My birthday present

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Material Information

Title:
My birthday present
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 15 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
S. W. Partridge & Co. (London, England) ( Publisher )
Publisher:
Thomas Nelson and Sons
S.W. Partridge and Co.
Place of Publication:
New York
London
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1884   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1884
Genre:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
England -- London

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002234732
notis - ALH5168
oclc - 63260264
System ID:
UF00053163:00001


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The Baldwin Library
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MY BIRTHDAY

PRESENT.
















fict pork:
THOMAS NELSON AND SONS.
zonbon:
S. W. PARTRIDGE AND CO.












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PHARISEE AND PUBLICAN.
THE Pharisee prayed with his lips only,
and wanted to be heard of men who
would praise his piety; but the publican,
the poor man, was sincere, and prayed
from his heart to be heard only by God
who answers prayer, and helps all who
trust in Him. His prayer was, God be
merciful to me a sinner."
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"DON'T LOITER ON THE ROAD."
"Go quickly there and back; and don't
loiter," said Mrs. Black to her grand-
child, who was taking a basketful of
dolls to the grand shop in the town,
and to which shop little Betty held the
post of dolls'-dressmaker; and very
proud she was of it too, and tried to do
her work well.



























THE COPY-BOOK.

UNCLE Peter promised to give Emma
a prize if, when she next paid him a
visit, she brought a neatly-written copy-
book to show him; so Emma has done
her best, and hopes that she has gained
it. A book would please her best, for
she likes reading; but UnclePeter must
give what he chooses.


















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"DON'T CRY, MOTHER."
THE doctor has been to see how the
little patient is to-day, and says there is
slight hope of recovery; and the poor
mother, overcome at the thought of her
child dying, is weeping bitterly, when
Robin consoles her by saying, Trust in
God, and ask Him to make Kitty well
again."




























THE LINNET.
THE linnet is a gay and active little
bird. It is of a very sociable disposition,
and likes to live in company with a
goodly number of its sprightly and
pleasant tribe. It has a wonderful affec-
tion for its young. God has given to
$ this little feathered warbler remarkable
skill in the building of its pretty nest.
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most beautiful specimens of bird-labour
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feathered friend can. The birds teach
THE GOLDFINCH.
THE nest of the goldfinch is one of the
most beautiful specimens of bird-labour
that can be found in the whole world.
No tailor with needle and thread could
fasten the twigs, and moss, and feathers
together so cleverly as this pretty little
feathered friend can. The birds teach
us lessons of trust in God.



















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A ROYAL HERALD.
ON state occasions heralds precede the
royal processions, and blowing their
silver trumpets give notice of the Queen's
approach; and all the people are glad to
see Her Majesty, for Englishmen are
loyal and love their sovereign, who will,
they hope, reign over them yet for many
years.
Dewdrof Series, No. 3. C













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VERY UNSAFE.

IF the horse moves a foot, Marie will
certainly fall; for standing on his back
is not too safe, and she would have been
wise to forego the pleasure of picking
the tempting fruit; but Marie is wilful,
and cousin Max can refuse her nothing
she asks him. I fear also that they are
stealing.





























A REST ON THE STILE.
THESE two men are not as young as
they once were, and a rest is pleasant.
Besides this, the view is so beautiful that
it is worth looking at, and it fills their
hearts with thankfulness to God who
has made the world so fair, and given us
A REST ON THE STILE.




THESE to enjoy it. We notas yould praise
they once were, and a res pleasant scenes.



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Besides this, the view is so beautiful that
it is worth looking at, and it fills their
hearts with thankfulness to God who
has made the world so fair, and given us
senses to enjoy it. We should praise
God for pleasant scenes.
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" Now, Joan;" said little Harry, "you
know you mustn't tell papa what we are
going to do on his birthday, because it
is to be a surprise; but I'll whisper in
your ear. We are going to have our
portraits taken and hung up on the
drawing-room wall." And Joan says,
" Oh, how delightful !"
















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TOM seems kind to his guinea pigs, for
they have a box full of straw to sleep
in, and are nibbling away at a cabbage-
leaf; he hopes you will give him a trifle,
as he has no money to buy food; and as
he is kind to his pets you should en-
courage him by doing so. Those who
keep pets should be very kind to them.





























