• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 A useful pilot
 Jack
 A singular habit of the woodco...
 The sky-lark
 The story of a seal
 The king of the mountains
 Mother and pups
 Illustrations of whooping crane,...
 The hedgehog
 "She stoops to conquer"
 "George"
 Teaching Dolly to walk
 The puffed-up smoker
 "The more haste, the less...
 Going to the circus
 Bathing
 "Right of way"
 Indian converts
 A song for merry harvest
 Charity children preparing for...
 Learning to write
 The artist
 The vain cat
 The voice of the grass
 Little Jack off to school
 Man and the monkey
 The picnic in the wood
 Grandma's plates
 Spring flowers
 Will she round the point?
 My puppies, Jack ad Flo
 The young duck and the lobster
 At eventide
 The folly of foolish Fred
 Grace and her playmates
 The city cousin in the country
 The cunning little chicks
 The land of papyrus
 Birds of the river and sea
 Quails, jays, and blackbirds
 John Coleridge Patteson
 Back Cover






Title: Baby dear
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00053016/00001
 Material Information
Title: Baby dear stories, pictures and poems
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Worthington, R ( Publisher )
Greenaway, Kate, 1846-1901 ( Illustrator )
Weir, Harrison, 1824-1906 ( Illustrator )
Publisher: R. Worthington
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1882
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1882   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1882   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1882   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1882
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: illustrated.
General Note: Illustrated t.p.
General Note: Contains several illustrations by Kate Greenaway and Harrison Weir. Cover: brown pictorial boards with purple cloth spine. Advertisement on backcover for R. Worthington's new juvenile books.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00053016
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002222701
notis - ALG2947
oclc - 34494788

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page i
    A useful pilot
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Jack
        Page 3
        Page 4
    A singular habit of the woodcock
        Page 5
        Page 6
    The sky-lark
        Page 7
        Page 8
    The story of a seal
        Page 9
        Page 10
    The king of the mountains
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Mother and pups
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Illustrations of whooping crane, great heron, wild turkey, and fire backed jungle fowl
        Page 15
    The hedgehog
        Page 16
    "She stoops to conquer"
        Page 17
        Page 18
    "George"
        Page 19
    Teaching Dolly to walk
        Page 19
        Page 20
    The puffed-up smoker
        Page 21
        Page 22
    "The more haste, the less speed"
        Page 23
    Going to the circus
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Bathing
        Page 25
    "Right of way"
        Page 26
    Indian converts
        Page 27
    A song for merry harvest
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Charity children preparing for the harvest home
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Learning to write
        Page 31
    The artist
        Page 32
    The vain cat
        Page 33
    The voice of the grass
        Page 34
    Little Jack off to school
        Be in time
            Page 35
            Page 36
    Man and the monkey
        Sagacity of a cat
            Page 37
        A monkey trap
            Page 37
            Page 38
    The picnic in the wood
        Watching the birds
            Page 39
        Playing school
            Page 39
            Page 40
    Grandma's plates
        Six little turkeys
            Page 41
    Spring flowers
        Page 42
    Will she round the point?
        The goat
            Page 43
            Page 44
    My puppies, Jack ad Flo
        The clever sheep dog
            Page 45
        The dancing lesson
            Page 45
            Page 46
    The young duck and the lobster
        Page 47
    At eventide
        Page 48
    The folly of foolish Fred
        Feeding the Robin
            Page 49
        Our Charlie
            Page 49
            Page 50
    Grace and her playmates
        Page 51
        Page 52
    The city cousin in the country
        The squirrel
            Page 53
            Page 54
    The cunning little chicks
        The vampire bat
            Page 55
            Page 56
    The land of papyrus
        The mill
            Page 57
        The mandarin
            Page 57
            Page 58
    Birds of the river and sea
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Quails, jays, and blackbirds
        Page 61
        Page 62
    John Coleridge Patteson
        The three answers
            Page 63
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
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BABY DEAR


STORIES. PICTURES AND POEMS.

























ILL US TRA TED.



NEW' YORK:
(COPYRIGHT, 1882, BY)
R. WORTHINGTON, 770 BROADWAY.











A USEFUL PILOT.



S-HERE is a trained sheep kept on
board a steamer plying in California.
SIt goes out on the gang-plank, when
a flock is to be loaded, .to ssow that the ap-
proach is safe, and to act as -lot to the flock,
"which readily follows it on to the boat. The
sheep, when in a flock, are all alike timid, and
it is difficult to find a leader among them,
each being afraid to go first; but when one
goes, they all follow after, so that this clever
sheep is very valuable. The only other way
to get a flock on board a ship is to catch one
and drag it on board; but this is aot such a
good way as having the clever "Pilot."


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JACK.



nHE name of the bear is "Jack." I fetched
H him from the West India Import Dock on
the 5th of November, 1870. He was
running about with another bear on board ship,
but the job was to catch him. After many at-
tempts we at last put a strong collar round
his neck, to which was attached a long chain,
and then we got him into a large barrel, and
fastened the head on with hoop-iron, lowered
him over the side of the vessel into a boat, and
then pulled to the quay, and hauled him up
into a cart. For a time the little fellow was
quiet enough, but he got very inquisitive when
being driven toward the city, and wanted to
Shave a look round. I managed to quiet him
by giving him pieces of lump sugar. He arrived
safely at the Crystal Palace, and has lived in
an aviary till the beginning of last month,
when he was put into his new bear-pit. The
little fellow has grown twice the size he was
when he first came. He is very playful, but
sometimes shows his teeth when he is teased.




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A SINGULAR HABIT OF THE
WOODCOCK.

MONG several curious habits of the
S woodcock, describe by the editor of
S the zoologist, its practice of carrying its
"young is perhaps the most interesting.
1 The testimony of many competent wit-
nesses is cited to corroborate the statement.
The late L. Lloyd, in his "Scandinavian Adven-
tures," wrote, "If, in shooting, you meet with a
brood of woodcocks, and the young ones can-
not fly, the old bird takes them separately be-
tween her feet, and flies from the dogs with a
moaning cry."
The same author makes a similar statement
in another work, this habit of the woodcock
having been observed by a friend.
One of the brothers Stuart gives, in "Lays bf
the Deer Forest," a graphic account of the per-
formance. He says, "As the nests are laid on
dry ground, and often at a distance from nas-
ture, in the latter case, as soon as the -roung
are hatched, the old bird will sometimes carry
them in her claws to the nearest spring or green




























strip. In the same manner, when in danger, she
will rescue those which she can lift; of this we
have' frequent opportunities for observation in
Tarnaway. Various times when the hounds, in
beating the ground, have come upon a,brood, we
have seen the old bird rise with the young one
in her claws and carry it fifty or a hundred
yards away.









THE SKY- LARK.



AS any one ever told you that they
were "happy as a lark," and have you
stopped to think how happy a lark is?
-its joyous flight up into the sky, as high or
higher than the sight of man can reach, singing
louder and louder, and more and more gayly
the higher it ascends ? When the sweet hay-time
comes on, and mowers are busy in the fields with
their great scythes, it is sometimes a danger-
ous season for larks, who make their nests on
the ground. Often the poor little nests must
suffer; but only think how ingenious their own-
ers are if they do. A mower once cut off the
upper part of a lark's nest. The lark sitting
in it was uninjured. The man was very sorry
for what he had done; but there was no help
for it-at least so he thought. The lark knew
better, and soon afterward a beautiful dome
was found made of grass over the nest by the
patient, brave bird.



























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THE STORY OF A SEAL.

OME years ago a German Artist was
travelling in Norway, on foot, with
his knapsack on his back and his stick in
his hand. He lodged most of time in the
cottages that he fell in with on his road. In
one of them there was a seal, which the
fisherman had found on the sand, after
harpooning the mother of the poor animal.
No sooner was it admitted into the cottage
than the seal became the friend of the
family and the playmate of the children. It
played from morning till night with them,
would lick their hands, and call them with
a gentle little cry, which is not unlike the
human voice, and it would look at-them
tenderly with its large blue eyes, shaded by
long black lashes. It almost always followed
its master to fish, swimming around the
boat and taking a great many fish, which it
delivered to the fisherman without even
giving them a bite. A dog could not have
been more devoted, faithful, teachable, or
even more intelligent.










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THE KING OF THE MOUNTAINS.



HAT is that, mother?" "The eagle,
boy,
Proudly careering his course with
Sjoy,
Firm on his own mountain vigor re-
lying,
Breasting the dark storm, the red bolt defy
ing;
His wing on the wind, and his eye on the sun,
He swerves not a hair, but bears onward, right
on.
Close to the sun in lonely lands,
Ringed with the azure world he stands;
The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls,
He watches from his mountain walls.
Boy, may the eagle's flight ever be thine,
Oqi] rd and upward, and true to the line."




