atlantic be drawn off, so as to ex-
Sosi e to view this great sea-gash which
separates continents and extends from
.--: .. the Arctic to the Antarctic, it would proe-
.' w sent a scene the most rugged, grand, and
"e imposing. The very ribs of the solid
ad T .: earth, with the foundations of the sea,
--..t would be brought to light, and we should
"".oe is. a' have presented to us at one view, in the
Sa eempty cradle of the ocean, a thousand
.. \ fearful wrecks, with that fearful array of'
[ g- bac '-k o. t" af(disa dead men's skulls, great anchors, hieaps
t t of pearls, and inestimable stores, which,
in the poet's eye, lie scattered in the
bottom of the sea, making it hideous with
"";.. sights of ugly death." The deepest part
e- of the North Atlantic is probably some-
Swhere between the Bermudas and the
Grand Banks. The waters of the Gulf
.- of Mexico are held in a basin, about a
-- tmtile deep in the deepest part. There is,
-- ,,at the bottom of the sea, between Cape
Race, in Newfoundland, and Cape Clear,
Iin Ireland, a remarkable steppe, which is
already known as the telegraphic plateau.
sensible and pertinent, traits which do not always, or even fre- The great circle distance between these two shore lines is 1600
quently, distinguish the La tin-derived names of objects in nat- miles; the sea along this route is probably no more than 10,000
rural history. This strange development is even greater in the feet deep.
hind paws than in the fore paws. --- %. --
The Tarsier is a native of Borneo, Celebes, the Philippine
Islands, and Banca. From the latter locality it is sometimes No words can express 'how much the world owes to sorrow.
called the Banca Tarsier. It is also known as the Podji. The Most of the Psalms were born in a wilderness. Most of the
color of the Tarsier is a grayish brown, with a slight olive tint epistles were written in a prison. The greatest thoughts of the
washed over the body. A stripe of deeper color surrounds the greatest thinkers have all passed through fire. Take comfort,
back of the head, and the face and forehead are of a warmer afflicted Christian i When God is about to make pre-eminent
brown than the body and limbs. It is a tree-inhabiting animal, use of a man, he puts him in the fire.












SUNS pHI I FA OM1. 37H

T N Y r bolster. Neither are they put on bedsteads as ours are. They
JTv- P^ 0 "F J1 p Jg'-T are simply cotton quilts spread on the ground, and are very soon
rolled up, and easily carried away.
EAR Jerusalem was a pool or pond of water in which rolled p, and easily carried away
many people used to bathe, called the Pool of Siloam. It is the same
It was a very wonderful pool ; for often an angel went now in the East as
down into it, and stirred up the water; and the man, when Jesus lived ,
woman, or child, who first stepped into it afterward, there. Men who ,
was healed of all disease. Many sick people, from far travel carry their
and near, visited this pool-the weak, the lame, the blind, and beds with them.
those that had dried-up and withered limbs; and so many of The poor people _
them were cured that it was called Bethesda? or the Iouse of have nothing but
Mercy. their own clothes
So John tells us there was always a great multitude waiting cover them -
there. It is sad to witness so much -.ai. ..;. Many will turn selveswith. Sme
away from viewing it ; but Jesus did not. lie delighted in vis- who are better off,
iting such places, that if possible he might comfort and save havequilts, orbeds ; _
some. It was here that he saw the man who had been sick as they call them, '',
thiri ... ; _,I years. What a long time to be sick! The Saviour twice the usual
pitied him, and kindly asked him, Wilt thou be made whole ? width. In these |_
they roll them ......
The poor man told Jesus that he would very gladly be cured, ty rl
selves up, and looklr
but he had no friend to help him into the water after it had been r r lie t -
rather like the k
stirred. He was one of the weakest of the sick people there, mmmi of
and he moved so slowly that while he was t1 ;,1.I to get to the o
Igypt, althou-g -
pool, some one else stepped in before him. pt, althou h
they might not W
But the Saviour could heal him without the water. le like to be told so.
said to the sick man, Rise, take up thy bed and walk! and the Even in Eastern
man was cured, took up his bed, and walked away. houses these thick
Some may think it strange that a man should take up his bed quilts are used; and the bud-chamber is not the place where the
and carry it away as easily as he did ; but the beds in Eastern people sleep, but where all the beds are kept through the day.
countries are very different from ours. They are not large, or At night they are carried out of the bed-chamber again, and
heavy; and they have no sheets or blankets, and seldom even a spread on the floor.
Thus you see how natural it was for Jesus to say, "l ise, take
up thy bed, and walk." This pool, even if known and accessible
--- to us, has lost its healing power; but the fountain (Christ has
S-- ..--- opened for sin, guilt, an.d death, is nigh to all, and of never-fail-
-- ing virtue.



UTTIR" wa--s doubtless much i- use among the an eint
"Jews, and from the information that can ble obtained, it
--gc is thought that it was prepared in the same mannlier as
at this day among the Arabs and Syrians, who use a
kind of boiled butter, called gee.
The milk is put into a large copper pan over a slow
7 fire, and a little sour milk, or a portion of the dried en-
trails of a lamb, is thrown into it. The milk then separates, and
: is put into a goat-skinu 1.. which is tied to a pole, as seen in the
7- .., picture, and constantly moved acikwardo f an forward fdor two
hours; or sometimes thl e bag is placed upon te ground and
-----"- utrodden upon. Job referred to this manner of cSyrians whto ie
said, I washed my steps with butter." The buttery sibstauce
Sohatving coagulalted, tle water is pressed e ouat, d te o n butter is
put into'anothor skin. After the lapse of two days, the butter
.is placed over the fireand allowed to boil for some time, durinllg
-which it is carefully skimmedt; when so prepared it will keep in
.. a hot climate.
Spi Butter is chiefly used among the Arabs and Syrians to impact
h.asoftness to bGl or T bruised wheat, the common diet of the
country. The Greeks and tRomans used butter as a medicine
and for external application-not as an article of food.
"- '= hchi screul lmed;we o rprdi 4wl epi












SUNS pHI I FA OM1. 37H

T N Y r bolster. Neither are they put on bedsteads as ours are. They
JTv- P^ 0 "F J1 p Jg'-T are simply cotton quilts spread on the ground, and are very soon
rolled up, and easily carried away.
EAR Jerusalem was a pool or pond of water in which rolled p, and easily carried away
many people used to bathe, called the Pool of Siloam. It is the same
It was a very wonderful pool ; for often an angel went now in the East as
down into it, and stirred up the water; and the man, when Jesus lived ,
woman, or child, who first stepped into it afterward, there. Men who ,
was healed of all disease. Many sick people, from far travel carry their
and near, visited this pool-the weak, the lame, the blind, and beds with them.
those that had dried-up and withered limbs; and so many of The poor people _
them were cured that it was called Bethesda? or the Iouse of have nothing but
Mercy. their own clothes
So John tells us there was always a great multitude waiting cover them -
there. It is sad to witness so much -.ai. ..;. Many will turn selveswith. Sme
away from viewing it ; but Jesus did not. lie delighted in vis- who are better off,
iting such places, that if possible he might comfort and save havequilts, orbeds ; _
some. It was here that he saw the man who had been sick as they call them, '',
thiri ... ; _,I years. What a long time to be sick! The Saviour twice the usual
pitied him, and kindly asked him, Wilt thou be made whole ? width. In these |_
they roll them ......
The poor man told Jesus that he would very gladly be cured, ty rl
selves up, and looklr
but he had no friend to help him into the water after it had been r r lie t -
rather like the k
stirred. He was one of the weakest of the sick people there, mmmi of
and he moved so slowly that while he was t1 ;,1.I to get to the o
Igypt, althou-g -
pool, some one else stepped in before him. pt, althou h
they might not W
But the Saviour could heal him without the water. le like to be told so.
said to the sick man, Rise, take up thy bed and walk! and the Even in Eastern
man was cured, took up his bed, and walked away. houses these thick
Some may think it strange that a man should take up his bed quilts are used; and the bud-chamber is not the place where the
and carry it away as easily as he did ; but the beds in Eastern people sleep, but where all the beds are kept through the day.
countries are very different from ours. They are not large, or At night they are carried out of the bed-chamber again, and
heavy; and they have no sheets or blankets, and seldom even a spread on the floor.
Thus you see how natural it was for Jesus to say, "l ise, take
up thy bed, and walk." This pool, even if known and accessible
--- to us, has lost its healing power; but the fountain (Christ has
S-- ..--- opened for sin, guilt, an.d death, is nigh to all, and of never-fail-
-- ing virtue.



UTTIR" wa--s doubtless much i- use among the an eint
"Jews, and from the information that can ble obtained, it
--gc is thought that it was prepared in the same mannlier as
at this day among the Arabs and Syrians, who use a
kind of boiled butter, called gee.
The milk is put into a large copper pan over a slow
7 fire, and a little sour milk, or a portion of the dried en-
trails of a lamb, is thrown into it. The milk then separates, and
: is put into a goat-skinu 1.. which is tied to a pole, as seen in the
7- .., picture, and constantly moved acikwardo f an forward fdor two
hours; or sometimes thl e bag is placed upon te ground and
-----"- utrodden upon. Job referred to this manner of cSyrians whto ie
said, I washed my steps with butter." The buttery sibstauce
Sohatving coagulalted, tle water is pressed e ouat, d te o n butter is
put into'anothor skin. After the lapse of two days, the butter
.is placed over the fireand allowed to boil for some time, durinllg
-which it is carefully skimmedt; when so prepared it will keep in
.. a hot climate.
Spi Butter is chiefly used among the Arabs and Syrians to impact
h.asoftness to bGl or T bruised wheat, the common diet of the
country. The Greeks and tRomans used butter as a medicine
and for external application-not as an article of food.
"- '= hchi screul lmed;we o rprdi 4wl epi










SUNSJITNJ= AT'I I1O K15 .




-- -



' .







































THE ARGALI OR MOUNTAIN SHEEP.
l~i'', ," .t 'l : ' .:. : ,'
!)1 q',',,. ', i'~i''''' .'""11I1'" ' "' "- ""












SuNSmHTrs A^T HPoMi 39

T-T p; A gorge,-a highway of innumerable short curves,-where you are
T / "' steadily climbing at the rate of one hundred and thirty feet to
N of te largest s s of s p is te Argali, the mile, and where one moment an apparently solid wall runs
NE of I11e largest species of sheep is the Argali,
dwelling in the mountains of Siberia and to the clouds across the track, and the next you twist sharply
"i i around or under it, while the cars surge and creak with the
Central Asia. It is frequently found meas- strain.
during as much 'ls fbur feet at the shoulder, In some places where the chasm is very narrow, the road-bed
and bearing massive horns, sometimes nineteen has been carved out of the solid rock; and as you pass under the
Inches in circumference, and so large at the overhanging rocks,
Base as to cover almost the entire forehead; and with the dashing,
each curves substantially the same way. They foaming torrent by
are great fighters, and display a power and a cour- your side, the scene
age certainly not surpassed by animals of any other becomes terribly
species. The Argali are also found on the Rocky Mountains. sublime. As you
They live in herds on the highest summits, feeding on lichens, ascend the canyon,
mosses, and small shrubs. They are extremely shy, watch- the frowning rocks
ful, and timid. Their swiftness of foot is amazing, and their reach higher, and at
agility in bounding from rock to rock is unsurpassed by that times the chasm
of any quadruped. grows narrower till
the eye can scarcely
59j] rq~i T~pF $FJ/. reach the summit
from the car win-
OWHERE in nature are the grand and beautiful more dow.
effectually illustrated than in the Rocky Mountains. Atwenty-mile ride
Whoever beholds their towering, cloud-capped peaks, or up the windings of
"- explores the awful depths of their mysterious canyons, this rocky defile
cannot fail to be impressed with the grandeur of the scene. And brings one to the
when in connection with this, the mind takes in the infinite va- mines and stamp
riety afforded by the blending of rocks and '. I i-h, foliage, millsofBlack Hawk.
the mountains present attractions that the eye never tires of One mile farther on
beholding. is Central. The
The accompanying cut represents a canyon in the Rocky first sight of these
Mountains. As can be readily seen, this is a deep ravine, or mountain cities is
gorge, in the solid rock, the walls of which stand on either side not soon forgotten.
several hundred feet high. In some localities the walls of these In spite of the bar-
canyons rise to the height of two thousand feet. Among the renness of the coun-
most prominent canyons, we find the names of Boulder, Clear try about, one is
Creek, Cheyenne, and the Grand Canyon of the Arkansas. attracted by the
To give a description of one will convey a general idea of them novelty of the scene.
all. Through each of these mountain gorges dashes a stream of' Streets and houses
water white with foam, rushing impetuously on in its march are wedged into
toward the "great waters." For beauty of' scenery, Boulder narrow ravines and
Canyon compares favorably with any of those mentioned. En- gulches, crowded up
tearing the canyon just above Boulder City, the road winds in the steep incline.
and out among the rocks, at times on the verge of a precipice Far up the giddy
overhanging the stream, then crossing by bridges. and oi and mountain-sides are
up the rocky opening. H-ere, the rocks tower aloft two thousand built cottages which
fooeet, shutting out the rays of' the sun at midday; there, lies a hang over, and seem
stretch of road, one side decked with fl'agl':l,t, flowers, the other ready to topple on
side washed by a crystal stream that foams and leaps from point each other. These
to point in its hurry to reach the plain. are the miners
Ten miles up are the falls. Here the water drops some forty homes. Down in
or fifty feet from the shelving rock into a deep, narrow pool, the depths, hundreds of feet from the light of day, these miners,
presenting a charming sight. To use the language of a famous by the dim light of a candle, delve for the gold buried beneath
writer: "We have read of Alpine scenory, and of the Yosemite the mountains.
Valley, and have soon Niagara Falls, Delaware Water Gap, and
the passage of' the Potomac through the Blue Ridge, and we SAYS the biographer of an eminent Sunday-school worker:
pronounce them all as tame and commonplace when compared He was the stronger for his own work through not neglecting
with the scenery of this wonderful canyon." the Lord's work. In truth, all that he did he looked on as the
On account of its railroad privileges, a journey through Clear Lord's work; and because lie honored the Lord in its doing,
Creek Canyon is more novel and interesting than one through the Lord honored him in its results; and 'the Lord made all
Boulder. Think of taking a railroad ride through a mountain that he did to prosper in his hand."


L












SuNSmHTrs A^T HPoMi 39

T-T p; A gorge,-a highway of innumerable short curves,-where you are
T / "' steadily climbing at the rate of one hundred and thirty feet to
N of te largest s s of s p is te Argali, the mile, and where one moment an apparently solid wall runs
NE of I11e largest species of sheep is the Argali,
dwelling in the mountains of Siberia and to the clouds across the track, and the next you twist sharply
"i i around or under it, while the cars surge and creak with the
Central Asia. It is frequently found meas- strain.
during as much 'ls fbur feet at the shoulder, In some places where the chasm is very narrow, the road-bed
and bearing massive horns, sometimes nineteen has been carved out of the solid rock; and as you pass under the
Inches in circumference, and so large at the overhanging rocks,
Base as to cover almost the entire forehead; and with the dashing,
each curves substantially the same way. They foaming torrent by
are great fighters, and display a power and a cour- your side, the scene
age certainly not surpassed by animals of any other becomes terribly
species. The Argali are also found on the Rocky Mountains. sublime. As you
They live in herds on the highest summits, feeding on lichens, ascend the canyon,
mosses, and small shrubs. They are extremely shy, watch- the frowning rocks
ful, and timid. Their swiftness of foot is amazing, and their reach higher, and at
agility in bounding from rock to rock is unsurpassed by that times the chasm
of any quadruped. grows narrower till
the eye can scarcely
59j] rq~i T~pF $FJ/. reach the summit
from the car win-
OWHERE in nature are the grand and beautiful more dow.
effectually illustrated than in the Rocky Mountains. Atwenty-mile ride
Whoever beholds their towering, cloud-capped peaks, or up the windings of
"- explores the awful depths of their mysterious canyons, this rocky defile
cannot fail to be impressed with the grandeur of the scene. And brings one to the
when in connection with this, the mind takes in the infinite va- mines and stamp
riety afforded by the blending of rocks and '. I i-h, foliage, millsofBlack Hawk.
the mountains present attractions that the eye never tires of One mile farther on
beholding. is Central. The
The accompanying cut represents a canyon in the Rocky first sight of these
Mountains. As can be readily seen, this is a deep ravine, or mountain cities is
gorge, in the solid rock, the walls of which stand on either side not soon forgotten.
several hundred feet high. In some localities the walls of these In spite of the bar-
canyons rise to the height of two thousand feet. Among the renness of the coun-
most prominent canyons, we find the names of Boulder, Clear try about, one is
Creek, Cheyenne, and the Grand Canyon of the Arkansas. attracted by the
To give a description of one will convey a general idea of them novelty of the scene.
all. Through each of these mountain gorges dashes a stream of' Streets and houses
water white with foam, rushing impetuously on in its march are wedged into
toward the "great waters." For beauty of' scenery, Boulder narrow ravines and
Canyon compares favorably with any of those mentioned. En- gulches, crowded up
tearing the canyon just above Boulder City, the road winds in the steep incline.
and out among the rocks, at times on the verge of a precipice Far up the giddy
overhanging the stream, then crossing by bridges. and oi and mountain-sides are
up the rocky opening. H-ere, the rocks tower aloft two thousand built cottages which
fooeet, shutting out the rays of' the sun at midday; there, lies a hang over, and seem
stretch of road, one side decked with fl'agl':l,t, flowers, the other ready to topple on
side washed by a crystal stream that foams and leaps from point each other. These
to point in its hurry to reach the plain. are the miners
Ten miles up are the falls. Here the water drops some forty homes. Down in
or fifty feet from the shelving rock into a deep, narrow pool, the depths, hundreds of feet from the light of day, these miners,
presenting a charming sight. To use the language of a famous by the dim light of a candle, delve for the gold buried beneath
writer: "We have read of Alpine scenory, and of the Yosemite the mountains.
Valley, and have soon Niagara Falls, Delaware Water Gap, and
the passage of' the Potomac through the Blue Ridge, and we SAYS the biographer of an eminent Sunday-school worker:
pronounce them all as tame and commonplace when compared He was the stronger for his own work through not neglecting
with the scenery of this wonderful canyon." the Lord's work. In truth, all that he did he looked on as the
On account of its railroad privileges, a journey through Clear Lord's work; and because lie honored the Lord in its doing,
Creek Canyon is more novel and interesting than one through the Lord honored him in its results; and 'the Lord made all
Boulder. Think of taking a railroad ride through a mountain that he did to prosper in his hand."


L













40 u H IA PIOME.


T__ T FJT'r whom we now quote, "
TP9 F00, rj^]^-P have observed goldfinchoes i r
that had escaped from me -
I\IONG the class of birds called Finches are not only that had escapi fiom me
S.in this manner, when about
.: i -omne of the most beautiful but some of the most me-
S. o alight on any twig,
!, odious of the feathered tribe. They are, too, v)ry -whother s' with
---- easilyy tamed, and have been the companions of man w ier s d wi
'. *bird-lime or not, flutter
: i-omn the most ancient Timcs, and in some places they bird-lime or not, t t e r
.'* over it, as if to assure -
.re valued more than any other birds. We give an l
themselves of its being safe
"r engraving g of fi\e of them-the Goldfinch (at the top), thems o it n f
for them to perch upon it. -Y
the (', ,,ilh. ,, Bullfinch, Siskin, and Mountain-finch. Sevehe t of on'
Several species of goldfinch
The Goldfinch is noted for the colors of its plumage, the ele- eral species of
iare found in the United
gance of its form, and the sweetness and fullness of its notes. It Id in te
is at the same time a gentle and peaceful bird, easily tamed and States." '
s The Chaffinch is a cheer-
raised as a cage-bird, and showing great attachment to those
ful little creature, and p
who take charge of it. It will live to a great age in a cage or e rt '.
Sipasses the greater part of ---
room. Audubon says he has known instances in which birds of the eatr par of
the day in action, only re-
this species have been confined ten years. It also gives evi- posing from its fatigues during the noon-tide heat and it, like
dence of unusual sagacity. It can be trained to draw water for te goldfinch, builds an exceedingly artistic nest. While the fl-
its drink from a glass,-and when it alights on a twig covered er mte por out a ier-
with bird-lime for the purpose of securing it, "it no sooner dis- ruptd flow of song. Chaffinches are exceedingly attached to
covers the nature of the treacherous substance than it throws it- their y..a,._, and utter loud cries at the approach of an enemy.
self backward, with closed wings, and hangs in this position un- The Bullfinch is a very docile bird, and though its natural
til the bird-lime has run out in the form of a slender thread con- song is harsh and disagreeable, yet it can be trained, as in En-
siderably below the mwig, when feeling a certain degree of see- gland, Germany, and Scotland, to whistle many airs and songs
rity, it boats its wings and flies off;"-and says Audubon, from in a soft, pure, and flute-like tone, which is highly prized. There
are many schools for training them, especially in Ger-
------- many, the teacher making use of a flute to aid him.
9 Both the plumage and song of the Siskin are at-
Str active, the greater part of the former being a beau-
ttil green, called the siskin green." Its song re-
Ssembles that of the canarvy. It does not care about
S-- staying long in one place, but spends much of its
n- time in wandering over the country, going south for
Sthe winter.
-- V Mountains and largo, close forests are the favorite
resorts of the Mountain-finch, but in the winter sea-
son, when deep snow is on the mountains, it descends
into the lowlands, and mingles with the other
I3 k--- finches. It equals the Chaffinch in its activity, but
is inferior to it in the quality of its song.