A CATASTROPHE.
WHO would have thought of hives so
near a stile ? Certainly John did not,
and in jumping over he has upset them,
and the enraged bees are coming out so
madly, that he will be stung to death if
no help comes. Keep your hands down,
John, and do not fight them, and you
may escape yet.




























IN MISCHIEF.
OH, boys, boys, always in mischief!
what torments you are to be sure! Who
do you think is going to get your clothes
clean after a visit to the inside of a
sugar-cask ? and look what a swarm of
flies you have disturbed; you had much
better leave them in possession, and go
about your own business.




























LIGHTING THE LAMPS.
EVERY night, wet or fine, the lamp-
lighter must go on his rounds, or we
should find our streets in darkness; and
every morning early, while you are snug
in bed, he must go round and see that
all the lights are out ; so he has plenty
to do. But he does not mind, for he likes
to be employed.













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"THE GARDENER.

EARLY and late the gardener must be
at his work, if he wishes the garden to
look nice. He must dig and rake, and
hoe up weeds, plant seeds, and water the
plants; take away the leaves and flowers
that are dead, and save up seeds for
another year. Gardening is very healthy
employment.
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ILL IN BED.

HERBERT has been very ill, but is, we
hope, recovering; and meanwhile he is
carefully nursed, and has all he wants,
and everybody praises him, for he is
very patient, and takes whatever the
doctor orders him, however nasty it may
be, without one murmuring word. He
knows it is meant to do him good.







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"AND what is Tommy to be ?" asked
Uncle Walter, taking his nephew on his


to be a clergyman, and spend his life
Uncle Walter taking his nephew on his
knee. Tommy hasn't quite made up


going about preaching the Gospel to the
poor people in the land who are still
ignorant of it.




























THE NEW CARRIAGE.

JESSIE'S new carriage is only a wheel-
barrow, but it gives her more pleasure
than if it was gold: She, dolly, and the
watering-pot are all tumbled in together,
and kind brother Jack is acting horse
for the ride, and away they go! How
much delight a very simple thing gives
contented people!




























WILL THEY COME?

GRACE and Ethel really believe that the
birds will come if they call them ; but
the only reason these robins don't fly
away is that they are hungry, and hope
the little girls have some food. Think
of this, and throw out your crumbs
daily in winter to feed the birds. They
will thank you in summer with a song.






























with her little foal. She is as proud of


tempted to injure it, she is well contented
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to have us admire it, and even stroke
BRENDA AND HER FOAL.
COME and look at pretty white Brenda
with her little foal. She is as proud of
her baby as she can be, and although
she would run after any one who at-
tempted to injure it, she is well contented
to have us admire it, and even stroke
its soft head; but she likes to have the
care of it herself.







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help their owners. Tray, for instance,
can be trusted to carry a basket to the
baker's and bring back a loaf as well as
a servant would, and quicker, too, for he
runs all the way, and does not stop for
a gossip on the road.











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A FEED OF CORN.
"ALL right, sir ; I'll see your horse is
"well looked after ;" and with a feed of
corn in a sieve, Thomas opens the stable
door and goes in to attend to his charge.
Thomas is a kind and attentive man, and
never neglects his duties, and so is re-
spected by his employers, who know the
value of a faithful servant.



















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DECORATING THE WALLS.

PAPA'S new house is being painted and
papered, and though the smell of paint
would be unpleasant if we lived in it,
we like to go daily and see what is
being done. The walls in the drawing-
room are now being decorated with
flowers, and very pretty it will look when
all is finished.




























DRESSED UP.
DORA thinks herself very grand as she
glides along dressed up in, a bonnet and
shawl belonging to mamma and far too
large for her. She has a basket in one
hand and holds a large leaf in the other,
which serves as a parasol; and in this
garb she trots about he house, making
every one who se*sVer laugh.




























"JUST ONCE MORE."

NURSE has called out to Edward to be
quick, as she is waiting to dress him;
but dabbling in the water is so very
pleasant, that he says, "Just once more."
Little boys should be obedient, and come
at once when they are told, and not imi-
tate Edward. Disobedient boys usually
make bad men.











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THE NOSEGAY.
LOTTIE has a little garden of her own,
and when she can pick a nosegay of
sweet flowers from it, she is delighted,
and running off to mamma, presents her
gift at once. Then she and mamma
talk about the flowers, and how God
made them and cares for them, as He
does for all the works of His hands.





