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MOTHER AND PUPS.



THE dog that you see here looking
quite maternal with her family around
her, is the sheep dog, the shepherd's
faithful and invaluable friend. It is the
most sagacious and intelligent of all
dogs, and volumes of anecdotes might be writ-
ten of its intelligence and affection.
Mr. St. John, in his "Highland Sports," tells
the following: "A shepherd once, to prove the
quickness of his dog, who was lying before the
fire where we were talking, said to me in the
middle of a sentence concerning something else,
'I'm thinking, sir, the cow is in the potatoes;'
when the dog, who appeared to be asleep, im-
mediately jumped up, and leaping through the
open window and on to the roof of the house,
where he could get a view of the potato field,
and not seeing the cow there, he looked into
the farm-yard, where she was, and finding that
all was right, returned to his old position be-
"forthe fire."



















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WHOOPING CRANE. GREAT HERON.



























WILD TURKEY FIRE BACKED JUNGLE FOWL.




























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THE HEDGEHOG.

WHERE are you going so fast away ?
- Where are you going?" the children said.
"To seek my dinner, this summer day,
To seek my dinner," the hedgehog said.

"You've got d1ng prickles, so sharp and fine!
"Such terrible prickles! the children said.
"Don't I tell you I'm going to dine?
o Let me be trotting," the hedgehog said.

"Nay, nay, now stay; don't hurry away!
Don't run away! the children said.
"What will you get for your dinner to-day."
S "A little fat snail," the hedgehog said.

"And do you gobble your snails quite raw?
Do you not cook them ?" the children said.
"Such inquisitive children I never saw!
Of course I don't cook them! the hedgehog said.





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"SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER."

" MISTRESS NELLIE, fair good morning! "Dear Mistress Nellie you distress me,
To night I go to see the play; For long I've counted on this play.
We have a box, will you go with us? And if your sisters do not like it
I beg you will not say me nay! Surely they can stay.aw y! "

"Oh, no I could not, pray excuse me, Dear Master Lacy, I will go then,
Whatever would my sisters say ? And I will join your party gay;
You know they are so stiff and mighty, I dearly, dearly love a frolic,
They will not go to see the play." To night I'll go to see the play! "
















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GEORGE."
OOR George makes a very sour
face; and why ? Because he just
suffered punishment for running
about the streets when he should
have been at work. If he had been a good
boy and learnt his lessons, it would not
have happened; but now let us hope that
this will be a warning to him and will make
him in future an obedient child.

TEACHING DOLLY TO WALK.
OL L Y, walk, you little THE CHILD'S MIAY SONG.
goose, A merry little maiden,
Don't annoy me; what's r
I the use ? In the merry month of May,
You can walk as well as I-Came tripping o'er the meadow,
Just as well if you would try. As she san ths merry lay
See how nicely you are dressed, "I'm a merry little maiden,
Fitted with your very best. My heart is light and gay;
Were you but as proud as I, And I love the sunny weather
You could walk if you would try. In the merry month of May.
Come, the grass is fresh and clear, I love the pretty lambkins
Do not tumble, dolly dear. That gayly sport and play,
Step up lively; if you ti, And make such frolic gambols
You can walk as well as I. In the merry month of May
There you drop, you haughty doll; I love the little birdies
Be ashamed of such a fall. That sit upon the spray,
Home I mean to make you go, And sing me such a blithe song
Home I mean to make you go, In the merry month of May.
If you trouble Clara so. In the merry month of May.
I love the blooming flowers
That grow on bank and brae,
How things arie done te adverbs tell, And with them weave my garlands
As slowly, quickly, ill or well. In the merry month of May.
Conjunctions join the words together, I love my little sisters
As men and women, wind or weather. And my brothers every day,
And I seem to love them better
The preposition stands before In the merry month of May.
A noun, as in or through a door.
The interjection shows surprise, Instead of nouns the pronouns stand,
As oh !/ow pretty; ah how wise.' Her head, his face,your arm, my hand.







GEORGE."
OOR George makes a very sour
face; and why ? Because he just
suffered punishment for running
about the streets when he should
have been at work. If he had been a good
boy and learnt his lessons, it would not
have happened; but now let us hope that
this will be a warning to him and will make
him in future an obedient child.

TEACHING DOLLY TO WALK.
OL L Y, walk, you little THE CHILD'S MIAY SONG.
goose, A merry little maiden,
Don't annoy me; what's r
I the use ? In the merry month of May,
You can walk as well as I-Came tripping o'er the meadow,
Just as well if you would try. As she san ths merry lay
See how nicely you are dressed, "I'm a merry little maiden,
Fitted with your very best. My heart is light and gay;
Were you but as proud as I, And I love the sunny weather
You could walk if you would try. In the merry month of May.
Come, the grass is fresh and clear, I love the pretty lambkins
Do not tumble, dolly dear. That gayly sport and play,
Step up lively; if you ti, And make such frolic gambols
You can walk as well as I. In the merry month of May
There you drop, you haughty doll; I love the little birdies
Be ashamed of such a fall. That sit upon the spray,
Home I mean to make you go, And sing me such a blithe song
Home I mean to make you go, In the merry month of May.
If you trouble Clara so. In the merry month of May.
I love the blooming flowers
That grow on bank and brae,
How things arie done te adverbs tell, And with them weave my garlands
As slowly, quickly, ill or well. In the merry month of May.
Conjunctions join the words together, I love my little sisters
As men and women, wind or weather. And my brothers every day,
And I seem to love them better
The preposition stands before In the merry month of May.
A noun, as in or through a door.
The interjection shows surprise, Instead of nouns the pronouns stand,
As oh !/ow pretty; ah how wise.' Her head, his face,your arm, my hand.













































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THE PUFFED-UP SMOKER.

OH, GORDON, how naughty!
Now, don't look so haughty,-
That's Uncle's pet pipe you've got in
your hand.
SIf you go on smoking,
We'll soon have you choking,
S We'll then have to bury you under
,the sand.

Said Gordon to Nellie,
"Go home and cook jelly,
S And don't interfere so with me and
my pipe!
Or else go and garden,
First begging my pardon,
And see if the plums have begun to
get ripe."













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"THE MORE HASTE, THE LESS SPEED."
UR two friends were on their
S -,way home, and being in a
-i.- great hurry, owing to their
staying out longer than they
"A,' should have done, thought of making
a short cut by crossing the pond that
was just frozen over. In their great
,- haste they over-looked the danger
sign and stepped on the ice, but
before they were half-wray over, the
ice broke and they fell into the water..
I am glad to say they got home safe
"after all, but 'hereafter they should
better understand the proverb, "the
more haste the less speed."

GOING TOO THE CIRCUS.
One of the greatest, pleasures of CHILD'S SONG IN SPRING.
children is going to the circus. How Yes, little girl.
they always enjoy seeing the wild Out in the wheat,
animals, the beautiful trained horses, Daisies are springing
how they laugh over the funny sayings White as your feet;
and jests of the clowns, and how they Growing for you
get excited about the races. Our Out in the wheat,
young people in our illustration Only because
appear to be delighted and thoroughly You are so sweet.
pleased. It really does one good to Yes, little girl,
see people enjoy themselves the way Down in the wood,
they do. And then when they go Violets are blowing
home after the circus is finished, they Blue as your hood;
will talk themselves to sleep, telling Blooming for you,
how the clown- tried to walk dn his Down in the wood,
Sear, and couldn't, and about the gen- Only because
tleman who rode on the horses bare You are so good.
back and jumped over bars, through Yes, little girl,
hoops, and the wonderful way he rode Under the mere,
on the horses tail without falling off. Lilies laugh up
Where the water is clear;
Three little words you often see Smile up at you
Are articles, a, an and the. From under the mere,
A noun's the name of any thing, Only because
As school or garden, hoop br swing. You are so dear.









"THE MORE HASTE, THE LESS SPEED."
UR two friends were on their
S -,way home, and being in a
-i.- great hurry, owing to their
staying out longer than they
"A,' should have done, thought of making
a short cut by crossing the pond that
was just frozen over. In their great
,- haste they over-looked the danger
sign and stepped on the ice, but
before they were half-wray over, the
ice broke and they fell into the water..
I am glad to say they got home safe
"after all, but 'hereafter they should
better understand the proverb, "the
more haste the less speed."

