• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Introduction
 Selling in the classroom
 Final thoughts
 Reference
 Advertising






Group Title: Teaching and Learning Paper Series - University of Florida. Food and Resource Economics Dept. ; TLP 01-2
Title: Enhancing buyerseller relationships in the classroom
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00053093/00001
 Material Information
Title: Enhancing buyerseller relationships in the classroom
Series Title: Teaching and learning paper series
Physical Description: 11, 4 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Wade, Mark A
University of Florida -- Food and Resource Economics Dept
Publisher: University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Food and Resource Economics Dept.
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Publication Date: 2001
 Subjects
Subject: Teacher-student relationships   ( lcsh )
Classroom environment   ( lcsh )
Motivation in education   ( lcsh )
Learning, Psychology of   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. 10-11).
Statement of Responsibility: by Mark A. Wade.
General Note: Cover title.
General Note: "May 2001"--Cover.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00053093
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida
Resource Identifier: aleph - 003415883
oclc - 47709270

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Selling in the classroom
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Final thoughts
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Reference
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Advertising
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
Full Text


TLP 01-2




TEACHING AND LEARNING PAPER SERIES


The goal of the Teaching and Learning paper Series is to improve, enhance, and enrich
the teaching and learning environment in the department, college, university, and
profession through the publication of papers on teaching philosophies and techniques,
curricular issues, and case studies. Papers are circulated without formal review by the
Food and Resource Economics Department and thus the content is the sole
responsibility of the faculty author or co-author.











( UNIVERSITY OF
*FLORIDA
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Food and Resource Economics Department
Gainesville, Florida 32611


ENHANCING BUYER/SELLER RELATIONSHIPS
IN THE CLASSROOM
by
Mark A. Wade

Teaching and Learning Paper TLP 01-2 May 2001













Enhancing Buyer / Seller Relationships in the Classroom


by


Mark A. Wade






Abstract: Agribusiness selling techniques are adapted to the classroom. As in any relationship
between buyer and seller, the educational transaction between learner and teacher requires that a
level of receptivity be created so that FAB's of the transaction can be examined. A five-step
classroom sales plan is discussed and examples are provided. When you "sell on purpose," great
care is taken to create a receptive environment so that a mutually beneficial level of trust can be
established. By introducing these concepts into the classroom, in effect "teaching on purpose," a
win-win transaction occurs.


Key Words: agribusiness selling, transactional relationship, classroom environment, teaching
techniques, learning style, teaching on purpose












Enhancing Buyer / Seller Relationships in the Classroom


by


Mark A. Wade




"Students learn what they care about and remember what they understand."

The Essence of Good Teaching (p. 51)


"To be successful, a salesperson must be able to find and address the
dominant buying motive of each client "

Relationship Selling (p. 65)




Introduction

Today's consumers do not want to be sold; they want to be provided with solutions to

problems (Webster). This requires a change from the traditional product oriented sales approach

to a partner driven, solution driven relationship. According to Cathcart (p. 1), "Relationship

Selling is focused on building a good relationship with someone and providing a valuable service

through that relationship." Salespeople have rediscovered the importance of listening to

customers, and quickly learn that by listening they can determine customer needs (Wilson).


Mark A. Wade is an Assistant Professor of Food and Resource Economics, College of
Agricultural and Life Sciences, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of
Florida, Fort Pierce, Florida.










The innovation and quality aspects of this re-awakening then help to provide what many sales

professionals seek --- growth and a level of satisfaction that can only come from solving real

problems.

People buy because they have needs which can be met, or perceived to be met, by the

products or solutions being sold. But the salesperson doesn't act alone in the transaction, selling

is interactual, meaning that it involves at least two people (Buzzotta, Lefton and Sherberg).

When the transaction yields mutually beneficial results, both parties have performed together,

equally. This relationship is then defined by a degree of trust, and the selling environment is

established to be safe, friendly and based upon two-way communication.

