• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 The friendly terns
 The mastiff
 Sea reptiles
 Zebra and young
 Little owls
 The swan and the drake
 A pet Jack
 White swan, eider duck, barnacle,...
 The artist to the highland...
 Among the wild flowers
 A visit to the farm
 The flowers are blooming
 Pretty poll
 Happy Mary
 The Yosemite Falls (picture)
 Big trees of Mariposa (picture...
 Rowland Hill
 Twelve hours in a day
 The bucket
 The doll doctor
 Dean Stanley
 Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
 Roasting chestnuts
 Going a hunting
 Thomas Carlyle
 James Watt and the kettle
 The prisoner
 Mother and the chicks
 The patter of little feet
 Fan and her family
 Absorbed
 Night heron, spoonbill, flamingo,...
 Waiting
 The argus
 Timothy
 The brave cockatoo
 Hare taking the water
 Our wild birds
 Blackbirds and young
 Goat, sheep, cow and calf, and...
 Back Cover






Title: Children at home
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00053014/00001
 Material Information
Title: Children at home stories, pictures and poems
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 26 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Worthington, R ( Publisher )
Publisher: R. Worthington
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1882
 Subjects
Subject: Children's literature, American   ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1882   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1882   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1882   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1882
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Publisher's advertisements on back cover.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00053014
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223109
notis - ALG3357
oclc - 42677158

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
    The friendly terns
        Page 2
        Page 3
    The mastiff
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Sea reptiles
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Zebra and young
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Little owls
        Page 10
        Page 11
    The swan and the drake
        Page 12
        Page 13
    A pet Jack
        Page 14
        Page 15
    White swan, eider duck, barnacle, and mallard (picture)
        Page 16
    The artist to the highland girl
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Among the wild flowers
        Page 20
        Page 21
    A visit to the farm
        Page 22
        Page 23
    The flowers are blooming
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Pretty poll
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Happy Mary
        Page 28
        Page 29
    The Yosemite Falls (picture)
        Page 30
    Big trees of Mariposa (picture)
        Page 31
    Rowland Hill
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Twelve hours in a day
        Page 34
        Page 35
    The bucket
        Page 36
    The doll doctor
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Dean Stanley
        Page 38
    Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Roasting chestnuts
        Page 40
    Going a hunting
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Thomas Carlyle
        Page 42
    James Watt and the kettle
        Page 42
        Page 43
    The prisoner
        Page 44
    Mother and the chicks
        Page 44
        Page 45
    The patter of little feet
        Page 46
    Fan and her family
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Absorbed
        Page 48
    Night heron, spoonbill, flamingo, black bellied daster (picture)
        Page 49
    Waiting
        Page 50
        Page 51
    The argus
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Timothy
        Page 54
        Page 55
    The brave cockatoo
        Page 56
        Page 57
    Hare taking the water
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Our wild birds
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Blackbirds and young
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Goat, sheep, cow and calf, and ox (picture)
        Page 64
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
Full Text
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CHILDREN AT HOME


STORIES, PICTURES AND POEMS.


























ILL US TRA TED.


NEW YORK:
(COPYRIGHT, 1882, BY)
R. WORTHINGTON, 770 BROADWAY.











THE FRIENDLY TERNS.



OINE day Mr. Edward, the Scotch natural-
ist shot at a Tern, hoping to secure the
beautiful creature as a specimen. The ball
broke the bird's wing, and he fell screaming
down to the water. His cries brought other
terns to the rescue, and with pitiful screams
they flew to the spot where the naturalist
stood, while the tide drifted their wounded
brother toward the shore. But before Mr. Ed-
ward could secure his prize, he observed, to
his astonishment, that two of the terns had
flown down to the water, and were gently lift-
ing up their suffering companion, one taking hold
of either wing. But their burden was rather
heavy; so, after carrying it seaward about
six or seven yards, they let it down, and two
more came, picked it up, and carried it a little
farther. By means of thus relieving each other
they managed to reach a rock where they con-
cluded they would be safe.






















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THE MASTIFF.


HE mastiff is a large, grave, sullen-
looking dog, with a wide chest, noble
head, long switch tail, bright eyes,
and a loud, deep voice. Of all dogs
this is the most vigilant watcher over
"the property of his master, and noth-
ing can tempt him to betray the
confidence reposed in him. Notwithstanding
his commanding appearance, and the strictness
with which he guards the property of his mas-
ter, the mastiff is possessed of great mildness
of character, and is very grateful for any favors
bestowed upon him. I once went into the
barn of a friend where there was a mastiff
chained; I went up to the dog and patted him
on the head, when out rushed the groom from
the stable exclaiming, "Come away, sir! He's
dangerous with strangers." But I did not re-
move my hand nor show any fear. The conse
quence was, that the dog and I were the best
of friends; but had I shown any fear, and has-
tily removed my hand, I might have fared ra-
ther badly, for this dog always couples fear
with guilt.














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SEA REPTILES.



HERE were in the sea in very ancient
Times long before the flood-two
very large and wonderful reptiles.
Of them we present striking illustra-
tions. One of them has been named
the Ichthyosaurus, which means Fish
Reptile. Its head somewhat resem-
bled that of the crocodile, except that the orbit
was much larger, and had the nostril placed
close to it, as in the whale, and not near the
end of the snout. It had four paddles and a
powerful tail, and was very active in its move-
ments and a rapid swimmer.
The other huge reptile was the Plesiosaurus,
the meaning of which is Near to a Reptile."
Its structure was very singular and its charac-
ter very strange. In the words of Buckland:
"To the head of a lizard, it united the teeth
of the crocodile, a neck of enormous length.
resembling the body of a serpent, a trunk and
a tail of the size of an ordinary quadruped,
the ribs of a chameleon, and the paddles of a
whale."