GOING TOO THE CIRCUS.
One of the greatest, pleasures of CHILD'S SONG IN SPRING.
children is going to the circus. How Yes, little girl.
they always enjoy seeing the wild Out in the wheat,
animals, the beautiful trained horses, Daisies are springing
how they laugh over the funny sayings White as your feet;
and jests of the clowns, and how they Growing for you
get excited about the races. Our Out in the wheat,
young people in our illustration Only because
appear to be delighted and thoroughly You are so sweet.
pleased. It really does one good to Yes, little girl,
see people enjoy themselves the way Down in the wood,
they do. And then when they go Violets are blowing
home after the circus is finished, they Blue as your hood;
will talk themselves to sleep, telling Blooming for you,
how the clown- tried to walk dn his Down in the wood,
Sear, and couldn't, and about the gen- Only because
tleman who rode on the horses bare You are so good.
back and jumped over bars, through Yes, little girl,
hoops, and the wonderful way he rode Under the mere,
on the horses tail without falling off. Lilies laugh up
Where the water is clear;
Three little words you often see Smile up at you
Are articles, a, an and the. From under the mere,
A noun's the name of any thing, Only because
As school or garden, hoop br swing. You are so dear.





























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BATHING.


HE didn't like bathing, oh dear oh dear!
The sea was so cold and the waves came so near.
"But sister was gentle, oh, sister was kind,
She whispered of beautiful shells they would find.
She told him the waves sing a wonderful song,
That only to wavelets and ripples belong.
"And will you not bathe, and make friends with the sea?
And would you not like a merman to be ? "
Then slowly, the frown faded out of his face,
And a smile like a ripple came back in its place.









































"RIGHT OF WAY."

"BAA, baa, there's no road this way!"
"Pretty sheep, do let me pass, I say,
It's too late to go back again to-day;
Nice little sheep, please do go away! "

""Baa, baa, we won't let you by;
It's no use for you to begin to cry.
You can't come this road,-no, not if you try,
And never mind asking the reason why."
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INDIAN CONVERTS.
HOSE three young lads sit-
ting in their native woods,
where birds in the richest
of dress and nature in its
lovliest attire are to be seen, are
Indians, having been recently con-
verted to the Christian religion. They
now attend the mission schools and
are learning the English language,
and also how to write it, which to
them is the greatest puzzle. In the
intervals of school hours they still de-
light to take a run into the woods and
listen to the songs of the birds, and
enjoy the fruit and beauty of nature.

A SONG FOR MERRY HARVEST.
Bring forth the harp, and let us sweep May bend the knees in thanks to see
its fullest, loudest string; the ample promised bread:
The bee below, the bird above, are Awake, then, all! 'tis Nature's call;
teaching us to sing and every voice that lives
A song for merry harvest; and the Shall welcome merry Harvest, and
one who will not bear bless the hand that gives.
His grateful part, partakes a boon he
ill deserves to share. THE FIRST POSTAGE STAMP.
The grasshopper is pouring forth his The first postage stamp ever used
quick and trembling notes; in this country is believed to have been
The laughter of the gleaner's child, broughtout in New Haven, Connec-
the heart's own music, floats. ticut, in 1846, by E. A. Mitchell, who
Up! up! I say, a roundelay from was then the postmaster there. In
every voice that lives response to many complaints of incon-
Should welcome merry, Harvest, and venience in paying postage at the
bless the hand that gives, delivery windows, as the office was
The buoyant soul that loves the bowl sometimes closed, and it took time at
may see the dark grapes shine; best, Mr. Mitchell finally got a stamp
And gems of melting ruby deck the engraved and printed. These stamps
ringlets of the vine; were sold at postage rates, and proved
Who prizes more the foaming ale, very convenient. An engraver of
may gaze upon the plain; New Haven has found the original
And feast his eye with yellow hops design, engraved in 1846. The
and sheets of bearded grain, stamping tool was made for use as a
The kindly one whose bosom aches canceling stamp, as used now, and the
to see a dog unfed, letters were engraved on brass.









INDIAN CONVERTS.
HOSE three young lads sit-
ting in their native woods,
where birds in the richest
of dress and nature in its
lovliest attire are to be seen, are
Indians, having been recently con-
verted to the Christian religion. They
now attend the mission schools and
are learning the English language,
and also how to write it, which to
them is the greatest puzzle. In the
intervals of school hours they still de-
light to take a run into the woods and
listen to the songs of the birds, and
enjoy the fruit and beauty of nature.

A SONG FOR MERRY HARVEST.
Bring forth the harp, and let us sweep May bend the knees in thanks to see
its fullest, loudest string; the ample promised bread:
The bee below, the bird above, are Awake, then, all! 'tis Nature's call;
teaching us to sing and every voice that lives
A song for merry harvest; and the Shall welcome merry Harvest, and
one who will not bear bless the hand that gives.
His grateful part, partakes a boon he
ill deserves to share. THE FIRST POSTAGE STAMP.
The grasshopper is pouring forth his The first postage stamp ever used
quick and trembling notes; in this country is believed to have been
The laughter of the gleaner's child, broughtout in New Haven, Connec-
the heart's own music, floats. ticut, in 1846, by E. A. Mitchell, who
Up! up! I say, a roundelay from was then the postmaster there. In
every voice that lives response to many complaints of incon-
Should welcome merry, Harvest, and venience in paying postage at the
bless the hand that gives, delivery windows, as the office was
The buoyant soul that loves the bowl sometimes closed, and it took time at
may see the dark grapes shine; best, Mr. Mitchell finally got a stamp
And gems of melting ruby deck the engraved and printed. These stamps
ringlets of the vine; were sold at postage rates, and proved
Who prizes more the foaming ale, very convenient. An engraver of
may gaze upon the plain; New Haven has found the original
And feast his eye with yellow hops design, engraved in 1846. The
and sheets of bearded grain, stamping tool was made for use as a
The kindly one whose bosom aches canceling stamp, as used now, and the
to see a dog unfed, letters were engraved on brass.



















A ___ __~8 1~\







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CHARITY CHILDREN PREPARING FOR THE
HARVEST HOME.

IN mob-cap and apron as white as the snow,
What are they doing! Heigho! heigho!
Wreathing a pillar with garland of posies
Of green leaves and jasmine, and red and white roses.
They are dressing the church for the thanksgiving-day;
The old village church is not often so gay.
So that's what the children are doing, heigho I
In apron and mob-cap as white as the snow.

Soon will the church bells go pealing and ringing,
Soon will the Charity Children go singing
Into the church where the wreaths are all twining,
Where lilies and roses are blooming and shining;
Where the rich autumn light through the windows is
streaming,
Till old and young faces light up with its beaming.
In apron and mob-cap as white as the snow,
There sit the Charity Children, heigho!













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tO
















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it

















LEARNING TO WRITE.
ILLUSTRATION BY MISS DICKENS.
Our Mabel has her lessons to learn Her sister's her teacher, who fondly
and to write, guides her hand
Though the wind's in the west, and And makes her the very best writer
the sun's shining bright in the land.


















THE ARTIST1
An I what a gift is his, whose skilful hand
"Can seize t-e beauty of the passing scene,
And bring back summer to a wintry land,
With all its golden light and smiling green!
Can build again the cot where we'were born,
S' And paint the mead where roved our infant feet;
relight the hearth whence we too soon were torn,
The world's loud strife and endless toil to meet
Can give us back dead faces half forgot
Amid the dreary mists of daily cares,
7 Aglow with lifo as when the heart was hot
>3 With love, and blessed us with its daily pray'rs !
Yea, that can give us beauty from afar,
Which else our poor dim eyes had ne'er conceived-
The orient sky, the sea, the mountain spar,
Whose spoken wonders we had scarce believed;
Or, stooping to the lowly things of earth,
Can fix for us the glorious works of God,
That through the fleeting seasons have their birth
In sky or sea, in bush or verdant sod I
Ah would that gift were mine, that I might trace
With faithfulness beyond poor human speech,
The heavenly beauty of the wondrous face
Sweet nature turns to all within her reach!
But though high heaven that gift to me deny,
I bow with thanks to him whose skilful hands
Have worked to place beneath my raptured eye
Choice gems of beauty from remotest lands.
And though my feet in mental passage tread
The distant scenes my blessed Saviour trod,
Or though my eyes behold the reverent head
Of some devoted messenger of God,
Preaching to me from silent, earnest eyes,
Of living faith, and bliss beyond the skies,
'Tis still to that quick hand and subtle brain
Iowe my joy-that all my thanks pertain.
ROGR QUIDDAM.




-r5K







The Vain Cat.

UR Tommy was a pretty cat
As ever caught a mouse;
We kept him sleek and round and fat,
When he staid in the house,

SBut he would run away at night,
With his companions fine;
And they would roam about and fight,
Whene'er they felt inclined.

Then he got vain, when he got bad.
-- And wanted clothes to wear;
Although a glossy coat he had,
That would not rip nor tear.

He dressed 'himself up prim and
neat,
And with a staff in hand,
He sallied forth upon the street,
And strutted very grand.