Success in the new millennium classroom requires that educators also break free of

traditional pedagogical paradigms and recognize that they must capitalize on student's existing

needs (Davis, pp. 193-94). Educators must accept that a variety of learning styles exist and adapt

their teaching methods in order to facilitate the learning process. A positive classroom

environment is comfortable and non-threatening, a place where expectations are exchanged

between teacher and student (Davis). Part of the goal in moving young minds from a dualistic

intellect to a more relativistic stage, requires that the student accept that what is being taught has

value, not only educational value, but value worth entering into a transactional relationship. This

transaction occurs when the learner makes a rational decision to exchange dollars, time, and

energy for the knowledge and experience offered by the instructor. As in any relationship

between buyer and seller, the transaction requires that a level of receptivity be created so that

features, advantages and benefits of the transaction can be examined and evaluated.

Creating a receptive environment, listening, needs analysis, motivation, problem solving,

and partnership are all equally important ingredients to the sales transaction, whether the product

be a tractor, ton of feed, or an educational concept (Schunk). Where Buzotta, Lefton and










Sherberg profile buyer and seller behaviors, Davis profiles learner and teacher behaviors. Like

buyers and sellers, recognition that all students and instructors are unique provides a basic

opportunity for communication, participation and maximized learning. Just as the product driven

salesperson of old, many educators tend to focus a majority of their attention on the "product"

they have to "sell" rather than identifying student needs, recognizing objections or obstacles to

success, and maximizing student learning.





Selling in the Classroom

Similarities between buyer seller, and student teacher relationships are profound,

especially to those that have operated on both sides of the transaction in both types of

relationship. At the simplest level, teaching and selling both deal with the transfer of goods or

services between parties that may be somewhat resistant to the transaction. In both situations,

steps can be taken that will create an environment which is conducive to breaking down barriers

to the transaction. Needs can then be identified and met to the mutual satisfaction and benefit of

both parties. Recommendations as to how this can be achieved will be presented in five steps

(Buzzotta, Lefton and Sherberg, pp. 182-87).



Step One: Developing a Pre-Call Plan

Any successful selling situation begins with a Pre-Call Plan. The pre-call plan provides

the salesperson with their plan of attack. It identifies the target audience, information to be

discovered, possible products of interest, how the first interaction or "opening" will be









conducted, materials needed, and a specific strategy for creating a positive environment, or

"spinning receptivity."

A teaching situation requires no less advance preparation. The initial lesson plan should

identify:

who is expected to be taking the course (undergraduate or graduate students)

information that might be beneficial to know (grade level, previous course experience in

the subject area, related work experience, student expectations, is the class required or an

elective)

an initial outline of course content (preliminary syllabus)

required materials (overhead projector, handouts, student surveys and data sheets)

actions the instructor will take to create a positive learning environment



Feelings are ever present in the classroom. Some feelings may be overtly expressed,

some private, and others outside of awareness (Menges and Rando). Levels of student

motivation vary, so it is important to build a sense of belonging or community immediately,

before barriers between teacher and student are created (Povlacs, p. 8).



Step Two: Creating a Positive Selling Environment (Opening)

Creating a positive selling environment can be as complex as decorating an office or

taking potential customers on a fishing trip, or as simple as telling a joke or commenting on the

weather. The keys to spinning receptivity to your message are preparation, proper profiling of

the customer (introvert, extrovert, passive, aggressive), a statement of purpose, and establishing

an active relationship with the customer's best interests in mind (The Psychology of Sales









Success). Building trust does not happen overnight, but by focusing on the four elements of trust

--- competence, reliability, intentions and appearance --- the seeds of trust are planted (Peterson).

The positive environment then allows the relationship, or seed, to grow and develop.

"Relationship selling transcends the sales transaction and looks beyond it to the ongoing

relationship between the buyer and the seller." (Cathcart, p. xiii)

Whatever level of motivation students bring to the classroom will be transformed, for

better or worse, by what happens in that classroom. Interaction between teachers and learners

and interaction among learners are powerful factors in promoting learning (Angelo). Active

learning creates excitement in the classroom and needs to be incorporated into the daily routine

of classroom instruction. Active learning gets students involved, relative to passive learning, and

engages students (Bonwell). By placing a greater value on exploration of attitudes and values,

and encouraging cooperative learning, information transmission is de-emphasized and greater

emphasis is placed on developing student skills. Students can then be involved in higher order

thinking.