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ZEBRA AND YOUNG.



4i ,RS. ZEBRA, standing with her baby by
[ her side, asks proudly of the lookers-on,
"Did you ever see such a likeness?" and
certainly mother and child are very much alike,
striped all over their bodies, from head to foot,
and from nose to tail, with the same regular
marks of black. Strong and wild by nature, the
zebra family are left very much to themselves,
which is a source of great happiness to the
mother and child in the picture before us. "No!
no! my baby is not going to become as tame as
the donkey, or to draw carts and carriages like
the horse; it is to have its freedom, and go just
where it likes all over these large plains; "-so
says Mrs. Zebra, and she means it too, for if
anybody took the trouble to go all the way to
the hot country of Africa, where Mrs. Zebra is
at home, and tried to carry off her baby, they
would find their journey a vain one, and that
she would kick severely, and perhaps break the
legs of the person bold enough to take away
her darling.


































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LITTLE OWLS.



HO has not at one time or other of his
life read fairy tales and sympathized
with stories of enchanted princes and
princesses? I once thought of this
when a country boy offered me a nest with
four of the young of the Little Owl. I put
them into a large cage, where they could stare
at each other and at my pigeons to their hearts'
content.
Let me say that this little owl is a very use-
ful bird, for it keeps mice, bats, beetles, and
other creatures in check, which might other-
wise multiply too fast. On a spring or sum-
mer evening you may hear its plaintive hoot
among the apple-blossoms of an orchard, or the
sheaves of a cornfield. Curiously enough, this
simple sound earned the little bird the name
of being the harbinger of death, and peasants
believed that whenever its cry was heard
where sickness was in the family, the patient
was sure to die.



































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THE SWAN AND THE DRAKE.



^SLOWLY in majestic silence
A Sailed a Swan upon a lake;
Round about him, never quiet,
Swam a noisy, quacking Drake.

"Swan," exclaimed the latter, halting,
"I can scarcely comprehend
Why I never hear you talking:
Are you really dumb, my friend?"

Said the swan, by way of answer:
"I have wondered, when you make
Such a shocking, senseless clatter,
Whether you are deaf, Sir Drake!"

Better, like the swan, remain in
Silence grave and dignified,
Than keep, drake-like, ever prating,
While your listeners deride.
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A PET JACK.


HE first fish I ever saw in an aquarium,
twenty years ago, was a "Jack," as
he is called when young, or a "Pike,"
when he grows older; and ever since then I
have contrived to have a pet one, and this,
drawn from life by Mr. Harrison Weir, is an
accurate portrait of the one I now possess
in the Crystal Palace Aquarium. There he
is, just as he steals round the corner of a
bit of rock. He is glaring at a minnow, at
which he is taking most accurate aim; he
hardly seems to move, but yet he does by a
very trifling motion of the edge of his back
fin-sometimes resting a little on the tips
of his two foremost fins, as they touch the
ground, carefully calculating his distance;
and then, at the very moment when the
minnow has got into a position which leaves
a space of clear water in front, so that Mr.
Jack shall not hurt his nose against any hard
substance when he gets carried on by the
violence of his rush, he darts at the minnow
with the speed of Shakspeare's Puck :-
"I go, I go! look, how I go!
Swifter than arrow from the Tartar's bow."











































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THE ARTIST TO THE HIGHLAND
GIRL.

WEET highland girl, a very shower
Of beauty is thy earthly dower !
SThrice seven consenting years have shed
Their utmost bounty on thy head ;.
And these gray rocks; this household lawn ;
These trees, a veil just half withdrawn;
This fall of water, that doth make
A murmur near the silent lake;
This little bay, a quiet road
That holds in shelter thy abode:
In truth, together do you seem
Like something fashioned in a dream.
What hand but would a garland cull,
For thee, who art so beautiful?
Oh, happy pleasure, here to dwell
Beside thee in some healthy dell;
Adopt your homely ways and dress,
A shepherd, thou a shepherdess!
But I could frame a wish for thee
More like a grave reality.
Thou art to me but as a wave
Of the wild sea; and I would have
Some claim upon thee if I could,
Though but of common neighborhood.











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ERE is a pretty country girl who
loves to ramble through the meadows
and gather wild flowers. She makes bouquets,
and decorates her hat with the flowers that
smell so sweet; and after strolling about, she
feels tired and thinks she had better lay
down and enjoy the fragrance of the flowers.
Don't you wish you could always go out
and enjoy yourself as nicely as this little
girl does? I suppose if you are living in the
city you would be afraid to lay down as she
is doing, as you might think some insects
would want to make your particular
acquaintance; but this little girl has no fear
of that, and is resting as securely as if on
the carpet at home.



































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OW delighted the children were when
Mrs. Johnston said she would take
them to spend a day at a farm-house!
When they reached the farm next morning,
there was so much to see and do, they
scarcely knew where to go first. The hay-
field, pond, the poultry-yard, and the
meadows with cows and sheep, were new
pleasures to the town-bred children. Here is
a picture of that happy day, and in it we see
Harry drinking the fresh milk which Peggy,
the milk-maid, has given him, and Bessie
feeding the goat, while Helen holds a kid in
her arms. A hen is cackling her anger at
being disturbed; baby, who thinks it is all
done for her amusement, jumps and crows
in Aunt Mary's arms; and the quietest
spectator of all is the old cow, who munches
her hay and wonders what it all means.






























