• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Testing his strength
 Lioness and cubs
 Zebra and young
 Little owls
 The beaver
 Aurochs
 The lion (picture)
 Our clever dog (picture)
 Red deer, the deer, reitbok, and...
 Carlo (picture)
 Illustrations of Cuban bloodhound,...
 My friend Neptune
 Ruff, passenger pigeon, great crowned...
 The council of friends (pictur...
 The king of the castle
 Mrs. Bruin and family
 The kangaroo
 Night heron, spoonbill, flamingo,...
 A visit to the monkeys (pictur...
 Goat, sheep, cow and calf, and...
 The zebra, horse, ass and foal,...
 The kingfisher
 Whooping crane, great heron, wild...
 Come to me! (picture)
 Great horned owl, cardinal bird,...
 Summer (picture)
 Diana monkey, red monkey, and baboon...
 Feeding the pet (picture)
 White swan, eider duck, barnacle,...
 Neddy's breakfast (picture)
 The lioness and cubs, the leopard,...
 An exciting tail (picture)
 Condor, great bustard, ground robin,...
 The nest in the apple tree
 The whale, the elephant, the white...
 The lark and young (picture)
 The golden eagle, the stork, the...
 Just arrived! (picture)
 The raven, the ring-dove, the hoopoe,...
 The donkey ride (picture)
 The ibex, deer, the Syrian goat,...
 "Fetch the stick here!" (pictu...
 The turtle-dove, the cuckoo, the...
 Good morning birdie! (picture)
 The baboon, the orang-outan, the...
 I would rather be my lady's...
 The water-rat, the wild cat, the...
 The Syrian ox, the horse, the mule,...
 The silkworm, the bat, carrion...
 The glow-worm, the locust, the...
 The sand lizard, the crocodile,...
 The wild boar, the badger, the...
 The swan and the drake
 A pet Jack
 The swallow's nest
 Mother-deer and baby
 The siasin, or antelope of...
 Carrier pigeons
 The chamois
 Faithful friends (picture)
 Back Cover






Title: Jumbo menagerie, or, Stories and pictures of natural history
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00053009/00001
 Material Information
Title: Jumbo menagerie, or, Stories and pictures of natural history
Alternate Title: Stories and pictures of natural history
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 26 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Worthington, R. ( Publisher )
Weir, Harrison, 1824-1906 ( Illustrator )
Dalziel Brothers ( Engraver )
Publisher: R. Worthington
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1882
 Subjects
Subject: Animals -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Pictorial works -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1882   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1882   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1882   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1882
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Contains prose and verse.
General Note: Some illustrations engraved by Dalziel after Weir.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements on back cover.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00053009
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223966
notis - ALG4222
oclc - 62726095