11 I;:1 I is a beautiful group of American birds
,.1..' Orioles, or HIang-birds. They are so
Called because they hang their nests from
:, branches of trees. The most noted of this
"r group is the Baltimore Oriole, sometimes called
I TGolden Robin; also Fire-bird and Fire Hang-
bird, because its bright orange color seen through
the leaves of the trees resembles flashes of fire.
These birds build their nests of different materials
according to the temperature of the climate. In
....:-I 9 Louisiana its nest is made of moss, so woven that the
air can pass easily through it, and is placed in the
coolest position; in Pennsylvania and New York, the
Snest is built of the warmest and softest materials, and
so placed as to be exposed to the sun's rays. So
57 firmly do they secure the nest, that no wind can carry
-it cft without breaking the branch on which it hangs.













40 u H IA PIOME.


T__ T FJT'r whom we now quote, "
TP9 F00, rj^]^-P have observed goldfinchoes i r
that had escaped from me -
I\IONG the class of birds called Finches are not only that had escapi fiom me
S.in this manner, when about
.: i -omne of the most beautiful but some of the most me-
S. o alight on any twig,
!, odious of the feathered tribe. They are, too, v)ry -whother s' with
---- easilyy tamed, and have been the companions of man w ier s d wi
'. *bird-lime or not, flutter
: i-omn the most ancient Timcs, and in some places they bird-lime or not, t t e r
.'* over it, as if to assure -
.re valued more than any other birds. We give an l
themselves of its being safe
"r engraving g of fi\e of them-the Goldfinch (at the top), thems o it n f
for them to perch upon it. -Y
the (', ,,ilh. ,, Bullfinch, Siskin, and Mountain-finch. Sevehe t of on'
Several species of goldfinch
The Goldfinch is noted for the colors of its plumage, the ele- eral species of
iare found in the United
gance of its form, and the sweetness and fullness of its notes. It Id in te
is at the same time a gentle and peaceful bird, easily tamed and States." '
s The Chaffinch is a cheer-
raised as a cage-bird, and showing great attachment to those
ful little creature, and p
who take charge of it. It will live to a great age in a cage or e rt '.
Sipasses the greater part of ---
room. Audubon says he has known instances in which birds of the eatr par of
the day in action, only re-
this species have been confined ten years. It also gives evi- posing from its fatigues during the noon-tide heat and it, like
dence of unusual sagacity. It can be trained to draw water for te goldfinch, builds an exceedingly artistic nest. While the fl-
its drink from a glass,-and when it alights on a twig covered er mte por out a ier-
with bird-lime for the purpose of securing it, "it no sooner dis- ruptd flow of song. Chaffinches are exceedingly attached to
covers the nature of the treacherous substance than it throws it- their y..a,._, and utter loud cries at the approach of an enemy.
self backward, with closed wings, and hangs in this position un- The Bullfinch is a very docile bird, and though its natural
til the bird-lime has run out in the form of a slender thread con- song is harsh and disagreeable, yet it can be trained, as in En-
siderably below the mwig, when feeling a certain degree of see- gland, Germany, and Scotland, to whistle many airs and songs
rity, it boats its wings and flies off;"-and says Audubon, from in a soft, pure, and flute-like tone, which is highly prized. There
are many schools for training them, especially in Ger-
------- many, the teacher making use of a flute to aid him.
9 Both the plumage and song of the Siskin are at-
Str active, the greater part of the former being a beau-
ttil green, called the siskin green." Its song re-
Ssembles that of the canarvy. It does not care about
S-- staying long in one place, but spends much of its
n- time in wandering over the country, going south for
Sthe winter.
-- V Mountains and largo, close forests are the favorite
resorts of the Mountain-finch, but in the winter sea-
son, when deep snow is on the mountains, it descends
into the lowlands, and mingles with the other
I3 k--- finches. It equals the Chaffinch in its activity, but
is inferior to it in the quality of its song.





11 I;:1 I is a beautiful group of American birds
,.1..' Orioles, or HIang-birds. They are so
Called because they hang their nests from
:, branches of trees. The most noted of this
"r group is the Baltimore Oriole, sometimes called
I TGolden Robin; also Fire-bird and Fire Hang-
bird, because its bright orange color seen through
the leaves of the trees resembles flashes of fire.
These birds build their nests of different materials
according to the temperature of the climate. In
....:-I 9 Louisiana its nest is made of moss, so woven that the
air can pass easily through it, and is placed in the
coolest position; in Pennsylvania and New York, the
Snest is built of the warmest and softest materials, and
so placed as to be exposed to the sun's rays. So
57 firmly do they secure the nest, that no wind can carry
-it cft without breaking the branch on which it hangs.











StrUfSPimK AT PIOM. 41

J Tf J l at no distant period to experience new disasters; again it was
repaired by the Christians who made it an episcopal see; but
EIZIOCHO, the city of palm-trees" derives all its impor- in the twelfth century it was captured by the Mohammedans,
ir nce from history. Though now only a miserable village, and has not since emerged from its ruins. Of all its magnificent
S ,.ntaining about thirty wretched cottages, which are in- buildings there remains only part of one tower, the dwelling of
habited by half-naked Arabs, it was one of the oldest the governor of the district, which is seen in the middle of our
cities in Palestine, and was the first place reduced by the *' _"-:,,' i. and which is i, ..1.;;,,..,`i, said to have been the
Israelites on entering the Holy Land. It was razed to the dwelling of Zaccheus, the publican, who lived at Jericho.
ground by Joshua, who pronounced a curse on the person who The steep mountainous ridge in the background of our engrav-
should rebuild it. Five hundred and thirty years afterward this ing is called the mountain of Quarantania, and is supposed to
malediction was literally I ,r. I' .: upon lIiel, of Bethel, who re- have been the scene of our Saviour's temptation. This mountain
built the city, wlhch soon appears to have attained a consider- commands a distinct and delightful view of the mountains of





"0-. -:" .- --






























able degree of importance. There was a school of the prophets Arabia, and of the Dead Sea, and of the extensive and fertile

have resided much here. In the vicinity of Jericho there was a a most miserable, dry, and barren place, consisting of rocky
large but unwholesome -..i-. which rendered the soil unfruit- mountains, torn and disordered, as if the earth --ad here suf-
ful, until it was cured by the prophet Elisha. fred some great convulsion. On the left hand, looking down a
Jericho appears to have continued in a flourishing condition steep i iil y, as he passed ]l..ii_ lie saw ruins of small cells and
during several centuries. In the time of our Saviour it was in- cottages, the former habitations of hermits who had retired
ferior only to Jerusalem in tlie number and splendor of its public thither for penance and mortification; for which purpose a more
edifices, and was one of the royal residences of Herod, misnamed comfortless and abandoned place could not be found in the whole
the (meat, who died there. It is situated in the hollow or hot- earth. The particular mountainous precipice, whence all the
torn of the extensive plain called the "Great Plain," and is about kingdoms of the world and the glory of them were shown to
nineteen miles distant from the capital of Judea. In the last Jesus Christ, is, as the evangelist describes it, an exceeding high
wer of the Romans with tlie Jews, Jericho was sacked by Ves- mountain",and in its ascent not only difficult but dangerous. It
W .- ___






































pasia, andgee of inhaitane.ts were put to the sword. Subsequently has a small chapel at the top, and another about halfway down,rtile
have reestablished by the emperor Hadrian, A. u. 13, it was doomed founded on a projecting part of the rock.
Lj--- 4t ~j i












j SUNSHINE AT -HOME.


'n0 Thfv fTnr~ < May gather these tokens of mercy,
StAnd live by their beauty and bloom.

HE world calls us lonely and friendless, But while we are holding the treasures,
And pities our orphaned estate, And crying, Come buy of my flowers," / /
Not dreaming what sweetness of blessing, We know that they only are loaned us,
May often on poverty wait. They all are God's treasures, not ours. :I r

For God in his mercy is teaching
Such lessons of trust in our need, 3 TaJT f lTq
We daily are led to remember
That he is a father indeed. I' the dale and down the bourne,
"O'er the meadow swift we fly;
Each morning we wake to new mercies, -
Now we sing, and now we mourn,
As we from his bounty are fed, Now we whistle, now we sigh. -
Now we whistle, now we sigh. ;t. 21 S VS
And feel how directly his watch-care -
Provides for each day's daily bread. By the grassy fringed river,
Through the murmuring reeds we sweep;
For while we are quietly sleeping, Mid the lily-leaves we quiver,
In night's holy ministrant hours, To their very hearts we creep.
He breathes with his life-giving spirit, I
Above all the beautiful flowers. Through the blooming grove we rustle,
Kissing every bud we pass,-
He paints with the rose-blush the roses, As we did it in the bustle,
Beneath the embrace of the night, Scarcely knowing how it was. r
And blanches the heart of the lilyearted pans
To purest and snowiest white. Down the glen, across the mountain, i fI. the golden-hearted pansies !
S O'er the yellow heath we roam, I Oh, the velvet-petaled pansies!
The violets too, and the daisies, Whirling round about the fountain, \ith their shining faces lifted upward to
Come out from the brown, lifeless sod, Till its little breakers foam. the morning cool.
And answer in fragrance and beauty, Oh, the beauty of the pansies,
The call of the life-giving God. Bending down the weeping willows, And the blooming of the pansies,
While our vesper hymn we sigh; Like a group of rosy children with their faces
That we, when the day with its glory Then unto our rosy pillows washed for school.
Has banished the night with its gloom, On our weary wings we hie.
Oh, the budding of the pansies,
And the blooming of the pansies,
Filling all the air around with the faintest of
perfume,
Make me sure that purple pansies-
Yellow pansies-velvet pansies-
Are the favorite flowers of all that in the Father's
garden bloom.




,HERE is a time, just when the frost
Begins to pave old Wihter's way,
V_ When autumn in a reverie lost,
The mellow daytime dreams away;

When Summer comes, in musing mind,
To gaze once more on hill and dell,
To mark how many sheaves they bind,
And see if all are ripened well.

With balmy breath she whispers low;
The dying flowers look up and give
Their sweetest incense ere they go,
For her who made their beauties live.
She enters neathh the woodland shade,
Her zephyrs lift the lingering leaf,
And bear it gently where are laid
The loved and lost ones of its grief.
At last, old Autumn, rising, takes
Again his scepter and his throne;
With boisterous hand the tree he shakes,
Intent on gathering all his own.
Sweet Summer, sighing, flies the plain,
And waiting Winter, gaunt and grim,
Sees miser Autumn hoard his grain,
And smiles to think it's all for him.












j SUNSHINE AT -HOME.


'n0 Thfv fTnr~ < May gather these tokens of mercy,
StAnd live by their beauty and bloom.

HE world calls us lonely and friendless, But while we are holding the treasures,
And pities our orphaned estate, And crying, Come buy of my flowers," / /
Not dreaming what sweetness of blessing, We know that they only are loaned us,
May often on poverty wait. They all are God's treasures, not ours. :I r

For God in his mercy is teaching
Such lessons of trust in our need, 3 TaJT f lTq
We daily are led to remember
That he is a father indeed. I' the dale and down the bourne,
"O'er the meadow swift we fly;
Each morning we wake to new mercies, -
Now we sing, and now we mourn,
As we from his bounty are fed, Now we whistle, now we sigh. -
Now we whistle, now we sigh. ;t. 21 S VS
And feel how directly his watch-care -
Provides for each day's daily bread. By the grassy fringed river,
Through the murmuring reeds we sweep;
For while we are quietly sleeping, Mid the lily-leaves we quiver,
In night's holy ministrant hours, To their very hearts we creep.
He breathes with his life-giving spirit, I
Above all the beautiful flowers. Through the blooming grove we rustle,
Kissing every bud we pass,-
He paints with the rose-blush the roses, As we did it in the bustle,
Beneath the embrace of the night, Scarcely knowing how it was. r
And blanches the heart of the lilyearted pans
To purest and snowiest white. Down the glen, across the mountain, i fI. the golden-hearted pansies !
S O'er the yellow heath we roam, I Oh, the velvet-petaled pansies!
The violets too, and the daisies, Whirling round about the fountain, \ith their shining faces lifted upward to
Come out from the brown, lifeless sod, Till its little breakers foam. the morning cool.
And answer in fragrance and beauty, Oh, the beauty of the pansies,
The call of the life-giving God. Bending down the weeping willows, And the blooming of the pansies,
While our vesper hymn we sigh; Like a group of rosy children with their faces
That we, when the day with its glory Then unto our rosy pillows washed for school.
Has banished the night with its gloom, On our weary wings we hie.
Oh, the budding of the pansies,
And the blooming of the pansies,
Filling all the air around with the faintest of
perfume,
Make me sure that purple pansies-
Yellow pansies-velvet pansies-
Are the favorite flowers of all that in the Father's
garden bloom.




,HERE is a time, just when the frost
Begins to pave old Wihter's way,
V_ When autumn in a reverie lost,
The mellow daytime dreams away;

When Summer comes, in musing mind,
To gaze once more on hill and dell,
To mark how many sheaves they bind,
And see if all are ripened well.

With balmy breath she whispers low;
The dying flowers look up and give
Their sweetest incense ere they go,
For her who made their beauties live.
She enters neathh the woodland shade,
Her zephyrs lift the lingering leaf,
And bear it gently where are laid
The loved and lost ones of its grief.
At last, old Autumn, rising, takes
Again his scepter and his throne;
With boisterous hand the tree he shakes,
Intent on gathering all his own.
Sweet Summer, sighing, flies the plain,
And waiting Winter, gaunt and grim,
Sees miser Autumn hoard his grain,
And smiles to think it's all for him.












j SUNSHINE AT -HOME.


'n0 Thfv fTnr~ < May gather these tokens of mercy,
StAnd live by their beauty and bloom.

HE world calls us lonely and friendless, But while we are holding the treasures,
And pities our orphaned estate, And crying, Come buy of my flowers," / /
Not dreaming what sweetness of blessing, We know that they only are loaned us,
May often on poverty wait. They all are God's treasures, not ours. :I r

For God in his mercy is teaching
Such lessons of trust in our need, 3 TaJT f lTq
We daily are led to remember
That he is a father indeed. I' the dale and down the bourne,
"O'er the meadow swift we fly;
Each morning we wake to new mercies, -
Now we sing, and now we mourn,
As we from his bounty are fed, Now we whistle, now we sigh. -
Now we whistle, now we sigh. ;t. 21 S VS
And feel how directly his watch-care -
Provides for each day's daily bread. By the grassy fringed river,
Through the murmuring reeds we sweep;
For while we are quietly sleeping, Mid the lily-leaves we quiver,
In night's holy ministrant hours, To their very hearts we creep.
He breathes with his life-giving spirit, I
Above all the beautiful flowers. Through the blooming grove we rustle,
Kissing every bud we pass,-
He paints with the rose-blush the roses, As we did it in the bustle,
Beneath the embrace of the night, Scarcely knowing how it was. r
And blanches the heart of the lilyearted pans
To purest and snowiest white. Down the glen, across the mountain, i fI. the golden-hearted pansies !
S O'er the yellow heath we roam, I Oh, the velvet-petaled pansies!
The violets too, and the daisies, Whirling round about the fountain, \ith their shining faces lifted upward to
Come out from the brown, lifeless sod, Till its little breakers foam. the morning cool.
And answer in fragrance and beauty, Oh, the beauty of the pansies,
The call of the life-giving God. Bending down the weeping willows, And the blooming of the pansies,
While our vesper hymn we sigh; Like a group of rosy children with their faces
That we, when the day with its glory Then unto our rosy pillows washed for school.
Has banished the night with its gloom, On our weary wings we hie.
Oh, the budding of the pansies,
And the blooming of the pansies,
Filling all the air around with the faintest of
perfume,
Make me sure that purple pansies-
Yellow pansies-velvet pansies-
Are the favorite flowers of all that in the Father's
garden bloom.




,HERE is a time, just when the frost
Begins to pave old Wihter's way,
V_ When autumn in a reverie lost,
The mellow daytime dreams away;

When Summer comes, in musing mind,
To gaze once more on hill and dell,
To mark how many sheaves they bind,
And see if all are ripened well.

With balmy breath she whispers low;
The dying flowers look up and give
Their sweetest incense ere they go,
For her who made their beauties live.
She enters neathh the woodland shade,
Her zephyrs lift the lingering leaf,
And bear it gently where are laid
The loved and lost ones of its grief.
At last, old Autumn, rising, takes
Again his scepter and his throne;
With boisterous hand the tree he shakes,
Intent on gathering all his own.
Sweet Summer, sighing, flies the plain,
And waiting Winter, gaunt and grim,
Sees miser Autumn hoard his grain,
And smiles to think it's all for him.












j SUNSHINE AT -HOME.


'n0 Thfv fTnr~ < May gather these tokens of mercy,
StAnd live by their beauty and bloom.

HE world calls us lonely and friendless, But while we are holding the treasures,
And pities our orphaned estate, And crying, Come buy of my flowers," / /
Not dreaming what sweetness of blessing, We know that they only are loaned us,
May often on poverty wait. They all are God's treasures, not ours. :I r

For God in his mercy is teaching
Such lessons of trust in our need, 3 TaJT f lTq
We daily are led to remember
That he is a father indeed. I' the dale and down the bourne,
"O'er the meadow swift we fly;
Each morning we wake to new mercies, -
Now we sing, and now we mourn,
As we from his bounty are fed, Now we whistle, now we sigh. -
Now we whistle, now we sigh. ;t. 21 S VS
And feel how directly his watch-care -
Provides for each day's daily bread. By the grassy fringed river,
Through the murmuring reeds we sweep;
For while we are quietly sleeping, Mid the lily-leaves we quiver,
In night's holy ministrant hours, To their very hearts we creep.
He breathes with his life-giving spirit, I
Above all the beautiful flowers. Through the blooming grove we rustle,
Kissing every bud we pass,-
He paints with the rose-blush the roses, As we did it in the bustle,
Beneath the embrace of the night, Scarcely knowing how it was. r
And blanches the heart of the lilyearted pans
To purest and snowiest white. Down the glen, across the mountain, i fI. the golden-hearted pansies !
S O'er the yellow heath we roam, I Oh, the velvet-petaled pansies!
The violets too, and the daisies, Whirling round about the fountain, \ith their shining faces lifted upward to
Come out from the brown, lifeless sod, Till its little breakers foam. the morning cool.
And answer in fragrance and beauty, Oh, the beauty of the pansies,
The call of the life-giving God. Bending down the weeping willows, And the blooming of the pansies,
While our vesper hymn we sigh; Like a group of rosy children with their faces
That we, when the day with its glory Then unto our rosy pillows washed for school.
Has banished the night with its gloom, On our weary wings we hie.
Oh, the budding of the pansies,
And the blooming of the pansies,
Filling all the air around with the faintest of
perfume,
Make me sure that purple pansies-
Yellow pansies-velvet pansies-
Are the favorite flowers of all that in the Father's
garden bloom.




,HERE is a time, just when the frost
Begins to pave old Wihter's way,
V_ When autumn in a reverie lost,
The mellow daytime dreams away;

When Summer comes, in musing mind,
To gaze once more on hill and dell,
To mark how many sheaves they bind,
And see if all are ripened well.

With balmy breath she whispers low;
The dying flowers look up and give
Their sweetest incense ere they go,
For her who made their beauties live.
She enters neathh the woodland shade,
Her zephyrs lift the lingering leaf,
And bear it gently where are laid
The loved and lost ones of its grief.
At last, old Autumn, rising, takes
Again his scepter and his throne;
With boisterous hand the tree he shakes,
Intent on gathering all his own.
Sweet Summer, sighing, flies the plain,
And waiting Winter, gaunt and grim,
Sees miser Autumn hoard his grain,
And smiles to think it's all for him.













