• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Dolly Dimple's one fault
 The wonderful gingerbread man
 Baby
 Rover's fun
 Bow-wow
 Johnny Jenks
 Ready for pudding
 An old nursery song
 What naughty Susie saw
 The three little cotton babies
 The first snow
 Pussy's choice
 Winnie's troubles
 How gip went on a journey
 A piece of rubber
 What Percy found
 Tick tock
 A naughty sheep
 Back Cover






Title: The story of dolly and other stories
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00053182/00001
 Material Information
Title: The story of dolly and other stories
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: D. Lothrop & Company
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: c1883
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1883   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1883   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1883
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: twenty-one illustrations.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00053182
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224939
notis - ALG5211
oclc - 63172969

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
    Frontispiece
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Dolly Dimple's one fault
        Page 1
    The wonderful gingerbread man
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Baby
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Rover's fun
        Page 7
    Bow-wow
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Johnny Jenks
        Page 10
    Ready for pudding
        Page 11
    An old nursery song
        Page 12
    What naughty Susie saw
        Page 13
    The three little cotton babies
        Page 14
        Page 15
    The first snow
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Pussy's choice
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Winnie's troubles
        Page 20
    How gip went on a journey
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    A piece of rubber
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    What Percy found
        Page 27
    Tick tock
        Page 28
    A naughty sheep
        Page 28
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
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' TEDDY IS SORRY!'" SOBlS -E,






THE STORY OF DOLLY




AND OTHER STORIES






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TWENTY-ONE ILLUSTRA 7IONS





BOSTON
D. LOTHROP AND COMPANY
32 FRANKLIN STREET.













































COPYRIGHT, IS83.

D. LOTHROP & COMPANY.


















































" .







DOL-LY DIM-PLE'S ONE FAULT.

DOLLY DIM-PLE she who left the
had just one fault buck et cov- er
but that one was a-jar, which was
like a nest of cle-ceit."
bas-kets "- it i But one day
held sev-er-al Dol-ly was pun-
oth-ers in-side / ished for it all.
it. This "one She was such a
fault" was- fat lit-tle ro-ly-po-
wis/-ing to do ly that she was
cx-act-ly as she al-ways get-ting a
chose! -- fall, and mam-
Well, this ma had for-
" one fault"-- bid-den her to
why, it took -swing when
Dol- ly's fat 1, .nurse could
fin-gers in- to not at-tend
the for-bid- "L her. But
den su-gar-buck-et, which was one day
"theft"; and it led Dol-ly's Dol-ly went all by her-self and
fat legs in a run-a-way race climbed in. She sat still for
when mam-ma's step was heard some time, but at last she
at the door-- which was "cow- kicked out both lit-tle feet and
ard-ice"; and it led Dol-ly's went fly-ing up in the air, and
ro-sy lips in-to aver-ynaugh-ty, lost her bal-ance and fell out,
fal-ter-ing No, mam-ma," and her dresscaughtinthe seat,
when mam-ma asked if it was and thus she hung by one poor






strug-gling foot, her head down Poor Dol-ly, with her one
on the ground, and there she fault." I don't suppose she is
had to stay and cry along time cured yet she will, I dare
be-fore nurse heard her and say, need ma-ny, ma-ny such
came to re-lease her. les-sons.



THE WONDERFUL GINGERBREAD MAN.



CHAPTER five min-utes la-ter -but now,
DOOD-NESS a, now /
The word popped out of Carl sprang to his feet with
Carl's mouth like a wad from
his pop-gun. "
No won-der! .-
He sat on the back pi-az-za, ."'"'
un-der the o-pen pan-try win-
dow, a-play with his gin-ger- J
bread horse-man.
Mam-ma had got-ten it from
the gin-ger-bread jar but five
min-utes be-fore; there seemed
noth-ing strange a-bout it then
-noth-ing at all-why, Carl CARL PROPOSES TO LUNC.
had pro-posed to eat the gin- the big-gest blue eyes a boy
ger-bread man, horse and all, ev-er had, and the dood-