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Page i
    Title Page
        Page ii
    Testing his strength
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Lioness and cubs
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Zebra and young
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Little owls
        Page 7
        Page 8
    The beaver
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Aurochs
        Page 11
        Page 12
    The lion (picture)
        Page 13
    Our clever dog (picture)
        Page 14
    Red deer, the deer, reitbok, and blauwbok (picture)
        Page 15
    Carlo (picture)
        Page 16
    Illustrations of Cuban bloodhound, cat, African bloodhound, and road horse
        Page 17
    My friend Neptune
        Page 18
    Ruff, passenger pigeon, great crowned pigeon, and the turtle dove (picture)
        Page 19
    The council of friends (picture)
        Page 20
    The king of the castle
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Mrs. Bruin and family
        Page 23
        Page 24
    The kangaroo
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Night heron, spoonbill, flamingo, and black bellied daster (picture)
        Page 27
    A visit to the monkeys (picture)
        Page 28
    Goat, sheep, cow and calf, and ox (picture)
        Page 29
    The zebra, horse, ass and foal, and mule (picture)
        Page 30
    The kingfisher
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Whooping crane, great heron, wild turkey, and fire backed jungle fowl (picture)
        Page 33
    Come to me! (picture)
        Page 34
    Great horned owl, cardinal bird, Carolina parrot, and Baltimore oriole (picture)
        Page 35
    Summer (picture)
        Page 36
    Diana monkey, red monkey, and baboon (picture)
        Page 37
    Feeding the pet (picture)
        Page 38
    White swan, eider duck, barnacle, and mallard (picture)
        Page 39
    Neddy's breakfast (picture)
        Page 40
    The lioness and cubs, the leopard, the Syrian bear, and the jackal (picture)
        Page 41
    An exciting tail (picture)
        Page 42
    Condor, great bustard, ground robin, and wood pigeon (picture)
        Page 43
    The nest in the apple tree
        Page 44
    The whale, the elephant, the white rhinoceros, and the hippopotamus (picture)
        Page 45
    The lark and young (picture)
        Page 46
    The golden eagle, the stork, the Virginian horned owl, and the crane (picture)
        Page 47
    Just arrived! (picture)
        Page 48
    The raven, the ring-dove, the hoopoe, and the cock (picture)
        Page 49
    The donkey ride (picture)
        Page 50
    The ibex, deer, the Syrian goat, and the roe (picture)
        Page 51
    "Fetch the stick here!" (picture)
        Page 52
    The turtle-dove, the cuckoo, the peacock, and the tame (picture)
        Page 53
    Good morning birdie! (picture)
        Page 54
    The baboon, the orang-outan, the Barbary ape, and the marimonda (picture)
        Page 55
    I would rather be my lady's hawk
        Page 56
    The water-rat, the wild cat, the weasel, and the Syrian dog (picture)
        Page 57
    The Syrian ox, the horse, the mule, and the Arabian horse (picture)
        Page 58
    The silkworm, the bat, carrion beetles, and the spider (picture)
        Page 59
    The glow-worm, the locust, the hercules beetle, and the chameleon (picture)
        Page 60
    The sand lizard, the crocodile, the viper, and the asp (picture)
        Page 61
    The wild boar, the badger, the ferret, and the lynx (picture)
        Page 62
    The swan and the drake
        Page 63
        Page 64
    A pet Jack
        Page 65
        Page 66
    The swallow's nest
        Page 67
        Page 68
    Mother-deer and baby
        Page 69
        Page 70
    The siasin, or antelope of India
        Page 71
        Page 72
    Carrier pigeons
        Page 73
        Page 74
    The chamois
        Page 75
        Page 76
    Faithful friends (picture)
        Page 77
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
Full Text




.




~a
MBU
























*4.
EN.








....................




















































Is




























iiI





























.. nThe Baldwmn Library
Oi









































*. : ..* I












i -.

-.' A.1 -t h.' .-, ,
J- ,-. I .i
-..JUMBO REFUSING r F.AVE LONDON .










Twl








JUMBO

MENAGERIE;

OR,

STORIES AND PICTURES OF NATURAL HISTORY,






~ ~ ~ 7 -' "-,



NEW YORK :
COPYRIGHT, 1882, BY
R. WORTHINGTON, 770 BROADWAY.










TESTING HIS STRENGTH.



EE this monster of the forest uprooting
trees, as a test of its strength before
entering on a fight with one of its
companions, which is often a bitter struggle
for supremacy. There are two species of
Elephants, the Indian and African; the ears of
the latter are much larger than the Indian,
covering the whole shoulder, and descending
on the legs. Elephants live in herds, and
each herd has a leader-generally the largest
and most powerful animal-who exercises
much control over the herd, directing its
movements, and giving the signal in the
case of danger. The trunk of the Elephant
is of great service to it, and is a wonderful
combination of muscle; Curier, the famous
Naturalist, stating that there is not far short
of 40,000 muscles, having distinct action, and
so giving it an acute sense of touch and
smell-so much so, that it can pick up a pin,
or pluck the smallest leaf. The Elephant is
generally about ten feet high, and sometimes
reaches to twelve feet, and lives to the age
of seventy or eighty years.





















;1-
i;-..I
C-.: -i--- _I
----
r

ir
;-

.s
r_
-' ''
r\;
-- 12' L 1
-ra 'i
: :d
PB I *r
''
I'. Y; TX r

:tti:f ;_-isaPss-swaasasPrs;r -1

-i_..
--L
;Li

E
c, II
r!
.JIj''l!
: ", ''"' 4-oin
.=
55







I "1'
:1`




r.







LIONESS AND CUBS.



aIHE lioness is much smaller than the lion,
__ ~and her form is more slender and grace-
ful. She is devoid of the mane of her
lord and master, and has four or five cubs at
a birth, which are all born blind. The young
lions are at first obscurely striped and spotted.
They mew like cats, and are as playful as kit-
tens. As they get older, the uniform color is
gradually assumed. The mane appears in the
males at the end of ten or twelve months, and
at the age of eighteen months it is very con-
siderably developed, and they begin to roar.
Both in nature and in a state of captivity the
lioness is very savage as soon as she becomes
a mother, and the lion himself is then most to
be dreaded, as he will then brave almost any
risk for the sake of his lioness and family.