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Nl HE flowers are bloomiing everywhere,
Oi On every hill and dell;
And oh, how beautiful they are!
How sweetly, too, they smell!

The birds they spring' along,
And look so glad and gay;-
I love to hear their pleasant song,
I feel as glad as they.

The young lambs bleat and frisk about,
The bees hum round their hive;
The butterflies are coming out
'Tis good to be alive.

See! yonder bird spreads out his wings,
And mounts the clear blue skies;
And hark, how merrily he sings
As far away he flies!















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OLL was a beautiful green parrot; he
had been taught to say a great many
words, and was never tired of talking.
The first thing in the morning he was heard
saying to the maid, Fine day, Bessy! Open
the shutters! Polly's awake! Pretty poll!
pretty Poll!"
Later on, when breakfast was being
brought in, he would call out, "Polly's
hungry! A cup of tea More cream Buttered
toast! Polly's hungry! Poor Poll, poor Poll!"
And Poll made so much noise that he
always had his breakfast sooner than any
one else.
He would take his master's watch in his
claw and look at it as though he was going
to tell you the right time of day, and say,
"Five o'clock, polly wants supper." But
Polly guessed at the time.
Then he would be quiet for a time; but
when Lucy and Rose came into the room, he
began to chatter again, for the little girls
were very fond of him, and liked hearing
him talk.




























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ERE sits little Mary,
SWith her face of winning grace,
Chattering tongue that runs apace,
And her ways contrary.

Who so gay as Mary?
With her laugh of rippling glee
Brimming o'er with melody-
Bonny, blithesome Mary.

Household pet is Mary-
Such a merry, joyous sprite,
Filling all our home with light-
Pretty, winsome Mary.

Mischief-loving Mary,
Busy as the busiest bee,
Full of sunshine, life and glee,
Is our heart's sweet Mary.




















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ROWLAND HILL.

























OR the privilege now en- Office. This was no easy matter. His
joyed in being able to scheme, like so many other good
send a letter to any part of works, was much opposed; but after
Great Britain or Ireland long and patient labor he succeeded
for a penny, thanks are due to the in convincing the House of Commons
late Sir Rowland Hill, who died a that if his scheme were carried out
little more than three years ago. He the Government would be enriched
was the son of a schoolmaster in Bir- and a great blessing given to all the
mingham, and used to teach the boys Queen's subjects; and so at last they
to write. But after working hard for listened to him, and it was decided
some years at school-keeping, his that every letter not weighing more
health gave way, and he had to go than half an ounce should be sent for
abroad. When he came back he be- a penny, for which purpose penny
gan to give himself up to that which stamps bearing the image of the
became henceforth the object of his Queen's head were appointed to be
life, viz. the working of a thorough used. He died aged eighty-three, and
change in the system of the Post was buried in Westminster Abbey.










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STEK O CLOCK.

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T i DOOR IS SHUT: OUTSIDE THEY STAND,
THE NAUGHTY LITTLE TRUANT BAND;
INSIDE THEY HEAR THE SOUND OF SONG, ;
ND MANY FEET THAT MARCH ALONG.
THEIR TEARS AND GRIEF (
P NG NO PELIEF: |'
T THEY MUST CONFESS
THEIR NAUGHTINESS.
TEN STPI!ES, AND THEY HEAR,
THROUGH THEIR SOBS, VOICES CLEAR I
Si F GOOD LITTLE CHILDP\EN WITH NOTHING TO FEAR!






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THE BUCKET.


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the scenes of my child- the cataract fell;

XWhen fond recollection hung in the well.
presents them to view! The old oaken bucket, the iron-bound
The orchard, the meadow, the deep bucket,
tangled wild wood, The moss-covered bucket which
And every loved spot which my i hung in the well.
infancy knew;

THE DOLL DOCTOR.
Oh, my, what evcr shall Id" do ll? He was a very ood-natured
exclaimed little Annie Matthews. She looking man, and after telling them
had been throwing her doll up in the t6 be seated on the sand and looking-
air and catching it as it came down, at the bruised doll, he took it on his
but having missed it once, poor dolly knee and commenced to doctor it.
"fell to the round. hen lifted up He first took a small piece ofputtyand
it was found that Miss Dolly had a rolled it between his hands, making
broken nose and quite a piece knocked Annie think he was going to give
out of her cheek. Poor dolly looked dolly a pill, but he took a tiny little
quite a fright, and while Annie was bit and placed it on dolly's nose, and
thinking what to do Lulu Clark came then he placed a small piece on the
in and hearing Annie's remark, said, check, and makinnd it nice and round
"Come with me and I'll get your and plump he laid dolly on her back
doll made all well again." Lulu had in the sun for a little while, until the
once the same trouble herself, and putty became harder. He then took
knew of a man she called the Doc- dolly up again, painted the nose a nice
tor" that made her doll all right again. cream color and the cheeks beautiful
They started off, and after going red, making dolly, as Lulu declared,
through several streets came to the better than new," and after thanking
beach, where they saw a man painting him very much, they returned home
a boat and Lulu said, "there he is !" delighted with the result of their visit
and up they ran, when Lulu said, to the Doctor."
" please, sir, would you mend Annie's










THE BUCKET.