ness-es pop-ping out be-tween com-ing was post-ed all o-ver
the quick breaths-for zhs town, would give as fab-u-lous
Gin-ger-bread Man had come to a sum for him as for the big
zfe gi-ant or lit-tie Tom Thumb
Carl was sure of that, for -and then Carl would buy-
the Man had winked his plum well, just what he did-n't de-
eyes and chir-ruped gai-ly to cide, for it ev-i-dent-ly oc-curred
his steed; and the horse had to the G. Man, at the same
neighed and whisked its tail, mo-ment, that he ought to be
and now stood champ-ing its off too.
bits and paw-ing the pi-az-za And the queer chase be-gan,
floor. the Gin-ger-bread Man blow-
Sud-den-ly the Gin-ger-bread ing wild-er blasts out of his
Man blew a wild blast out of bu-gle, Carl rush-ing af-ter,
down the lawn, in-to the or-
Schard, grow-ing more ex-cit-ed
'II, Iat ev-er-y bound, his cries as
"i',' l wild as the bu-gle's, and fall-ing
S_-:..._,--. in-to a sort of gal-lop-ing
COME TO LIF rhyme
his bu-gle, and dashed a-cross "Whoa, Gin-ger!
the pi-az-za to the lawn; and Hi, Gin-ger!
then, all at once, it oc-curred to Whoa, Gin-ger !
Carl that such a horse-man as Ho!"
that ought nev-er to es-cape-- Back past the big oak, on
that he must be cap-tured. He to the sta-ble, swept horse-man
must be-long to an en-tire-ly and boy. Of a sud-den Carl
new race of men, and doubt' found he was gain-ing; and
less Bar-num, whose "I am then he no-ticed the trail was






strewn with gin-ger-bread How it was done Carl nev-er
crumbs! knew, but in a wink the won-
His heart beat ver-y fast at der-ful G. Man had kicked
this, for he knew the horse's
legs were crumb-ling a-way, and i.'- -
that cap-ture was now sure.
As they reached the sta-ble, -
the poor horse, that had been .
stumbling along on his stumps .
o f cTHE G. MAN TAKES A FRESH HORSE
of legs, gave out ut-ter-ly.
Carl sprang for-ward to free, was a-stride Fiz, and dash-
seize the G. Man, when, whiz! ing off down the drive.
out of the o-pen door, past his Fiz went like wild, heels
ver-y eyes, flashed Fiz, the cat. high, and tail as big as four.
(TO BE CONTINUED.)


Nod! nod nod!
SWhere is the ba-by's head ?
"-... / Up and down, like a lit-tle
ball-
He must be put to bed!
All day long he's sung and
l'r/.- ""' ,.t.
S .-. pranced,
-^.' Up and down he's had to be
danced!
---: --- H il-ly, nil-ly,
--. Jack-y down dil-ly !"
This is our ba-by, and is-n't he fun-ny !
He's nic-er than sug-ar, and sweet-er than hon-ey !







BA-BY.

BY MRS. L. C. WHI-TON.

Ba-by is get-ting to be so old;
Count-ing your fin-gers the months are told;
A part of a spring, a sum-mer and fall,
A part of a win-ter, and that is all;





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But she nev-er has seen two months of snow,
That are just be-fore the vi-o-lets blow:
And now, if you can-not guess her age,
You will nev-er be called a sage.

Ba-by has beau-tt-ful silk-en hair,
Brown, with the shim-mer of gold so rare;
And she sits on the floor a lit-tie each day,
And when she rolls o-ver, we jump up and say,





" Bump-e-ty, bump-e-ty, did she fall!"
Tust to make her for-get it all:
And then she smiles, though the big tears drop,
But we kiss her, to make them stop.

Ba-by has got four teeth in sight,
Just like kernels of rice so white;
And she looks at her fin-gers so round and pink,
As if she did not know what to think;
And she jumps when she hears a sud-den sound;
And stud-ies the chil-dren play-ing a-round,
As if she were try-ing to learn the way
To be as nois-y as they.

We call her a dar-ling the whole day through;
And what do you think at e-ven-ing we do ?
We just say, Ba-by, it's time for bed,"
And cud-dle up close-ly the dear lit-tle head,
And then lay her down and kiss her good-night,
And go out of the room and shut out the light,
And then, in a while, we go back and peep,
And ba-by is fast a-sleep.

Well! won-der-ful ba-bies al-ways grow
Wher-ev-er there is a ba-by you know,
But this one is worth-y of all one's praise,
And ought to be pa-tent-ed some one says:
And if a-ny of you would like to call
And see this ba-by so charm-ing to all,
A num-ber we'll send (not of ba-bies, you know,
But a num-ber, to which you can go).