His shoes were but a sorry fit,
His tail he couldn't hide;
His collar had no pin to it;
His belt was tight beside.

But in his pride he didn't care,
But bore it very well,
To make his' friends all come and
stare,
To see him cut a swell.

1He called for all the cats around,
S* To come and see him.now;
He thought that each one would be
-- J- i bound
S- 'To humbly cringe and bow.

But when they saw him' strut so vain,
Dressed up so very nice;
They sprang'with-all their might and main,
And killed him in a trice.























The Voice of tble Grass.
Here I come creeping, creeping everywhere:
By the dusty roadside,
On the sunny hillside,
Close by the noisy brook,
In every shady nook,
All round the open door,
Where sit the aged poor ;
Here where the children play,
In the bright and merry May,
I come creeping, creeping everywhere.
Here I come creeping, creeping everywhere;
In the noisy city street
My pleasant face you'll meet,
Cheering the sick at heart
Toiling his busy part.-
You cannot see me coming,
Nor hear my low, sweet humming;
For in the starry night,
And the glad morning light,
I come quietly creeping everywhere.
Here I come creeping, creeping everywhere;
My humble song of praise
Most joyfully I raise
To Him at whose command
I beautify the land,
Creeping silently, creeping everywhere.




SJ





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Little Jack off to School.

ACK is growing very Kiss him or his heart will fail.
old, Dash looks up with gleaming eye;
Summers six have By the wagging of .his tail
seen his joy ; Marks his doggish sympathy.
Mother may no longer Jack, attempting to be cool,
hold Whispers, with an eager sigh:
In her arms so big a boy. If I might take Dash to school,
He must now to school away, I believe I should not cry.
Through the world his bark to steer. School should be a place of joys;
How that little heart to-day Could little Jack have his whim-
Beats with mingled pride and fear! Fancy if two hundred boys
Each might take his dog with him!
k a Lessons would he only clogs;
This the question to decide-
From four hundred boys and dogs,
"Where the schoolmaster could
hide?
SrBe ir Tirqe.
BE in time for every call;
If you can, be first of all :
SBe in time.
If your teachers only find
You are never once behind,
"oe But are, like the dial, true,
They will always trust to you;
Be in time.
Never linger ere you start;
Set out with a willing heart;
Be in time.
In the morning up and on,
First to work and soonest done,
This is how the goal's attained;
This is how the prize is gained;
Be in time.
Those who aim at something great
Jack arid his Ducks. Never yet were found too late;
Be in time.
JACK is home from school again, and Life with all is b'yt a school;
has run down to the brook to see his We must work by plan and rule,
ducks. The old duck has eight young With some noble end in view,
ones, and she is very proud of them. Ever steady, earnest, true:
What a fuss she makes over Jack. Be in time.










I'.."
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Man arid tl e Morkey.

H HERE.are philosophers -the door had been left open, and a
who tell us that the dif- strange cat had just entered the room.
ferent species of animals
inhabiting this earth -L-
have been produced by'
a process called devel-
opment. Here we have the key to this
picture. The man in the centre is sup-
posed to be announcing this doctrine
of the origin of species to an assembly
of the lower animals. There are mon-
keys, ourangs, geese, pelicans, owls, When it was driven out, her own cat
turtles, grasshoppers, an alligator, an came down from her place of safety,
elephant, a giraffe, and on the right a and dropped the bird without doing it
very sedate-looking jackass in man's the least injury.
clothes. See how interested they all
are, particularly the monkey in the A Mortkey Trap.
foreground, whose tail stands a good AN old, hard cocoanut is taken, and
chance of being cut off, now that his a hole is made in the shell. Furnished
brother monkey thinks that to be the with this and a pocketful of boiled rice,
first step to manhood. Do you think the sportsman sallies into the forest
that these curious-looking creatures are and stops beneath a tree tenanted by
wishing they were men, or are they sat- monkeys. Within full sight of these
isfied to be just as they are? It is inquisitive spectators he first eats a lit-
strange how much some people's faces tle rice, and then puts a quantity into
are like the faces of the lower animals, the cocoanut with all the ostentation
and what a human expression is some- possible. The nut is then laid upon
times found in the features of beasts the ground, and the hunter retires to
and birds; but it would be stranger a convenient ambush. No sooner is
still if the world should come to be- the man out of sight than. the monkeys
lieve that they are really related to each race shelter skelter for the cocoanut.
other in the manner referred to. The first arrival peeps into it, and see-
ing the rice inside, squeezes his hand
Sagacity of a Cat, through the hole and clutches a hand-
ful. Now, so paramount is greed over
A LADY had a tame bird which she every other feeling connected with
let out of its cage every day. As it monkey nature that nothing will in-
was picking. crumbs of bread off the duce the creature to relinquish his
carpet, her cat, which always before hold. With his hand thus clasped he
showed great kindness for the bird, can't possibly extract it; but the thought
seized it on a sudden, and jumped upon that if he lets go, one of his brethren
the table. The lady was much alarmed will obtain the feast is overpowering.
for the fate of the favorite, but on turn- The sportsman soon appears upon the
ing round she instantly saw the cause, scene; and he is easily captured.



& -:.-, **.I








Man arid tl e Morkey.

H HERE.are philosophers -the door had been left open, and a
who tell us that the dif- strange cat had just entered the room.
ferent species of animals
inhabiting this earth -L-
have been produced by'
a process called devel-
opment. Here we have the key to this
picture. The man in the centre is sup-
posed to be announcing this doctrine
of the origin of species to an assembly
of the lower animals. There are mon-
keys, ourangs, geese, pelicans, owls, When it was driven out, her own cat
turtles, grasshoppers, an alligator, an came down from her place of safety,
elephant, a giraffe, and on the right a and dropped the bird without doing it
very sedate-looking jackass in man's the least injury.
clothes. See how interested they all
are, particularly the monkey in the A Mortkey Trap.
foreground, whose tail stands a good AN old, hard cocoanut is taken, and
chance of being cut off, now that his a hole is made in the shell. Furnished
brother monkey thinks that to be the with this and a pocketful of boiled rice,
first step to manhood. Do you think the sportsman sallies into the forest
that these curious-looking creatures are and stops beneath a tree tenanted by
wishing they were men, or are they sat- monkeys. Within full sight of these
isfied to be just as they are? It is inquisitive spectators he first eats a lit-
strange how much some people's faces tle rice, and then puts a quantity into
are like the faces of the lower animals, the cocoanut with all the ostentation
and what a human expression is some- possible. The nut is then laid upon
times found in the features of beasts the ground, and the hunter retires to
and birds; but it would be stranger a convenient ambush. No sooner is
still if the world should come to be- the man out of sight than. the monkeys
lieve that they are really related to each race shelter skelter for the cocoanut.
other in the manner referred to. The first arrival peeps into it, and see-
ing the rice inside, squeezes his hand
Sagacity of a Cat, through the hole and clutches a hand-
ful. Now, so paramount is greed over
A LADY had a tame bird which she every other feeling connected with
let out of its cage every day. As it monkey nature that nothing will in-
was picking. crumbs of bread off the duce the creature to relinquish his
carpet, her cat, which always before hold. With his hand thus clasped he
showed great kindness for the bird, can't possibly extract it; but the thought
seized it on a sudden, and jumped upon that if he lets go, one of his brethren
the table. The lady was much alarmed will obtain the feast is overpowering.
for the fate of the favorite, but on turn- The sportsman soon appears upon the
ing round she instantly saw the cause, scene; and he is easily captured.



& -:.-, **.I







































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;-s





















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----



















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The Picnic in the Wood.

HE children are having 'tis a sunny day, the chilly nights warn
a picnic, and all are in- the birds that they must get ready to go
vited. Here is Willie to a warmer clime. The blackbirds are
with his hoop and foot- gathering in great flocks, and making
ball and his sister Lou much clatter as they prepare for their
leading little Mamie by long flight to the South. How swiftly
the hand. Mamie has brought her they circle round the edge of the
doll in her arms. Cousin Ida has woods. Now they are all gone! No,
brought hers in a ieat little doll car- here they come again over the tops of
riage. Some of the other girls have the trees. They seem to be trying
brought dolls, too, and they.will have their wings to see if they are strong
a fine time playing with them in the enough for the coming journey. In a
cool shade of the trees. We may be day or two they will be gone, and then
certain, too, that there are more boys other little boys and girls, who live a
in the throng behind with hoops and long way off, can go out every day and
balls. The papas and mammas and all watch them.
the older folks are coming too, and
nurse has baby in her arms. How Playing School.
happy they all look! Willie, who knows
the way, acts as leader, and he makes DING Dong Dolly, school is in,
them all march along to the time of a 'Hark thfe lessons now begin :
lively tune which they are singing. Keep all the pupils there-
_Dollies nice and neat and fair,
Fat and lean, short and tall,
In a row against the wall.
Lots of little teachers, too,
Come to show them what to do.
Now, Miss Wax, turn out your toes;
Tell me how you spoiled your nose.
Miss Rag, pray for opce sit straight;
S How came you to be so late ?
: Do, Miss China, sit down, dear;
S. Papa dolls, don't act so queer."
Mabel's doll could say, Mamma."
Smartest in the class, by far.
SSome will graduate next fall;
Others are almost too small.
Does your dolly ever go?
Terms are very cheap, you know.
Better take her there at once.
Watcllirtg the Birds. Who would want a doll a duire ?
Miss ALICE has taken her little "Time is up !" the teachers shout.
brother out to see the birds. Though Ding-dong Dolly, school is out.