"DINNER IS READY."
"VERY glad to hear it, Rachel, for I am
as hungry as a hunter," said Hubert;
" I went a long walk over Beachy Head,
and it has given me such an appetite,
I could eat wood." Here is something
rather better than wood, Master Hubert,"
said Rachel smiling, as she gave him a
plate of cold beef.












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THE BATH.
WHAT a delight it is to Edwin to sit in
the warm water and splash He would
like to stay in the bath a longer time
than nurse can spare, for she has the
other children to attend to, and it is
getting late. Edwin rather objects to
being soaped; but nurse is gentle, and
so no tears are shed.










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SOMETHING has gone wrong here, for
high words are heard, and the farmer is
disputing the bill which is shown him.
The dealer says he has brought the
horse he sold him to the door, and
won't go without the money, and the
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DISPUTING.

SOMETHING has gone wrong here, for
high words are heard, and the farmer is
disputing the bill which is shown him.
"The dealer says he has brought the
horse he sold him to the door, and
won't go without the money, and the
farmer says he won't pay, so there is a
fine to-do about it.















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MOTHER AND CHILD.
AND very like each other, too. The
likeness between mother and child is a
striking one; but there is, of course, a
difference in size. Poor little donkey!
you belong to a badly-used race, but I
do hope you may fall into good hands,
and be treated with more kindness than
falls to the lot of most of your friends.
















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From Photo. b3] [Mr. Mares.
THE FIDDLER.
IF his tunes are as merry as his face he
will get many people stopping to listen
to him, and we hope some of them will
remember to give him a trifle, for he
has a wife and four children at home;
and as he always takes them all the
money he gets he deserves to be en-
couraged for his kindness to them.
Dewodrop Series, No. 4. D











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"ORANGES, TO-DAY?"
YES, we will buy some of your oranges,
my good man, for they are refreshing
this hot weather, and you will be glad
to have less to carry; so put down'your
basket, and we will choose them. Do
oranges grow in this country ? I hear you
ask. Only-in greenhouses; but abroad
they grow in orchards, as apples do here.













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frightened ? Never mind, you're all
safe now," said Robert, cuddling up as
he spoke a poor little puppy he had
rescued from some cruel boys. And the
little thing understood him, and licked
his face, and seemed ready to go any-
where with such a kind master.
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A SELF-WILLED BOY.
GEORGE fell down as he was running
round the garden, and cut his face with
a stone; and now he is crying because
he thinks the cold water will hurt him.
Is not he a silly boy not to let mamma
do what she knows is best for him ? I
am afraid he is self-willed and disobe-
dient, and will often get into trouble.
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GIVING TRACTS.
HERE is an old gentleman who, although
he is ill, and unable to walk, still wishes
to be useful; so when he goes down the
village street in his chair, he stops at the
cottages and gives away tracts to the
children, and at the same time he tells
them to be obedient to their parents and
diligent at their lessons.













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GLEANERS.

MOTHER and children have all been
working hard, and' are now at the close
of the day returning home with the
wheat they have collected; and when
the grains are beaten out, and ground
up into flour, there will be a nice store
of it, which will be a great help to
this industrious family.



























HELP HELP!


the river beyond, James ran down the
field with such full speed that before he
could stop he was in the water. For-
tunately, as he cannot swim, his cries for
help were heard, and while a boat put off
from the lock, the gamekeeper plunged
in, and James was quickly rescued.
in, and James was quickly rescued.







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papa and mamma to -church; and al-
though too young to understand all that
is said, they know that God has told us
to reverence the Sabbath day, and that
when we are in church, we must think
about Him, and our Lord Jesus Christ,
and all He has done for us.












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"MAY I COME TO SCHOOL?"
WHEN a boy is really so anxious to
learn that, at the risk of being laughed
at, he goes in his shabby clothes, and
asks the master to let him come to
school, there must be hope of him; and
so thinks the master, for he is speaking
kindly, and telling him he will try him
for a week, and see how he gets on.
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"BUY a shell, ma'am," said a pleasant
voice to Mrs. Merton, who sat with
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her children on the beach. Oh, do,
mamma!" cried Johnny; and mamma,
willing to please him, did so, and after
"talking to the boy who sold it, promised
to go and see his mother, who was ill;
and he went away quite happy.