RO-VER'S FUN.

I do be-lieve dogs laugh a long, slim, la-zy wasp in a
and en-joy fun, and make lit, gold-en dress. She buzzed out
tie jokes. For the last half at him from her nest when he
hour old Ro-ver, ly-ing on his first came in. She meant to
clean straw, has been teas-ing sting him right on the lit-tle






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black spot up-on his nose, and them right at her a-gain, with
Ro-ver knew it. He closed a sharp snap of his teeth.
his eyes. She came near-er. And so it went. He would
Then he o-pened them right at let her come just so near, but
her. She buzzed a-way in a no near-er. I am sure Ro-ver
hur-ry. He shut them. She laughed. Per-haps the wasp did
came back. Then he o-pened too, but I saw Ro-ver laugh.









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BOW- WOW.
BY E. F.

His name was Bow-wow. Miss Ju-lie. That was what
Just Bow-wow and noth-ing Bow-wow called it, for they
else. It could-n't have been did ling-er at the gate and
a-ny-thing else ver-y well. Not steal up the path as still as
" Rover," for he al-ways staid they could, for fear that watch-
at home. Not "Fris-ky," for he ing, wick-ed Bow-wow would
nev-er frisked. Nor "Spot" see them and bark; and Bow-
nor Li-on" for he was-n't wow called that "prowl-ing."
spot-ted nor li-on col-ored. But But Bow-wow nev-er did
he did "bow-wow" a large bite. For al ways, just as
share of his time. they thought he was go-ing to
And he had naught-y look- spring, lit-tle Ju-lie would come
ing teeth, and his eyes .were out and say Hush up, Bow-
full of sparks, and his hair wow!" and he would "hush;"
stood up all o-ver his head, or else she would go down and
and there he would sit, white meet her play-mates, and when
and shag-gy and fierce, on his Bow-wow saw that, he would
lit-tie mis-tress' bal-co-ny, right cut his bark short and say,
in a-mong her or-ange trees if it is some-bod-y she
and ger-a-ni-ums and pots of likes, it's all right!"
ros es, and just bark and No, Bow-wow nev-er did
growl and look mur-der at ev- hurt a-ny-bod-y, and I don't be-
er-y lit-tle boy and girl that lieve he ev-er will! He mere-ly
came "prowl-ing round" to see de-lights to hear his own voice.








John-ny Jenks, he's ver-y sad !
And John-ny Jenks, he's ver-y mad !
-"



And John-ny Jenks, he's ver-y bad !
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"Be-fore that he can o lay !
His les-sons he must learn and say
Be-fore that he can go play!
















__- ,, "AD, S I MOORE











READ-Y FOR PUD-DING.

BA-BY is read-y for pud- feed him tur-key and cof-fee
ding! and oys-ters and pick-les, and
It is Ba-by's first Christ-mas ten oth-er bad things that make
din-ner. Ba-by is Mas-ter of stom-ach-ache. And now Ba-
the Feast. The grand-pas, by is read-y for plum pud-ding i
the grand-mas, the pret-ty aunt- Won't Ba-by's stom-ach ache
ies, all wait on Ba-by. They though ?
ies, all wait on Ba-by. They though ?








AN OLD NURS-ER-Y SONG.

WHEN your pa-pas and mam-mas lived in Ba-by-land, and
were bits of boys and girls like you, they used to say some
pret-ty vers-es a-bout this lit-tle girl and this lit-tie lamb :-

It fol-lowed her to school one
day,
That was a-gainst the rule,
I t made the chil-dren laugh
and play
To see a lamb at school.
t. And so the teacher turned him
... out,
S But still he lin-gered near,
S, And in the grass he fed a-bout
_'": "" _,' Till M a-ry did ap-pear.
What makes the lamb love
NM1a-ry had a lit-tle lamb, Ma-ry so ? "
Its fleece was white as snow, -The ea-ger chil-dren cried;
A'nd ev'-ry-where that Ma-ry Why, Ma-ry loves the lamb,
went you know,"
The lamb was sure to go. The teach-er quick re-plied.