S'sUN iNEr. AT Plomi 43


"h ad gathered at a carpentCr's shop, o01 picked up around some
now house just being built.
-T is a very mistaken notion some of us 'Thlough in so nme respects a prince's life may look very desira-
ShaiveI t"^t if we only had plenty of money) ble t() u, et there lre dangers, trials, and sorrows connected
aS and lived in a fine house, and could wear wilh the reslpollsibilities they have to bea that poorer )1peop!e
Si.,,,1;,,i clothes, we should be perfectly ,kinow Iothliig of', and many tiines they can go with -.,i. I where
happy. And when we think of princes a kini's life would be in danger.
"and princesses, the children of kings 1and(
S(Queens, we are apt to imagine then) the
most fortunate little people in the world.
But whatever we may think, they do not,
---- id .always consider themselves so. We re- 1 ONNY bright flowerets, born in the wildwood,
neniber reading of the Prince Imperial of Sweetly illustrating innocent childhood!
i'rance, wlien lhe was a small boy, standing at the window of Shy as an antelope, brown as a berry,
his room one rainy day, and looking out upon some -. .1 clil- Free as the mountain air, romping and merry.
drell wlio were splashing in some pools of water in tlie street, Out in the hilly patch, seeking for berries;
and crying because he he was not allowed to take off his shoes Under the orchard tree, feasting on cherries;
iand stockiniigs, roll up his trowsers and go out and play witl Making long daisy chains, down amongg the grasses;
them. These royal children are generally placed under miuch No voice to hinder them, dear lad and lassies!
severe discipline than our Republican children, too. Louise Dear little innocents, born in the wildwood
Victoria, the oldest daughter of the Prince and Princess of Oh that all little ones had such a childhood!
\ales, is described as being a very sweet little girl but with no God's blue spread over them, God's green beneath them;
"great fondness for her French and German lessons. as who canl No sweeter heritage could we bequcathe them.
wonder, when she is only six years old, and, one
would think, might better be playing with her
doll or rolling ]her hoop than to be puzzling her
little brain over such long words. Her cousins,,
conie on special days to recite with her. But.
one day the little lady felt disposed to shirk her
lesson, so she said to her mother, "I am so tiredl;
I want to lio down Hecr mother, suspecting
what the trouble was, gave her permission. U
Shortly after, the child looked up and asked if 'L
her cousins had come for their lessons yet.
Oh said her attendant, they do not conime .
till to-morrow."
Then out came the confession, Oh dear mi!c
I've laid down onil the wrong day. Please lot me
get up." But little princesses are seldom in- '
dulged like other young people, and11 she was
obliged to lie there the full hour. -l.- is said to
be not very rich ill playthings either, and once
when she had the present of a little toy doiiley
"she was so delighted with it that she carried it
around in her arms everywhere.
It is related of Queen Victoria's younger
daughters, that when they were still young,
they had a small kitchen and pantry fitted iup Il I
with all the conveniences, and it was their favor- I. '
ite pastime to go into it and work like little
housemaids. You think it would n't have been
quite so nice if they had been obliged to do it, and
to do it every (lay? Well, they mighit not have
thought so. But is n't it better on the whole to
know how to do a thing than only to make be-
lieve? Better to know how to keep a real
house than just a playhouse?
But there is no need of envying those little
royal people. We do not doubt they would ofte n
be glad to exchange their fine clothes and mainy l \
servants for the privilege of pl. -, ;,.- in a sand-
heap, or with an armful of rough Iblocks they













S'sUN iNEr. AT Plomi 43


"h ad gathered at a carpentCr's shop, o01 picked up around some
now house just being built.
-T is a very mistaken notion some of us 'Thlough in so nme respects a prince's life may look very desira-
ShaiveI t"^t if we only had plenty of money) ble t() u, et there lre dangers, trials, and sorrows connected
aS and lived in a fine house, and could wear wilh the reslpollsibilities they have to bea that poorer )1peop!e
Si.,,,1;,,i clothes, we should be perfectly ,kinow Iothliig of', and many tiines they can go with -.,i. I where
happy. And when we think of princes a kini's life would be in danger.
"and princesses, the children of kings 1and(
S(Queens, we are apt to imagine then) the
most fortunate little people in the world.
But whatever we may think, they do not,
---- id .always consider themselves so. We re- 1 ONNY bright flowerets, born in the wildwood,
neniber reading of the Prince Imperial of Sweetly illustrating innocent childhood!
i'rance, wlien lhe was a small boy, standing at the window of Shy as an antelope, brown as a berry,
his room one rainy day, and looking out upon some -. .1 clil- Free as the mountain air, romping and merry.
drell wlio were splashing in some pools of water in tlie street, Out in the hilly patch, seeking for berries;
and crying because he he was not allowed to take off his shoes Under the orchard tree, feasting on cherries;
iand stockiniigs, roll up his trowsers and go out and play witl Making long daisy chains, down amongg the grasses;
them. These royal children are generally placed under miuch No voice to hinder them, dear lad and lassies!
severe discipline than our Republican children, too. Louise Dear little innocents, born in the wildwood
Victoria, the oldest daughter of the Prince and Princess of Oh that all little ones had such a childhood!
\ales, is described as being a very sweet little girl but with no God's blue spread over them, God's green beneath them;
"great fondness for her French and German lessons. as who canl No sweeter heritage could we bequcathe them.
wonder, when she is only six years old, and, one
would think, might better be playing with her
doll or rolling ]her hoop than to be puzzling her
little brain over such long words. Her cousins,,
conie on special days to recite with her. But.
one day the little lady felt disposed to shirk her
lesson, so she said to her mother, "I am so tiredl;
I want to lio down Hecr mother, suspecting
what the trouble was, gave her permission. U
Shortly after, the child looked up and asked if 'L
her cousins had come for their lessons yet.
Oh said her attendant, they do not conime .
till to-morrow."
Then out came the confession, Oh dear mi!c
I've laid down onil the wrong day. Please lot me
get up." But little princesses are seldom in- '
dulged like other young people, and11 she was
obliged to lie there the full hour. -l.- is said to
be not very rich ill playthings either, and once
when she had the present of a little toy doiiley
"she was so delighted with it that she carried it
around in her arms everywhere.
It is related of Queen Victoria's younger
daughters, that when they were still young,
they had a small kitchen and pantry fitted iup Il I
with all the conveniences, and it was their favor- I. '
ite pastime to go into it and work like little
housemaids. You think it would n't have been
quite so nice if they had been obliged to do it, and
to do it every (lay? Well, they mighit not have
thought so. But is n't it better on the whole to
know how to do a thing than only to make be-
lieve? Better to know how to keep a real
house than just a playhouse?
But there is no need of envying those little
royal people. We do not doubt they would ofte n
be glad to exchange their fine clothes and mainy l \
servants for the privilege of pl. -, ;,.- in a sand-
heap, or with an armful of rough Iblocks they













44 SUNKEP,-m I- HoM^.


MJVI, A TiA rAqTC 5 ;JSL J\Np: king's forces on one side and those of his nobles on the other,
with the island, shown in the picture, between them. The
II i; view presented in the picture is that of an island king, accompanied by some of his ministers, rowed over from
Sthe Thames River, England, near Wilndsor Castle. his side of the river to the island, while some of the nobles came
i is noted for an important event that happened from the opposite side, and there, in the presence of the oppos-
ineere many hundred years ag'o, and is still visited by ing armies on either hand, the king placed his name to the char-
most travelers who pass through England. John 1., who was ter on the fifteenth day of June, 1215. A small hut now stands
king of England in the thirteenth century, was a very cruel on the island, within which is the stone whereon it is said the
man, and oppressed his subjects so severely that the nobles paper was placed for the king's signature.
raised an army to fight against him, and finally succeeded in Though the king, after signing the charter, hired foreign sol-
capturing the city of London. After defeating 1he king's forces diers to come and subdue his rebellious subjects, yet ie died be-
several times, they wrote out a paper, which they IIh. It a char- fore he accomplished his object, and his successors, for many
ter, granting certain liberties to the people, and then sent word years, were obliged to place their names to the same paper.
to the king that if lh would sign it they would stop fighting This charter is as much reverenced by the English as the
and go back to their homes. The king knew that he was Declaration of Independence is by the Americans, and is con-
beaten, at least for the time being, and promised to grant their sidered the foundation stone of British liberty. It is always re-
request. Both armies then advanced to the Rivei Thames, the ferried to as the Magna Charta, or Great Charter, and the island
where it was signed is called

originally riltei in the Latin han-
g.uage, anld a (opy cain ble seen at
-____-__-_- tile present day in the British imu-



-_- -r\,q A

P,_ 1. IA I oliservanc es of' stated
L-_--____ ____--- h t.days which were prac-
Stieed by ofIr ancestors two (or
._--___ -three hundred years ago might
__---_._ _be revived by this generation with
-a wholesome effect. Aniong lese
_. ..is the celebration of' Nothering
,- __- Day, the fourth Sunday in ihent, at
which time it was formerly the
___-__.__custom in England fir all children
to bring to their notl her a little gift
as expressive of their love to her
and gratitude for all that she had
done for them. The children who
were mnci and womenll, and had
long left her side to become them-
selves heads of households, and fa-
---------l-- others anid mothers, were especially
-- --I called upon to return on this day
E -- with their offerings; the mother,
Si-,,i her turn, giving each a peculiar
S-- cake called Similel, a boiled com-
S- pound of dough, sugar, and raisins.
The idea seemed to be that the
adult returned gladly for oie day
--:- to the condition of child ood, and
cane back to pay reverenceo alld
love to the mother who had nursed
him on her knee.
r'the custom seems to us very
/ beautiful and i.....! ,, ,, and the
""- memory of' those old days was the
almost precious, of a mother's posses-
A1 N I ~T '~ i ~siois. The heart is never so hun-
'" guy for love or the tokenii of it, is
I ... When it grows old.













44 SUNKEP,-m I- HoM^.


MJVI, A TiA rAqTC 5 ;JSL J\Np: king's forces on one side and those of his nobles on the other,
with the island, shown in the picture, between them. The
II i; view presented in the picture is that of an island king, accompanied by some of his ministers, rowed over from
Sthe Thames River, England, near Wilndsor Castle. his side of the river to the island, while some of the nobles came
i is noted for an important event that happened from the opposite side, and there, in the presence of the oppos-
ineere many hundred years ag'o, and is still visited by ing armies on either hand, the king placed his name to the char-
most travelers who pass through England. John 1., who was ter on the fifteenth day of June, 1215. A small hut now stands
king of England in the thirteenth century, was a very cruel on the island, within which is the stone whereon it is said the
man, and oppressed his subjects so severely that the nobles paper was placed for the king's signature.
raised an army to fight against him, and finally succeeded in Though the king, after signing the charter, hired foreign sol-
capturing the city of London. After defeating 1he king's forces diers to come and subdue his rebellious subjects, yet ie died be-
several times, they wrote out a paper, which they IIh. It a char- fore he accomplished his object, and his successors, for many
ter, granting certain liberties to the people, and then sent word years, were obliged to place their names to the same paper.
to the king that if lh would sign it they would stop fighting This charter is as much reverenced by the English as the
and go back to their homes. The king knew that he was Declaration of Independence is by the Americans, and is con-
beaten, at least for the time being, and promised to grant their sidered the foundation stone of British liberty. It is always re-
request. Both armies then advanced to the Rivei Thames, the ferried to as the Magna Charta, or Great Charter, and the island
where it was signed is called

originally riltei in the Latin han-
g.uage, anld a (opy cain ble seen at
-____-__-_- tile present day in the British imu-



-_- -r\,q A

P,_ 1. IA I oliservanc es of' stated
L-_--____ ____--- h t.days which were prac-
Stieed by ofIr ancestors two (or
._--___ -three hundred years ago might
__---_._ _be revived by this generation with
-a wholesome effect. Aniong lese
_. ..is the celebration of' Nothering
,- __- Day, the fourth Sunday in ihent, at
which time it was formerly the
___-__.__custom in England fir all children
to bring to their notl her a little gift
as expressive of their love to her
and gratitude for all that she had
done for them. The children who
were mnci and womenll, and had
long left her side to become them-
selves heads of households, and fa-
---------l-- others anid mothers, were especially
-- --I called upon to return on this day
E -- with their offerings; the mother,
Si-,,i her turn, giving each a peculiar
S-- cake called Similel, a boiled com-
S- pound of dough, sugar, and raisins.
The idea seemed to be that the
adult returned gladly for oie day
--:- to the condition of child ood, and
cane back to pay reverenceo alld
love to the mother who had nursed
him on her knee.
r'the custom seems to us very
/ beautiful and i.....! ,, ,, and the
""- memory of' those old days was the
almost precious, of a mother's posses-
A1 N I ~T '~ i ~siois. The heart is never so hun-
'" guy for love or the tokenii of it, is
I ... When it grows old.













SSUNSHINK AT HOME. 45 5


Laughed the brook for my delight Though the flinty slopes be hard,
PT j rYRF ^q0q T Pq-Y 'Through the day and through the night, Stubble-speared the new-mown sward,
Whispering at the garden wall, Every morn shall lead thee through
1 .E I N. on thee, little man, Talked with me from fall to fall; Fresh baptisms of the dew;
1: .. .1 Ioy with cheek of tan Mine the sand-rimmed pickerel pond, Every evening from the feet
SWith thy turned-up pantaloons, Mine the walnut slopes beyond, Shall the cool wind kiss the heat :
And thy merry whistled tunes; Mine on bending orchard trees, All too soon these feet must hide
With thy red lip, redder still Apples of Hesperides In the prison cells of pride,
Kissed by strawberries on the hill Still as my horizon grew, Lose the freedom of the sod,
With the sunshine on thy face, Larger grew my riches too; Like a colt's for work be shod,
Through thy torn brim's jaunty grace :All the world I saw or knew Made to tread the mills of toil,
From my heart I give thee joy, Seemed a complex Chinese toy, Up and down in ceaseless moil:
I was once a barefoot boy Fashioned for a barefoot boy Happy if their track be found
princee thou art,-the grown up Never on forbidden ground;
mania Happy if they sink not in
Only is republican. Quick and treacherous sands of
Let the million-dollared ride Lfa sin.
Barefoot trudging at his side, Ah that thou sh ouldst know
Thou hast more than lie can thy joy,
buy E'er it passes, barefoot boy
In the reach of ear and eye,-
Outward sunshine, inward joy;
"oi" thee, barefoot boy y qT.r

( for boyhood's painless play, T e
Sleep that wakes in laughing I T-- a- --s t
day,
Health that mocks the doctor's we know familiar voices,
rules, Every near and dear one's
Knowledge never learned of call,
schools, Comning through the silent cham-
Of the wild bee's morning chase, hers,
Of the wild flower's time and e Waking echoes in the hall
place, So with instinct all ruerring,
Flight of fowl and latitude Ever strengthening more and
Of the tenants of the wood; more,
How the tortoise bears his shell, We can read the varied language
How the woodchuck digs his Of the footsteps at tihe door
cell,
And the ground mole sinks his Grandpa's faltering tread, now
well; heavy
How the robin feeds her young, With the weight of fruitful
How the oriole's nest is hung ; years,
Where the whitest lilies blow, Nearing yonder golden city
Where the freshest berries grow, Almost through this vale of
Where the ground-nut trails its tears;
vine, Steadfast feet that never loitered
Where the wood-grape's clusters Bravely going oin before;
shine ; By and by we'll miss their nmu-
Of the black wasp's cunning sic,-
"way, Precious footsteps at the door!
Mason of his walls of clay,
And the architectural plans Then, the patter of the children,
Of gray hornet artisans IHappy darlings out and in,
For, eschewing books and tasks, 0 for festal dainties spread, Like the butterflies and sunbeamns,
Nature answers all he asks; Like my bowl of milk and bread,- With no thought of care or sinll;
Hand in hand with her he walks, Pewter spoon and bowl of wood, Little feet that need sure guiding
Face to face with her he talks, On the door-stone gray and rude Past the pitfalls on the shore,
Part and parcel of her joy,- ('er me like a regal tent, Lest they turn aside to mischief,-
Blessings on thee, barefoot boy ....I ribbed, the sunset bout, Blessed footsteps at the door !

0 for boyhood's time of June, Then, the matron, glad and cheery,
Looked in many a wind-st-vmg fold;
Crowding years in one ief moon, ed i y a windsvg fold Hears her good man drawing nigh
When all things I heard or saw While for music came the play And the children hear the mother
hen all things I hear w (Of the pied frig's orchestra ;
Me, their master,waited for. d, to light the oisy choir, As her busy footsteps fly.
SAnd, to light the noisy choir,
I was rich in flowers and trees, Lit the fly his lamp of fire. Household music We all hear it,
Hmumini-birds an'l honey-bees; i was monarch : ponp and joy While we love it more and more,
I was monarch : pulp anmidA joy
For my sport the squirrel played, Waited on the barefoot boy And we hope to welcome with it
Plied the snouted mole his spade; Angel footsteps at the door !
For my taste the blackberry cone '!I... ,!5, then, my little man,
Purpled over hedge and stone ; Live and laugh as boyhood can ll
. ~~"1 -,- :. -:. .-













SSUNSHINK AT HOME. 45 5


Laughed the brook for my delight Though the flinty slopes be hard,
PT j rYRF ^q0q T Pq-Y 'Through the day and through the night, Stubble-speared the new-mown sward,
Whispering at the garden wall, Every morn shall lead thee through
1 .E I N. on thee, little man, Talked with me from fall to fall; Fresh baptisms of the dew;
1: .. .1 Ioy with cheek of tan Mine the sand-rimmed pickerel pond, Every evening from the feet
SWith thy turned-up pantaloons, Mine the walnut slopes beyond, Shall the cool wind kiss the heat :
And thy merry whistled tunes; Mine on bending orchard trees, All too soon these feet must hide
With thy red lip, redder still Apples of Hesperides In the prison cells of pride,
Kissed by strawberries on the hill Still as my horizon grew, Lose the freedom of the sod,
With the sunshine on thy face, Larger grew my riches too; Like a colt's for work be shod,
Through thy torn brim's jaunty grace :All the world I saw or knew Made to tread the mills of toil,
From my heart I give thee joy, Seemed a complex Chinese toy, Up and down in ceaseless moil:
I was once a barefoot boy Fashioned for a barefoot boy Happy if their track be found
princee thou art,-the grown up Never on forbidden ground;
mania Happy if they sink not in
Only is republican. Quick and treacherous sands of
Let the million-dollared ride Lfa sin.
Barefoot trudging at his side, Ah that thou sh ouldst know
Thou hast more than lie can thy joy,
buy E'er it passes, barefoot boy
In the reach of ear and eye,-
Outward sunshine, inward joy;
"oi" thee, barefoot boy y qT.r

( for boyhood's painless play, T e
Sleep that wakes in laughing I T-- a- --s t
day,
Health that mocks the doctor's we know familiar voices,
rules, Every near and dear one's
Knowledge never learned of call,
schools, Comning through the silent cham-
Of the wild bee's morning chase, hers,
Of the wild flower's time and e Waking echoes in the hall
place, So with instinct all ruerring,
Flight of fowl and latitude Ever strengthening more and
Of the tenants of the wood; more,
How the tortoise bears his shell, We can read the varied language
How the woodchuck digs his Of the footsteps at tihe door
cell,
And the ground mole sinks his Grandpa's faltering tread, now
well; heavy
How the robin feeds her young, With the weight of fruitful
How the oriole's nest is hung ; years,
Where the whitest lilies blow, Nearing yonder golden city
Where the freshest berries grow, Almost through this vale of
Where the ground-nut trails its tears;
vine, Steadfast feet that never loitered
Where the wood-grape's clusters Bravely going oin before;
shine ; By and by we'll miss their nmu-
Of the black wasp's cunning sic,-
"way, Precious footsteps at the door!
Mason of his walls of clay,
And the architectural plans Then, the patter of the children,
Of gray hornet artisans IHappy darlings out and in,
For, eschewing books and tasks, 0 for festal dainties spread, Like the butterflies and sunbeamns,
Nature answers all he asks; Like my bowl of milk and bread,- With no thought of care or sinll;
Hand in hand with her he walks, Pewter spoon and bowl of wood, Little feet that need sure guiding
Face to face with her he talks, On the door-stone gray and rude Past the pitfalls on the shore,
Part and parcel of her joy,- ('er me like a regal tent, Lest they turn aside to mischief,-
Blessings on thee, barefoot boy ....I ribbed, the sunset bout, Blessed footsteps at the door !

0 for boyhood's time of June, Then, the matron, glad and cheery,
Looked in many a wind-st-vmg fold;
Crowding years in one ief moon, ed i y a windsvg fold Hears her good man drawing nigh
When all things I heard or saw While for music came the play And the children hear the mother
hen all things I hear w (Of the pied frig's orchestra ;
Me, their master,waited for. d, to light the oisy choir, As her busy footsteps fly.
SAnd, to light the noisy choir,
I was rich in flowers and trees, Lit the fly his lamp of fire. Household music We all hear it,
Hmumini-birds an'l honey-bees; i was monarch : ponp and joy While we love it more and more,
I was monarch : pulp anmidA joy
For my sport the squirrel played, Waited on the barefoot boy And we hope to welcome with it
Plied the snouted mole his spade; Angel footsteps at the door !
For my taste the blackberry cone '!I... ,!5, then, my little man,
Purpled over hedge and stone ; Live and laugh as boyhood can ll
. ~~"1 -,- :. -:. .-












r 46 suI SNHNEl AT PHOME.