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the scenes of my child- the cataract fell;

XWhen fond recollection hung in the well.
presents them to view! The old oaken bucket, the iron-bound
The orchard, the meadow, the deep bucket,
tangled wild wood, The moss-covered bucket which
And every loved spot which my i hung in the well.
infancy knew;

THE DOLL DOCTOR.
Oh, my, what evcr shall Id" do ll? He was a very ood-natured
exclaimed little Annie Matthews. She looking man, and after telling them
had been throwing her doll up in the t6 be seated on the sand and looking-
air and catching it as it came down, at the bruised doll, he took it on his
but having missed it once, poor dolly knee and commenced to doctor it.
"fell to the round. hen lifted up He first took a small piece ofputtyand
it was found that Miss Dolly had a rolled it between his hands, making
broken nose and quite a piece knocked Annie think he was going to give
out of her cheek. Poor dolly looked dolly a pill, but he took a tiny little
quite a fright, and while Annie was bit and placed it on dolly's nose, and
thinking what to do Lulu Clark came then he placed a small piece on the
in and hearing Annie's remark, said, check, and makinnd it nice and round
"Come with me and I'll get your and plump he laid dolly on her back
doll made all well again." Lulu had in the sun for a little while, until the
once the same trouble herself, and putty became harder. He then took
knew of a man she called the Doc- dolly up again, painted the nose a nice
tor" that made her doll all right again. cream color and the cheeks beautiful
They started off, and after going red, making dolly, as Lulu declared,
through several streets came to the better than new," and after thanking
beach, where they saw a man painting him very much, they returned home
a boat and Lulu said, "there he is !" delighted with the result of their visit
and up they ran, when Lulu said, to the Doctor."
" please, sir, would you mend Annie's

























_WOM I M































- ~ -c-- -~ - = --WK









DEAN STANLEY.
-- THUR PENRHYN
.-7, STANLEY, Dean of West-
_---.^ minster, was long one of the
S:. .-- most popular clergymen in
Si England. He was born on Dec. 3th,
8 1 5, and was educated at the famous
" 3 l Rugby School, and is the Arthur"
in that ever delightful book, Tom
Brown's School Days." He was
-- afterwards elected Professorof Church
History and wrote a great many im-
portant books on that subject. In
186 he was made Dean of West-
"-- : _, minster, and as such was guardian of
.. that grand historic building, Westmin-
.) fv 7 I ster Abbey. He died on July i8th,
", 1881, and was buried in the venerable
S .. Abbey in which he had through life
taken such pride and interest.

HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW.
The most popular and most widely time in his father's office, but a pro-
known of American Poets, Henry fessorship having in the meantime
Wadsworth Longfellow, died at Cam- been founded in Bowdoin College,
bridge, Mass., on March 24th, 1882, and having been offered him, he, after
at the ripe age of 75. His life had some consideration, accepted it, and
been a quiet and loving one, his chief proceeded to Europe to prepare
enjoyments being among his books himself for his new duties. He
and at home, where he used to meet soon afterwards published some of
all strangers with a graceful welcome his longer pieces, and was elected
that left a pleasing and lasting im- Professor of Modern Languages at
pression on his visitors. He was the HarvardUniversity,whichhe resigned
Poet of the people, and when the in 1854. His literary career corn-
charmed words left his pen, they menced very early, and while a grad-
were scattered over the English- uate he published many of his beau-
speaking world, and entered every tiful poems in the newspapers, but his
home, rich or poor, that had the least pay was not encouraging, as he had
sympathy with poetry. sometimes to take a subscription to the
He was born at Portland, Maine, on newspaper in payment for his contri-
Feb. 27, 1807, and at the age of 14 he bution. He was very fond of children
entered Bowdoin College, and after and used to take great pleasure in
a course of study there for four years, their gambols, and the little ones, rich
graduated with high honors in 1825. or poor, had always a rood friend in
Afterwards he studied law for a short the great poet, Longfellow.









DEAN STANLEY.
-- THUR PENRHYN
.-7, STANLEY, Dean of West-
_---.^ minster, was long one of the
S:. .-- most popular clergymen in
Si England. He was born on Dec. 3th,
8 1 5, and was educated at the famous
" 3 l Rugby School, and is the Arthur"
in that ever delightful book, Tom
Brown's School Days." He was
-- afterwards elected Professorof Church
History and wrote a great many im-
portant books on that subject. In
186 he was made Dean of West-
"-- : _, minster, and as such was guardian of
.. that grand historic building, Westmin-
.) fv 7 I ster Abbey. He died on July i8th,
", 1881, and was buried in the venerable
S .. Abbey in which he had through life
taken such pride and interest.

HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW.
The most popular and most widely time in his father's office, but a pro-
known of American Poets, Henry fessorship having in the meantime
Wadsworth Longfellow, died at Cam- been founded in Bowdoin College,
bridge, Mass., on March 24th, 1882, and having been offered him, he, after
at the ripe age of 75. His life had some consideration, accepted it, and
been a quiet and loving one, his chief proceeded to Europe to prepare
enjoyments being among his books himself for his new duties. He
and at home, where he used to meet soon afterwards published some of
all strangers with a graceful welcome his longer pieces, and was elected
that left a pleasing and lasting im- Professor of Modern Languages at
pression on his visitors. He was the HarvardUniversity,whichhe resigned
Poet of the people, and when the in 1854. His literary career corn-
charmed words left his pen, they menced very early, and while a grad-
were scattered over the English- uate he published many of his beau-
speaking world, and entered every tiful poems in the newspapers, but his
home, rich or poor, that had the least pay was not encouraging, as he had
sympathy with poetry. sometimes to take a subscription to the
He was born at Portland, Maine, on newspaper in payment for his contri-
Feb. 27, 1807, and at the age of 14 he bution. He was very fond of children
entered Bowdoin College, and after and used to take great pleasure in
a course of study there for four years, their gambols, and the little ones, rich
graduated with high honors in 1825. or poor, had always a rood friend in
Afterwards he studied law for a short the great poet, Longfellow.




