There were no mag-a-zines for ba-bies then; so when a sweet
sto-ry was made their mam-mas must have told it to each oth-er
all through Ba-by-land, be-cause I nev-er saw a mam-ma yet
that did not know these vers-es by heart.
\








"WHAT NAUGHT-Y SUS-IE SATV.
SING a song of sug-ar plums! Christ-mas morn-ing, bright
Naught-y fing-ers-naught-y and fine,
thumbs! Lit-tle Sus-ie went to dine
Sing a song what Su-sie did, At her Grand-ma's, where she
For it can't be long-er hid had
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A.ll.. good- -__*k .1_=7_


All good things to make her Yet, what did this Sus-ie do ?
glad: When the day to twi light
Schat -






Lit-tle frost-ed cran-ber-ry tarts, Off she crept just like a cat,
Jells and jams, and turk-ey
wings, Climbed on Grand-ma's pant,
Plum-my cakes, 0, lots of ry shelf
Things! 'Gain to stuff her lit-tle self,
things 'Gain to stuff her lit-tle self,






Hunt-ing Grand-ma's cakes Of the fac-es the plates made!
and pies
With her greed-y lit-tle eyes. Plate and plat-ter, bowl and
cup,
All at once quick down she Each a dread-ful face made
hopped! up,-
Out she ran and nev-er Sus-ie says so. P'r'aps they
stopped! did,-
Naught-y Sus-ie, so a-fraid Sus-ie went, I know, and hid.


THE THREE LIT-TLE COT-TON BA-BIES.

BY MRS. HAT-TIE F. BELL.

ONE, two three-plump and can tell, for they winked and
ros-y. Three lit-tle, real, live blinked so. The three lit-tle
ba-bies, and all just as near mouths were a-bout as big, when
a-like as the smooth round shut,as a red, ripe cher-ry, but
peas that lie side by side in when o-pen for a good cry big
their bright green cra-dles in e-nough, you would think, to
the sum-mer time. Just so hold half a pint of cher-ries,
they lay there in the daint-y and, would you be-lieve it, not
crib to-geth-er, three lit-tle fac- a tooth in one of them!
es, all wrin-kled up, with three Three lit-tle ba-bies and to
lit-tle nos-es a-bout as big as a whom do you think they be-
good-sized beech-nut, six lit-tie longed ? I don't be-lieve they
eyes shut tight, bright blue, knew, for first Nurse took them
and when o-pen a-bout the size and trot-ted them a-while; then
of -well, I don't be-lieve I Grand-ma sat with them all






spread out on her lap; then ute, then they were hand-ed
Aunt Ju-lia rocked them and o-ver to mam-ma, who knew
sang ba-by-tunes soft-ly in their just how to put them to sleep,
won-der-ing ears; and once in oh! so nice-ly No, they did-
a while, when all the rest grew n't know who owned them,
tired of them, and had rocked and ver-y like-ly did-n't care,
them and jolt-ed them and for they did-n't o-pen their eyes
cat-niped them un-til their dear more than two or three times
lit-tle ba-by na-tures could- a day, and the rest of the time
n't stand it an-oth-er min- slept like lit-tle kit-tens.







But I know, and I'll tell you. came in from the store, he
They be-longed to Mrs. Cot- would take up one lit-tle gir-lie
ton. She was their mam-ma. and kiss it and lay it down,
And to Mr. Cot-ton. He was and take up an-oth-er and kiss
their pa-pa. it and lay it down, and then
These three lit-tle Cot-ton he could-n't tell which to take
ba-bies throve, and grew larg- up next, and some-times the
er and strong-er, and bright-er same ba-by would get kissed
and smart-er, ev-e-ry day, and twice, and one poor lit-tle ba-by
still they looked just a-like. would have to do with-out a-ny,
The nurse could hard-ly tell and all be-cause pa-pa could-n't
them a-part, and when pa-pa tell them a-part.






So mam-ma said to pa-pa and of an-oth-er with pink rib-
one day, You bring me up bon, and of an-oth-er with
some rib-bon from the store, white rib-bon, and then she
and I'll fix the ba-bies so laughed to see how cun-ning
they'll each get a kiss, and theylooked. Pa-panev-ermade
you'll know them ev-e-ry a-ny more such mis-takes but
time. Bring a yard of blue, he laughed ev-er-y time, and
a yard of pink, and a yard of called them his lit-tle bunch of
white." blue Cot-ton, his lit-tle bunch
So when he came to din-ner of pink Cot-ton, and his lit-tle
he brought the rib-bon, and bunch of white Cot-ton, while
mam-ma took the three lit-tle mam-ma used to call them
ba-bies, and tied up the sleeves Pink-ey," White-y" and
of one ba-by with blue rib-bon, Blue-y."