One way to develop a positive learning environment is to allow students to co-create the

course syllabus. Give students the opportunity to take responsibility for what they will learn in

the course by allowing them input on the syllabus prior to the syllabus being distributed. Solicit

input based on student's prior experience and interests. This does not mean that the students

determine course content, but that they have some opportunity to influence that content, its

presentation and prioritization (Ellis, 1991b). The syllabus can be much more than just a list; it

can introduce the course to students in a number of creative ways, and can represent a vested

covenant between student and teacher ("What Did You Put in Your Syllabus?").










Step Three: Customer Needs Analysis

Once a receptive climate has been established, the customer-focused salesperson begins

to determine customer needs. Needs analysis provides the foundation for future sales by

identifying problems or concerns that the customer may have. The salesperson's desire to learn

and willingness to listen builds additional good will and further develops the buyer-seller

relationship. By concentrating on the buyer's needs, the salesperson demonstrates his/her desire

to find solutions to the customer's needs, through which his/her own needs will be met.

The most direct, and quickest, method of determining needs is to simply --- ask. Student

concerns regarding the course, course content, assessments, workload, and expectations can be

gathered in part by soliciting their inputs on the course syllabus. A student questionnaire can

also be used to determine student experience levels (which is important for experiential

learning), acquire personal data such as e-mail addresses and phone numbers, and provide the

tool for ice-breaker and community development activities. This helps to reduce the competitive

nature of education and enhance the cooperative (Ellis, 1991a).

Motivation plays an important role in learning (Schunk, p. 284). One way to encourage

students to become self-motivated is to help them find personal meaning and value in the

material. This cannot be done without first identifying their needs. Creating an atmosphere that

is open and positive, and helping students feel they are a valued member of a learning

community also enhances student's self-motivation (Davis).



Step Four: Problem Solving (Demonstration of Benefits)

Once communication barriers have been eliminated and customer needs have been

identified, the salesperson can begin to offer solutions to the customer's needs. It is key that

benefits derived from the offered solutions (most likely a product or service) be directly linked









with product features and advantages. Do not assume that the customer can readily see the

linkage between the product's features and the benefit of purchasing the product. The Features

(what is it) Advantages (what does it do) Benefits (what's in it for me) or FAB approach to

problem solving is a process that allows the buyer to reach their own conclusion as to how much

the product will satisfy their stated needs. In consultative or relationship selling, the

salesperson's role is not to "sell" the product, but to lead clients along the path to self-

determination (Webster, p. 91).

Students are not all motivated by the same values, needs, wants, or desires. Prior

knowledge and experience affects how the learner perceives and values new information

(Svinicki). It is important to work from student's strength and interests. Explain how the

content and objectives of the course will help the student achieve their educational, professional,

and personal goals (Lucas).

Sometimes students resist taking a course. Sell students on the benefits they will receive

from the course. Demonstrate points of transferability. Show that many of the techniques the

student will learn directly relate to the techniques that they will need to build successful careers.

Distinguish between "liking" the material and "benefiting" from the material. This is important

in helping students recognize that not all content can be fun and exciting (Ellis).



Step Five: Close

The close is in a sense the moment of truth. An agreement on action (hopefully a sale) is

reached and the climate for further interaction is established. At this point, plan, needs

assessment, and problem solving converge. If needs were properly identified and met, the sale is

made and both parties benefit mutually from the transaction. If not, additional data may be










needed to identify opportunities to improve the relationship, the environment, needs assessment

and/or the solutions offered.

For educators, the "close", or "making the sale" involves something less tangible. There

may be no physical exchange of product, but instead the exchange of knowledge. Indications of

a successful "sale" can include student performance on assessments, grades and course

evaluations. The opportunity for success in the classroom occurs on a daily basis, with each

subject, topic, or concept that is introduced being either accepted or rejected, based upon how the

concept was presented. Students that buy into what the instructor has to sell, illustrated in some

part by learning, benefit. Those that do not may have failed to see the value of entering into the

transaction.