- - --.--
- --- --: -_-..-. :-. .-{










;7" : ." : -. ;


/ i



b ...:. .
... .. .. ... ...
l'.1;. ;.: .. .---- ---







~~~~~ -..... ... -.;.,- -- -. -..... --








ROASTING CHESTNUTS. GOING A HUNTING.
Master Fred Tyson was one of
those clever little fellows that are
H always running about and ever lively
and sometimes in mischief, but always
ready to apologize when any harm
was done to any one. His papa
l brought him home, one day, from the
city, a gun that could shoot pellets a
Considerable distance, and so he
Thought he would go out a hunting.
p hThere was also the big dog, Nero,
almost as tall as himself, who would
s be only too glad to go on such an ex-
r a hcursion. Master Fred then made up
a party of his sisters, Alice and Mary,
and with Nero and the gun they ex-
Spected to have some fine sport.
"They wandered all through the
fields and saw lots of birds, but the
gun would not fire far enough, and
Nero, big as he was, could not catch
them. They were beginning to get
somewhat discouraged, when they
entered a wood, which was very
dense, and began to think that if they
ERE is a merry party of went much further they might not
young folks delightfully find their way back, and their fate
employed roasting chest- might be the same as the babes in
nuts over an open fire, and the wood. So they held a consulta-
to all appearance it is a very hot one, tion and resolved to return. They
seeing that the little girl has to hold tied their handkerchiefs together and
up her hand as a shield from the heat. making quite a rein they tied it to
They are eagerly watching for the Nero's collar, and off he went at
chestnuts to pop up and. dance all full speed half dragging master Fred
over the pan and then to crack open and his sisters home, where they soon
and be ready for eating, and I think arrived very tired and hungry, and
it will not be long before that takes they confessed that although they had
place, and the boy seems to think so not had much success in bringing
too, by the pleasant smile on his face. home lots of birds, they had had lots
Their mamma sits quietly knitting, of fun.
and thinking of the time long ago,
when she was a little girl and enjoyed As land is improved by sowing it
it as much as the little ones are now with various seeds, so is the mind by
doing, exercising it with different studies.








ROASTING CHESTNUTS. GOING A HUNTING.
Master Fred Tyson was one of
those clever little fellows that are
H always running about and ever lively
and sometimes in mischief, but always
ready to apologize when any harm
was done to any one. His papa
l brought him home, one day, from the
city, a gun that could shoot pellets a
Considerable distance, and so he
Thought he would go out a hunting.
p hThere was also the big dog, Nero,
almost as tall as himself, who would
s be only too glad to go on such an ex-
r a hcursion. Master Fred then made up
a party of his sisters, Alice and Mary,
and with Nero and the gun they ex-
Spected to have some fine sport.
"They wandered all through the
fields and saw lots of birds, but the
gun would not fire far enough, and
Nero, big as he was, could not catch
them. They were beginning to get
somewhat discouraged, when they
entered a wood, which was very
dense, and began to think that if they
ERE is a merry party of went much further they might not
young folks delightfully find their way back, and their fate
employed roasting chest- might be the same as the babes in
nuts over an open fire, and the wood. So they held a consulta-
to all appearance it is a very hot one, tion and resolved to return. They
seeing that the little girl has to hold tied their handkerchiefs together and
up her hand as a shield from the heat. making quite a rein they tied it to
They are eagerly watching for the Nero's collar, and off he went at
chestnuts to pop up and. dance all full speed half dragging master Fred
over the pan and then to crack open and his sisters home, where they soon
and be ready for eating, and I think arrived very tired and hungry, and
it will not be long before that takes they confessed that although they had
place, and the boy seems to think so not had much success in bringing
too, by the pleasant smile on his face. home lots of birds, they had had lots
Their mamma sits quietly knitting, of fun.
and thinking of the time long ago,
when she was a little girl and enjoyed As land is improved by sowing it
it as much as the little ones are now with various seeds, so is the mind by
doing, exercising it with different studies.



































2k--


jb~4 P~ 3 ;~~ ~~ZCl




Ik.=


























%, Ile~








THOMAS CARLYLE.
SHIS great author and phil-
S ---- osopher commenced life in
"a very humble way, but
,-by crreat perseverance he
reached the highest position in liter-
t nature. He was born on September
"4th, 1795. Thomas Carlyle was a
great reader, and made rapid pro-
"gress in his studies, so much so,
that when he was fourteen years of
age he was able to enter Edinburgh
University, and had completed his
course there whenhe was eighteen.
\ ,He settled in Edinburgh for a time,
Sand a very hard time it was, writing
articles for the magazines. He
afterwards removed to London,
and lived in Chelsea, where he
passed a quiet and secluded life,
Sand was latterly known as the
Sage of Chelsea." He died on
S, February 5th, 1881, and by his
Sown request was buried among his
"native Scottish hills.

JAMES WATT AND THE KETTLE.
"To read the life of James Watt, who and when she quietly opened the
invented that part of the steam engine door, there he sat in deep thought
that enabled it to become of the great with his head on his hand watching
use it is now put to, is like reading the the kettle steaming on the fire. He
tale of Aladdin and the wonderful saw the kettle throwing out steam
lamp, and makes us believe thattruth from spout and lid, and every now
is sometimes stranger than fiction. and again the lid would jump up, and
James Watt was born at Greenock, in his young mind he was wondering
Scotland, on the 19th of January, what invisible force it was inside that
1736, his father being a merchant and was lifting the lid; and this incident
ship-builder. Young Watt was a may be said to have been the starting