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BUSY HELPERS.
VERY busy indeed are all tbhg children,
and they think that but f.:f te help
they give it would not be possible for
father to get the garden tidily done up;
and he encourages them to do their best,
and pull up all the weeds, which, by-
and by, he will sweep up, and carry
away in the basket.




























THE BUSY GARDENER.

FLORENCE had a border given up to her
care this last spring; and being resolved
that it shall be the best-kept border in
the whole garden, she works early and
late. In the morning she ties up the
flowers, and pulls up the weeds, and in
the evening, when the sun sets, she takes
her can and waters the plants.






























POLLY AND THE SUGAR.
" MAY I give Polly this lump of sugar,
aunt ?" "Yes, dear; but let her take it
at once, and do not tease her." "Oh,
no, aunt, I would not think of it!" and
Jessie went up to Polly, who said, Good
morning, my dear," and then took the
sugar, which she seemed to enjoy very
much.









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A DRINK OF WATER.
AFTER a long ride a draught of water
is as welcome to Mr. Thornton as to his
horse, especially when he gets it without
dismounting; but Bessie is always ready
to do a kindness, and she held up the
jug to him directly the horse stopped.
Mr. Thornton offered her something for
her trouble, but she politely declined it.





















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A LIFT ON THE ROAD.

IT was fortunate for old Joe that kind
Mr. Smith came along just as he wvas
feeling quite faint, carrying such a heavy
load, for directly he saw the old man, he
stopped the car, and after helping him
to put in the basket, told him to jump
up on the seat, and he would drive him
to his own house.




















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THE WEAVER.

SEE how carefully this ma-n moves the
bars of his machine; he knows that if
his fingers slipped they might get seri-
ously hurt. He has to sit at his work
many hours a day before he can make
the bright carpets for our floors, or the
soft velvet which mamma likes to wear
in winter.




























A HOD OF MORTAR.

A HOD of mortar does not seem any
great thing in itself; but yet no house
could be built without it, and the labourer
who carries it up the ladder is quite as
useful in his way as the bricklayer who
uses it. I hope both bricks and mortar
are good of their kind, for whatever is
worth doing is worth doing well.










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A GOOD WASH.
FRITZ is a little boy who has been taught
that a clean face and hands will make
even poor clothes look well; and so
when he has done his day's work in the
fields he never fails to go down to the
brook, and have a good wash in the cool
running water before he goes back to
his well-earned supper.




























WELCOMING PAPA.
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WELCOMING PAPA.

FRANKIE is ready to bound off his sister's
knee when he sees papa coming up the
garden path, for he loves him so very
dearly that he cries after him when in
the morning papa has to go away to his
office, and is always the first to say,
"Good evening, papa," when he returns
honie to his family.
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THE PICTURE PAPER.

How fortunate the little girls and boys
of the present day are-so many people
write pretty tales for them, and there
are so many picture papers, that there
is always something new to look at.
When papa and mamma were young it
was quite different-there were then very
few books and fewer pictures.
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THE LIGHT IN THE WINDOW.

A POOR old woman, who lived all alone
by the sea-shore, used to put a light in
her window every dark night, in hopes
that some sailor might find it help to
guide his boat; and though it seemed a
little thing to do, it was often of the
;'-:ti:t use to those at sea, and, perhaps,
"1xi: means, many lives were saved.






























evening at home. Uncle John sits at

the harmonium, Albert plays the flute,
Eva and Maud sing, and papa, putting
on his spectacles, looks over his little
daughter's shoulder, and joins in with a
bass voice. They are practising carols
to sing on Christmas Eve.
to sing on Christmas Eve.








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THE NEEDLEWORK PRIZE.
JANE is one of the best scholars in May-
bury School, and all her schoolfellows
think she is sure to gain the prize for
needlework at the next examination.
Here we see her diligently working at
a sampler, and as she does so her chief
thought is, How pleased grandmother
and mother will be if I gain the prize.










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THE CLOCK.
THIS clock is a great attraction to all
little people, because W'he', father winds
up a certain part of it the.chimes begin
to play; and as this is not done every
day, it is considered, a treat to hear
them, and is usually the reward on
Saturday night for having behaved well
all the week.






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