Final Thoughts

Given the importance of agriculture to the global economy, and the increase in

agribusiness teaching programs throughout the United States, it is vital that the teaching methods

utilized in the classroom maximize student performance. When we "sell on purpose," great care

is taken to create a receptive environment so that a mutually beneficial level of trust can be

established. Products and services are positioned as solutions to problems and salespeople are

viewed as important members of the team. When team members act for the overall good of the

team, long-term relationships are built and encouraged to develop. Only when that has been

accomplished will utility be maximized.

By adopting agribusiness sales techniques in the classroom environment, students play

the role of buyers and instructors act as sellers. Students are invited to share in the dialogue that

is their course, as partners that can help to determine their ultimate destiny. Efforts are made by









the instructor to adopt teaching styles that are appropriate for a variety of students learning styles

and experiences. Students and teacher both understand the relationship that exists and are

presented with the information necessary for both to achieve success. The active learning

process provides the foundation for instructor / student interaction that is an essential element to

needs determination and the eventual transfer of knowledge. The exchange of knowledge then

becomes a mutually beneficial transaction. Introducing agribusiness selling concepts into the

classroom, by "teaching on purpose," a win-win-win transaction occurs; students benefit, faculty

benefits, and the agribusiness community and society benefit.










References

Angelo, Thomas A., "A 'Teacher's Dozen': Fourteen General, Research-Based Principles for

Improving Higher Learning in Our Classrooms". Adapted from Session 56, "A

'Teacher's Dozen': Fourteen General Findings from Research That Can Inform

Classroom Teaching and Assessment and Improve Learning," from AAHE's 1993

National Conference on Higher Education.

Bonwell, Charles C., Active Learning: Creating Excitement in the Classroom. Workshop

presented at the annual meeting of the American Agricultural Economics Association,

July, Salt Lake City, UT, 1998.

Buzotta, V.R., R.E. Lefton and Manuel Sherberg, Effective Selling Through Psychology,

Cambridge, MA, Ballinger Publishing Co., 1981.

Cathcart, Jim, Relationship Selling, Berkley Publishing, New York, 1990.

Davis, Barbara G., Tools for Teaching, San Francisco, CA, Jossey-Bass Publishers, 1993.

Ellis, David B., Becoming a Master Student, 7h ed., College Survival / Houghton Mifflin

Company, Rapid City, SD, 1991, pp.178-9.

Ellis, David B., Course Manual for Becoming a Master Student, College Survival / Houghton

Mifflin Company, Rapid City, SD, 1991, p. 205

Lucas, A. F., "Using Psychological Models to Understand Student Motivation." In M. D.

Svinicki (ed.), The Changing Face of College Teaching. New Directions for Teaching

and Learning, no. 42. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1990.

Menges, R. J. and Rando, W.C., "What Are Your Assumptions? Improving Instruction by

Examining Theories," College Teaching 37(2), 1989, pp. 54-60.










Peterson, Robin T., "The Building Blocks of Trust," Personal Selling Power, 15(8) Nov./Dec.

1995, pp. 60-61.

Povlacs (Lunde), Joyce T., "101 Things You Can Do The First Three Weeks of Class,"

Teaching at UNL, the newsletter of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Teaching and

Learning Center 8(1), 1986, pp. 1-4.

Schunk, Dale H., Learning Theories, 2nd ed., Upper Saddle River, NJ, Prentice Hall, 1996.

Svinicki, Marilla, "What they don't know can hurt them: The role of prior knowledge in

learning," Teaching Excellence 5(4), 1993-1994.

"The Psychology of Sales Success," vol. 1, Selling Power Magazine, Fredericksburg, VA, 1997,

pp. 101-107.

Webster, Bryce, The Power of Consultive Selling, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, Prentice-Hall, Inc.,

1987.

What Did You Put in Your Syllabus?, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Teaching and Learning

Center. 1997.

Wilson, Larry, Changing the Game: The New Way to Sell, New York, NY, Simon and Schuster,

1987.










TEACHING AND LEARNING PAPER SERIES
FOOD AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT


Author


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