very delicate child and had often point of his wonderful discoveries in
to be kept at home from school in the use of steam. When you see the
consequence, and it was on one of steam engine dragging a train of cars
these occasions while sitting quietly behind it, or a large steamship plough-
in the kitchen by himself, that his ing through the water, you can think
mother, who was in the next room, of James Watt and the kettle.
wondered at the silence of her son,








THOMAS CARLYLE.
SHIS great author and phil-
S ---- osopher commenced life in
"a very humble way, but
,-by crreat perseverance he
reached the highest position in liter-
t nature. He was born on September
"4th, 1795. Thomas Carlyle was a
great reader, and made rapid pro-
"gress in his studies, so much so,
that when he was fourteen years of
age he was able to enter Edinburgh
University, and had completed his
course there whenhe was eighteen.
\ ,He settled in Edinburgh for a time,
Sand a very hard time it was, writing
articles for the magazines. He
afterwards removed to London,
and lived in Chelsea, where he
passed a quiet and secluded life,
Sand was latterly known as the
Sage of Chelsea." He died on
S, February 5th, 1881, and by his
Sown request was buried among his
"native Scottish hills.

JAMES WATT AND THE KETTLE.
"To read the life of James Watt, who and when she quietly opened the
invented that part of the steam engine door, there he sat in deep thought
that enabled it to become of the great with his head on his hand watching
use it is now put to, is like reading the the kettle steaming on the fire. He
tale of Aladdin and the wonderful saw the kettle throwing out steam
lamp, and makes us believe thattruth from spout and lid, and every now
is sometimes stranger than fiction. and again the lid would jump up, and
James Watt was born at Greenock, in his young mind he was wondering
Scotland, on the 19th of January, what invisible force it was inside that
1736, his father being a merchant and was lifting the lid; and this incident
ship-builder. Young Watt was a may be said to have been the starting
very delicate child and had often point of his wonderful discoveries in
to be kept at home from school in the use of steam. When you see the
consequence, and it was on one of steam engine dragging a train of cars
these occasions while sitting quietly behind it, or a large steamship plough-
in the kitchen by himself, that his ing through the water, you can think
mother, who was in the next room, of James Watt and the kettle.
wondered at the silence of her son,






















INd






















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THE PRISONER.
f rather timid at first, but the more she
S> - looked at its rich colors the more she
"w ished to have it. So she took off
"" / -f.' the lid and made a sudden snatch at
7 -- it, and lo, and behold! she had the
bee and flower safely in the box and
S- .- Ithe lid safely on. She was so de-
S\Jr lighted that she returned home, and
1 ', o ion the way she saw her little brother
""and sister sitting on a stile together.
S... *i She ran up and holding out the box
,,yI /, 0b , : ,,asked them to guess what she had
,.-X_ ,, 'l *cauirht. But they could not guess,
I ', \\\ ...,'" 'a and when she told them it was a bee,
1 and alive! they started back afraid;
S NE lovely summer day when and when she came nearer and they
the sun was shining bright heard it buzzing inside, they wanted
and warm, Amy Herbert to get away as soon as possible.
"went into the fields for a They all returned home together;
ramble. She took a paper box with and Amy, not hearing it buzz, she
her as she thought she might catch was afraid it had escaped, so she
something and bring it home alive. lifted the lid just a little bit, when
She had not gone far when she saw out flew Mr. Bee, who was once more
a large bee on a flower busy gathering free, to the great delight of Amy's
all the sweetness out of it. She was brother and sister.

MOTHER AND CHICKS.
Cluck-a-cluck! clack-clack! Chickens, chickens, keep together;
Every horny yellow toe Walk in decent two and two,
Posed with graceful erudition As Miss Crabb's young ladies do.
In the proper fifth position, Pray preserve a proper row-
Very dignified and slow Nobody can count you so.
Chickens trooping at her back, Clack-a-clack, and cluck-a-cluck !
Cluck-a-cluck clack-clack \\hat is this her mind has struck?
See the lady-mother go Every moment louder, prouder,
While the chickens jolt and crowd her,
Cluck-a-cluck clack-clack! Sharper, quicker,
Chickens chirrup at her back. Shorter, thicker,
How they waver to and fro, Comes her clack-a-cluck-a-cluck.
In a long and struggling tether, See, her gnarly toes she points,
Light as thistledown doth blow Till one trembles for her joints.
In the harvest weather Lady hen---to put it thus-
Oh, enchanted balls of feather, \hy and wherefore all this fuss ?









THE PRISONER.
f rather timid at first, but the more she
S> - looked at its rich colors the more she
"w ished to have it. So she took off
"" / -f.' the lid and made a sudden snatch at
7 -- it, and lo, and behold! she had the
bee and flower safely in the box and
S- .- Ithe lid safely on. She was so de-
S\Jr lighted that she returned home, and
1 ', o ion the way she saw her little brother
""and sister sitting on a stile together.
S... *i She ran up and holding out the box
,,yI /, 0b , : ,,asked them to guess what she had
,.-X_ ,, 'l *cauirht. But they could not guess,
I ', \\\ ...,'" 'a and when she told them it was a bee,
1 and alive! they started back afraid;
S NE lovely summer day when and when she came nearer and they
the sun was shining bright heard it buzzing inside, they wanted
and warm, Amy Herbert to get away as soon as possible.
"went into the fields for a They all returned home together;
ramble. She took a paper box with and Amy, not hearing it buzz, she
her as she thought she might catch was afraid it had escaped, so she
something and bring it home alive. lifted the lid just a little bit, when
She had not gone far when she saw out flew Mr. Bee, who was once more
a large bee on a flower busy gathering free, to the great delight of Amy's
all the sweetness out of it. She was brother and sister.

MOTHER AND CHICKS.
Cluck-a-cluck! clack-clack! Chickens, chickens, keep together;