-_ .. :: , % 1,.- -; :- .
--- t" -l..?' "

,' ., '
'~~~ ~~ ..". .. ,. o .o

-,, '-, i %~? I.-

r I, ,M r,


.! .-, ., : \

( ,.- ,.




"! . "- '
.- I. -..




-. ,. _- . -








ZEBRA AND YOUNG.



B RS. ZEBRA, standing with her baby by
IIher side, asks proudly of the lookers-on,
S"D id y ou ev er see su ch a lik en ess ? an d
certainly mother and child are very much alike,
striped all over their bodies, from head to foot,
and from nose to tail, with the same regular
marks of black. Strong and wild by nature, the
zebra family are left very much to themselves,
which is a source of great happiness to the
mother and child in the picture before us. "No!
no! my baby is not going to become as tame as
the donkey, or to draw carts and carriages like
the horse; it is to have its freedom, and go just
where it likes all over these large plains; "-so
says Mrs. Zebra, and she means it too, for if
anybody took the trouble to go all the way to
the hot country of Africa, where Mrs. Zebra is
at home, and tried to carry off her baby, they
would find their journey a vain one, and that
she would kick severely, and perhaps break the
legs of the person bold enough to take away
her darling.















,, --_ .. -
,,
~~,~ -, . --7-
v> .._ -._
---_ jr--'-: \1-
._-: -
-C ; _--ii
.. .... -- -_ _. _
S.. =- ----
_-:; __.: ..:

~ E "c

y"_ :. ,-=;.. ._ .








LITTLE OWLS.



HO has not at one time or other of his
life read fairy tales and sympathized
with stories of enchanted princes and
princesses ? I once thought of this
when a country boy offered me a nest with
four of the young of the Little Owl. I put
them into a large cage, where they could stare
at each other and at my pigeons to their hearts'
content.
Let me say that this little owl is a very use-
ful bird, for it keeps mice, bats, beetles, and
other creatures in check, which might other-
wise multiply too fast. On a spring or sum-
mer evening you may hear its plaintive hoot
among the apple-blossoms of an orchard, or the
sheaves of a cornfield. Curiously enough, this
simple sound earned the little bird the name
of being the harbinger of death, and peasants
believed that whenever its cry was heard
where sickness was in the family, the patient
was sure to die.












''
'\2 b






;a


j:I::;:

,r:











:::I' li;'l I's
I ..;


t: : ''
.'r

Ili

:::.:
:1::
Iilir
;ri iIs

Ti!.i
': .C
I :
I
,:111
9;


.5_
2 s
C-'
--7. Z
L- Yil r







THE BEAVER.



-HIS industrious animal is generally
found in Canada and the northern
portions of the United States, where it
makes its home on the banks of the
rivers and lakes. Here they assemble
in hundreds to assist each other in the con-
struction of their dams, and in the building of
their houses, which are put together with a
considerable amount of engineering skill. The
materials used in building the dams are wood,
stones, and mud, which they collect themselves
for that purpose, and after finishing the dam,
or winter storehouse, they collect their stores
for the winter's use, and then make a connec-
tion with their houses in the banks. Their
skins are valuable in making fine hats, and
their flesh is much relished by the hunters.
The beaver is an interesting animal in many
respects, and the expression "busy as a bea-
ver" is borne out by its habits.

..- -'-" -,' .... ^ -" :'- '- -~ -"-.' _. '.- ..
:---




















































. -- _- I
._ -- -." --

































4 4 ._. . .-
--









I









AUROCHS.



IN Aurochs in blind rage, charging through
/.1 thick and thin, has had a fascination for
me as long as I can remember. The
true aurochs and this, the European Bison,
ceased to exist in the British Isles, except in
the Zoological Gardens; but the latter is still
found wild in Lithuania, and is also carefully
preserved in other parts of Russia, of which the
Emperor has a herd. There is much talk about
their being untamable--that they will not mix
with tame cattle-that tame cows shrink from
the aurochs' calves; but does not any cow
shrink from any calf not her own ? The Ameri-
can Bison, with which you are all pretty fa-
miliar, is very similar to the one just men-
tioned. There have been several attempts made
to domesticate the American bison, and have
been so far successful. The size and strength
of the animal make it probable that if domes-
ticated, it would be of great use.






i



















wV
.,.............






f-al I-
.7 ,
1, :.: ,. ;. .,, '.,
",~; ,~)



.. . ..,...
AI 0

,. ,4.t .
")! .














k,.'
l Li5
' ." -. '
" '.iJ .'# '... :,., ;:. : .
,. 'a i., .
'''
.' ; ', ',"' ...