:w1'F. T MPT .

A3)I Al, 0ou1 1 ton thing I nam s1re of, and that is, I can
.' ^.Br.' 1, e good as long as I have to live with SMtany.
1 i -() Edna, think a nuonient,-do not, speak so;
yul are blaming yoiir brother oI yourI own sins !"
S Well, o iI mtes ine nauhty. 'in a always worse when
S h's in tile house. Does n that show thae t I'i ot really soit
X had ?I? ] walit to be goiod and ]keep my temper, but as soon
I ... .. an comes -where I am, lie is sure tn) do soviet hino to
N_. h t vex ale, and I n an't help getting a ross and saying something
hateful "
"...- Conel here, my dear ; and the mother laid down her
_.!rw. ork with that pleasant way which mothers have oi show-
--" il' ', .ngI that they are wiilllng to ivce their whole attention the
R case in Ihand. Drawing Edna close to her side, she said: 'I
ill tell you what it siows it shows simply that you are
t not strong, enough to resist strong temptations. Nothing is
S.... .. easier for us all than to think ourselves angelic because we
Happen to live with people of easy tempers, or who smooth
_T cH H A R sles ousr way for us with kindness and love. And I think it shows
Se something else, too,-that you have not that true sisterly
fooling toward Sandy which should make you bear with him
it 'o in spite of his faults and annoyatnces."
f.i a g d e ig, I do n't think he's got a very brotlherl/ feeling toward me,
O_ r ad o td o ar he wouldn't treat me so, '" muttered iEdna.
h-i' ,,iti th d...i., i .... "I don't defend his conduct," replied her mother. "You
It .1a i ...., ... I... know that I have reproved and punished him for irritating
Aii II,. n ...,,, .... .. you; but I want you to seo plainly that what lie brings out
SI: i .: is really inv you, else he could not bring it out. It might he
. .1 ... .,.possible for a person to live for years without doing anything
l..I ...i .'..I; ..,I,,.I- flagrantly bad : he might, on the whole, seem to be quite
\\itl.! -.......,,.... ,. H ... !...I good enough ; and yet this same person might in the end do
That caught the smallest sound. some very dreadful things, thus showing himself to have been
The field-mouse rustled in the grass, full of the possibilities of wickedness all the time."
The squirrel in the trees; "I do n't think that I quite understand you, manmna."
But the little hare was not afraid Well, I will try and make it plainer. You remember the
Of common sounds like those. poor little girl with spinal disease whom I took you to see last
She frisked and gamboled with delight. winter, and you remember also that her mother was hump-
And cropped a leaf or two backed. When Emma was born, although she was then
Of clover and of tender grass straight and well-formed, the doctors said it was not unlikely
That glistened in the dew. that she would inherit her mother's disease. Yet for twelve
What was it, then, that made her start, years there was no sign of such a thing happening. Bnt t the day
And run away so fast ? eame at length when she had a fall. bruising her Iaek ; and then
She heard the distant sound of hounds, the dreadful disease, which had
She heard the huntsman's blast. been lying quiet for years, made .I
Hoy !-tally-ho :--hey !--tally-ho its appearance, and poor Emma
The hounds are in full cry ; is helpless for life, ; and this ease ,.
Ehew ehew in scarlet coats shows tha t the bad seed was in w
The men are sweeping by. her all the time. Now does my
So off sthe set with a spring and a bound, illustration explain itself'? -,
Over the meadows and open ground, Edna looked up and said
Faster than hunter and faster than hound; I see what you mean, mnnma.n m
And on, and on, till she lost the sound, I know now that the badness is Z!
And away went the little hare.
in me. I cannot be sure I a_ -m
good until I have resisted lthe 4
Two horsemen met near the statue of a knight with a shield. hardest temptations."
One side of the shield was of gold, tIhe other of silver. One said Yes ; trials are not sent to .. .
the shield was gold; tIe other that it was silver. They got an- make us bad, but good,-to
gry about it, and fit till both wore ..11lly hurt. An old priest eamlle show us our weakness or ourn-
S along and told them they should have looked op both sides of the strength. Remember this leb
shield. We should always look on both sides of the question. next time Sandy teases you." -

--'












r 46 suI SNHNEl AT PHOME.


:w1'F. T MPT .

A3)I Al, 0ou1 1 ton thing I nam s1re of, and that is, I can
.' ^.Br.' 1, e good as long as I have to live with SMtany.
1 i -() Edna, think a nuonient,-do not, speak so;
yul are blaming yoiir brother oI yourI own sins !"
S Well, o iI mtes ine nauhty. 'in a always worse when
S h's in tile house. Does n that show thae t I'i ot really soit
X had ?I? ] walit to be goiod and ]keep my temper, but as soon
I ... .. an comes -where I am, lie is sure tn) do soviet hino to
N_. h t vex ale, and I n an't help getting a ross and saying something
hateful "
"...- Conel here, my dear ; and the mother laid down her
_.!rw. ork with that pleasant way which mothers have oi show-
--" il' ', .ngI that they are wiilllng to ivce their whole attention the
R case in Ihand. Drawing Edna close to her side, she said: 'I
ill tell you what it siows it shows simply that you are
t not strong, enough to resist strong temptations. Nothing is
S.... .. easier for us all than to think ourselves angelic because we
Happen to live with people of easy tempers, or who smooth
_T cH H A R sles ousr way for us with kindness and love. And I think it shows
Se something else, too,-that you have not that true sisterly
fooling toward Sandy which should make you bear with him
it 'o in spite of his faults and annoyatnces."
f.i a g d e ig, I do n't think he's got a very brotlherl/ feeling toward me,
O_ r ad o td o ar he wouldn't treat me so, '" muttered iEdna.
h-i' ,,iti th d...i., i .... "I don't defend his conduct," replied her mother. "You
It .1a i ...., ... I... know that I have reproved and punished him for irritating
Aii II,. n ...,,, .... .. you; but I want you to seo plainly that what lie brings out
SI: i .: is really inv you, else he could not bring it out. It might he
. .1 ... .,.possible for a person to live for years without doing anything
l..I ...i .'..I; ..,I,,.I- flagrantly bad : he might, on the whole, seem to be quite
\\itl.! -.......,,.... ,. H ... !...I good enough ; and yet this same person might in the end do
That caught the smallest sound. some very dreadful things, thus showing himself to have been
The field-mouse rustled in the grass, full of the possibilities of wickedness all the time."
The squirrel in the trees; "I do n't think that I quite understand you, manmna."
But the little hare was not afraid Well, I will try and make it plainer. You remember the
Of common sounds like those. poor little girl with spinal disease whom I took you to see last
She frisked and gamboled with delight. winter, and you remember also that her mother was hump-
And cropped a leaf or two backed. When Emma was born, although she was then
Of clover and of tender grass straight and well-formed, the doctors said it was not unlikely
That glistened in the dew. that she would inherit her mother's disease. Yet for twelve
What was it, then, that made her start, years there was no sign of such a thing happening. Bnt t the day
And run away so fast ? eame at length when she had a fall. bruising her Iaek ; and then
She heard the distant sound of hounds, the dreadful disease, which had
She heard the huntsman's blast. been lying quiet for years, made .I
Hoy !-tally-ho :--hey !--tally-ho its appearance, and poor Emma
The hounds are in full cry ; is helpless for life, ; and this ease ,.
Ehew ehew in scarlet coats shows tha t the bad seed was in w
The men are sweeping by. her all the time. Now does my
So off sthe set with a spring and a bound, illustration explain itself'? -,
Over the meadows and open ground, Edna looked up and said
Faster than hunter and faster than hound; I see what you mean, mnnma.n m
And on, and on, till she lost the sound, I know now that the badness is Z!
And away went the little hare.
in me. I cannot be sure I a_ -m
good until I have resisted lthe 4
Two horsemen met near the statue of a knight with a shield. hardest temptations."
One side of the shield was of gold, tIhe other of silver. One said Yes ; trials are not sent to .. .
the shield was gold; tIe other that it was silver. They got an- make us bad, but good,-to
gry about it, and fit till both wore ..11lly hurt. An old priest eamlle show us our weakness or ourn-
S along and told them they should have looked op both sides of the strength. Remember this leb
shield. We should always look on both sides of the question. next time Sandy teases you." -

--'











SuNsBNiEm AT HIOMn. 47

the Botanical Garden of Rio de Janeiro. The tall stems rise to
7. : '` JTUA VI.Q' P the height of eighty fiet, and their overarching branches inter-
-1 lace, forming a
S ill I'.liE are no less than six hundred kinds of palms, beautiful roof.
I .,.1 they Tr'selnt in their varie, firms some of the Thebralehes, or -
-; ...;t graceful and picturesque as well as some of the rather their long ---
I-- -_ ,i....,t majestic objects to be found in tlhe vegetable leaves, were col- : '-
S- I.. 'ld. They stand out, with their light, airy, and sideredasemlblenms '
~ i.IOne-liko foliago, in beautiful contrast with the of victory; and -
""I.. p, dark growfh of the under\wood. Some kinds were oftonll used ias
S reach the height of two hundred feet, while others such o0 occasions
have s:iens sealcely visible above ground, anwd n- ,. clothing of public rejoicing.
but. a wilde-spreading bunch of illlllense leaves. The trunks of When our Saviour
some are smooth, while others are rough with a fibrous covering. made his triumph- e '
All are beautithl. ant entry into Je-
The bold and crect posture (of some of them is proverbially rusalm, some of
emblell tic ot perfectly righteousness. Thus .David says, The the people took ,l' i
righteous shall flourish like the palm-tree." No cathedral has a branches of palm- '
pillared aisle so magniificent as the famous Avenue of Palms in trees, and strewed
them iln ihe way. And in the vision of' St. John,
the multiitude which no manll could m1unber were
l/ //l\( / seen standing before the throne, clothed with
white robes, and with palms in their hands.


;. ,t ,TE -' T
"' E ardth is full "f blessing,
TThere's b>eautty everywhere ;

----.- 2" ".
l it And Heo who made the universe,
Hs made it good and fair-
I Jl 5._"\1' 'rlThe wild-flowers in the hedge-row,
l [The blossolls on the trees,
"The radiance of the sumnner sun,
, Id,/'"I, The freshness of the breeze,
j i ( The lhar-frost in the winter,
I ".'. The crystals pure antd bright,
,- ',Created in their loveliness
''" In one brief winter's night,
..-'" I^ IThe mountains and the valleys,
I U" I ~The deep, unfathomed sea,
'T '/" With all its rippling waves that play
1/"' And dance about with glee.
There's beauty in the luster
__OI Of every twinkling star;
f( _. lThe colors of the rainbow, too,
/ I '-'- How beautiful they are !
// We gaze in silent wonder,
!! O. And whisper reverently,
/" 'If this world is so very fair,

'r Iivery apartment of the earth l displays th.'
1 /'1 I/lan ldiwork of' our Fatherl. I I. is a beauty in
S1 11 11 I1 ( Ile structure and a mystery ill tlhe liti of the lenf,
j i I 'tl the blade of grass. tlle smallest insect, which we
S| I I ii cannot comprehend. There is an exhaustless
Sj h I richness in the sunlight, there is a grandeur in
I Ithie fobIrests, the mollutais, the oceans, which ever
lift the devout mind to the Giver of all good. If
.C ___we would tlink of God as often as he gives us
something to remind us of his care, lie would he
_i 1. in all our thoughts, and we should talk of himl
THE FAN PALM. and praise him all the day long.











SuNsBNiEm AT HIOMn. 47

the Botanical Garden of Rio de Janeiro. The tall stems rise to
7. : '` JTUA VI.Q' P the height of eighty fiet, and their overarching branches inter-
-1 lace, forming a
S ill I'.liE are no less than six hundred kinds of palms, beautiful roof.
I .,.1 they Tr'selnt in their varie, firms some of the Thebralehes, or -
-; ...;t graceful and picturesque as well as some of the rather their long ---
I-- -_ ,i....,t majestic objects to be found in tlhe vegetable leaves, were col- : '-
S- I.. 'ld. They stand out, with their light, airy, and sideredasemlblenms '
~ i.IOne-liko foliago, in beautiful contrast with the of victory; and -
""I.. p, dark growfh of the under\wood. Some kinds were oftonll used ias
S reach the height of two hundred feet, while others such o0 occasions
have s:iens sealcely visible above ground, anwd n- ,. clothing of public rejoicing.
but. a wilde-spreading bunch of illlllense leaves. The trunks of When our Saviour
some are smooth, while others are rough with a fibrous covering. made his triumph- e '
All are beautithl. ant entry into Je-
The bold and crect posture (of some of them is proverbially rusalm, some of
emblell tic ot perfectly righteousness. Thus .David says, The the people took ,l' i
righteous shall flourish like the palm-tree." No cathedral has a branches of palm- '
pillared aisle so magniificent as the famous Avenue of Palms in trees, and strewed
them iln ihe way. And in the vision of' St. John,
the multiitude which no manll could m1unber were
l/ //l\( / seen standing before the throne, clothed with
white robes, and with palms in their hands.


;. ,t ,TE -' T
"' E ardth is full "f blessing,
TThere's b>eautty everywhere ;

----.- 2" ".
l it And Heo who made the universe,
Hs made it good and fair-
I Jl 5._"\1' 'rlThe wild-flowers in the hedge-row,
l [The blossolls on the trees,
"The radiance of the sumnner sun,
, Id,/'"I, The freshness of the breeze,
j i ( The lhar-frost in the winter,
I ".'. The crystals pure antd bright,
,- ',Created in their loveliness
''" In one brief winter's night,
..-'" I^ IThe mountains and the valleys,
I U" I ~The deep, unfathomed sea,
'T '/" With all its rippling waves that play
1/"' And dance about with glee.
There's beauty in the luster
__OI Of every twinkling star;
f( _. lThe colors of the rainbow, too,
/ I '-'- How beautiful they are !
// We gaze in silent wonder,
!! O. And whisper reverently,
/" 'If this world is so very fair,

'r Iivery apartment of the earth l displays th.'
1 /'1 I/lan ldiwork of' our Fatherl. I I. is a beauty in
S1 11 11 I1 ( Ile structure and a mystery ill tlhe liti of the lenf,
j i I 'tl the blade of grass. tlle smallest insect, which we
S| I I ii cannot comprehend. There is an exhaustless
Sj h I richness in the sunlight, there is a grandeur in
I Ithie fobIrests, the mollutais, the oceans, which ever
lift the devout mind to the Giver of all good. If
.C ___we would tlink of God as often as he gives us
something to remind us of his care, lie would he
_i 1. in all our thoughts, and we should talk of himl
THE FAN PALM. and praise him all the day long.













48 SuNsNi AT Homn.





L'NDI ANS were the aboriginal inhabitants
of America, and were so-called by Colurn- --
bus and the early navigators from the li
4 supposed identity of Amllerica with Imdia.
I Wen the first settlers caolne to this e(ol11i
try, they fobnd the Indians quiet alnd
peeaeable; but when the white man tres-
I wl passed upon their rights too much, their
f. orieldship was turned to haired, 1md noth- A
inig was too bad for them to do. They 4
attacked the pale-filees," as the Inioliais "i Y _'(
called the white people, whenever an11d1 Niii
-tfherever they could. ';.-1 .1.i was this the case in the New r ,.
!,I ,,cI colonies. They would tear up, or otherwise destroy- ,
tho newly planted corn, set fire to t tie log ceabils,l andl se.-,
showers of arrows after those who tried to escape from the K.
burning dwellings. Often the men of' the settlemllent., returning _
at nii lit from a hunting expedition, foiund their crops and blild- -
ings consumllled b iV fire, anllt their wives anditt little ( iones either ;
carried away into captivity, or cruelly murdered 1w the tomia-
hawk, or Indian hatchet. But the Inldianls were ,not alone to
blnime. They did not always receive kindness from the had of
the white man. Once they were virtuous and haIppy); their
lakes were full of fish, their woods alive with deer and elk, their
prairies covered with .,trl 1.. there was always plenty in the k
hunter's wigwam, and they wanted Iothlitng
A missionary once went to a chief of the Mohawk iiation in
Uplper C(anada. alnd asked permission to dwell among them. was the replyI. ':Do't want Christ; no Christ!!" said the
- What you preach ? preach ('. asked the chief Yes," chief. The missionary persCvered. At last the chief t'rot warm.
and, towering to his full hight, with a
volcano of fire in his eye, broke out:
Onco we we wre powerful; we were a
"reat nation ; our y)'oung men were many;
_____-___-__our lodlles were full of children our cel-
__--. iies feared us; but the white lan came
and brought us fire-water.' Now we
are poor ; we are weak; nobody foars us;
our lodges are empty ; olr council fires
j C- are gone out. We do n't want white nian
S.i.lnor Chr(l t. Geo!" A fearfll reckoning
._ _-_-___"awaits the men who, to build up them-
--- solves, treoad down others, and thus dis-
lihonor God, and cover ('1 ,-'s gospel with
reproach.




F birds that fly through the fields of air,
Whact'lessons of wisdom and truth ye bear:
Y e would teach our souls from earth to rise;
Ye would bid us all groveling scenes despise.
VYe would tell us that all its pursuits are vain,
Thiat pleasure is toil -ambition is pain--
Ti'hat its bliss is touched with a poisoning leaven,
Ye would teach us to fix our aim on Heaven.

Swift birds, that skim o'er the stormy deep,
Who steadily onward your journey keep,
\Who neither for rest nor for slmnber stay,
.But press still forward, by night or day,-
As in your unwearying course ye fly
- I iBeneath the clear unclouded sky;
-_0 Oh may we, without delay, like you,
'The path of duty and right pursue.













48 SuNsNi AT Homn.





L'NDI ANS were the aboriginal inhabitants
of America, and were so-called by Colurn- --
bus and the early navigators from the li
4 supposed identity of Amllerica with Imdia.
I Wen the first settlers caolne to this e(ol11i
try, they fobnd the Indians quiet alnd
peeaeable; but when the white man tres-
I wl passed upon their rights too much, their
f. orieldship was turned to haired, 1md noth- A
inig was too bad for them to do. They 4
attacked the pale-filees," as the Inioliais "i Y _'(
called the white people, whenever an11d1 Niii
-tfherever they could. ';.-1 .1.i was this the case in the New r ,.
!,I ,,cI colonies. They would tear up, or otherwise destroy- ,
tho newly planted corn, set fire to t tie log ceabils,l andl se.-,
showers of arrows after those who tried to escape from the K.
burning dwellings. Often the men of' the settlemllent., returning _
at nii lit from a hunting expedition, foiund their crops and blild- -
ings consumllled b iV fire, anllt their wives anditt little ( iones either ;
carried away into captivity, or cruelly murdered 1w the tomia-
hawk, or Indian hatchet. But the Inldianls were ,not alone to
blnime. They did not always receive kindness from the had of
the white man. Once they were virtuous and haIppy); their
lakes were full of fish, their woods alive with deer and elk, their
prairies covered with .,trl 1.. there was always plenty in the k
hunter's wigwam, and they wanted Iothlitng
A missionary once went to a chief of the Mohawk iiation in
Uplper C(anada. alnd asked permission to dwell among them. was the replyI. ':Do't want Christ; no Christ!!" said the
- What you preach ? preach ('. asked the chief Yes," chief. The missionary persCvered. At last the chief t'rot warm.
and, towering to his full hight, with a
volcano of fire in his eye, broke out:
Onco we we wre powerful; we were a
"reat nation ; our y)'oung men were many;
_____-___-__our lodlles were full of children our cel-
__--. iies feared us; but the white lan came
and brought us fire-water.' Now we
are poor ; we are weak; nobody foars us;
our lodges are empty ; olr council fires
j C- are gone out. We do n't want white nian
S.i.lnor Chr(l t. Geo!" A fearfll reckoning
._ _-_-___"awaits the men who, to build up them-
--- solves, treoad down others, and thus dis-
lihonor God, and cover ('1 ,-'s gospel with
reproach.




F birds that fly through the fields of air,
Whact'lessons of wisdom and truth ye bear:
Y e would teach our souls from earth to rise;
Ye would bid us all groveling scenes despise.
VYe would tell us that all its pursuits are vain,
Thiat pleasure is toil -ambition is pain--
Ti'hat its bliss is touched with a poisoning leaven,
Ye would teach us to fix our aim on Heaven.

Swift birds, that skim o'er the stormy deep,
Who steadily onward your journey keep,
\Who neither for rest nor for slmnber stay,
.But press still forward, by night or day,-
As in your unwearying course ye fly
- I iBeneath the clear unclouded sky;
-_0 Oh may we, without delay, like you,
'The path of duty and right pursue.













SUNHr7JM AT HolMn. 49







ISTEN to the water-mill
J Through the live-long day,__- -____
SHow the clanking of the wheels
Wears the hours away I
Si-





L ,,.il, .the autumn wind
Stirs the greenwood leaves: --_
From the fields the reapers sing,
Binding up the sheaves.
And a proverb haunts my mind, ____
As a spell is cast-
"The mill will never grind
With the water that has passed."