Every horny yellow toe Walk in decent two and two,
Posed with graceful erudition As Miss Crabb's young ladies do.
In the proper fifth position, Pray preserve a proper row-
Very dignified and slow Nobody can count you so.
Chickens trooping at her back, Clack-a-clack, and cluck-a-cluck !
Cluck-a-cluck clack-clack \\hat is this her mind has struck?
See the lady-mother go Every moment louder, prouder,
While the chickens jolt and crowd her,
Cluck-a-cluck clack-clack! Sharper, quicker,
Chickens chirrup at her back. Shorter, thicker,
How they waver to and fro, Comes her clack-a-cluck-a-cluck.
In a long and struggling tether, See, her gnarly toes she points,
Light as thistledown doth blow Till one trembles for her joints.
In the harvest weather Lady hen---to put it thus-
Oh, enchanted balls of feather, \hy and wherefore all this fuss ?


















Iii I




IL {I, .. .




















fill-






W-P! ~








THE PATTER OF LITTLE FEET.














P with the sun in the morning, With a step as light and fleet,
Away to the garden they Under the window I hear
fly, The patter of little feet.
"To see if the sleeping blos- Now to the brook they wander
soms In swift and noiseless flight,
Have begun to open an eye. Splashing the sparkling ripples
Running a race with the wind, Like the fairy water-sprite.

FAN AND HER FAMILY.
Oh! how anxious that handsome along until they came to a fence and
dog looks up in the face of its mistress then waited to see how the little
who holds the two pups, pleading for fellows would get over. So how do
her to let them on the ground so that you think they got over ? Simply by
she may care for them herself. Fan their mother, Fan. taking them by the
feels of course a certain confidence back of the neck in her mouth and
that her beautiful mistress would not lifting them over so tenderly and
hurt her offspring, but still she would carefully that they did not seem to
rather attend to them herself. The feel it. One would have thought
little ones are somewhat anxious also, that the mother's teeth would have
and are each commencing to whine, hurt them, but it was not so. for the
as much as to say, please let me go little ones never winced during the
to my mother." The ladies presently operation, and when they were placed
place them on the ground, and it is on the ground toddled off in their
quite amusing to see them waddling tumble-all-over manner.
along, and in their hurry to keep pace
"with their mother, will fall down on
their side and roll over and get up i F.LsJ.:Ii(,i) may le a thick crust;
from the other side in the funniest but in course of time truth will find a
manner possible. The ladies walked place to break through.








THE PATTER OF LITTLE FEET.














P with the sun in the morning, With a step as light and fleet,
Away to the garden they Under the window I hear
fly, The patter of little feet.
"To see if the sleeping blos- Now to the brook they wander
soms In swift and noiseless flight,
Have begun to open an eye. Splashing the sparkling ripples
Running a race with the wind, Like the fairy water-sprite.

FAN AND HER FAMILY.
Oh! how anxious that handsome along until they came to a fence and
dog looks up in the face of its mistress then waited to see how the little
who holds the two pups, pleading for fellows would get over. So how do
her to let them on the ground so that you think they got over ? Simply by
she may care for them herself. Fan their mother, Fan. taking them by the
feels of course a certain confidence back of the neck in her mouth and
that her beautiful mistress would not lifting them over so tenderly and
hurt her offspring, but still she would carefully that they did not seem to
rather attend to them herself. The feel it. One would have thought
little ones are somewhat anxious also, that the mother's teeth would have
and are each commencing to whine, hurt them, but it was not so. for the
as much as to say, please let me go little ones never winced during the
to my mother." The ladies presently operation, and when they were placed
place them on the ground, and it is on the ground toddled off in their
quite amusing to see them waddling tumble-all-over manner.
along, and in their hurry to keep pace
"with their mother, will fall down on
their side and roll over and get up i F.LsJ.:Ii(,i) may le a thick crust;
from the other side in the funniest but in course of time truth will find a
manner possible. The ladies walked place to break through.





















r














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ABSORBED.
HIS pretty little picture seems the garden, or the field, where he has
to grow more and more life- been playing with his brothers and
like the longer you look at it. sisters, and it has struck the little gen-
The little fellow is evidently tleman that he will write a message to
not in school, or he would not be sit- his mother, who is perhaps sick up-
ting before a table with his cap on stairs; and he is trying to write very
nicely and cor-
rectly. And
then, it is very
likely he will
take the slate
up stairs to his
mother himself,
and watch her
as she reads the
writing, and be
on hand to re-
ceive her an-
swer, and the
sweet mother-
ly kiss which
will be sure to
go with it.
See how ab-
sorbed" he is
in his work.
Absorbed" is
rather a diffi-
cult word, and
it has more
than one mean-
ing. Some
times it means
that one thing
is taken into the
substance o f
"some other
and his comforter round his neck. thing, so as to be lost sight of,
Nor would the table be just like that as when water is sucked up by a
shown in the picture, but more prob- sponge, and from this idea we have
ably a desk, with a school chair or come to say that a person is absorbed
form before it, on which to sit, instead when he is so taken up by one par-
of that curious high-back chair. No, ticular thought or work as to be en-
he has just come into the house from tirely forgetful of everything else.






























NIGHT HERON.
SPOONBILL.




















FLAMINGO. BLACK BELLIED DASTER.










WAITING.

AITING- for master to come down the stair,
l Are Noble" and Floss," and his favor-
L. J ^ ite mare-
Brenda" the gentle, with skin soft and gray,