I'-:;' ."-


; %, ": .. ,;#-.
,i' i: .
)'.-.; . .,
S. . ,,
"-,. ""' .'. '-." --:i -'
.. - -: .' " .. :
-,. ) . .-.-, -: ,,, ,, ,
























































THE LION.










',ji ;1i-.
i,' !i.: I




dle
I I I-












-j
!igr ' l, ,.) j ; iI,
4 C II I "'3-
,, ,,








-_,. ------














OUR CLEVER DOG.
.. :" ,: "- .

s.\


--
/ii /---___
f, _

-: 5.
l;~7 1



OUR1 i)fCLEVE DO.





























RED DEER. rTHE DEER.




















REITBOK. BLAUWBOK.










































- '_---









CARLO.


















r~~~ -- .l
'Y1





CUBAN BLOODHOUND. CAT.










AFRICAN BLOODHOUNDi' ROAD HORSE
'= -- -~''":. "',' .;. -r-
--%- i-" -' '-

,'. ,-


AFRIAN BL00DtIOUND. ROA HRS.































MY FRIEND NEPTUNE.
ILLIE is tired after trundling his hoop for
more than an hour, and now, with his fine
old dog, he lies down by the side of a
stream, under the shade of a young oak
tree, while Neptune drowsily glances at the
dragon-flies that dance in the sunlight.
















.~ ~~~~ _% .



,.."~g ,t -'- .. .. .
-. -. ,:: "' ':
Z4-









+ r .. ', '". "1 ,. .

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ m t V:,,1 ..
RUFF. PASSENGER PIGEO





_. II
'" ~r ,- -...,..::- -










Ilk.- .0. .. .,"



GREAT CROWNED P IGEON. THE TURTLE DOVE.
16 "-' 1
S . I_ _
'---" i-
'- ... ..,,': / ,' ,
,.-., ,,-
GRA RWE pE_ H UTEDV]

















































THE COUNCIL OF FRIE1NPD









THE KING OF THE CASTLE.

S the lion is called the king of beasts,
so the eagle is called the king of birds;
but except that it is bigger, stronger,
and swifter than other birds, there does
not seem much reason for the name. It is a mis-
take to attribute noble or mean qualities to ani-
mals or birds, or to think they can do good or
bad actions, when they can only do what God
has created them to do, and as their instinct
teaches.
The most powerful of the eagles is the Golden
Eagle, so called because of the rich yellowish-
brown bordering to its feathers. It makes its
nest in the clefts of the rocky sides of the moun-
tains, and seldom on a tree, unless where one
has sprung up in between the clefts, and the
tangled roots make a sort of platform. This the
eagles cover with sticks, and here they make
their house, living in it always, and not only
when they lay eggs or have young ones.
If there are eaglets in the nest, the food is at
once carried home to them, and the skinning and
eating done at home. Eagles are very attentive
to their young, and feed them with great care
until they are able to take care of themselves.












,.- ,' ,', .. -. ----

".,- '.- -j-.
1w
I ,


,r ,, I ,
I .'11 t'
Ip!





.ii Ii,
r -- .,-...
t, .: . --. .. "" ,,,


,AI



'.." i ti :- ------ -- -i

- - -I---;
-~ -: --- :___
I. ;:i --
t', ,,, .\ ,..!.--
:_ _- -











MRS. BRUIN AND FAMILY.



A1 ~HIS is the American black bear, who
W- is looking so lively and seemingly
inviting the young folks to have a
Srom p w h ich th ey w ill b e on ly to o
j willing to join in. The black bear
S is of a timid disposition, and seldom
/'":, :, attacks man except in self-defense.
The female bear is a most affection-
ate mother, and many stories are related show-
ing her care and love for her young, and her
sorrow and mournful cries when any evil be-
falls them. On one occasion a black bear
with her two cubs was pursued across the ice
by some armed sailors. At first she urged her
cubs to increased speed, but finding her pur-
suers gaining upon them, she carried, pushed,
and pitched them, alternately, forward, until
she effected their escape from her pursuers.












;r ., ,

















~irl.I MIS"~r
--' - t "
..- :


E :- --.--....
1









THE KANGAROO.