THE FIRST SNOW.

0, 0, snow-flakes,
What have you done! i '
You've come and spoiled .
My wee folks' fun !

You've come with wind,
With clouds of black,-
My wee folks wish
You would go back.

















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ey had a nice hay nest. This de-bed.








is ?
Perhaps you never have seen one.
Trundle-beds are not much used *
no\\. Long ago they were common.
PUSSY'S CHOICE.

Pussy slept in the barn with her thought the kittens would like better.
three kittens. This place was a little girl's trun-




They hadThen the bedsteads for grown po-This de-bed.
hay nest as warm and soft. Do you know whan they a trundle-bed now.
is ?
Perhaps you never have seen one.
Trundle-beds are not much used
now. Long ago they were common.
Then the bedsteads for grown pco-
ple were higher than they are now.
A trundle-bedstead was like a low
""" J .. square box, with four feet.
S/ It had casters fitted into its four
Feet, so that it could be rolled, or trun-
dled, under the large bed.
MI\R'S I'F.T. .
It staid under the large bed in the
The kittens were comfortable. daytime.
But mother Pussy was not satis- It was pulled out at night.
fled. The little children slept in this
She knew about a place which she trundle-bed.







Mary's trundle-bed was soft. It After she had gone, something said,
had a white pillow. Mi-ew, mi-ew "
It had a silk bed-quilt, made from That was what Mary heard. 0,
one of mamma's dresses, such a little mi-ew !
This silk bed-quilt was quilted in Mice don't mew.
little squares, like a checker-board. So it was not a mouse.
In every square there was a blue The mi-ew came from under the
flower, big bed.
Little Mary liked this silk bed- Mary pulled out the trundle-bed.
quilt very much. She saw a tiny kitty on her pretty
It was so soft and so pretty. silk quilt.
Pussy liked it too. She was al- It was a lovely white kitty, with
lowed to lie on it sometimes. black spots.
One day Pussy ran into the house. Mary ran back to the window.
She came from the barn. She had She saw pussy going straight back
something in her mouth, to the barn to get her other little
She went through the kitchen so kitties.
fast that the cook did not see what But mamma-said that this couldn't
she had in her mouth, be allowed.
The cook thought pussy had caught This is what mamma sang to her
a mouse. little girl:
Pussy ran right through the kitch- Puss and her kittens
en, into the hall, and up-stairs. Must sleep in the hay;
She crept under the big bed. And the bed be kept tidy
She jumped up into the trundle- For my little May !"
bed.
She put something down on the But the first little kitty staid in
soft, silk quilt. the house. Mary tied a blue ribbon
Ss around its neck, and it always was
Then she jumped out and ran
s Mary's pet.








WINNIE'S TROUBLES.
I NEVER shall be big,"
Said little Winnie Winch;
I have tried for a month
And I haven't grown an inch -
I know, for I measured
S- By a mark on the wall.
., W Little cups, little books, little desks,
.. little clothes-
.., For seven long years I've had only
"\. .those.


N .Then the poor small Winnie
Made a great wise plan
How to grow very fast;
And away she ran.
., .When she came in again
". ; She was-oh, so tall
"* ,: Her gown swept the floor
From the door to the wall;
She walked up and down, till she tripped in her train,
And then she was glad to be a small girl again.
-E. F. P.


HOW GIP WENT ON A JOURNEY.
(A TRUE STORY.)
GIP was a dog. His master was a carpenter.
He was small, shaggy, and pretty, One day his master went away in
with bright eyes. the cars.
I knew Gip. He lived in Salem. He went to build a house for a man








WINNIE'S TROUBLES.
I NEVER shall be big,"
Said little Winnie Winch;
I have tried for a month
And I haven't grown an inch -
I know, for I measured
S- By a mark on the wall.
., W Little cups, little books, little desks,
.. little clothes-
.., For seven long years I've had only
"\. .those.