The Picnic in the Wood.

HE children are having 'tis a sunny day, the chilly nights warn
a picnic, and all are in- the birds that they must get ready to go
vited. Here is Willie to a warmer clime. The blackbirds are
with his hoop and foot- gathering in great flocks, and making
ball and his sister Lou much clatter as they prepare for their
leading little Mamie by long flight to the South. How swiftly
the hand. Mamie has brought her they circle round the edge of the
doll in her arms. Cousin Ida has woods. Now they are all gone! No,
brought hers in a ieat little doll car- here they come again over the tops of
riage. Some of the other girls have the trees. They seem to be trying
brought dolls, too, and they.will have their wings to see if they are strong
a fine time playing with them in the enough for the coming journey. In a
cool shade of the trees. We may be day or two they will be gone, and then
certain, too, that there are more boys other little boys and girls, who live a
in the throng behind with hoops and long way off, can go out every day and
balls. The papas and mammas and all watch them.
the older folks are coming too, and
nurse has baby in her arms. How Playing School.
happy they all look! Willie, who knows
the way, acts as leader, and he makes DING Dong Dolly, school is in,
them all march along to the time of a 'Hark thfe lessons now begin :
lively tune which they are singing. Keep all the pupils there-
_Dollies nice and neat and fair,
Fat and lean, short and tall,
In a row against the wall.
Lots of little teachers, too,
Come to show them what to do.
Now, Miss Wax, turn out your toes;
Tell me how you spoiled your nose.
Miss Rag, pray for opce sit straight;
S How came you to be so late ?
: Do, Miss China, sit down, dear;
S. Papa dolls, don't act so queer."
Mabel's doll could say, Mamma."
Smartest in the class, by far.
SSome will graduate next fall;
Others are almost too small.
Does your dolly ever go?
Terms are very cheap, you know.
Better take her there at once.
Watcllirtg the Birds. Who would want a doll a duire ?
Miss ALICE has taken her little "Time is up !" the teachers shout.
brother out to see the birds. Though Ding-dong Dolly, school is out.



















I I
/~Ii~~~~B~r,_~Y~~








Grandria's Plates.

S,- ,..A ., But just like Bessie's hair;
And as she waits
V The rare old plates
-_ With funny faces stare.

Six Little Turkeys.
Six little turkeys, and all in a row !
Now what they were hatched for,
they didn't know :
Our grandmamma did, but she would
not tell;
She watered and fed them every day
well.
But not one of the six heard her once
say
She was fattening them for Thanks-
giving Day.

EAT and dressy Six little turkeys! From morning till
Little Bessie night
On the dresser waits, They would run away and hide ott of
And sits a-gazing sight.
At the amazing Grandmamma's sun-bonnet scarcely at
Rows of dinner plates, all
And cups and bowls, Found time to hang on its peg on the
And plates for rolls, wall:
All of ancient dates. For they kept her all summer watching
about
As Bessie sits, The byways and hedges, calling them
All of her wits out.
Seem tranced as in a spell.
She has been told Six large, fat turkeys, and all in a row,
That plates so old On Thanksgiving morfiing One was
A wondrous tale can tell to go
Of other years, To Sam, one to Tom, another to Lu-
And hopes and fears, (Dear little grandchildren, loving and
And what Grandma befell true);
One was to be sent to poor Widow
When she was young, Gray,
And her hair hung With six helpless children to feed that
In ringlets brown and fair, day ;
And was not gray One was cooked for lame little Joe-
As 'tis to-day, His mother is sick and feeble, you know.

















Sprirtg Flowers.
THE flowers that bloom
In early May,
Z.. When winter's gloom
Has passed away;
But lingers still
In merfnt'ry near,
And distant hill
Is brown and sere-
Are sweeter far
To wearied view,
Than blossoms are
Of gaudier hue,
That summer brings, P
When all is gay,
And nature sings
All care away.
So dawn is brighter
To the oppressed,
Than all the lighter
Hours of rest,
That noonday brings
To lives so fair,
That know no stings,
No pain, no care.









Will She Rou d the Poirnt?

PHIS group of sailors is good, and that of the kid or young
and fishermen is. worth goat is in many countries esteemed a
studying. Notice the delicacy. The milk is very rich and
earnest expression up- nutritious, and the butter and cheese
on the faces of these made from it are very good. The skin
sturdy and weather- of the goat was early used for clothing,
beaten but brave men. They are look- and is now dressed as leather and made
ing at something far out on the sea. into gloves and the finer kind of shoes.
You cannot see it, for the picture is The hair is used for making ropes
not large enough to show it upon the which are not injured by water, and is
canvas, but it is not difficult for us to also much used in making wigs. The
imagine what it is. One of the
men is looking through a spy-
glass at it. And now guess
what the picture means? Out
there upon the sea is a ship,
trying to get round the point
or cape so as to escape the
rocks. It is not the little ship
shown in the picture, but an-
other one in the direction to-
wards which the sailor in the
front is pointing. The sea is
rough and the tide is coming in
strong and high. The good
ship is in danger, and her cap-
tain and crew are doing their
* very best to keep her well out _
to sea till the dangerous rocks
are passed. The men in the
picture understand all about it,
and, if the ship should strike a
rock, they will go out to her in
boats, even at the risk of their lives, hair of the Angora and Cashmere goats
and try to save the men from drown- make valuable fabrics. The horns are
ing. used for making knife handles, etc., and
the fat is said to be superior to that of
The Goat. the ox for making candles. One of the-
SGoatdelightful uses of the goat, all our young
THIS Goat seems to be quite at friends will admit, is drawing the pretty
home on shipbom as it stands there carriages to be seen in Central Park
to be milked by ft young sailor. and otherplaces every pleasant summer
The uses of the goat are more nu- day. Goats can be easily trained to
merous than many suspect. Its flesh draw wagons.









~-~---= ~~~~~-I~- : =T- ..... .... -=-------_- :-- T;f.-i---
~_--- _--_- ,_ __ ....~
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~-~~'-~;~~-~--~-4








My Puppies, Jack arid Flo.

Y dear wee puppies, do dog. My errand over, I was return-
keep still, ing home, when my horse not only
Or you will tumble kicked me off but kicked me after-
down, you-will, ward, so that my leg was frightfully
And maybe break broken. The night was coming on,
your little bones, the snow falling heavily, and I could
And tear your coats upon the stones. not move. In desperation I dipped
Don't be so restless, Master Jack; my glove in my blood and gave it to
You think because your nose is black my sheep-dog, saying: "Take this
That you're a prettier dog than Flo; straight home-let no one stop you
But you are wrong in thinking so. from going into the parlor to my father,
Now, if you two will but keep still, and fetch me help." As if the beast
I'll carry you to Primrose Hill; had understood every word, he seized
There I will let you romp and run- the glove and tore home. The servants
I know you will enjoy the fun; tried to catch him in vain-he forced
And all the fine-dressed ladies there his way into the parlor and dropped the
Will say, "Oh, what a pretty pair!" glove, "whining piteously. My father
recognized the glove, saw that some ac-
cident had occurred, gathered the men
on the farm, and came to my rescue.

1' The Daricing Lesson.
S" i-FOUR little girls
All in a row !
What are they doing?
Don't you know?
They are dancing;
Not noisily prancing,
As wild girls do-
S. a I know a few,
And so do you,-
But skipping gently,
And looking intently,
To see that their steps
li.G Are correct and true.
They know the rule,
The Clever Sheep Dog, For they go to school,
And improve their chances
WHEN I was a young man, my father To learn the new dances;
said to me, There is a heavy snow- And so, just now,
storm coming. Ride up the mountain They're showing how
and see that the sheep are properly To dance in time,
folded." So off I set, mounted on a And keep in line,
frisky colt, and accompanied by my When they make their bow.
* -








My Puppies, Jack arid Flo.