Work while yet the daylight shines,
Man of strength and will;
Never does the streamlet glide
Useless by the mill.
Wait not till to-morrow's sun
Beams upon the way;
All that thou canst call thy own
Lies in thy to-day.
Power, intellect, and health
May not, cannot last
"The mill will never grind
With the water that has passed."

Oh, the wasted hours of life,
That have drifted by !
0Oh, the good we might have done,
Lost without a sigh !
Love that we might once have saved
By a single word;
Thoughts conceived, but never pen'd
Perishing unheard..
Take the proverb to thine heart,
Take oh, hold it fast !-
The mill will never grind
With the water that has passed."





.OT long sin ce a steamer w as
1, passing in sight of a drown-
Sing man .,, -. for help.
"Stand )up!" shouted( an
Soffcer on the boat, who
knew that a good found'a-
tion for his feet was near the sup-
Ifacee. The despairing victim 'of'
his own carelessness rose heom
the baptism of' the flood, and walked with gladness toward the Ready for the weakest feet is the Lord Jehovah's way of deliv-
green shore. eranee; Other foundation can no man lay than that is laid,
By how many .1.. ,..,.1,_ weary spirits, wasting in useless which is Jesus ('!,, "
.I,,.1. their strength, looking for distant help, might this Struggling, desponding soul, look not to pastor or friend;
voice be heard from the skies-" Stand up God's foundation wait not for some imagined aid coming through the mist and
"is beneath, and the fragrant land of harvest-work for glory and gloom. Stand up is the loving command ; and the waters
immortality is nigh. shall only lave thy feet, which move toward the wide field of
Despondency comes not from God. He may providentially usefulness beyond which is the strength and open vision of
permit it, but it is not in him. There is no possible condition of heaven, "Stand up !" and bid the waves of temptation reced
life which ctanm e--use gloomy discouragementt or despair; no front thee and ine the endthou shalt find that these temptations,
call for el apart from ersoal effo rt which will be answered. firmly resisted, have wafted thee on to the immortal shore.













SUNHr7JM AT HolMn. 49







ISTEN to the water-mill
J Through the live-long day,__- -____
SHow the clanking of the wheels
Wears the hours away I
Si-





L ,,.il, .the autumn wind
Stirs the greenwood leaves: --_
From the fields the reapers sing,
Binding up the sheaves.
And a proverb haunts my mind, ____
As a spell is cast-
"The mill will never grind
With the water that has passed."

Work while yet the daylight shines,
Man of strength and will;
Never does the streamlet glide
Useless by the mill.
Wait not till to-morrow's sun
Beams upon the way;
All that thou canst call thy own
Lies in thy to-day.
Power, intellect, and health
May not, cannot last
"The mill will never grind
With the water that has passed."

Oh, the wasted hours of life,
That have drifted by !
0Oh, the good we might have done,
Lost without a sigh !
Love that we might once have saved
By a single word;
Thoughts conceived, but never pen'd
Perishing unheard..
Take the proverb to thine heart,
Take oh, hold it fast !-
The mill will never grind
With the water that has passed."





.OT long sin ce a steamer w as
1, passing in sight of a drown-
Sing man .,, -. for help.
"Stand )up!" shouted( an
Soffcer on the boat, who
knew that a good found'a-
tion for his feet was near the sup-
Ifacee. The despairing victim 'of'
his own carelessness rose heom
the baptism of' the flood, and walked with gladness toward the Ready for the weakest feet is the Lord Jehovah's way of deliv-
green shore. eranee; Other foundation can no man lay than that is laid,
By how many .1.. ,..,.1,_ weary spirits, wasting in useless which is Jesus ('!,, "
.I,,.1. their strength, looking for distant help, might this Struggling, desponding soul, look not to pastor or friend;
voice be heard from the skies-" Stand up God's foundation wait not for some imagined aid coming through the mist and
"is beneath, and the fragrant land of harvest-work for glory and gloom. Stand up is the loving command ; and the waters
immortality is nigh. shall only lave thy feet, which move toward the wide field of
Despondency comes not from God. He may providentially usefulness beyond which is the strength and open vision of
permit it, but it is not in him. There is no possible condition of heaven, "Stand up !" and bid the waves of temptation reced
life which ctanm e--use gloomy discouragementt or despair; no front thee and ine the endthou shalt find that these temptations,
call for el apart from ersoal effo rt which will be answered. firmly resisted, have wafted thee on to the immortal shore.













r 50 SU NSriINK Al 14 0mn.
50 P-


What a lovely coat you have said ( ray-fuir, with longing
oyes turned toward the mouse's door. "And what beautiful
TAY here and watch for a field-mouse?" said Pussykin, paws! I lived with an old school-teacher once who was always
l ooki".r at a little hole in the ground, and then survey- telling the children to '1mind their pawses,' and they hadn't any
Sing lher owni i smooth pais with complaceroey. I should that I considered worth mindiig. But ytourls, now-I should
Think I could, indeedtl 1 can catch him too if 1he so think you would want to take care of them and not dig in the
much as looks out. My mother need n't think it such a great dirt too much. Scratching about after field-mice does n't seem
thing for her to go fit work for them;
off to the barn andl -- it does n't, really."
leave ime to watch No; I do n't like
for a little while. -- it," answered Pus-
What a great man}y d sNiu oiseontented-
chargos she dtid give t it m yt m. another
mne Deair T Of left me here to keep
course I can watch ` watch at this hole
for a field -mouse a till slhe cname back."
well as she. I would nlt mind
Pussykin blinleed -- -ax wa tc lii g it for you
her bright eyes, it a-ou'd like to go
fiisked around aft- away and attend to
elr her tail once or g and t ltg te fbr a
twice by way of ex- little vheile," obtfoed
ercise, and looked in (raiy-fiir eagely,-v-
at the mouse's door m old ad not
again. d ood fior much else,
"Wat a time he but I ate to se
is coming out! Does -i I
he think] a calt waxntat c ire like you
to wait all day fo r kept at such stupid
her dinner? I i isi w-orik.'
my mother w ould tV Pussy hesitated.
leave this stupid'j7 SIhe had some mlis-
place and go wrlieio !o1 givinigs about leav-
we could inake tour inlg her poIst, but just
fortunes. There earo tt ct
places where iniceI
are pentv tooi, for flew up frIn a lto"-
I heard my mistress s4m icn ar and sprC'ad
read about one last 'its bright 1iigs in
niigt; Poverty was tthe sunshine. ius-
the Jiame of it. She sykin's round eyes
said a man wvho I opeiid wite i sar-
lived in it iwas a rise and delidt.
'rCat niicc' c What was tt ?
she called it-and -_2 So"ethitig fin' bet-
toe a fod to cL thai itero, o

laid up i gold -n i iat,
ain old chest. lint f a would notser
I tloll't sec whlrat he but--t Wo uld_ I___ ____
waited to lay themt mlici' be astonl-
"up in gold for, when he had so many. Five Inldred mlice.-wouldl islied andl rejoiced if she should capture this u- '
last us a long time, and we could enjoy ourselves. It would be knowi 1reaslure? XX itat a triunimph it Would he i And without
iiiuch better' than watching so long foir one." further words Pissyuin darted away in pursuit.
Pussykini pranced about once, darted after a pretended mouse Overlhead, backward aind forward, flow the butterfly, now
in the shirubbcry, and altogether kept up so nutchi noise that aliglitiiig on a lblossomi, iiow ianitalizingly near on a gr'ass-blade,
the real mouse was not likely to appear. Just then a liuiiriguy- but always utp and away before Pussykin could reach him. On
looking gray cat crept through the hedge and softly approached. followed poor Puss, racing aiid jumping, nowi scratched lby the
Alih, I tlholught I heard music. Was it your sweet voice, my thorns of the teoltge, now plunged into the mud by the eager-
dear?" le asked. 11Do you sii g tenor? nos of her chasc, bu-t never overtaking; and at last the butter-
"Oh, yes, I can sing ten or a dozen," 'replied Pissykin, fly flutteredl gayly aw'ay, far overheadl, and disappeared.
archiig her neck. "I sing as much as twenty sometimes." Tired, 1 -. .1, and forilorit, Pussykin made her way back to
/ ---------- -- -----* ____ ___________-----------------












SUNS H IN AT Io 51

her post, only to see old Grayfur marching off with the field- oil will boil up and flow over the sides just like a kettle of soap.
mouse in his mouth, and to wait for her mother, with no prize At two o'clock the first grand overflow occurred. As I stood on
but a humiliating story. the hill-side, I heard a man shout, She's coming," and I saw
"Well, well," said the old cat, gravely shaking her gray pipe-line men running away from the tank for their lives. I
whiskers, "the butterfly would n't have been good for anything beard a rumbling sound inside the tank and did n't know what
if you had caught it. Now we must both go hungry; that's it meant, but a few seconds after, I saw fully five hundred bar-
what comes of neglect- rels of burning oil
ing the plain work be- shoot up from the
fore you and chasing tank and boil over the
off after something sides. The burning
that looks grander. oil floated down the
And when you hear creek for a mile, burn-
any more talk about ing a saw-mill, numer-
any mor tk--wells and tanks,
genius, just you re- ous oil-wellsandtanks,
member this: It's buildings, and every-
faithfulness, and not thing within reach of
brilliancy, that earns .- its devastating breath.
the most dinners in :When the flow bad
this world." partly subsided, it was
t' found that a second
twenty-five thousand
TI- barrel iron tank had
been set on fire by the
X-J(' overflow of burning
oil.
T the pretty book "I ventured down be-
tway hind the tank to get a
That your hand is better view from the
tearing; .- lower side. While
Let mamma see the sorry trying to avoid a pool
look of burning oil, I fell
Your baby face is wear- into a sort of quick-
ing. sand, and stuck fast.
It is not the book alone, in i My utmost endeavors
Your little hand is tear- were of no avail in
ing, o extricating myself. I
But your own heart's ba- yelled at the top of my
by peace, voice, but so great was
And its quiet feeling. the roar of the boiling
Go at once to mamma, tanks that my voice
then, sounded weak and far
She'll drive from off away. Suddenly I
thy cheek P i heard a cannon, and
The shadow that is lurk- saw a column of flame
ing there;- "'and smoke shoot up
Her voice will comfort and smoke shoot tak
pik -.-- fromm one of the tanks;
speak. the truth came upon
----- me, and I was stricken
senseless. The men
@k PA V 4QT9 were firing cannon balls through the first tank to draw off the
oil and prevent a second overflow.
ABORERS in the oil-wells are often exposed to dangers. "What a conviction came upon me! It was a matter of sec-
One of these oil-men, whose hair turned white during a bonds. I tried to shout, but the words would not come. With
night of terror, related his experience to a correspond- the strength of despair /I struggled to get free, but the quicksand
ent of the Philadelphia Times. He said there had held me with the grip of death. All at once I saw a little stream
been a heavy storm about midnight, and, as it was of burning oil running Mlowly down toward me. My time had
usual with the oil-country residents, be arose and looked come, I thought, and I must be burned to death by inches. The
out of the window to see if any tanks had been struck by light- stream of burning oil, now grown larger, was almost upon me,-
ning. A bright glare in the sky convinced him that a large then all was dhirk. When I came back to consciousness, I was
tank of oil was on fire a few miles distant, and he went back to lying in my own room yvith my 'friends around me. In follow-
sleep, determined to see the first overflow the next day. ing the supposed course of the overflowed oil, the men found and
You know that when a twenty-five thousand barrel iron tank rescued me just as the burning stream was about to reach me.
of oil has been on fire for twelve or fourteen hours, the burning After a long sickness I found my hair as white as you see it now."












SUNS H IN AT Io 51

her post, only to see old Grayfur marching off with the field- oil will boil up and flow over the sides just like a kettle of soap.
mouse in his mouth, and to wait for her mother, with no prize At two o'clock the first grand overflow occurred. As I stood on
but a humiliating story. the hill-side, I heard a man shout, She's coming," and I saw
"Well, well," said the old cat, gravely shaking her gray pipe-line men running away from the tank for their lives. I
whiskers, "the butterfly would n't have been good for anything beard a rumbling sound inside the tank and did n't know what
if you had caught it. Now we must both go hungry; that's it meant, but a few seconds after, I saw fully five hundred bar-
what comes of neglect- rels of burning oil
ing the plain work be- shoot up from the
fore you and chasing tank and boil over the
off after something sides. The burning
that looks grander. oil floated down the
And when you hear creek for a mile, burn-
any more talk about ing a saw-mill, numer-
any mor tk--wells and tanks,
genius, just you re- ous oil-wellsandtanks,
member this: It's buildings, and every-
faithfulness, and not thing within reach of
brilliancy, that earns .- its devastating breath.
the most dinners in :When the flow bad
this world." partly subsided, it was
t' found that a second
twenty-five thousand
TI- barrel iron tank had
been set on fire by the
X-J(' overflow of burning
oil.
T the pretty book "I ventured down be-
tway hind the tank to get a
That your hand is better view from the
tearing; .- lower side. While
Let mamma see the sorry trying to avoid a pool
look of burning oil, I fell
Your baby face is wear- into a sort of quick-
ing. sand, and stuck fast.
It is not the book alone, in i My utmost endeavors
Your little hand is tear- were of no avail in
ing, o extricating myself. I
But your own heart's ba- yelled at the top of my
by peace, voice, but so great was
And its quiet feeling. the roar of the boiling
Go at once to mamma, tanks that my voice
then, sounded weak and far
She'll drive from off away. Suddenly I
thy cheek P i heard a cannon, and
The shadow that is lurk- saw a column of flame
ing there;- "'and smoke shoot up
Her voice will comfort and smoke shoot tak
pik -.-- fromm one of the tanks;
speak. the truth came upon
----- me, and I was stricken
senseless. The men
@k PA V 4QT9 were firing cannon balls through the first tank to draw off the
oil and prevent a second overflow.
ABORERS in the oil-wells are often exposed to dangers. "What a conviction came upon me! It was a matter of sec-
One of these oil-men, whose hair turned white during a bonds. I tried to shout, but the words would not come. With
night of terror, related his experience to a correspond- the strength of despair /I struggled to get free, but the quicksand
ent of the Philadelphia Times. He said there had held me with the grip of death. All at once I saw a little stream
been a heavy storm about midnight, and, as it was of burning oil running Mlowly down toward me. My time had
usual with the oil-country residents, be arose and looked come, I thought, and I must be burned to death by inches. The
out of the window to see if any tanks had been struck by light- stream of burning oil, now grown larger, was almost upon me,-
ning. A bright glare in the sky convinced him that a large then all was dhirk. When I came back to consciousness, I was
tank of oil was on fire a few miles distant, and he went back to lying in my own room yvith my 'friends around me. In follow-
sleep, determined to see the first overflow the next day. ing the supposed course of the overflowed oil, the men found and
You know that when a twenty-five thousand barrel iron tank rescued me just as the burning stream was about to reach me.
of oil has been on fire for twelve or fourteen hours, the burning After a long sickness I found my hair as white as you see it now."












r 52 UNSIpiDNE AT I IO IE.


noon. They spread their
S3- T W-I .. ---- dinner upon the grass,
i ... ..rnlE, flower-time, a llld no meal eaten at
Earth is new and fair;- hone was ever enjoyed
May-time, hay-time, half so much as this one

Nest-time, best time, -- -
After dinner, they all
Days have longer grown; -- --
Leaf-time, brief time, .- .. .. gathered wild flowers and
Make it all yourr own; I :' played till nearly sunset.
Berry-time and cherry-time, T .n thec swiftly bore
._i.- Then th 'swiftly e
Songs of bird and bee: h ome, bt that little
But, of all the gay times, -, TH i oti


In the closing year; i .-p for the summer (lay.
Sheaf-time, leaf-time,
Now will disappear; t _- i
Ice-time, nice time, -si -i" -o stdy od'-
For a merry lad;
Snow-time, blow-time, TI. -- Bible is so strict
.... .. .- :--z "- -' '- b ook w ite n ti t ,-- o al T HE Bg ible is so strict,
Earth is lone and sad; ro. l=r : c i s-i .
Yellow ones and mellow ones M and yooou"a.nt a gpay
Dropping from the tree; t a yoenfg man to a gay-
Rusty-coats and pippins: haired friend who was ad-
Apple-time for me. vising himin to study God's
"T".he te word if he would learn how to live, Therere par lenty of
JO books written now-a-days that are moral enough in their teach-
"ERE we are at last," cried a chorus of ing, and which do n't bind one down a"s the Bible does."
merry voices, as the train stopped at The old merchant turned to his desk and took out a couple of
Sthe little station of Elmwood, and a rulers, one iof whih was slightly bent. With each of these he
r troop of boys and girls, with their
Teacher, hurried from the cars, and,
S- carrying their well-packed dinner bas-
"C okLets, bmad their way across the fields -" -
to the beautiful lmn grove.
L- In all their lives, manl y of these chil-
dren had never been beyond the brick
walls of the great city, and for weeks they had been looking
forward to the summer vacation, when they were to spend a
day in the country.
"Follow me," said the teacher, and he led the way through a
lane where the tall trees shut out the sunlight. Soon they came
to a wide e.i. ....-. where the soft grass spread out like a rich
carpet to the edge of a little pond.
"Oh, is n't it beautiful cried the children ; and leaving their
baskets under a tree, they quickly scattered in all directions.
A fine, large swing was hanging from two of the tallest trees,
and some of the children rushed toward it. Harry Blake ,
reached it first, and was about to say, Now I'll have the first j
swing," when he remembered his teacher's lesson only the day ) let& ,-
before. It was about the Golden Rule," and quickly turning
to the little group that had eagerly followed him, Harry said, ..._..
Come on, boys, there'll be time enough for us all to swing.
Let's begin with the youngest first." "All right," was the an-
swer. and one of the boys turned to lift little Miiniic lee into the
swing. But the child shook her head, and drew close to the
side of her teacher, who had now come up and stood under Ihe ..
shade of a tree near by.
"Let me go," said her sister Mabel, I'm not afraid;" so she
climbed into the swing, and Harry pulled the rope. Why, it's ruled a line, and silently handed the ruled paper to his companion.
almost like being a bird," she said, "to fly up so high among Well," said the lad, what do you mean?"
the branches." One line is not straight and true, is it ? When you mark out
By the time they had all taken their turn at the swing, it was your path in life, do n't use a crooked ruler."
f) -I












r 52 UNSIpiDNE AT I IO IE.


noon. They spread their
S3- T W-I .. ---- dinner upon the grass,
i ... ..rnlE, flower-time, a llld no meal eaten at
Earth is new and fair;- hone was ever enjoyed
May-time, hay-time, half so much as this one

Nest-time, best time, -- -
After dinner, they all
Days have longer grown; -- --
Leaf-time, brief time, .- .. .. gathered wild flowers and
Make it all yourr own; I :' played till nearly sunset.
Berry-time and cherry-time, T .n thec swiftly bore
._i.- Then th 'swiftly e
Songs of bird and bee: h ome, bt that little
But, of all the gay times, -, TH i oti


In the closing year; i .-p for the summer (lay.
Sheaf-time, leaf-time,
Now will disappear; t _- i
Ice-time, nice time, -si -i" -o stdy od'-
For a merry lad;
Snow-time, blow-time, TI. -- Bible is so strict
.... .. .- :--z "- -' '- b ook w ite n ti t ,-- o al T HE Bg ible is so strict,
Earth is lone and sad; ro. l=r : c i s-i .
Yellow ones and mellow ones M and yooou"a.nt a gpay
Dropping from the tree; t a yoenfg man to a gay-
Rusty-coats and pippins: haired friend who was ad-
Apple-time for me. vising himin to study God's
"T".he te word if he would learn how to live, Therere par lenty of
JO books written now-a-days that are moral enough in their teach-
"ERE we are at last," cried a chorus of ing, and which do n't bind one down a"s the Bible does."
merry voices, as the train stopped at The old merchant turned to his desk and took out a couple of
Sthe little station of Elmwood, and a rulers, one iof whih was slightly bent. With each of these he
r troop of boys and girls, with their
Teacher, hurried from the cars, and,
S- carrying their well-packed dinner bas-
"C okLets, bmad their way across the fields -" -
to the beautiful lmn grove.
L- In all their lives, manl y of these chil-
dren had never been beyond the brick
walls of the great city, and for weeks they had been looking
forward to the summer vacation, when they were to spend a
day in the country.
"Follow me," said the teacher, and he led the way through a
lane where the tall trees shut out the sunlight. Soon they came
to a wide e.i. ....-. where the soft grass spread out like a rich
carpet to the edge of a little pond.
"Oh, is n't it beautiful cried the children ; and leaving their
baskets under a tree, they quickly scattered in all directions.
A fine, large swing was hanging from two of the tallest trees,
and some of the children rushed toward it. Harry Blake ,
reached it first, and was about to say, Now I'll have the first j
swing," when he remembered his teacher's lesson only the day ) let& ,-
before. It was about the Golden Rule," and quickly turning
to the little group that had eagerly followed him, Harry said, ..._..
Come on, boys, there'll be time enough for us all to swing.
Let's begin with the youngest first." "All right," was the an-
swer. and one of the boys turned to lift little Miiniic lee into the
swing. But the child shook her head, and drew close to the
side of her teacher, who had now come up and stood under Ihe ..
shade of a tree near by.
"Let me go," said her sister Mabel, I'm not afraid;" so she
climbed into the swing, and Harry pulled the rope. Why, it's ruled a line, and silently handed the ruled paper to his companion.
almost like being a bird," she said, "to fly up so high among Well," said the lad, what do you mean?"
the branches." One line is not straight and true, is it ? When you mark out
By the time they had all taken their turn at the swing, it was your path in life, do n't use a crooked ruler."
f) -I












r 52 UNSIpiDNE AT I IO IE.