(r v/f ELL," said little Herbert Joyce, as he
looked over the books of drawings
'i which his cousin had just brought home
from Australia, "I never saw anything
so extraordinary before in all my life;
why here is an animal with three heads, and
two of them are very low down, and much
smaller than the others." "What do you
mean, Herbert?" asked his cousin, who just
then came into the room. "There are no three-
headed animals-let me see the picture. Oh!
no wonder you were puzzled; it does look like
a queer creature. That is a kangaroo, and the
small heads belong to her children, whom she
carries about in a bag formed by a hole in her
skin, until they are old enough to walk; and
the little things seem very happy there; and
sometimes, as their mother moves along over
the grass, you may see them nibbling it."





























/9 I
l' ,,r .'









-., -, 1
_. j ,.,










. -_, T= .. - .C .-- m .
* a--











































FLA ING. .-A. .. .L .=SER



FAINIGHT HERON. BL K B D .











FLAMINGO. BLACK BELLIED MASTER













I,
I '''-" '--, ,1 '














2 7: . . ._ .
'Iv,_



-.III*
I- -



















A VISIT TO THE MONKEYS.




















P L l`VW











I. r .
'r~l .''q' ~s










c(11




COW AND CALFSE oEP.
?\

~_ --:; -
i `3 .. ..j ,



.,. ,., LL-- ,-- -__." --- _
S .. ~ ~~,,, ,i "' ;',,.t' VI"., , -
ow A OL.
































THE ZEBRA. HORSE.
















A DO









ASS AND FOAL. MULE









THE KINGFISHER.
HE common kingfisher is a beautiful bird,
fl and is well known. It is, as Sir William
Jardine observes, one of the most gayly
tinted birds, and when darting down some
wooded stream, and shone upon at times by the
sunbeams, it may give some faint idea of the brill-
iant plumage that sports in the forests of the
tropics, and that flits from place to place like so
many lights in their deeply shaded recesses."
The plumage of the upper parts is resplendent
with emerald green, becoming on the tail ultra-
marine blue, while the under parts are of a pale
orange hue; the throat and neck are varied with
white and blue.
The ordinary food of the kingfisher is fish-the
stickleback and the minnow, with the young of
larger species; but he is said also to eat slugs,
worms, and leeches.
The kingfisher either digs or selects a hole in
some bank, as the scene of its domestic economy.
It is always formed in an upward direction, that
the accumulating moisture may drain off at the
mouth. At the end, which is about three feet
from the entrance, quantities of fish-bones are
found, ejected by the parent birds; but whether
these are placed there with or without design, is
as yet a disputed point among naturalists. The
prevailing opinion seems to. be that the castings
are purposely accumulated to form a sort of nest.
Six or seven eggs are laid, and the young do not
leave the hole till able to fly, after which they sit
on a branch for a few days, and are fed by the
parents. The kingfisher is partially migratory.











































































c






























----

=--==-:_---- ----i--


--;-9=i-_ .







I






---------- Ii-

----I*


n;b--'=;---------------------







---i










y.,








'' -








-. f--s.. /.. t* |
-z









I A






WHOOPING CRANE. GREAT HERON.


























WILD TURKEY FIRE BACKED JUNGLE FOWL.













, ---_---"--.. _. ". -- ..
~,,' "I,|l ,

..... ,, :/, "
-- Ii :, i 'IlI I
\w. 1,7,







IA
__, I 0 i
, / ,' "i':Ii '


N- I- I,

''"I Ii






I P A,.,,!,iI,!.,',
.. . '" i, "
.. -;,, ,
_- ', ',., ,

-ll. ./ .....;~ \ ... \ 1,


:\ 'J, : '






C M T M
CM TO ME!
~n .i - _I .1 i, '
,~ 2 Ii




S ' "' ~ ',, I
~ ,, ,. ; / :

(OME T0 ME!









fiv.


'4,
Inqc
3".' F ''" A' -




IIg








GREAT HORNED OWL. (TiD.IAL P .IP




4 A
-- '--' j, ,1-, ; i





.J' ' : '" i-A ~
.' f..,I ..- . ..,,





IRET -IONE OWL- --' >'
"Ih' I













J 'II

CAROLINA PARROT, BALTIMORE ORIOLE.
,5 -:- ,, I.. '" :'"~



.L -., .I
' ,.i :,. -- ,'," ,.,:

, :,
"a :' "; a':" ''"i

I ._ ,I~ .. '..- ,. .;. ,
., ... i
-. ; ... ,, ,.'', ',
ORAR OLINED AROTL. ATOROIL.
















P S-d: c: .. 4L.,
Z7,
1 .....- I-jjvr
.:-.-' "} ~ ~, *"' ."



,' .
S- -,'"



N -7 -
4, I"
,-,i' _., : .. ., -- ,. ,,.