Y dear wee puppies, do dog. My errand over, I was return-
keep still, ing home, when my horse not only
Or you will tumble kicked me off but kicked me after-
down, you-will, ward, so that my leg was frightfully
And maybe break broken. The night was coming on,
your little bones, the snow falling heavily, and I could
And tear your coats upon the stones. not move. In desperation I dipped
Don't be so restless, Master Jack; my glove in my blood and gave it to
You think because your nose is black my sheep-dog, saying: "Take this
That you're a prettier dog than Flo; straight home-let no one stop you
But you are wrong in thinking so. from going into the parlor to my father,
Now, if you two will but keep still, and fetch me help." As if the beast
I'll carry you to Primrose Hill; had understood every word, he seized
There I will let you romp and run- the glove and tore home. The servants
I know you will enjoy the fun; tried to catch him in vain-he forced
And all the fine-dressed ladies there his way into the parlor and dropped the
Will say, "Oh, what a pretty pair!" glove, "whining piteously. My father
recognized the glove, saw that some ac-
cident had occurred, gathered the men
on the farm, and came to my rescue.

1' The Daricing Lesson.
S" i-FOUR little girls
All in a row !
What are they doing?
Don't you know?
They are dancing;
Not noisily prancing,
As wild girls do-
S. a I know a few,
And so do you,-
But skipping gently,
And looking intently,
To see that their steps
li.G Are correct and true.
They know the rule,
The Clever Sheep Dog, For they go to school,
And improve their chances
WHEN I was a young man, my father To learn the new dances;
said to me, There is a heavy snow- And so, just now,
storm coming. Ride up the mountain They're showing how
and see that the sheep are properly To dance in time,
folded." So off I set, mounted on a And keep in line,
frisky colt, and accompanied by my When they make their bow.
* -





































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The Young Duck and tlhe Lobster.

UACK! quack! I'll hit it and see.
quack He won't stay,
What's this on its But runs away,
Backk? There he goes;
A thing very queer, And his toes
To be lying here, Open and close
With nobody near. In a saucy way,
I'll give it a whack As though talking,
With my bill; Or boldly mocking.
It seems to be lying I come here to swim,
Very still. And I'll show him
It must be dying That I'm a duck
With fear With lots of pluck
Of a duck like me And vim.

He shall not go
In that way. No
I'll pull him out
By his saucy toe.
What's he about -
To fight me so ?
"He has no mouth
That I can see, -
But up he throws
His funny toes
And snaps at me. _-
Now I'll beat him,
Then I'll eat him.

O dear! O dear! his feet are claws Why did I come to swim to-day ?
His toes are ugly, monstrous jaws. Why didn't I let him go away ?
By my leg he holds me tight My mother'll say it serves me right;
What shall I do? He'll kill me quite She's often told me not to fight.

-- ., v'

















THs shadows gently glide across the shallow stream;
A darker purple decks the heather-covered hills;
The evening comes as softly as an infant's dream,
And breathes its solemn hush upon the rippling rills.
The silence slowly deepens down, for night is near;
The tiny songsters chirp in drowsy undertone,
But one sweet melody breaks on my listening ear-
A sedge-bird warbling in the rustling'reeds alone.
The spreading sunset glory o'er the western sky
Has cast the kingly mantle of its red and gold;
The cloudlets gleaming brightly as they linger by,
Like islands in a jasper sea, all clear and cold.
A ruddy milkmaid, singing with her balanced load,
Follows the lowing cattle homeward through the grass,
And slowly o'er the chestnut-shaded, winding road
To home and rest the weary village toilers pass.
One glimmering evening-star shines yonder faint and dim,
The herald of a mighty host advancing slow;
And trembling in the shallows at the river's brim,
Its pale reflection seems a glimpse of heaven below.
The day is dying, and the year, too, slowly dies;
Yon in the harvest-fields are gathered autumn sheaves;
There is a mournful note in every breeze that sighs,
A hectic flush has tinted all the changing, leaves.
The winter soon will come with coverlet of snow,
With moaning.winds through yonder woods, and icy
showers;
But it will only hide the sleeping life below,
The harbingers of spring, and yellow crocus flowers.
So, musing as I walk, my heart is full of rest,
For 'tis of change, and not of death, these things do
speak:
Thg peace that passeth understanding fills my breast,
I dream of that glad time when endless day will breald
Thus unto me this quiet spot is holy ground;
For as to tired eyes God sends His gift of sleep,
The angel of His presence doth eneamp around
His resting flock's abiding-place, a watch to keep.
JAMES Bowi9E.










The Folly of Foolish Fred.

.ll RED and his sister have Our Charlie.
been playing that he WHO loves to pull the pussy's tail,
was a knight and she a Or decorate her with a pail,
grand lady. She has Delighted with her doleful wail?
dressed up in all the fine Our Charlie..
"toggery she can find, and
he has armed himself with an old pistol Who runs with patient little legs
which his father keeps as a curiosity. On errands. And when mamma begs
They have been reading how the Softly! tiptoes as though on eggs?
knights of old went on crusades and Our Charlie.
fought with other knights, and they
are now on a grand crusade against But sometimes when he's washed and,
the suits of armor standing by the dressed,
wall and the figures of saints and
heroes in the stained glass windows.
Bang! goes the pistol, and the beau-
"tiful window is destroyed.
What a foolish boy He will do
more mischief in an hour than can
be repaired in a year; and when his
father returns and sees his valuable
things ruined, Fred will get a lesson
in knight-errantry that he will not
soon forget. Florence begins to see
the folly already, but she should
have seen it at first and not have Ne
been led away by foolish books.n b, ad s







sings beautifully every day. 'Shall I Or" Buttercup," until we pine
Feeditell you why oneg the Robin.
andheHe kicks and screams like all possessed ;
Miss NELLIE is about to feed her Until a whipping we suggest
robin. Herkfriend Maud has had a For Charlie.
number of robins, but they have all
pined away and died, while Nellie's
robin is as well as a bird can be, and Who's always sin g Baby Mine,"
sings beautifully every day. 'Shall I Or Buttercup," until we pine
tell you why one can have a nice robin, To give some soothing anodyne
and the other cannot ? The robins are To Charlie ?
at first just alike, but the girls are not
.alike. Maud lies in bed every morning We're going out. Where's Charlie ?
and lets her robin go without his Far
breakfast; while Nellie wakes up as A little voice rings, Here I are,
soon as the bird begins to chirp and gives Expressly waiting for the car !"
him clean water and nice food. That's Charlie.










The Folly of Foolish Fred.

.ll RED and his sister have Our Charlie.
been playing that he WHO loves to pull the pussy's tail,
was a knight and she a Or decorate her with a pail,
grand lady. She has Delighted with her doleful wail?
dressed up in all the fine Our Charlie..
"toggery she can find, and
he has armed himself with an old pistol Who runs with patient little legs
which his father keeps as a curiosity. On errands. And when mamma begs
They have been reading how the Softly! tiptoes as though on eggs?
knights of old went on crusades and Our Charlie.
fought with other knights, and they
are now on a grand crusade against But sometimes when he's washed and,
the suits of armor standing by the dressed,
wall and the figures of saints and
heroes in the stained glass windows.
Bang! goes the pistol, and the beau-
"tiful window is destroyed.
What a foolish boy He will do
more mischief in an hour than can
be repaired in a year; and when his
father returns and sees his valuable
things ruined, Fred will get a lesson
in knight-errantry that he will not
soon forget. Florence begins to see
the folly already, but she should
have seen it at first and not have Ne
been led away by foolish books.n b, ad s







sings beautifully every day. 'Shall I Or" Buttercup," until we pine
Feeditell you why oneg the Robin.
andheHe kicks and screams like all possessed ;
Miss NELLIE is about to feed her Until a whipping we suggest
robin. Herkfriend Maud has had a For Charlie.
number of robins, but they have all
pined away and died, while Nellie's
robin is as well as a bird can be, and Who's always sin g Baby Mine,"
sings beautifully every day. 'Shall I Or Buttercup," until we pine
tell you why one can have a nice robin, To give some soothing anodyne
and the other cannot ? The robins are To Charlie ?
at first just alike, but the girls are not
.alike. Maud lies in bed every morning We're going out. Where's Charlie ?
and lets her robin go without his Far
breakfast; while Nellie wakes up as A little voice rings, Here I are,
soon as the bird begins to chirp and gives Expressly waiting for the car !"
him clean water and nice food. That's Charlie.





































Hi I, I ll
--- ----









Grace arid Her Playmates.