noon. They spread their
S3- T W-I .. ---- dinner upon the grass,
i ... ..rnlE, flower-time, a llld no meal eaten at
Earth is new and fair;- hone was ever enjoyed
May-time, hay-time, half so much as this one

Nest-time, best time, -- -
After dinner, they all
Days have longer grown; -- --
Leaf-time, brief time, .- .. .. gathered wild flowers and
Make it all yourr own; I :' played till nearly sunset.
Berry-time and cherry-time, T .n thec swiftly bore
._i.- Then th 'swiftly e
Songs of bird and bee: h ome, bt that little
But, of all the gay times, -, TH i oti


In the closing year; i .-p for the summer (lay.
Sheaf-time, leaf-time,
Now will disappear; t _- i
Ice-time, nice time, -si -i" -o stdy od'-
For a merry lad;
Snow-time, blow-time, TI. -- Bible is so strict
.... .. .- :--z "- -' '- b ook w ite n ti t ,-- o al T HE Bg ible is so strict,
Earth is lone and sad; ro. l=r : c i s-i .
Yellow ones and mellow ones M and yooou"a.nt a gpay
Dropping from the tree; t a yoenfg man to a gay-
Rusty-coats and pippins: haired friend who was ad-
Apple-time for me. vising himin to study God's
"T".he te word if he would learn how to live, Therere par lenty of
JO books written now-a-days that are moral enough in their teach-
"ERE we are at last," cried a chorus of ing, and which do n't bind one down a"s the Bible does."
merry voices, as the train stopped at The old merchant turned to his desk and took out a couple of
Sthe little station of Elmwood, and a rulers, one iof whih was slightly bent. With each of these he
r troop of boys and girls, with their
Teacher, hurried from the cars, and,
S- carrying their well-packed dinner bas-
"C okLets, bmad their way across the fields -" -
to the beautiful lmn grove.
L- In all their lives, manl y of these chil-
dren had never been beyond the brick
walls of the great city, and for weeks they had been looking
forward to the summer vacation, when they were to spend a
day in the country.
"Follow me," said the teacher, and he led the way through a
lane where the tall trees shut out the sunlight. Soon they came
to a wide e.i. ....-. where the soft grass spread out like a rich
carpet to the edge of a little pond.
"Oh, is n't it beautiful cried the children ; and leaving their
baskets under a tree, they quickly scattered in all directions.
A fine, large swing was hanging from two of the tallest trees,
and some of the children rushed toward it. Harry Blake ,
reached it first, and was about to say, Now I'll have the first j
swing," when he remembered his teacher's lesson only the day ) let& ,-
before. It was about the Golden Rule," and quickly turning
to the little group that had eagerly followed him, Harry said, ..._..
Come on, boys, there'll be time enough for us all to swing.
Let's begin with the youngest first." "All right," was the an-
swer. and one of the boys turned to lift little Miiniic lee into the
swing. But the child shook her head, and drew close to the
side of her teacher, who had now come up and stood under Ihe ..
shade of a tree near by.
"Let me go," said her sister Mabel, I'm not afraid;" so she
climbed into the swing, and Harry pulled the rope. Why, it's ruled a line, and silently handed the ruled paper to his companion.
almost like being a bird," she said, "to fly up so high among Well," said the lad, what do you mean?"
the branches." One line is not straight and true, is it ? When you mark out
By the time they had all taken their turn at the swing, it was your path in life, do n't use a crooked ruler."
f) -I












SU mSImE. AT 1Pomm. 53

T T Then well may we wait with patience here, Why John, dear John, how you do go on !
TPi -YkiF & YY Nor weep o'er the churchyard sod; I'm afraid it will be as they say."
We shall find the lost, whom we hold so dear, No, no, little wife, I have found that strife
SCOUNTRY life is sweet In the glorious garden of God. In a lawyer's hand do n't pay.
In moderate cold and heat, "-- >--..e-.- -- He is picking a flaw to drive me to law-
+ To walk in the air how pleasant and fair! I have heard that he said he would ;
In every field of wheat, -T T ,jl F JF ". And you know, long ago, law wronged me so,
The fairest of flowers adorning the bowers, I vowed I never should;
And every meadow's brow; LD farmer Smith came home in a miff
So that I say, no courtier may From his field tie other day, So what can I do that I will not rue
compare hem w oe in gry, while his sweet little wife, the pride of his To the man across the way ?
Compare with them who clothe in gray,life, If that's what you want, I can help you haunt
And follow the useful plow. At her wheel was spinning away. at man with a spectre gray!

They rise with the morning lark, Thirty dollars will do to carry
And labor till almost dark, it through,
Then folding their sheep, they And then you have gained a
hasten to sleep, neighbor;
While every pleasant park It would cost you more to peep
Next morning is ringing with in the door
birds that are singing --to- Of a court, and much more
On each green tender bough. labor.
With what content and merri-
ment "Just use your good sense -lot's
Their days are spent whose build him a fence,
iinds are bent And shame such thoughts out
To follow the useful plow i of the fellow."
:o They built up his part, and sent
to his heart
mr l\Tar'6 ,Love's dart, where the good
JhVkJNY yjU,,r soil was mellow.

That very same night, by the
E planted the bare brown candle-light,
stems one day, They opened, with interest, a
When the autumn winds letter;
blew cold, Not a word was there, but three
And the dying leaves fell mourn- greenbacks fair
fully Said the man was growing
In their tarnished red and better.
gold.
And you wondered whether they T
lived at all,
Those stems so brown and *E F, I know there are stains
bare, -. on my carpet,
With never a leaf or a bud so The tracks of small, muddy
small, boots;
To tell us that life was there. And I see your fair tapestry

blessed the earth,
And June smiles warm and-- -,{,
bright, -And I know that my parlor is
Their glory of roses shall wake = littered
to birth --
Andglowin th summerlight-- With many old treasures and
And glow iii the summer light! toys
toys ;
So we lay them down in their lowly bed, And ever anon a gay little song While your own is in daintiest order,
The dear ones we cherished so, With the bnzz of her wheel kept time; Unharmied by the presence of boys.
And sight would tell us that they are dead, And the wrathful brow is clearing now, And I know that my room is invaded
And more we may not know. TTnder the cheerbfil ...... Quite boldly all hours of the day
While you sit in yours unmolested
But faith looks on to the joyful spring "Come, come, little Turk! put away your And dream e soft quiet away !
That she tells us shall yet be ours, work,
And the new life's glorious blossoming And listen to what I say; Now, I think I'm a neat little woman:
Into far eternal flowers. What can I do but a quarrel brew I like my house orderly, too;
With the man across tue way ? And I'm fond of all dainty belongings,
For the secret of life is God's to keep, Yet would not change places with you.
Not the wisest sage can tell "I have built my fence, but lie won't commence No keep your fair home with its order,
How it thrills through the fibres that seem to To lay a single rail; Its freedom from bother and noise,
sleep, His cattle get in, and the feed gets thin- And keep your own fanciful leisure,
And pours through each hidden cell. I am tempted to make a sale i But give me my four splendid boys.
.4












SU mSImE. AT 1Pomm. 53

T T Then well may we wait with patience here, Why John, dear John, how you do go on !
TPi -YkiF & YY Nor weep o'er the churchyard sod; I'm afraid it will be as they say."
We shall find the lost, whom we hold so dear, No, no, little wife, I have found that strife
SCOUNTRY life is sweet In the glorious garden of God. In a lawyer's hand do n't pay.
In moderate cold and heat, "-- >--..e-.- -- He is picking a flaw to drive me to law-
+ To walk in the air how pleasant and fair! I have heard that he said he would ;
In every field of wheat, -T T ,jl F JF ". And you know, long ago, law wronged me so,
The fairest of flowers adorning the bowers, I vowed I never should;
And every meadow's brow; LD farmer Smith came home in a miff
So that I say, no courtier may From his field tie other day, So what can I do that I will not rue
compare hem w oe in gry, while his sweet little wife, the pride of his To the man across the way ?
Compare with them who clothe in gray,life, If that's what you want, I can help you haunt
And follow the useful plow. At her wheel was spinning away. at man with a spectre gray!

They rise with the morning lark, Thirty dollars will do to carry
And labor till almost dark, it through,
Then folding their sheep, they And then you have gained a
hasten to sleep, neighbor;
While every pleasant park It would cost you more to peep
Next morning is ringing with in the door
birds that are singing --to- Of a court, and much more
On each green tender bough. labor.
With what content and merri-
ment "Just use your good sense -lot's
Their days are spent whose build him a fence,
iinds are bent And shame such thoughts out
To follow the useful plow i of the fellow."
:o They built up his part, and sent
to his heart
mr l\Tar'6 ,Love's dart, where the good
JhVkJNY yjU,,r soil was mellow.

That very same night, by the
E planted the bare brown candle-light,
stems one day, They opened, with interest, a
When the autumn winds letter;
blew cold, Not a word was there, but three
And the dying leaves fell mourn- greenbacks fair
fully Said the man was growing
In their tarnished red and better.
gold.
And you wondered whether they T
lived at all,
Those stems so brown and *E F, I know there are stains
bare, -. on my carpet,
With never a leaf or a bud so The tracks of small, muddy
small, boots;
To tell us that life was there. And I see your fair tapestry

blessed the earth,
And June smiles warm and-- -,{,
bright, -And I know that my parlor is
Their glory of roses shall wake = littered
to birth --
Andglowin th summerlight-- With many old treasures and
And glow iii the summer light! toys
toys ;
So we lay them down in their lowly bed, And ever anon a gay little song While your own is in daintiest order,
The dear ones we cherished so, With the bnzz of her wheel kept time; Unharmied by the presence of boys.
And sight would tell us that they are dead, And the wrathful brow is clearing now, And I know that my room is invaded
And more we may not know. TTnder the cheerbfil ...... Quite boldly all hours of the day
While you sit in yours unmolested
But faith looks on to the joyful spring "Come, come, little Turk! put away your And dream e soft quiet away !
That she tells us shall yet be ours, work,
And the new life's glorious blossoming And listen to what I say; Now, I think I'm a neat little woman:
Into far eternal flowers. What can I do but a quarrel brew I like my house orderly, too;
With the man across tue way ? And I'm fond of all dainty belongings,
For the secret of life is God's to keep, Yet would not change places with you.
Not the wisest sage can tell "I have built my fence, but lie won't commence No keep your fair home with its order,
How it thrills through the fibres that seem to To lay a single rail; Its freedom from bother and noise,
sleep, His cattle get in, and the feed gets thin- And keep your own fanciful leisure,
And pours through each hidden cell. I am tempted to make a sale i But give me my four splendid boys.
.4












SU mSImE. AT 1Pomm. 53

T T Then well may we wait with patience here, Why John, dear John, how you do go on !
TPi -YkiF & YY Nor weep o'er the churchyard sod; I'm afraid it will be as they say."
We shall find the lost, whom we hold so dear, No, no, little wife, I have found that strife
SCOUNTRY life is sweet In the glorious garden of God. In a lawyer's hand do n't pay.
In moderate cold and heat, "-- >--..e-.- -- He is picking a flaw to drive me to law-
+ To walk in the air how pleasant and fair! I have heard that he said he would ;
In every field of wheat, -T T ,jl F JF ". And you know, long ago, law wronged me so,
The fairest of flowers adorning the bowers, I vowed I never should;
And every meadow's brow; LD farmer Smith came home in a miff
So that I say, no courtier may From his field tie other day, So what can I do that I will not rue
compare hem w oe in gry, while his sweet little wife, the pride of his To the man across the way ?
Compare with them who clothe in gray,life, If that's what you want, I can help you haunt
And follow the useful plow. At her wheel was spinning away. at man with a spectre gray!

They rise with the morning lark, Thirty dollars will do to carry
And labor till almost dark, it through,
Then folding their sheep, they And then you have gained a
hasten to sleep, neighbor;
While every pleasant park It would cost you more to peep
Next morning is ringing with in the door
birds that are singing --to- Of a court, and much more
On each green tender bough. labor.
With what content and merri-
ment "Just use your good sense -lot's
Their days are spent whose build him a fence,
iinds are bent And shame such thoughts out
To follow the useful plow i of the fellow."
:o They built up his part, and sent
to his heart
mr l\Tar'6 ,Love's dart, where the good
JhVkJNY yjU,,r soil was mellow.

That very same night, by the
E planted the bare brown candle-light,
stems one day, They opened, with interest, a
When the autumn winds letter;
blew cold, Not a word was there, but three
And the dying leaves fell mourn- greenbacks fair
fully Said the man was growing
In their tarnished red and better.
gold.
And you wondered whether they T
lived at all,
Those stems so brown and *E F, I know there are stains
bare, -. on my carpet,
With never a leaf or a bud so The tracks of small, muddy
small, boots;
To tell us that life was there. And I see your fair tapestry

blessed the earth,
And June smiles warm and-- -,{,
bright, -And I know that my parlor is
Their glory of roses shall wake = littered
to birth --
Andglowin th summerlight-- With many old treasures and
And glow iii the summer light! toys
toys ;
So we lay them down in their lowly bed, And ever anon a gay little song While your own is in daintiest order,
The dear ones we cherished so, With the bnzz of her wheel kept time; Unharmied by the presence of boys.
And sight would tell us that they are dead, And the wrathful brow is clearing now, And I know that my room is invaded
And more we may not know. TTnder the cheerbfil ...... Quite boldly all hours of the day
While you sit in yours unmolested
But faith looks on to the joyful spring "Come, come, little Turk! put away your And dream e soft quiet away !
That she tells us shall yet be ours, work,
And the new life's glorious blossoming And listen to what I say; Now, I think I'm a neat little woman:
Into far eternal flowers. What can I do but a quarrel brew I like my house orderly, too;
With the man across tue way ? And I'm fond of all dainty belongings,
For the secret of life is God's to keep, Yet would not change places with you.
Not the wisest sage can tell "I have built my fence, but lie won't commence No keep your fair home with its order,
How it thrills through the fibres that seem to To lay a single rail; Its freedom from bother and noise,
sleep, His cattle get in, and the feed gets thin- And keep your own fanciful leisure,
And pours through each hidden cell. I am tempted to make a sale i But give me my four splendid boys.
.4












SU mSImE. AT 1Pomm. 53

T T Then well may we wait with patience here, Why John, dear John, how you do go on !
TPi -YkiF & YY Nor weep o'er the churchyard sod; I'm afraid it will be as they say."
We shall find the lost, whom we hold so dear, No, no, little wife, I have found that strife
SCOUNTRY life is sweet In the glorious garden of God. In a lawyer's hand do n't pay.
In moderate cold and heat, "-- >--..e-.- -- He is picking a flaw to drive me to law-
+ To walk in the air how pleasant and fair! I have heard that he said he would ;
In every field of wheat, -T T ,jl F JF ". And you know, long ago, law wronged me so,
The fairest of flowers adorning the bowers, I vowed I never should;
And every meadow's brow; LD farmer Smith came home in a miff
So that I say, no courtier may From his field tie other day, So what can I do that I will not rue
compare hem w oe in gry, while his sweet little wife, the pride of his To the man across the way ?
Compare with them who clothe in gray,life, If that's what you want, I can help you haunt
And follow the useful plow. At her wheel was spinning away. at man with a spectre gray!

They rise with the morning lark, Thirty dollars will do to carry
And labor till almost dark, it through,
Then folding their sheep, they And then you have gained a
hasten to sleep, neighbor;
While every pleasant park It would cost you more to peep
Next morning is ringing with in the door
birds that are singing --to- Of a court, and much more
On each green tender bough. labor.
With what content and merri-
ment "Just use your good sense -lot's
Their days are spent whose build him a fence,
iinds are bent And shame such thoughts out
To follow the useful plow i of the fellow."
:o They built up his part, and sent
to his heart
mr l\Tar'6 ,Love's dart, where the good
JhVkJNY yjU,,r soil was mellow.

That very same night, by the
E planted the bare brown candle-light,
stems one day, They opened, with interest, a
When the autumn winds letter;
blew cold, Not a word was there, but three
And the dying leaves fell mourn- greenbacks fair
fully Said the man was growing
In their tarnished red and better.
gold.
And you wondered whether they T
lived at all,
Those stems so brown and *E F, I know there are stains
bare, -. on my carpet,
With never a leaf or a bud so The tracks of small, muddy
small, boots;
To tell us that life was there. And I see your fair tapestry

blessed the earth,
And June smiles warm and-- -,{,
bright, -And I know that my parlor is
Their glory of roses shall wake = littered
to birth --
Andglowin th summerlight-- With many old treasures and
And glow iii the summer light! toys
toys ;
So we lay them down in their lowly bed, And ever anon a gay little song While your own is in daintiest order,
The dear ones we cherished so, With the bnzz of her wheel kept time; Unharmied by the presence of boys.
And sight would tell us that they are dead, And the wrathful brow is clearing now, And I know that my room is invaded
And more we may not know. TTnder the cheerbfil ...... Quite boldly all hours of the day
While you sit in yours unmolested
But faith looks on to the joyful spring "Come, come, little Turk! put away your And dream e soft quiet away !
That she tells us shall yet be ours, work,
And the new life's glorious blossoming And listen to what I say; Now, I think I'm a neat little woman:
Into far eternal flowers. What can I do but a quarrel brew I like my house orderly, too;
With the man across tue way ? And I'm fond of all dainty belongings,
For the secret of life is God's to keep, Yet would not change places with you.
Not the wisest sage can tell "I have built my fence, but lie won't commence No keep your fair home with its order,
How it thrills through the fibres that seem to To lay a single rail; Its freedom from bother and noise,
sleep, His cattle get in, and the feed gets thin- And keep your own fanciful leisure,
And pours through each hidden cell. I am tempted to make a sale i But give me my four splendid boys.
.4












54 SUNSe rIN AT HoM. .

T lar and beautiful ap-
Spearanc is present-
ed. TI,.. f.w,, C X-,.
l _. IOLET started on her way to school, one column in the con-
"" ,Tmorning, with her books in hand, and ter of the flower,
Rover by her side. Now this Ihithfill dog with its surmount-
I. always accompanied his little mistress as far ing anther and the
as the door of the school-room to see that projecting glands of
Dno danger should befall her. pollen-masses, proe-
SWhile on her way, she met some of her sent a striking re-
little school-mates, who were going to have semblanceto a dove. 1
a holiday, and wished her to go to the pond with them to gather Hence the name,
water-lilies. They told her that her mother would never know El _Eslirito Santo--
but that she had been to school all the forenoon, and that the the Holy Spirit-
teacher would think she was kept at home. w as reverentially
With some hesitation she concluded to enjoy the forenoon applied to it by the
with them. After a few moments hasty 1ri.lKi. they reached native residents of
the desired spot, and soon had some of the fragrant lilies in their Panama, where the
possession. species of orchids is
At length, Violet discovered one much more beautiful than found.
the rest, some distance in the water, which she could reach if The form of a
she could but get on to that great rock only three or four feet dove assumed by
from the shore. But how was she to reach the rock? One plan the parts of this
after another flashed through her mind until she decided to flower, as described -
place a board from the shore to the stone. This plan proved above, is remarka-
successful, but just as her hand grasped her beautiful prize her bly true to nature.
feet slipped, and down she went into the water. IHer mates The breast, the ex-
were all very much frightened, but her faithful Rover immedi- tended wings, the head and beak, and even two purple dots for
ately sprang in and brought the dripping child to the shore. In the eyes, are all distinctly shown, and almost as true to nature
this sad plight, as the art of man can depict them.
M- u she was obliged It has been found very difficult to cultivate this plant, artifi-
to return home cially, away from its native region, which is comprised within
andtell hermoth- the central portion of the torrid zone of the Western Continent.
-- er all about how Some three or four years since, as Mr. Shuman, the chief florist
it happened. Sh,, at Woodward's Gardens, was crossing the Isthmus of Panama,
must then have he took the opportunity to make a collection of some of the
wished she had most characteristic tropical plants, among which was a speci-
gone to school as men of the Espirito Santo, which still occupies the portion of
SLI her mother de- the native wood upon which it was found.
S sired. If my Both the flowers and leaves, with the distinctive dove repre-
-_ little readers are sentation within the center of one of the flowers is shown in the
.-,,.., ,tempted to be led above picture, which was engraved from a photograph of the
I, "1Y, astray in this flower taken of the same while at the height of its show.
manner, remem- Five leaves spring from each bulb of the plant. These leaves
I b]oer the fate of are from twenty to thirty inches in length, by five or six inches
"little Violet and in breadth--lanceolate in form. The stem of the flower grows
"do not yield. from three to four feet in height, bearing upon its summit a spike
"of globose, fleshy, yellowish white flowers, yielding a very pe-
culiar and delicate perfume.
_PERFOR good A carefully prepared representation of the flower was made
.;.. -F 'deeds, speak kind in wax at the time it was in blossom, which may be seen under
words, bestow a glass receiver at the left hand under the dome of the crystal
p-leasant smiles, palace of the gardens. In its native clime, this plant blooms
--- and you will re- just at the commencement of the rainy season. The flowers
ceive the same hold on about one month.
in return. Sometimes there is a peculiar sensibility connected with the
flowers of this species of plant, which makes it a most effective
-*-- insect trap, so hinged that it immediately closes and holds fast
~ T T FPT y fany insect which mhay alight upon it, when its size is sufficient
to inclose such intruders.
IN Mr. Woodward's gardens, at San Francisco, Cal., is a most ---- C g -*-
Swoliderflil flower. As you see in the picture, it is called "Holy A GooD name will wear out, a bad one may be turned, a nick-
Ghost Flower." When the flower is fully opened, a most singu- name lasts forever.
p q