Waiting the signal, Now off and away."

Noble stands holding the whip and the rein,
His gaze fixed on Brenda, who tosses her mane;
While dear little Floss sits quietly by,
Winking and blinking her liquid brown eye.

Master's so kind to them-nothing to fear
Have horse or dogs when his footsteps they hear;
Look how they're waiting with eagerness there,
Ready to go with him everywhere.

And what a pleasure it is when these three
There on the staircase their kind master see;
Now he is mounted, the waiting is o'er-
Floss, Brenda, and Noble race off from the door.

^. ,4. -..
"l-


































































IV,


fff











:I.'is21









THE ARGUS.



-' HE Argus is a bird with
-- ---- magnificent plumage;
it inhabits the forests
'. I-"': 4-- of Java and Sumatra,
S aand takes its place beside the pheasant,
^ from which it only differs in being
unprovided with spurs, and by the
extraordinary development of the secondary
feathers of the wings in the male. The tail is
large and round, and the two middle feathers
are extremely long and quite straight. When
paraded, as it struts round the female, spread-
ing its wings and tail, this bird presents to the
dazzled eye of the spectator two splendid
bronze-colored fans, upon which is sprinkled a
profusion of bright marks much resembling
eyes. It owes its name of Argus to these spots.
















141









ri







Acp17l3. ,
~`'i~W L~,'i~~ i0s;





I' htU~llT 5











TIMOTHY.
---o* *--

IMOTHY was our pet hedgehog. I
bought him in Leadenhall Market,
brought him home, and put him into
the back-garden, which is walled in. There,
to that extent, he had his liberty, and many,
and many a time did I watch him from my
study window walking about in the twilight
among the grass, searching for worms and
other insects. And very useful was he to
the plants by so doing. When the dry
weather came food got more scarce: then
Timothy was fed with bread and milk from
the back-kitchen window, which is on a
level with the stone. Soon he came to know
that when he was hungry there wa s the
supply; and often he would come and scratch
at the glass or at the back-door lor his
supper, and after getting it, walk off to the
garden beds to make himself useful. Few
people know of the great use of.a hedgehog
in a garden, or they would be more generally
kept. Our Timothy, poor fellow, however,
in spite of all his good qualities, came to a
bad end. A strange dog coming one day,
saw him walking about in search of his
accustomed food, and pounced on him and
bit him; still I had hopes of his recovery, but
in a few days he died, and all of us were sorry.













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III
i~l iii I i 525R:4I










THE BRAVE COCKATOO.



NE Charles Durand, of whose travels
and adventures a book has been writ-
ten, owned a cockatoo, which he car-
ried about with him on his journeys;
the bird's name was Billy, and he
seems to have been as wise as he was loving.
Charles was asleep in his tent, when he was
roused by a sharp, shrill cry of the bird, of
"Time to rise! time to rise!" accompanied by
a violent flapping of the wings. So awakened,
Charles looked around, wondering what had
disturbed his feathered friend. The cause was
soon plain-a deadly snake lay coiled up close
to his bed, prepared to spring on the defense-
less man. Just when he thought that all hope
was at an end, the brave cockatoo sprang from
his perch, seized the reptile by the neck, and
held him tight till his master could summon help.

















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HARE TAKING THE WATER.



^ i WAS pike -fishing one season on the
1 Dorset Stour below Canford Major,
% when on passing from one field to
S/y_ another, I disturbed a hare. The ani-
mal at once entered an open, dry
"drain, and I lost sight of her. Pres-
ently, as I silently made my way plying my
rod by the bank, I saw her, this time without
any appearance of alarm, take to the water,
and making her way through the sedges. She
put her head to the stream so that the force
of the current, with but slight exertion by
swimming on her part, carried her nearly in a
straight line to the opposite bank. Here I
watched her to see whether she would trun-
dle herself like a dog, but she merely rested a
bit, letting the water run from her, and then
set off at a rattling pace across the mead,
which doubtless soon thoroughly dried her.
























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OUR WILD BIRDS.

,iT, ,DARE say you notice that all the birds
I: in this picture have long beaks. We
may be sure from this that they live in
places and seek for their food in ways in which
long beaks are just what they want. The fact
is they are all marsh birds, and the soil of
marshes being wet and soft, and full of worms,
these long beaks enable them to probe it, and
so get at the worms. I think the beaks of birds
afford a striking example of how good God is
in adapting creatures to the mode of life He has
appointed for them. The eagles and hawks, you
know, are provided with strong, short bills to
enable them to seize and tear flesh. Those of
canaries and all the finches are just the very
instruments to crack seeds with. Parrots, with
their tremendous weapons, can crush the hard-
est nuts of the tropic forest. The crossbill is
fitted with a wonderful tool for tearing fir-cones
to pieces. Robins and the other warblers have
soft bills, which are all they want for eating
insects and grubs.

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BLACKBIRDS AND YOUNG.

" COUNTRY lad having taken the nest of
some blackbirds containing young ones,
made off with it, but was closely pursued
by the parents, who tried to peck his face so as
to make him give them up. Mr. Jesse relates a
similar instance, where a pair of old birds fol-
lowed a boy into a house, pecking at his head
while he was carrying off one of their young
ones. People little think of the misery they
cause when they rob the birds of their nestlings.

The bird's nest is thus described:
Now put together odds and ends,
Picked up from enemies and friends:
See bits of thread and bits of rag,
Just like a little rubbish bag.




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