HERE are three of But not to tell her name were folly;
them. Grace is not at You know her well-she's your own
all afraid of the dog, Dolly.
and the dog is evi-
dently very proud to Th\e Locust.
be petted and taken TiHE locust is about three inches
care of, and to guard his mistress from long, with a large head and projecting
any danger. If another dog were to oval eyes. Its food consists of leaves
come along, Fido would warn him off, and green stalks of plants, and when
lest he should frighten the little girl, locusts alight on any vegetation that
and he would bark very angrily, and they fancy they consume it entirely.
perhaps bite, if anybody should attempt The terrible ravages of locusts are
to hurt her. All little girls are fond of owing to the vast numbers in which
dolls; that is a part of a girl's nature, they appear, filling the air and darken-
and it is very nice for them to have ing the sky so that objects cast no
them. In a few years the child will shadow, and advancing with a sound
grow into a woman, but where will Fido like the rushing of chariots. Locusts
and the doll be then? Dogs do not are found in almost all parts of the
live nearly so long as men and women, world except the coldest regions, and
and dolls, alas! often last but a few are equally destructive wherever they
months, appear. In France, a reward is paid
for the collection of locusts and their
eggs. In our country, they seldom do
She's Always Good. I.T -
SHE never sighs; she never
grumbles;
She never cries when down
she tumbles.

She never soils her pretty il
dresses
She never spoils her silken
tresses.

With cap on head, and wee
hands folded,
She's put to bed and never
scolded. any damage in the Eastern States, but
in the West they sometimes destroy
Oh she's a pearl, no mischief schem- thousands of acres of wheat and other
ing ; grain in an hour or two, and then they
There's such a girl-don't think I'm fly away again. Locusts are eaten, in
dreaming. some countries, as food.










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The City Cousin in the Courtry.

ASTER FREDER- amused, and so do the other children,
ICK is an only son, but I am afraid Cousin Frederick is not
and therefore is much polite. If he does not behave better
petted at home, and I do not think his grandpa or his cous-
some people think ins will want to see him again.
That he is a spoiled -
boy. One beautiful spring morning his The Squirrel.
mamma takes him for a long ride out
into the country. They go by railroad, STOP, little squirrel, stop, I pray,
and when they reach a certain little Why do you work so hard all day ?
station they alight from the train, and Stay a while with us to play,
get into a buggy, and are driven to an Do not run so quick away.
old farm-house where Aunt
Bertha and Grandpapa live.
There are also five cousins,
Johnny and little Dick, Emma,
Grace, and Baby. The boys
go about without shoes and
stockings when they are round
the house, not because they
are poor, but because it is the
custom in that part of the
country for boys, and even
sometimes girls and grown peo-
ple, to go barefoot, except when
they walk or ride to the town
or village or to church. These
cousins of Master Frederick ,-
have plenty of toys and lots
of fun, and they looked forward with a But the squirrel cunningly
great deal of excitement and pleasure Shook his head,
to this promised visit. And there And in squirrel language,
stands the little city cousin by 'his Thus he said:
mother's knee, looking as shy and cross The winter is coming,
as possible. He will not speak to his With stormy weather,
grandpa who sits near with his pipe in And I must hurry
his hand and his smoking cap on, try- Some nuts to gather.
ing to coax Master Frederick into a The winter is coming,
good humor. Little Dick comes for- With frost and snow;
ward with some nice apples which he The storm will howl,
has just picked out of the orchard, and And the-winds will blow;
mamma is telling him to be a good boy And I must have nuts
and shake hands with his cousins. In my nest, you know.
Poor Aunty, who holds the baby, looks Good-by ; I must go !"
















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Tle Cunr ing Little Qhicks.

SYOU pretty, sweet little with their sharp teeth in the great toe
dears," criez Bessie, as of the sleeping victim, suck his blood
she takes one of the little uptil full to' repletion, meanwhile fan-
baby chicks in her hands ning the sleeper with their wings to
and kisses it. Bob and induce continued slumber. The idea
Fred have just found the has proved to be fallacious, at least as
old hen in a nest in the lumber-room, far as the soothing fanning is concerned
with a brood of chickens she has hatched and the particular fancy for the great toe
on the sly. They ran into the house only. They are not particular as to
shouting for joy, and sister Amy, who where they make the incision, if they
was not yet out of bed, jumped up at only get the blood.
once and ran down stairs to see all about In some parts of South America
it. Of course Mother Hen would like to vampires are very numerous, and do-
havealady to callupon her under the cir- mestic aflimals suffer greatly from their
cumstances. How cunning that chick nocturnal attacks. They seem to take
looks standing on the edge of thenest, advantage of an existing wound, but
and how proud and yet anxious the old they also can make one." In some
hen seems as she watches the struggles parts of Brazil the rearing of calves is
of the chick which Amy has captured impossible on account of these bats,
How. funny it is that chickens should and there are districts, chiefly those.
come out of the eggs as they do. See where limestone rocks abound with
the broken egg-shells by the nest. The numerous caves, in which cattle cannot
hen has been patiently sitting over those profitably be kept.
eggs for about three weeks, keeping The vampire, according to an old su-
them very warm. I think somebody perstition invarious portionsof Europe,
must have known where she was, for particularly in Hungary, was supposed
there is a broken dish with some food to be a dead person, returned in body
in it, which the hen has now and then and soul from the other world, and wan-
picked at. Perhaps the children did, during about the earth doing every
but they would not disturb her while kind of mischief to the living.
she was "sitting." But now that the -
chicks are all "hatched," they are
glad.

The Varrpire Bat.
THE Vampire" is the name
given to a species of bat found in
South America, which "sucks the
blood of persons and beasts when
asleep." It was at one time the
popular idea that these bats would
enter the sleeping apartments of
human beings, in the warm climate
of Brazil, and, making an incision
































'Lii
















'I I
II








'
.y~~';l ~Pa~~~.~a l







ThIe Lard of the Papyrus.

E do not see any papy-
rus plants in this pict-
ure, but.it represents
a scene in a tropical or
sub-tropical country,
such as Egypt, Arabia,
or Abyssinia, where the palm and
cocoanut are indigenous. The party
of natives in the foreground are resting
beneath the welcome shade of a grove
by the ells -of water, and one of their
number has climbed a tree to gather
the fruit. He must be a good climber
and his companions ought to thank him
when they proceed to break open the
juicy nuts and drink the milk from "
them. The papyrus plant or paper
reed used to grow in great abundance
along the banks of the River Nile, and ,
in other parts of Africa, and also in 'r
some parts of Asia and Europe, but it
is not found in Egypt now, and is much
rarer than it used to be. The ancients The Martdarin.
made their paper from the stem.
A MANDARIN is a man who holds an
The Mill. office in China. There are nine differ-
ent grades or ranks of Mandarins, each
WINDING and grinding, being distinguished by a different col-
Round goes the mill; ored ball or button on the top of his
Winding and grinding, hat. 'The Chinese are a strange people
Should never stand still, and have strange customs concerning
Ask not if neighbor their Mandarins as well as everything
Grind great or small: else. No officer is allowed to hold
Spare not your labor, office in his native province, nor is he
Grind your wheat all. allowed to marry where he holds office,
nor to have a relative in office under
Winding and grinding, him. He must report truthfully, every,
Work through the day; little while, how those under him-are
Grief never minding, behaving themselves and doing their
Grind it away work, and then they are promoted or
What through tears dropping put down a step like boys in a class.
Rust as they fall ? No one is allowed to remain in office
Have no wheel stopping- in the same place longer than three
Work comforts all. years.







ThIe Lard of the Papyrus.

E do not see any papy-
rus plants in this pict-
ure, but.it represents
a scene in a tropical or
sub-tropical country,
such as Egypt, Arabia,
or Abyssinia, where the palm and
cocoanut are indigenous. The party
of natives in the foreground are resting
beneath the welcome shade of a grove
by the ells -of water, and one of their
number has climbed a tree to gather
the fruit. He must be a good climber
and his companions ought to thank him
when they proceed to break open the
juicy nuts and drink the milk from "
them. The papyrus plant or paper
reed used to grow in great abundance
along the banks of the River Nile, and ,
in other parts of Africa, and also in 'r
some parts of Asia and Europe, but it
is not found in Egypt now, and is much
rarer than it used to be. The ancients The Martdarin.
made their paper from the stem.
A MANDARIN is a man who holds an
The Mill. office in China. There are nine differ-
ent grades or ranks of Mandarins, each
WINDING and grinding, being distinguished by a different col-
Round goes the mill; ored ball or button on the top of his
Winding and grinding, hat. 'The Chinese are a strange people
Should never stand still, and have strange customs concerning
Ask not if neighbor their Mandarins as well as everything
Grind great or small: else. No officer is allowed to hold
Spare not your labor, office in his native province, nor is he
Grind your wheat all. allowed to marry where he holds office,
nor to have a relative in office under
Winding and grinding, him. He must report truthfully, every,
Work through the day; little while, how those under him-are
Grief never minding, behaving themselves and doing their
Grind it away work, and then they are promoted or
What through tears dropping put down a step like boys in a class.
Rust as they fall ? No one is allowed to remain in office
Have no wheel stopping- in the same place longer than three
Work comforts all. years.




















































d














































































Birds of the PIiver arid Sea.