54 SUNSe rIN AT HoM. .

T lar and beautiful ap-
Spearanc is present-
ed. TI,.. f.w,, C X-,.
l _. IOLET started on her way to school, one column in the con-
"" ,Tmorning, with her books in hand, and ter of the flower,
Rover by her side. Now this Ihithfill dog with its surmount-
I. always accompanied his little mistress as far ing anther and the
as the door of the school-room to see that projecting glands of
Dno danger should befall her. pollen-masses, proe-
SWhile on her way, she met some of her sent a striking re-
little school-mates, who were going to have semblanceto a dove. 1
a holiday, and wished her to go to the pond with them to gather Hence the name,
water-lilies. They told her that her mother would never know El _Eslirito Santo--
but that she had been to school all the forenoon, and that the the Holy Spirit-
teacher would think she was kept at home. w as reverentially
With some hesitation she concluded to enjoy the forenoon applied to it by the
with them. After a few moments hasty 1ri.lKi. they reached native residents of
the desired spot, and soon had some of the fragrant lilies in their Panama, where the
possession. species of orchids is
At length, Violet discovered one much more beautiful than found.
the rest, some distance in the water, which she could reach if The form of a
she could but get on to that great rock only three or four feet dove assumed by
from the shore. But how was she to reach the rock? One plan the parts of this
after another flashed through her mind until she decided to flower, as described -
place a board from the shore to the stone. This plan proved above, is remarka-
successful, but just as her hand grasped her beautiful prize her bly true to nature.
feet slipped, and down she went into the water. IHer mates The breast, the ex-
were all very much frightened, but her faithful Rover immedi- tended wings, the head and beak, and even two purple dots for
ately sprang in and brought the dripping child to the shore. In the eyes, are all distinctly shown, and almost as true to nature
this sad plight, as the art of man can depict them.
M- u she was obliged It has been found very difficult to cultivate this plant, artifi-
to return home cially, away from its native region, which is comprised within
andtell hermoth- the central portion of the torrid zone of the Western Continent.
-- er all about how Some three or four years since, as Mr. Shuman, the chief florist
it happened. Sh,, at Woodward's Gardens, was crossing the Isthmus of Panama,
must then have he took the opportunity to make a collection of some of the
wished she had most characteristic tropical plants, among which was a speci-
gone to school as men of the Espirito Santo, which still occupies the portion of
SLI her mother de- the native wood upon which it was found.
S sired. If my Both the flowers and leaves, with the distinctive dove repre-
-_ little readers are sentation within the center of one of the flowers is shown in the
.-,,.., ,tempted to be led above picture, which was engraved from a photograph of the
I, "1Y, astray in this flower taken of the same while at the height of its show.
manner, remem- Five leaves spring from each bulb of the plant. These leaves
I b]oer the fate of are from twenty to thirty inches in length, by five or six inches
"little Violet and in breadth--lanceolate in form. The stem of the flower grows
"do not yield. from three to four feet in height, bearing upon its summit a spike
"of globose, fleshy, yellowish white flowers, yielding a very pe-
culiar and delicate perfume.
_PERFOR good A carefully prepared representation of the flower was made
.;.. -F 'deeds, speak kind in wax at the time it was in blossom, which may be seen under
words, bestow a glass receiver at the left hand under the dome of the crystal
p-leasant smiles, palace of the gardens. In its native clime, this plant blooms
--- and you will re- just at the commencement of the rainy season. The flowers
ceive the same hold on about one month.
in return. Sometimes there is a peculiar sensibility connected with the
flowers of this species of plant, which makes it a most effective
-*-- insect trap, so hinged that it immediately closes and holds fast
~ T T FPT y fany insect which mhay alight upon it, when its size is sufficient
to inclose such intruders.
IN Mr. Woodward's gardens, at San Francisco, Cal., is a most ---- C g -*-
Swoliderflil flower. As you see in the picture, it is called "Holy A GooD name will wear out, a bad one may be turned, a nick-
Ghost Flower." When the flower is fully opened, a most singu- name lasts forever.
p q















these marked by a few longitudinal, dark red spots. And from
M P94 F -I"-J-aJ" the middle of'the rump spring pair of naked shafts, consider-
ably exceeding in length even I he .... loose plumes of the side.
S flowers among the vegetable kingdom are seemingly This bird is a native of the Molucca Islands, and the islands
sent to beautify the world, so birds have their place around New Guinea, particularly in the Aroo. The country
among living ani-
mals, and seem cre-
ated for the display of
beauty. Indeed, they rival
the flowers in variety and
brilliancy of color, especially
our tropical birds. Then,
too, the grace of their d
movements and their sweet
songs give an added and
indescribable charm.
Among the' most brilliant -
memlbers of the feathered -
tribe, are those called ]Birds_ --
of Paradise. The natives
of the Molucca Islands give
them the name of God's .
Birds," as being superior to --
all others he has m-lade. Not V
even thb humming-birds -
themselves," says one, -- -C-
sent such an inexhaustible h- --- --.
-- == N r---Z:- *- -=_;- -- .'"r
treasury of form and color ---
as is found among the comn- _- -- -
paratively few species of the -
Birds of Paradise."
The Great Emerald Para- A .
dise Bird is described an a -
most elegant bird. F.rom
the tipl of the bill to tfile ii I
of the long side feathers is-
about two feet, but to the
end oft the real tail abo ut\
twelve inches ; the size of TI
the bird being that of the
thrush. The bill is slightly
bent, and of a greenish
color; the base surrounded, I
for the distance of half an
inch, with close-set, velvet-
like, black plumes, with a
varying lastor of golden '
green. The head, together
with the back part of the ---
neck, is a pale gold color,
the throat and fore part of
the neck, of the richest
changeable gold-green. The 7
whole remainder of the
plumage on the body and
the tail is of a fine deep
chestnut, except on the
breast, which is a deep pur-
plish color.
From the upper part of each side of the body, beneath the where they breed is visited with tempestuous seasons, but these
wings, springs an abundance of long, loose, broad floating plumes birds are seldom seen at such I times; and it is supposed that they
of the most delicate texture and appearance, in some specimens then emigrate to countries where their food is to be found in great
of a bright, deep yellow, in others of a paler hue, but most of abundance; for, like swallows, they have their" appointed times."













5 6 S m S H. A T H o M E .





The song was very soft and low, but sweet as it could be.
And all the people passing by, looked up to see the bird
That made the sweetest melody that ever they had heard.

But all the bright eyes looked in vain; for birdie was so small, --
And with a modest, dark-brown coat, he made no show at all.
"Why, papa," little Effie said, "where can this birdie be
If I could sing a song like that, I'd sit where folks could see." -

I hope my little girl will learn a lesson from that bird,
And try to do what good she can, not to be seen or heard.
This birdie is content to, sit, unnoticed by the way, 7,-
And sweetly sing his Maker's praise from dawn to close of day.
So live, my child, all through y'our life, that, be it short or livng, br
Though others may forget your looks, they'll not forget your song."



himn out of the pit, and sell him to a band of Ishnmaclito mer-
OSEPTI was one of a family of thirteen children, twelve chants. Joseph is now carried down to Egypt, and sold as a
Sons and one daughter. Ho, as well as his brethren, was slave to Potiphar, a chief officer of the king.
Sa shepherd. tut the angel of' the Lord taught Joseph Soon, because of his integrity to the law of God, Joseph is un-
S'! in dreams. These he innocently related t)o his brethren. justly thr own into prison. But even here the Lord is with
In the engraving the artist has given a beautiftil illustra- him, and Joseph is given a position of some importance. After
tion of Joseph's dreams. a tine the Lord uses him to interpret the two dreanis of' the
While pursuing their vocation as shepherds, his breth- chief butler and the chief baker ; and eventually hie is brought
ren sometimes wandered quite a distance from home. Jacob, in before Pharaoh to interpret two singular dreams that dis-
with the solicitude of a true father, sends Joseph to see if' they turb him. Joseph explains to Pharaoh that there will be seven
are all well. When they behold him, even afar off, they conspire years of remarkable plenty, followed by seven years of severe
famine. Pharaoh now gladly
takes Joseph f'iom prison, and
"- in makes hint grand vizier of all
Egt. -Durit Iuirg the seven years
-otf plenty, Joseph lays up vast
__-- '_-.stores of food throughout Egypt,
'-- ... ..- .- for the coining famine.
----- -I".11 the years of' fh nine lie sur-
S"_rouling nations come to Egypt
"_____tlopInurc"ehlase fii)odl. As the dlread-
____--_-_-_ fiul scarcity reaclies into Caanaan,
even the patriarch Jacob and his
s--- are in danger of starvation,
Ss the ten sons of Jacob also go
down to Egypt to buy food.
Andthey ''cam and bowed down
themselves before Joseph with
t -- their faces to the earth." Jo-
-t seph knows his brethren, and re-
members the dreams which he
-- dreamed about them.
After making himself' known
to his brethren, Joseph sends to
S.... Canaan for his father and the
.- .whole household; "for," said he,
"God sent me before you, to
_-preserve you a posterity in the
earth, and to save your lives by
a great deliverance."
against him to slay him. But Reuben proposes to cast him into After Jacob and his sons came to Egypt, Joseph gave his fh-
a pit., hoping that lie may be able to deliver him to his father. their a possession in the land of Raneses; and Joseph nourished
While Reuben is absent, however, his brethren, having re- his fihther and his brethren, and all his father's household, with
51' lented at the thought of letting Joseph perish by starvation, lift bread, according to their families."

I V -













5 6 S m S H. A T H o M E .





The song was very soft and low, but sweet as it could be.
And all the people passing by, looked up to see the bird
That made the sweetest melody that ever they had heard.

But all the bright eyes looked in vain; for birdie was so small, --
And with a modest, dark-brown coat, he made no show at all.
"Why, papa," little Effie said, "where can this birdie be
If I could sing a song like that, I'd sit where folks could see." -

I hope my little girl will learn a lesson from that bird,
And try to do what good she can, not to be seen or heard.
This birdie is content to, sit, unnoticed by the way, 7,-
And sweetly sing his Maker's praise from dawn to close of day.
So live, my child, all through y'our life, that, be it short or livng, br
Though others may forget your looks, they'll not forget your song."



himn out of the pit, and sell him to a band of Ishnmaclito mer-
OSEPTI was one of a family of thirteen children, twelve chants. Joseph is now carried down to Egypt, and sold as a
Sons and one daughter. Ho, as well as his brethren, was slave to Potiphar, a chief officer of the king.
Sa shepherd. tut the angel of' the Lord taught Joseph Soon, because of his integrity to the law of God, Joseph is un-
S'! in dreams. These he innocently related t)o his brethren. justly thr own into prison. But even here the Lord is with
In the engraving the artist has given a beautiftil illustra- him, and Joseph is given a position of some importance. After
tion of Joseph's dreams. a tine the Lord uses him to interpret the two dreanis of' the
While pursuing their vocation as shepherds, his breth- chief butler and the chief baker ; and eventually hie is brought
ren sometimes wandered quite a distance from home. Jacob, in before Pharaoh to interpret two singular dreams that dis-
with the solicitude of a true father, sends Joseph to see if' they turb him. Joseph explains to Pharaoh that there will be seven
are all well. When they behold him, even afar off, they conspire years of remarkable plenty, followed by seven years of severe
famine. Pharaoh now gladly
takes Joseph f'iom prison, and
"- in makes hint grand vizier of all
Egt. -Durit Iuirg the seven years
-otf plenty, Joseph lays up vast
__-- '_-.stores of food throughout Egypt,
'-- ... ..- .- for the coining famine.
----- -I".11 the years of' fh nine lie sur-
S"_rouling nations come to Egypt
"_____tlopInurc"ehlase fii)odl. As the dlread-
____--_-_-_ fiul scarcity reaclies into Caanaan,
even the patriarch Jacob and his
s--- are in danger of starvation,
Ss the ten sons of Jacob also go
down to Egypt to buy food.
Andthey ''cam and bowed down
themselves before Joseph with
t -- their faces to the earth." Jo-
-t seph knows his brethren, and re-
members the dreams which he
-- dreamed about them.
After making himself' known
to his brethren, Joseph sends to
S.... Canaan for his father and the
.- .whole household; "for," said he,
"God sent me before you, to
_-preserve you a posterity in the
earth, and to save your lives by
a great deliverance."
against him to slay him. But Reuben proposes to cast him into After Jacob and his sons came to Egypt, Joseph gave his fh-
a pit., hoping that lie may be able to deliver him to his father. their a possession in the land of Raneses; and Joseph nourished
While Reuben is absent, however, his brethren, having re- his fihther and his brethren, and all his father's household, with
51' lented at the thought of letting Joseph perish by starvation, lift bread, according to their families."

I V -











SutsFmi TT HA OM. 57 O

him, saying, "The spirit of Elijah doth rest upon Elisha."
T J PT ?f;T ^ pP. While at Jericho, the people of the place complained to him
because the waters of the spring which supplied their city were
F the many good men and prophets whom God sent to bitter, and made the land around barren. And he went out, and
warn and instruct his ancient people, none has a more cast salt into the spring, and said, "Thus saith the Lord, I have
interesting history than the prophet Elisha. We first healed these waters, and there shall not be from thence any more
learn of him at his home, Abel-mololah, a little town sit- death or barren land." And so it has proved. The city of Jer-
uated in the valley of Jezrcel, a few miles west of the icho has gone to ruin, but near the old site is a pure, gushing
River Jordan. Here he was ploughing in the field with spring of water, which travelers speak of as peculiarly sweet and
twelve yoke of oxen, when Elijah, who was at that time a great refreshing. And as if ever to keep in memory the miracle, it is
prophet in Israel, passed along, and casting his mantle upon called by the natives, "Elisha's Fountain." All around it the
Elisha, went on his way. Now the Lord had told Elijah of this land is very fertile, and it is altogether a very pleasant place, bo-
man, and bade him call him to be prophet of Israel in his stead, ing shaded by palms, fig-trees, pomegranates, and other trees.
for Elijah was then an And as Elisha went
old man. Elisha seemed on his way to Bethel, he
to understand what Eli- ---- must travel by a very
jah wanted, and after --' rough and lonely road.
bidding his family fare- But finally he came near
well, he followed after -- the city, and as he was
him. For some years traveling quietly along,
after this he went about probably thinking of the
with Elijah, both miin- wonderful things lie hbad
istering unto him" and to. --just witnessed, a group
learning of him invalua- of children came out of
ble lessons and truths, the town, and mocking
calculated to fit him or him, began to cry, Go
the high place of trust ". up, thou bald head; go
wlhiel he was soon to till. up, thou bald head."
At last Elijah's earthly And Elisha looked back
work was done, but in- ps upon them and cursed
stead of his being called -- them in the name of the
to meet death as other Lord. And there came
men do, the Lord saw fit I ', I: two bears out of the
to take himu to himself --- woods and devoured for-
alive. Elisha wen w n with -l' ty-two of them. This
Eljah, stopping at vari- -- seems a very hard fte
ous lces o the A for these thoughtless
Outs places on the way, 5 ._--..- .,;,I "'
till they came to the Jor- children to meet ; but
n. nd Elih too at this time many of the
aii had lah,. people of Israel were
his mantle and smote the forsaking the God of
waters of the river, and .their, fL thers, and wor-
they two passed over on shipping idols and the
dry land. And when A-" strange gods of the hea-
they had gone over, Eli- then. This destruction
jah made known to Eli- . of the children was un-
3ha that he was to bcr w
shia that he was to be doubtedly meant to
taken away from him, teach their parents and
and told him to ask what friends that there was
he should first do for him. a God in heaven, and
And Elisha said, "I pray thee, lot a double portion of thy spirit that he, his works, and his servants, must be regarded with re-
be upon me." And the prophet replied, Thou hast asked a spect. It should also admonish children and young people of all
hard thing of me, nevertheless, if thou see me when I am taken times to treat the aged with the kindness and respect due to
from thee, it shall be so unto thee." "And it came to pass as them. And especially should the servants of God, his honored
they still went on, and talked, that, behold, there appeared a messengers to man, be reverenced, not only because of their age,
chariot of fire and horses of fire, and parted them both asunder, but because God has chosen them to do a great and holy work
and Elijah went up in a whirlwind into heaven." And Elisha saw on the earth.
it, and he cried, "My father, my father, the chariot of Israel and We have spoken of only a few of the interesting events in the
the horsemen thereof." And he took up the mantle of Elijah life of this good prophet. During his long ministry he acted an
which had fidlen from him when he went up, and going back important part in the public affairs of Israel, and many wonder-
to the River Jordan, smote the waters, and they again opened for ful miracles were wrought at his word. They are mostly related
him to pass through. As he came to Jericho, the sons of the in the first nine chapters of 2 Kings. He died lamented by King
prophets came out to meet him and bowed themselves before Joash and all the people.
L :












58S U vH Ni, AT' IOMK.


length of the wall, which consequently inclosed a space of 225
TK fE QF P5PY ]]-' square miles. The wall was an immense structure, 87 feet thick,
and 350 foot high.
'N the banks of the celebrated river Euphrates, the em- The material for the wall was dug from the ground just out-
pire of the world began. Nimrod, the great-grandson side the line of the wall itself: This clay was formed into im-
o' )f Noah, founded the first kingdom that arose this side monso blocks, or bricks, which were cemented together with
I ,he flood. In Gen. 10 : 10, we read that the begin- bitumen, a gluey substance found in the earth in some parts of
ning of his kingdom was Babel, and Erech, and Accad, that country, and which soon became much harder than the
and Calneh, in the land of -! ...... '." This Babel was mortar used in brick and stone buildings at the present day.
the Babylon of ancient history and renown. From this, it will be seen that there was around the city a ditch,
The Assyrian empire, thus established by Nimrod, ruled Asia or moat, of equal cubic ,. I, ; v with the wall itself. This was
for about 1300 years. In the year 747 before Christ, it assumed an additional defense to the city against the attacks of' an
a new form, when Belesis, called in the Bible Baladan, erected enemy.
on its ruins the Babylonian, or Chaldean empire. This king- The space within the walls was divided into 676 squares, each
dom also had its seat at Babylon, and from this point rose rap- two miles and a quarter in circumference, by 50 streets, 25 each
idly in extent and
power. It reached
the summit of its
glory under Nebu- ---- -_
chadnezzar, about -
whom we read in the
book of :Daniel. Ile _
added to the king-
dom the provinces of
Asia Minor, Plihcni---
cia, Egypt, Syria, and
Palestine. It em-
braced, with those
additions, all that
portion of the worhl d
that hadl then become-
,i...... 11 inhabited -
to be of any impr-
tanlce or lower, an(d """-"-
constituted the first 5. N 4 .
universal kingdom. I ,- I
Babylon, the capi- r0, T93' -
tal and metropolis of n" I H-
this kingdom, had
"been so enlarged, en- "" .....
riched, and adorned
by these powerful
kings that the Bible
itself calls it "'the glo-
ry of kingdoms, the
beauty of the ('h .!-
dees' excellence."
Isa. 13 :19. It was
situated in the gar-
dei of the East. The I
air was pure, the cli-
mate mild, and the
soil of all that region
most rich and produc-
tive. This all con-
tributed to its rapid ..
growth. The city
was laid out in a per-
fect square, 15 miles
on each side, or 60
miles in circumfor-
ence. This was the