'; I" '
i,,i~ it i',,


R : ,,'










:'i i .,


' :- ,
,i ~~~~B 1).';l 6ijif~~~

/ *, ,









SUMMERh




























DIANA MONKEY. RED MONKEY.





















-A c

Z,




S- Then Master Fritzy throws his cap,
BABOON. To make a cunning raven-trap.






















































FEEDING THE PET.























iF
S. --- -.- A' ..







L .
WHITE SWAN. EIDER DUCK.







"- ft - "'m..




S--,:, .--.- --.- -, ,
.-" ,...II. .- -

____ _-~ __"_--- _-;_ _.



BARNACLE. MALLARD, OR WILD DUCK.


















'K' "'' i' l' "

ZI ,---



"" i II'- ., 1" -
:11"


"ii .
;-4
,I






,, ,, r p :

[ ;' 1 .I' .. I f


,. )I,, D S BREA .- S--
i I I "
NEDY. --S BT F S- T
:' ~ 14 -~i~ '_ '; ,, ,
::.,'l , i I,, .- ._ __ .
..'' I . .._. .P -
_.~~\r _-- .

\ ~~~~~~ ~~~ ---_-I_-.I --,-: -'.. -











.~~~ivi~~~ ,, I-"~



fill
f-..._ -_,__
1V4



-a Z






THE LIONESS AND CUBS. THE LEOPARD.
oI`
zc




5-










THE SRI.AN BEAR. TE J_ CKA._
I i-




.., ' '': ":

TH IONES SRANI BEAR. THE LEOACKAI












milli

Jilll
-A


., . .- , .. .















AN EXCITING TAIL,
;'L...'' j



,



:l. /,C .'I. '
r : :- _- 7 --' _-:. L : - -






o----. __-_- -` __ _-- -_ -
-- -- -- .. -'


AN EXCIT!NC TAIT_,




















cz









CONDOR.








GREAT BUSTARD.
















GROUND ROBIN. WOOD PIGEON.



















; y
:5-




i;THE NEST~ IN-TE PLETRE

































THE WHALE.

THE ELEPHANT.



i. V, I










THEI HIITE







THE WHITE RHINOCEROS. THE HIPPOPOTAMUS, OR BEHEMOTH




























,..-. _.








































THE LARK AND YOUNG.
-- ~ ~ ~ r~ __----...






1I,,.-~:~













THE AI 2k- YU-g























THE GOLDEN EAGLE. THE STORK.















THE VIRGINIAN HORNED OWL THE CRANE.
-~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~i :--o-.-- :::4- -/'
_-:. - -.,











I .:/.
T,, HE "i--:*-N t2=_--- -'-- LI ":.













I'I ll I I
11111 1111 10 ,11111 11
,. ..i I ,II I


A Iil









'll~l'lei











JUST ARRIVED
ij :'i











~~~~' ... "'",1i' I-I "'
,,,,,iislta !:





" ,j---~~




JUST ARRIVE]) !
























M- A ;









THE RAVEN. THE RING-DOVE.


























THE HOOPOE. THE COCK.



















I.In

r t, -.o,,,:,


3 --.. r ,,,













-7:
T D O N KEY RI
i _- -- '.. .
S--.;~~ ... _
_.,_. ... ., ,


~. ; ,I~ .

TKE ONKEYIiIDE













- ,- '
-. 1-,,-... 'K ... !

V, 1









'THE IBEX, OR ROCK GOAT. DEER.




THE SYIAN GOAT .THE OE.
If i ,: ,' .
THE .I GOA _. THE-.-E,























I I
..,.- __.-= _;.--------_ '- ~:- _- Z__----_ - --- -- _ -

















i. ,m ,,


















"FETCH THE STICK HERE!"
.,i-.. ,,,,

-Li~--I~--", ....I~ i,,,,;,!i




-1-
I, N .--:

"FETCH THEi STIK ER

















I ii.'::
I i
.






4 ,2
r:!
Jv,













THE TURTLE-DOVE.


THE CUCKOO.















(I E C T
r AT A O E
/ ',' i I''
TH U TL-OE.,' ii

'-- :...


1;9 , ., ,:


..p... ~ '''



I-I:_ II- ",..:- -.. k






': ECC. T HE THIE, 01 UTE SWA

















'''
I liilil' r; t. ,,
I



lii(llll!
t C
II
."i :r
;p' ,iil jl11
I'il
''
h' C) ;

:I

-.' '' i;




:r:




GOOD MOII1NING BIRDI!
















i .r--
















,"


THE BABOON. THE ORANG-OUTAN.












,,TH BB
'4- L.- ,-, ....+ "'"'














THE BARBARY APE. THE MARIMONDA.









































WOULD rather be my lady's
hawk,
And perch upon her hand,
Than I would be the deerhound grim,
To range this forest-land.










'S


MEE' -




=- .. .... ...- _

THE WATER-RAT. THE WILD CAT.

'- # I,; W ,1 1".
~~~' I, r' .r I' i: I "-
....~ I ,, -,.,,,:,
P 'I
"c '"~ II~Ii l ... ..I