N no instances has na- the surface, and acting more like fishes
ture more thoroughly than birds.
provided animals with The Great Auk'is now thought to be
the organs suited to extinct, but there are stuffed specimens
their habits and neces- to be found in the museums. It in-
sities than in the birds habited the cold portions of the North-
which depend for food upon the sea. ern Hemisphere, and is sometimes
The waders have long legs and bills, called the Northern Penguin. It re-
sembled the Penguin, but was much
larger, being three feet long. Its wing
was but four inches long, and was used
chiefly for swimming. The last one
seen alive was on the coast of Iceland
in 1844, and well-stuffed specimens are
now worth a thousand dollars. A
dead one was found on the coast of
Labrador in 1870.
The Crying Bird, or Courlan, is a
wader, as you can see by his long legs.
He lives in hot climates, and is often
seen in Florida, where it is sometimes
shot and used for food. It gets its
name from the peculiar cry which it
Keeps up night and day.
The Spoonbill is also a wader. It
Belongs to the Heron family and re-
sembles a stork, except that it has a
flat bill, widening out at the end like a
while the swimmers have scarcely any spoon. It is found chiefly in Holland,
legs at all, but are provided with large, and on the coasts of Italy and Northern
webbed feet with which they propel Africa.
themselves in the water. Perhaps the most interesting bird in
The most curious of the sea birds are our group is the Frigate Bird, so called
the Penguins. They live in the Antarc- because he is found far out at sea.
tic seas, and are the lowest form of Though a small bird, it has long wings,
birds now known. In- fact they look spreading ten or twelve feet. These
,more and act more like seals. Their enable him to fly long distances, ancto
wings are only a few inches long, and support himself in the air with no more
are only useful in the water, and the motion than a boy's kite, for hours at
same may be said of their feet, although a time. Although he lives upon fish,
they do manage to scramble up on the he seldom swims, and it is said that he
rocks, where they sit upright on their never dives. He catches, the flying fish
stumpy tails. They are famous divers, as they leap out of the water, and will
swimming faster under water than on sometimes rob another bird of itsprey,
























Ta.xalid.
SGralatores Aramus gigantes Famis Tachypeida.
"Tatatores C rd Alcdw





STachypetes aqvalua



































Uca impennis
Aca impennis Atenodytes patagonica























ApPend










Quails, Jays, arid Blackbirds.

HE bird in the oppo- chicks when they are, half grown, while
site engraving with the female lays and hatches again.
the graceful crest is There are many kinds of Quails, and
the California Quail, some species is found in almost every
Sso-called because it is quarter of the globe. We read of
"found only in that them in the Bible, and they have been
State, and near the border in Mexico. common in Egypt and Syria ever since
As it inhabits only the valleys, it is the children of Israel ate them in the
Wilderness. Hundreds of thousands
St are captured in Northern Africa every
year and taken to France.
S The Blue Jay is found in nearly
every part of North America. He is
very shy, and likes to flit about in the
shadiest portion of the woods. But
sometimes he flies about the orchards
looking for grubs, and then his rich
plumage shows to great advantage in
Sthe sunlight. He belongs to the Crow
"" family, and, like all his relatives, he is
very cunning and tricky. When tamed,
S -n, bird trainers say that he can be taught
called there the Valley Quail, to distin- more easily than most birds. Like the
guish it from the Mountain Quail. It mocking bird, he is fond of imitating
has beautiful plumage, and two jet other birds, but instead of learning to
black crests, though they appear as sing their songs, he imitates only the
one in the picture. It does not whistle harsh sounds. When calling to his
like the Eastern Quail, and its cry is mate he can be as sweet asi any of his
rather disagreeable than pleasant. companions of the woods ; but at other
Like& all the Quails, it can be easily times he will scream so nearly like the
domesticated. hawk as to make an old hen scamper
The bird to its right is the familiar with her chicks, and scare all the little
little Bob White of New England and birds within hearing.
the Middle States. Before it was The cowbird, or cow blackbird,
hunted so mercilessly, it must have comes in summer to nearly all the
been very common in all this portion Northern States. He can be seen fol-
of the country, but now it is quite rare lowing the cows about the pasture and
in some portions. Though it breeds catching the flies which they whisk off
well, in cold winters, whole flocks often with their tails. The cowbird builds no
get frozen under the snow and perish. nest of her own, but lays her eggs in
A pair of Bob Whites will raise two the nests of other birds, where they are
broods of a dozen or more each sum- hatched and cared for without any
mer, the male taking care of the first trouble on her part.


















p sesIoreS Icterida
Rasgres, Carvida











l!olhbrus peeoris Cnw Bird












Cyanurns crisatus_.lzze Jay





























Ortyx virginianus-oU-il






Lophortyx califormcus Caizornra Ouaa










Johrq Coleridge Patteson.

MONG the lives of South Pacific. As the islands were in-
missionaries there is habited by savages, he was often at-
none more interesting tacked, and was finally killed in 1871.
than that of John Cole.- In order to teach, he had to learn the
ridge Patteson. He many languages of the different islands,
was the son of Judge and often to attend the sick, wash and
John Patteson, and his mother was a dress the children, and sometimes do
niece of the poet Coleridge. Though his own cooking. Wherever he suc-
he was the eldest son and had brilliant ceeded in talking to the people and
prospects in Englahd, he early formed staying among them, they learned to
love him ; but kidnappers used
to come sometimes and carry
off the natives, and Patteson's
life was probably taken as a
consequence of the nefarious
practice.

The Three Answers.
BEAUTIFUL, indeed, was the
lesson which a little Sabbath-
school class had been reciting,
-all about the Saviour's king-
---" __ dom. Boys," said the lady,
looking seriously upon the
Little boys, what will you do to
help on the Saviour's kingdom
What will you do, James ?"
I will give my half-pence
/ to the missionaries, and they
/ shall preach about it to the
heathen," answered James.
"And what will you do,
George ?"
George looked up and said,
I will pray for it."
PAS. And what will you do,
oTHN COLERmGE PATTESO~N. John ? said the teacher, addres-
a resolution to give up all and'become sing the youngest.
a missionary. His chance did not come He cast down his eyes and softly
till 1857, when he was thirty years old. said, I will give my heart to it." The
In that year he sailed with Bishop teacher blessed the little boy, and
Selwyn for New Zealand. His" work breathed a silent prayer that Jesus
was done here and on the islands of the might take the offering.








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TH V* E$ILE BOO1 S
4 r-... .. .... .




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.n -th snlk frm . ; Painting Book, .. .. .
k T My Parlor. nWithilk iring, i 5 New English'Toy Books.
r found fthe House. \\ilTett.. 62 c.l r O Favcrites. ?tidh ooar -igh .
red late ,, .psc. ,. Childhood 'Tottes Nu.aery R n
Sa h 3. f Shis .6. H aisha Bye b i
"-. : iCaL Cradle. \\illett. 6ou alorc-d plates, i 50 t 7 tle Dme Crunip.
Sugar and Spice. (iolrec l te;, I 5f'Aut P eBooks.:
P t t t Chtt o t u L 3^ 4te. lau Picture Bood
e, in clrsh, M Old
Panoramaa ace.r.. 5 6. Whir re tir torisand t
..rQ ala ette. rg 4W .. .r;o Aunt C ir robd ;-and Pictures.
Shatterbox. I.a o R idia- sty nPcture BsS .
i qtae.oat L Little Bc-peep P iBoP. urr i. r o
S.N meriaP' s Pict .e Book, .. i 5
..Noci 20 engrd gs I ..FamouStibrry of iography. r lof,
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A ca i Chatterb ox, B o Ch, Jd a. i. a -ur pvo. n ..l- ,
afterpu Natural History, H. e. ; and og r lome Gus.
Wt4ttk Spent in a Glass Pond,. ..F -
-tsop's Familes, ic. u .e.. ...- .I Sunbeam PicA tures Boks. t o. 4, -'
., Ups and Downs.. . .... 75 l A mcayhwet ?c:ureaboic. .- thePrtaitn Gi Clt .B,'
' "l .And se' s Fairy Tales,. .. .. 7o -l t -, Sunbeam Pn '. .'i
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ep Show, .. .. ....... .-You;* P 7ks' Nap.Wra' Histo.
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"w4urs... 1a llu-trtion. Pictreu Science for the Yodi:.
a i os. 8ti es Ifi Pir li .r .. .
Ups Pitt Jist the book,. 'ir Adventures Around the World., 4Git



And. n"s. ....... .75 American TNihts Entertainme.
Bud 4d BSossomsw ...... ....Impui
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