SUmSFIINM AT HOME. 59


way, crossing each other at right angles. These streets were into the heart of Cyrus to accomplish the work by stratagem.
each 150 feet wide and 15 miles in length. Besides these, there The Babylonians held a yearly feast to celebrate their victo-
was a street running around the entire city just inside the wall, ries over their enemies, especially their conquest of Judea.
200 feet wide. All these together made 810 miles of streets. In these feasts they gave themselves up to all sorts of excesses,
Through the center of the city, from north to south, passed drunkenness, and revelry. Cyrus learned the night upon which
the river Euphrates. On either bank, through the entire length this feast was to be held, and determined to make his attack
of the city, was built a large quay, and a wall as thick, though upon the city in that night, as he supposed the Babylonians
not as high, as the outer wall. On each side of the city were would then be entirely off their guard. So he dug an immense
25 gates of solid brass, opposite each of the 25 streets that on- trench around one side of the city, from the river above to the
tered lhe city on every side. In the river walls were 50 more river below, to form a new channel for the water. And when
gates through which the 25 streets that crossed the river passed the fatal night arrived, he turned the river into this new chan-
on il her bank. Thus Babylon had 150 gates of brass. nel. At the same time, he drew off what water he could into an
There stood the temple of Bolus, three miles in circumference. immense artificial lake above the city. By these means, he so
Its central lower, rising up higher than the pyramids of reduced the water in that part of I lie river which ran through
Egypi, is supposed to have been the original tower of Babel, the city, that men could wade through it in every part. Moan-
built soon after the flood. The immense building in the center while, he bad stationed a company of picked soldiers at the
of the picture is designed to represent this temple. point where the river entered the city above, and where it came
Just this side the temple of Belus is seen another largo struct- out below, giving them orders that when they found the water
ure. This was one of the royal palaces, three and a half miles low enough to wade in, they should pass in .through the channel
in circumference. There was another one, eight miles in cir- of the river under the wall, into the city, and make their way
euinference, at the other end of the bridge, across the river, not immediately to the palace of the king, seven miles and a half
shown in the picture. And there was a subterranean passage away, where they were to meet, and overpower the king's guard,
under the river, connecting these two palaces together. and slay the king.
The hanging gardens constituted another wonder of this The soldiers entered in as commanded. They found what
royal city. Immuense structures containing vast quantities of Cyrus supposed they would find,-the city given up to lawless
earth, resting on arches, and rising tier on tier, they equaled in confusion, every man intent oi his drunken revelry, none to
height lie walls themselves; and with grottoes and castles, and command, and none to obey. And in the reckless carelessness
full-grown forest trees, they seemed like veritable mountains of of that night, the gates in the river walls had all been left open,
beauty and verdure, which they were designed to imitate. so that the soldiers of Cyrus, having once entered the channel of
The wealth of all the nations was poured into the lap of this the river, passed without opposition into the heart of the city.
proud city. All that human ingenuity could accomplish, all that They pressed their way on as stealthily as possible, giving no
gold could buy, was lavished upon it. And when the sun, which alarm, till the two companies of Persian soldiers met, as had
nowhere shown clearer than in the pure atmosphere of that fair been arranged, at the palace of tile king.
land, rose upon Babylon, it looked upon a scene of beauty and Let us now look into that palace, and see what had been hap-
splendor such as it never beheld upon this earth before, and opening there. Belshazzar had been feasting with a thousand of
never since has seen. Marble palaces reflected its dazzling light, his lords. They brought out the vessels of gold and silver
Lofty monuments caught and flung over the city its rising splen- which had been taken from the temple at Jerusalem, and drank
dors. Columns, and domes, and towers grew radiant with the their wine in them, and praised their gods of gold and silver, and
brightness of its beams. Princes of renown, with gorgeous rot- brass, iron, wood, and stone. Wild with wine, the noise of their
inues flashing with diamonds and gems, displayed their glory in revelry was running high, when suddenly there appeared a
the streets of the city. Wise men and philosophers adorned its so- hand, gleaming with fierce, unearthly light, tracing strange
city. Children, light-hearted and happy, mingled in the throngs characters upon the palace wall. A sense of his fearful guilt
of its public palaces, and made its parks and gardens ring with seized upon the king. His countenance changed to a deathly
their merry glee. With mirth and music and song passed the line, and his knees smote together. In wild haste the sooth-
gay hours along in the city of Babylon. sayers and astrologers were summoned to interpret the alarm-
To the north of Babylon were the provinces of Media and Per- ing omen. Their arts and incantations failed them. They
sia. The inhabitants of these provinces, growing strong, at could neither read the writing nor tell its meaning. In their
length rose up against the king of Babylon. Two years after despair, the queen spoke of Daniel, the captive Jew, and he was
the death of Nebuchadnezzar, by whom the Jews were carried called. This man, whom the king had forgotten in supposed
captive and Jerusalem destroyed, the war broke out that was to security, he was glad to receive help from in his distress. Dan-
overthrow that kingdom. After twenty years' success, the Per- iel read the writing, and this was the sentence: "God hath
sians, under Cyrus, laid siege to Babylon, the only city that held numbered thy kingdom, and finished it. Thou art weighed in
out against them in all the East. But Belshazzar, the Babylo- the balances, and art found wanting. Thy kingdom is divided
nian king, and all his -,l.i. -. shut up in their city, felt per- and given to the Medes and Persians." See the whole account
fcetly secure; for who could scale their lofty walls, or break of this feast in the fifth chapter of Daniel.
down their brazen gates? And they had provision stored up Scarcely had Daniel finished the interpretation, when the noise
there to last them 20 years, and land which they could till, of bloody strife was heard in the entrance to the king's palace.
enough to raise -i lt. i. ,I provision for each year's demand. So The Persian soldiers had just then reached the place ; and fall-
they mocked at Cyrus from their towering walls, and bade defi- ing upon the king, they slew him, as Daniel had declared. The
ance to all his efforts. gates were soon thrown open, and the Persian army entered
No human power could force an entrance into the city. But into the city. Then, from street to street, from limit to limit,
SGod had said that the city should be overthrown; and he put it was heard the shout of the victors and the wail of the van- i4


s-s-












60 SUKmHm1N AT Home

quishcd. The voice of mirth and revelry was changed to the
sounds of slaughter. And the night which they thought to
make joyous with wine, was made horrible with blood.
And now began great Babylon's decay. Two years after this,
Cyrus gave permission to the captive Jews to take the gold and
silver vessels of their temple, and return to Jerusalem. The seat
"of empire was removed to Susa. Babylon's huge gates of brass
wore soon taken away, and its walls demolishedd. Xerxes plun-
dered hle temple of Belus of its immense wealth, amld then laid
the lofty structure in ruins. In the year 294 betfre ( I.. I New
Babylon was built in its neighborhood, and men and material
were drawn from the old city to supply the new. The princes
of Parthia ravaged it,. About the end oft'lhe fourth century, it,
was used by the Persian kings as an inelostire for wild beasts.
And about the end of the 12th century, or 700 years ago, the ruins
of Nebuchadnezzar's palace were so full of venolmous reptiles
that a person could not go near them without danger; while
to-day there is scarcely elloulgh left, even of the Irinis, to marke
the spot where once stood he largest, richest, and proudest city
the earth lhas ever seen. So wonderfully has God fulfilled his
word.


TK9 FAMk+M gF TT9 TP9

"N the night of the 13th of November there occurred one
Sthe graindest and most remarkable sights ever wit-
-' i ssed in this world. It seemed as if all the stars in
leaven were being hurled from their pllaces and cast un-
to the earth. It is called the great star-shower of 1833.
Of course we are not to understand that those stars
which constitute the heavenly bodies are here referred
to; because most of them, being many times larger than the
earth, could not fall to the earth. But these were meteors,
such as we have all soon occasionally shooting through the heav-
ens, and which have all the appearance of' falling stars.
Mainy are still living who witnessed this woiidorfill scene.
Prof. Olmstead, of Yale College, said of'it:--
Those who were so fortunate as to witness the exhibition of
shooting starLs oi the morning of' Nov. 13, 1833, probably saw
the greatest display of celestial fireworks that has ever been seen
since the creation of the world, or at least within the annals cov- appeared in various public journals do not exceed Ale reality.
cred by the pages of' history. No language, indeed, can come up to the splendor of that mag-
The extort of the shower of 1833 was such as to cover no in- nificent display; and I hesitate not to say that nio oine who did
considerable part of the earth's surface, from the middle of the not witness it can form an adequate conception of' its glory. It
Atlanltic on the east to the Pacific on the west; and firom the seemed as ift' the whole starry heavens hadl congregated at one
northern coast of' South America to undefined regions amojig Ihe poiit, near the zenith, and were simultaneously shooting forth,
British Possessions oil the north, the exhibition was visible, and with the velocity of lightning, to every part of the horizon; :and
everywhere presented nearly the same aplleara-ce. The mete- yet they were not exhausted- thousands swiftly followed in the
ors did not fly at random over all parts of thlie sky, but applearedl tracks of thousands, as if' rented for the occasion."'
to emanate from a point in the constellation Leo, near a star The Jomrnal of Co,enmerce said that "'three hundred miles this
called Gamma Leonis. ill the bend of the sickle. This is no lon- side of Liverpool the phenomenon was as splendid as here ; and
ger to be regarded as a terrestrial, but as a celestial phenome- that ill St. Lawrence county there was a snow-storm during the
non ; and shooting stars are iiow to be no more viewed as casual phenomenon, in which the ,I1,, stars appeared like lightning.
productions ,of the upper regions of the atmosphere, but as visit- In Germantown, Pa., they seemed like showers of great hail."
autsfi;om other worldss, or from the planetary voids." Such is the universal testimony of eye-witnesses respecting the
The C'hristian Adq'ocateir-d Journal of D)e. 13, 1833, describes great extent and wonderful appearance of this great dislilay of
it as follows:- telling stars.
"1 The meteoric phenomenon which occurred on the morning Rev. C: 13 exactly describes the way the stars fell in Novenm-
of the 13th of November last, was of so extraordinary and inter- ber, 1833. And soon the rest will be accomplished, the heavens
testing a character as to be entitled to more than a mere passing depart as a scroll, and Christ appear to take all his people to
notice. The lively and graphic descriptions which have their heavenly home.

--~ 4













S NHINKE ArT iO M IE. 61


T iT station in our picture. This opens into and sizes, many of them being from two
r the l._ ._..1 coast of the island with a no- to four feet in diameter. From the roof
HE for the ead Christ weepeth, ble gateway, the height of which, from of the cavern hang numerous whitened
RjE world for the dead Christ weepeth,
And holdeth her Lenten fast; the rocky floor to the top of the arch, is stalactites, sparkling with crystals.
Doth she think that Christ still sleepeth, The sea at all times flows into the cave,
And night is not o'erpast? covering the rocky floor at the entrance
Nay, but the word is spoken, to the depth of eighteen or twenty feet,
Nay, but the tomb is broken, but. the water becomes shallower as you
And Christ is risen! Yea, Christ is risen in- go ill, until at fhe farther end it is inot
deed !"
ded !x more than eight or nine feet deep. The
Long past is the Lenten moaning, action of the waves has broken many of
Long past is the bitter night, the columns near the entrance of the car-
Lorng past is the Easter dawning, ern. The whole cave is lighted from
Now it is noonday light;-
Nw it is noonday light; without, so that it is easy to see lhee cmi-
Set every song to gladness;
Why should the Bride have sadness? tire length of it. People often go ill there
Her" Lordis risen! Her Lord is risen indeed!" in boats, and they say the alir is dry and
wholesome, and not at all damp and Ibul,
He suffered once and forever as it is in many eaves. It must be grand
The cross, the smiting, and pain ; and solemnn to float away into ,this great
Oiic t did the sepulcher sever, natural cathedral, with its innumeralble
But never, never again, pillars, its vaulted roof, whose lemtif(ul
Earth nor hell can bereave us; lights of purple and gold are reflected in
Jesus never will leave us,
For He hath risen Yea, He hath risen in- ltheo waler; and to listen to lthe wave
deed!" surging always in deep aml mIeasmur
tones against the rocky sides. It is to
A always so ready to eas tays, this cave that the poet Sactt relfrs in his
Always so willing to stay,
Pray, pray that the living Jesus "Lord of the Isles," when he says,---
May walk with s day by day, The shores of Mull on the eastward lay,
Always the Easter glory, 177 fiet, and the breadth nearly 54 feet. And Ulva dark, and Colonsay,
"Always the same glad story,-- The depth of the cave from the entrance And all the groups of islets gay,
"The Christ is risen The Christ is risen in- to h is t, Adall the groups islts gay,
deed !to the farther end is 227 fibt, and ftr the That guard famed Staffis round.
whole distance the sides are supported by Then all unkno-wn its columns rose,
massive columns of rock, of different forms Where dark and undisturbed repose
f _At ~The eormorant had
-- found,
,- _- ,-L lAnd the shly seal ]lial

N the Atlantio And welter'd in that
O)ean. off the ------ wondrous, s dne,
nor( 1 west f Where, as to shame
coast of Scot- the temples deck'd
a y skill of earthly
land, is a small isl-
and knovm as tihe -r schitect,
Isle of Staffl It ji ', '-i" N rcelli'd rs'lf, it
is s clf'ntile raise
is omne of the ,nroup --_. -_ -_A iminster to her
of islands called Makers praise!
the II,chrides, but I,-l Not for a cleaner use
it is such a rocky, ascend
barren place that Her columns, or her
110 olle lives there. [- --arches bend;
In the hard Ibsal- Nor of a theme less
tic rock of which solemn tells
the island is corn- That mighty surge
posed, are numer- that ebbs and
ous strange cave ts, ti Y swells,
which ive to td still between
a(e its each awful paulse
plae its only ithehih vault
terest. Thile east Front-_--a tile it.
As- an answer draws,
ro n n i Ic of = z1 1
r.e m ar a t e ievarid tone hr,-
these is Fial's long'd and high,
Cave, of whicll -w e : -4 -- --That mocks the or-
have a rlepresen- .. .... gan's melodyy"













S NHINKE ArT iO M IE. 61


T iT station in our picture. This opens into and sizes, many of them being from two
r the l._ ._..1 coast of the island with a no- to four feet in diameter. From the roof
HE for the ead Christ weepeth, ble gateway, the height of which, from of the cavern hang numerous whitened
RjE world for the dead Christ weepeth,
And holdeth her Lenten fast; the rocky floor to the top of the arch, is stalactites, sparkling with crystals.
Doth she think that Christ still sleepeth, The sea at all times flows into the cave,
And night is not o'erpast? covering the rocky floor at the entrance
Nay, but the word is spoken, to the depth of eighteen or twenty feet,
Nay, but the tomb is broken, but. the water becomes shallower as you
And Christ is risen! Yea, Christ is risen in- go ill, until at fhe farther end it is inot
deed !"
ded !x more than eight or nine feet deep. The
Long past is the Lenten moaning, action of the waves has broken many of
Long past is the bitter night, the columns near the entrance of the car-
Lorng past is the Easter dawning, ern. The whole cave is lighted from
Now it is noonday light;-
Nw it is noonday light; without, so that it is easy to see lhee cmi-
Set every song to gladness;
Why should the Bride have sadness? tire length of it. People often go ill there
Her" Lordis risen! Her Lord is risen indeed!" in boats, and they say the alir is dry and
wholesome, and not at all damp and Ibul,
He suffered once and forever as it is in many eaves. It must be grand
The cross, the smiting, and pain ; and solemnn to float away into ,this great
Oiic t did the sepulcher sever, natural cathedral, with its innumeralble
But never, never again, pillars, its vaulted roof, whose lemtif(ul
Earth nor hell can bereave us; lights of purple and gold are reflected in
Jesus never will leave us,
For He hath risen Yea, He hath risen in- ltheo waler; and to listen to lthe wave
deed!" surging always in deep aml mIeasmur
tones against the rocky sides. It is to
A always so ready to eas tays, this cave that the poet Sactt relfrs in his
Always so willing to stay,
Pray, pray that the living Jesus "Lord of the Isles," when he says,---
May walk with s day by day, The shores of Mull on the eastward lay,
Always the Easter glory, 177 fiet, and the breadth nearly 54 feet. And Ulva dark, and Colonsay,
"Always the same glad story,-- The depth of the cave from the entrance And all the groups of islets gay,
"The Christ is risen The Christ is risen in- to h is t, Adall the groups islts gay,
deed !to the farther end is 227 fibt, and ftr the That guard famed Staffis round.
whole distance the sides are supported by Then all unkno-wn its columns rose,
massive columns of rock, of different forms Where dark and undisturbed repose
f _At ~The eormorant had
-- found,
,- _- ,-L lAnd the shly seal ]lial

N the Atlantio And welter'd in that
O)ean. off the ------ wondrous, s dne,
nor( 1 west f Where, as to shame
coast of Scot- the temples deck'd
a y skill of earthly
land, is a small isl-
and knovm as tihe -r schitect,
Isle of Staffl It ji ', '-i" N rcelli'd rs'lf, it
is s clf'ntile raise
is omne of the ,nroup --_. -_ -_A iminster to her
of islands called Makers praise!
the II,chrides, but I,-l Not for a cleaner use
it is such a rocky, ascend
barren place that Her columns, or her
110 olle lives there. [- --arches bend;
In the hard Ibsal- Nor of a theme less
tic rock of which solemn tells
the island is corn- That mighty surge
posed, are numer- that ebbs and
ous strange cave ts, ti Y swells,
which ive to td still between
a(e its each awful paulse
plae its only ithehih vault
terest. Thile east Front-_--a tile it.
As- an answer draws,
ro n n i Ic of = z1 1
r.e m ar a t e ievarid tone hr,-
these is Fial's long'd and high,
Cave, of whicll -w e : -4 -- --That mocks the or-
have a rlepresen- .. .... gan's melodyy"














62 SQUNS IeT AT ieHOMFd.


T' m nRunning with feet of silver Along the sky, in wavy lines,
SOver the sands of gold O'er isle and reach and bay,
SFar away in the briny ocean Green-belted with eternal pines,
XATDEN with the meek, brown eyes, There rolled a turbulent wave, The mountains stretch away.
||I| i whose orbs a shadow lies Now singing along the sea-beach, Below, the maple nlasses sleep
"4 Like the dusk in evening skies Now howling along the cave. Where shore with water blends,

Standing with reluctant feet, And the brooklet has found the billow, While midway on the tranquil deep
Where the brook and river meet, Though they flowed so far apart, The evening light descends.
Womanhood and child- So seemed it when you
hood fleet! hill's red crown,
Of old, the Indian
Gazing, with a timid tro ld, t
glance, And through the sunset
On the brooklet's swift air looked down
advance, l Upon the Smile of


shade the laws
Deep and still, that No forest skeptic
glidilw stream forest h skeptic
Beautiful to thee usist taught
Beatifl t thee mst Their living and eternal
seeIm, Cause
As the river of a dream. His t er ins
His t r ii e r instinct
sought.
O thou child of many e saw these m tains
prayers! He saw these mountains
Life hath quicksands. in the light
life bath snares Which n o w across
Care and age come un- them shines;
aware_ This lake, in summer
sunset bright,
Like the swell of some Walled round with
sweet tune, sobering pines.
Morning rises into noon, God near him seemed;
May glides onward into from earth and skies
June. His loving voice he

Childhood is the bough, heard,
where slumbered As, face to face, in Par-
where shnmbered
adise,
Birds and bloss msl ie
mlany-numbered ;- V Man stood before the
Age, that bough with Lord.
snows encumbered. Thanks, 0 our Father!
that, like him,
Gather, then, e a clh Thy tender love I see,
flower that grows, in radiant hill and
When the young heart woodland dim,
overflows, And tinted sunset sea.
To embalm that tent of For not in mockery dost
snows. thou fill
Our earth with light
Bear a lily in thy hand; and grace;
Gates of brass cannot Thou hid'st no dark and
withstand cruel will
One touch of that magic Behind thy smiling
wand. face !
Bear through sorrow, wrong, and ruth, And filled with its freshness and sweetness
In thy heart the dew of youth, That turbulent, bitter heart !
I SaOT an arrow in the air;
On thy lips the smile of truth. It fell to earth, I know not where;
Oh, that dew, like balm, shall steal TT-I For so swiftly it flew, the sight
Into wounds that cannot heal, Could not follow it in its flight.
Even as sleep our eyes doth seal; THE shadows round the inland sea I breathed a song into the air ;
And that smile, like sunshine, dart Are deepening into night; It fell to earth, I know not where;
Into many a sunless heart; Slow up the slopes of Ossipee For who has sight so keen and strong
For a smile of God thou art. They chase the lessening light. That it can follow the flight of song
Tired of the long day's blinding heat Long, long afterward in an oak
I rest my languid eye, I found the arrow still unbroke;
THE brooklet came from the mountain, Lake of the Hills! where, cool and sweet, And the song, from beginning to end,
As sang the bard of old, Thy sunset waters lie! I found again in the heart of a friend.
z A,-





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