'-" "' '
'' 'i a : n 'ee


THE WEASEL. T SYRIAN DOG..
THE WEASEL. TH-E SYR.IAN DOG,.











*-' .S. _- .















THE SYRIAN OX. ,

THE HORSE.
._ -~ .. ._= : -

-: _: -, - -: -



i r










THE- -T AB._


THE MULE. THE ARABIAN HORSE

























,-~ 7 .





THE SILK-WORM.L THE BAT.
orr










,I,, -"
. ,












-_~~~~~.. .. .....".' I=' -
r jr

i::j










CARIO .BEi THE SPIDER.
i L' ,- --




(-'II{ ION ~BEELE. THE SPIDE.
















-N I ',






S... ...r, u~. J ---. __ -- -- a,
ki










THE GLOW-WORM. THE LOCUST.
;I'I




;J1CEBT .TE.EO




14,t




IBEE AM N. --


TttE IIEICULES BSEETL`E. TIE CI38AMELEON.

























THE SAND LIZARD. THE CROCODILE.











TB. , .

THE VIPER. THE ASP. "































THE WILD BOAR. THE BADGER.
I' '























M" -RRT, T"..... LYNX,
01
















THE FERRET, TE LYNX,










THE SWAN AND THE DRAKE.



SLOWLY in majestic silence
SSailed a Swan upon a lake;
Round about him, never quiet,
Swam a noisy, quacking Drake.

"Swan," exclaimed the latter, halting,
"I can scarcely comprehend
"Why I never hear you talking:
Are you really dumb, my friend?"

Said the swan, by way of answer:
"I have wondered, when you make
Such a shocking, senseless clatter,
"Whether you are deaf, Sir Drake!"

Better, like the swan, remain in
Silence grave and dignified,
Than keep, drake-like, ever prating,
While your listeners deride.
W. R. E.






















"-'nA A


"r W'A -i~










A PET JACK.


HE first fish I ever saw in an aquarium,
twenty years ago, was a "Jack," as
he is called when young, or a "Pike,"
when he grows older; and ever since then I
have contrived to have a pet one, and this,
drawn from life by Mr. Harrison Weir, is an
accurate portrait of the one I now possess
in the Crystal Palace Aquarium. There he
is, just as he steals round the corner of a
bit of rock. He is glaring at a minnow, at
which he is taking most accurate aim; he
hardly seems to move, but yet he does by a
very trifling motion of the edge of his back
fin-sometimes resting a little on the tips
of his two foremost fins, as they touch the
ground, carefully calculating his distance;
and then, at the very moment when the
minnow has got into a position which leaves
a space of clear water in front, so that Mr.
Jack shall not hurt his nose against any hard
substance when he gets carried on by the
violence of his rush, he darts at the minnow
with the speed of Shakspeare's Puck :-
"I go, I go! look, how I go!
Swifter than arrow from the Tartar's bow."
























































































































4..









THE SWALLOW'S NEST.



T TEN in former years the twitter of the
S'.L. birds glittering in the morning sun was
the first sound that met my ear during the
wakeful hours which frequently accompany
illness after the worst crisis has passed, and
you are recovering by degrees. The gutters
ran beneath my bedroom windows, and I could
see the steel-blue backs of the swallows as
they sat on the rims of the gutter, twisting
their little heads, opening their yellow-lined
beaks, singing to their hearts' content. Whole
families would perch there together, or the
young would rest in rows of four or five, ac-
cording to the nest-broods of each. How
delightful to see them fed by their agile pa-
rents! how tantalizing to have them almost
within reach of my hands, yet not to be able
to catch them or give them a kiss, as they
would cower in my hollow hands if I only
could have got them in there!













r


3 =-
t.ip IIIIILOCE
'I


':'Y- -:'
: 1*1*1'P :IUrt(*(ILli(b(/IPjEk- 9r I ;(LWI: li
: i' i
c: r.:'
r lli
'': CI ';"
2'.6
'k`*

Tui-









i


.