N .Then the poor small Winnie
Made a great wise plan
How to grow very fast;
And away she ran.
., .When she came in again
". ; She was-oh, so tall
"* ,: Her gown swept the floor
From the door to the wall;
She walked up and down, till she tripped in her train,
And then she was glad to be a small girl again.
-E. F. P.


HOW GIP WENT ON A JOURNEY.
(A TRUE STORY.)
GIP was a dog. His master was a carpenter.
He was small, shaggy, and pretty, One day his master went away in
with bright eyes. the cars.
I knew Gip. He lived in Salem. He went to build a house for a man



















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who lived in Baytown, by the sea. Gip ran to the depot with his little
Before he left home he shut Gip sharp nose close to the ground.
up in a large room. His mistress followed.
He did not wish Gip to follow him. Three trains of cars stood in the
Gip cried hard to be let out. station.
He grew tired of walking up and Gip smelled them all. He turned
down and barking. away.
At last he jumped up on a table He was not pleased.
Five or six trains came in and
went out.
Gip did not like one of them.
-: '' At last his mistress said she must
S'go home. She had left her little baby
fast asleep on the bed.
Gip would not go with her.
-.-..- __- The man who looked after all the
WAITING FOR THE BAYTOWN TRAIN. trains said he would watch Gip for
and looked out of the window, her.
But it was no fun to look out and She thanked him. She said, My
watch the cats in the yard when his husband went to Baytown this morn-
master was gone. ing on the first train.
He thought about it for two hours. He will not come back for a
By and by his mistress heard some- week. Gip wants him."
thing go crash, crash rattle, bang! I understand," said the man. I
She looked out, and there was Gip will send you word about Gip."
running out of the yard. That night he told her what hap-
She called, but he ran on. opened after she went home.
"I must watch him," she said; The little dog walked back and
" he cost too much money to lose." forth like a man.
She put on her hat and cloak and He smelled of every train which
followed him. came in and went out.






When the Baytown train came at Gip decided at last which road he
last, he barked, and jumped about. would take.
The conductor said, Who's dog Then he ran on more than a mile.
is that?" At last he foOnd his master at
When he heard the story he said, work.
One of the men went after Gip,
"and told his master he would give
^ him one hundred dollars for him.
His master would not part with
'. his wise, loving dog.
SHe had never worked in Baytown
-,- before, and Gip had never been in the
S-cars before.
"I I I WAY DII MY MASTER GO ?" How could Gip tell which cars
went to the sea-shore, and which
" A dog that knows where he wants ent to the city?
to go need not buy a ticket." How did Gip know when he got to
Then Gip sprang up the car steps Baytown ?
and went in.
He took a seat close to the window .,
and looked out. .
One of the men on the train tried i -t.
to tease him. -
He tried to make him get off at
every place where the cars stopped. *-.. :-
Gip did not like it. He sat still : :
and growled. ", O1KNOW "
When the cars rolled into Baytown, How could Gip tell it from the
Gip sprung out. Then he looked all other places?
around. But Gip did many strange things
The conductor said, He knows as in his short life.
much as a child ; let him alone."







A PIECE OF RUBBER.

One day Percy's little brother,
Robin, asked what his piece of rub-
Sib:" er w as m ade of.
i -. Percy could not tell.
.--l' He asked his mamma.
-1 IX- She told him that India-rubber was
year- a kind of gum that.drops from trees.
'i. -o- -. o 1 d Then she told Percy and Robin
.- Per- to bring the big atlas.
c y is She turned to the maps of South
!i learning America and Asia.
..I .'' to draw. On these two maps she pointed
He has out the countries where the rubber
Sa drawing- trees grow.
S- book, two "The rubber trees are very tall
pencils, and trees, said mamma.
S ,. apiece of "The branches are all at the top.
,^ _1' India-rub- Early in the morning the rubber
b e r. gatherers go out and cut many holes
The lead in the trunks of these tall trees.
GATHERING THE SAP. i n one of Under each hole they fasten a lit-
the pencils is very hard. tle cup.
This pencil makes fine light marks By and by these cups are full of
on the paper, a yellow-white sap, or juice, which
The other pencil is filled with soft drops from the holes in the trees.
lead. This juice looks like good, rich
This pencil makes broad dark milk.
marks. Percy says these dark marks The rubber gatherers often mould,
are hard to rub out. out of clay, odd little bottles, and






sometimes the shapes of animals. Percy, made of the pure gum?"
Over these shapes they pour the I think so," said mamma.
thick, gummy, milky rubber juice. "The purer it is, the better it will
Then they hold these shapes rub out pencil marks.
over hot fires. When they wish to make the best
The heat hardens the juice, kind of pencil rubber they tear or
It also makes the color darker, grind the gum into fine bits.
When the first coating of gum is These bits are carefully washed.
dry, they wet it again, dry it, wet it "Then they are pressed together
again, dry it, and so on until the coat- under heavy rollers into sheets.
ing of dried gum is very thick. "The sheets of rubber that are
When the last layer of gum is dry, made in this way are very firm and
they break out the clay inside and fine.
throw it away. "These sheets are then cut into
"Then the curious rubber shapes little blocks by great shears that
are ready to take to market. work under water.
"They are carried to the city on "Then the blocks are put in long
the tops of long poles." iron trays and dried in the sun.
"Why don't they take them in After this they are sent to the
baskets ?" asked Robin. stores."
"Because they are often quite And little boys like me, who are
sticky. It takes the gum a long time learning to draw," said Percy, "go
to dry." into the stores and buy them."
"Is my piece of rubber," asked -E. E. B.



S" YES, little cat, you may come and look out;
S,. I '11 hold you tight and you needn't pout -
It's the naughtiest thing I ever heard,
"That you should wish to dine on a bird--
"On a dear little bird



































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JOE AKESHISBARRLS O POASH O BOTON








WHAT PERCY FOUND.

"It was a home.
A mother and her nine children
"..".. ., 1 ~ lived in it.
Yet it was so small that Percy
/, r. carried it away with him, on the palm
"of his hand.
Can you guess now?
No:
'Well, I shall have to tell you what
it was.
S, I-I E found It was the nest of a field mouse.
'it, one Satur- A field mouse is the smallest ani-
day, out in the wheat-field. It had mal that has four feet.
been there all summer long. There were nine baby mice, and
The tall wild flowers had peeped their mamma, in the nest that Percy
at it. The winds had swung it to found.
and fro. But Percy was the first one He kept them all. He put them
who held it in his hand. in a cage. They were pretty pets.
It was as round as an apple. The mother mouse eats grain. She
It was as soft as silk inside, laps water like a dog.
Can you guess now what it was Percy has taught her how to turn
that Percy found ? a wheel.
No. Sometimes, she will hang from
Then you cannot guess what was the top of the cage by her long tail.
in it. She will swing there for many min-
Well, it was something that held utes. She will keep time with the
ten pairs of eyes, and ten sets of ticking of the clock.
little feet. Percy never forgets 'to feed his
It was a house, tiny pets.









TICK TOCK.

Tick tock, tick tock -
I'll count the seconds by grand-
mother's clock.
When sixty have ticked, the min-
ute-hand shows
That one minute comes as another
one goes.
Sixty seconds a minute, and then
it will take
Sixty minutes, I -know, an hour to
make.
The length of a day I can easily
mark N,
Just twenty-four hours of day-light
and dark.
Seven days make a week; and then
'fifty-two
Of these weeks make a year, if my
counting is true.
A hundred long years, and then
there will be
A century here, for some one to see.



A NAUGHTY SHEEP.

What very soft steps you take, naughty sheep!
You wish me to think you're good, naughty sheep!
You've come through a hole in the fence, naughty sheep!
And now you must go straight back, naughty sheep!









TICK TOCK.

Tick tock, tick tock -
I'll count the seconds by grand-
mother's clock.
When sixty have ticked, the min-
ute-hand shows
That one minute comes as another
one goes.
Sixty seconds a minute, and then
it will take
Sixty minutes, I -know, an hour to
make.
The length of a day I can easily
mark N,
Just twenty-four hours of day-light
and dark.
Seven days make a week; and then
'fifty-two
Of these weeks make a year, if my
counting is true.
A hundred long years, and then
there will be
A century here, for some one to see.



A NAUGHTY SHEEP.

What very soft steps you take, naughty sheep!
You wish me to think you're good, naughty sheep!
You've come through a hole in the fence, naughty sheep!
And now you must go straight back, naughty sheep!






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