,,
r
.; ''
/!JiII I
''I I 'I'III;I 'I 1: II\
'',i, \' 'i
,i
I
,":II11I :i
:Ir ir jlllr11
: I Iliil.
4i 18!it
''''' rIt:iI I''' i\ ''ci\ ii
i. rt u ( I
iI II .. :I i
r I'ir ,,
I IJj II)''I I :F
i,, i

lli ill; ,,,,,,
I liil '''ilii i I I ,;I










MOTHER-DEER AND BABY.



OMETHING has startled them, as
they fed securely enough, one would
think, on the grass at the foot of the rocks;
and if we could only get a little nearer, this
is what we should hear the mother-deer
saying to her baby: "My child, I am sure
there is danger about; look out and tell me
if you see the slightest movement on the
hill yonder, or if I see it first, I will give you
the signal, and you must follow me, and run
for your very life." And the baby, with
cocked ears and glistening eyes, promises to
do as it is told. But after all it will probably
prove a false alarm, for this is not the time
of year for deerstalking; and I dare say the
noise they heard was made by a party of
people coming up the valley below to see
the waterfall, which is famous in the
neighborhood.



















!t5mt
_, I(itj
.,\
:\ ''A.i
'v''7 ":,;,,.+sj(







THE SIASIN, OR ANTELOPE OF INDIA.



HE Siasin, or Antelope of India, roams
-1 over the open and rocky plains of
that immense country. It is distin-
,j guished from the rest of its family by
the beauty and singular shape of its
horns, which are annulated or ringed, and spi-
rally convoluted or curved together, making two
or more turns, according to the age of the ani-
mal. The fakirs and dervishes oi India, who
are enjoined by their religion from carrying
swords, frequently wear at their girdles the
polished horns of the siasin instead of the usual
military arm. This antelope is one of the fleet-
est-footed of its family, and its leap is some-
thing wonderful. It is not uncommon for it to
vault to the height of twelve or thirteen feet,
passing over ten or twelve yards at a single
bound. In color it is almost black on the up-
per part of the body, and light-colored beneath.
When full grown, it is about the size of our
common deer.






































--------==-lli
----------------------------=----



------


I-----
-;-







=-========





-------=
-------








CARRIER PIGEONS.




.. HE carrier pigeon is
remarkable for the de-
gree in which it pos-
sesses the instinct and
Power of returning from a distance
to its accustomed home. In Eastern
countries it is the practice to bathe
the pigeon's feet in vinegar to keep them cool,
and to prevent it from alighting in quest of
water, by which the letter might sustain in-
jury. Pigeons intended for this use must be
brought from the place to which they are to
return, within a short period, and must be kept
in the dark and without food for at least eight
hours before being let loose. The carrier
pigeon was of great service during the siege
of Paris in 1871, and conveyed many impor-
tant messages. It goes through the air at the
rate of thirty miles an hour, but has been
known to fly even faster.



















_- -~_I fk''''' J!L :I V
























-------------
29











THE CHAMOIS.



HE CHAMOIS are indeed high-born,
for among the high mountain-peaks,
where the eternal snow rests and the Alpine
roses bloom, there they make their home!
There they spring up over the snowy slopes
to those heights to which man cannot climb.
They rest upon the glittering ice, the snow
does not blind them, neither does it cool
their hot blood. Carelessly they stride
across the snowed-over crevices, and when
the terrible storms, at which men are so
alarmed, hurl down rocks and avalanches
from the summits, the Chamois do not fear
them. They find their way safely through
the thickest mist and darkest clouds.
Agile and light-footed, gentle and peaceable,
proud and courageous, they lead a happy
life among the mountains, as long as man
does not molest them.




























"' "l, ._,.."#~3e~P ," ' ,1'~ii

Z. OA I: : '
51'--=- a-T










i :' I ,r . "' ."
,._. : : ,, .







.. .. -- -- .... ,
s ';~~~ i,- :. .',Z --'
k -Al
Witi~~;~:


















I: IIIj












Kj~. b










It!1 1t -1-























FATTHFU L FIIWENDS.




















Ii
















I.
























*I






07W 5 mpg


'. d0h.wl


Wn
.......... .....



5 sy,
Not








WO;





...........


FTT



59
Up.

FQ k!


-..j .'WIISI .





at



jQ r







e pi
Fir e
Oimi,"il
A.






... .. ... .... .. .









....................
,3A.



,4, %r


AD














72
I I I I I I I I I





University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs