• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Spring
 Around the house
 Grandma Gray
 How do they grow?
 Please, don't bite
 Barefoot
 Grandpa's boat
 The early bird
 Queen Dolly
 The yellow-bird
 Dolly's morning call
 Hen and chickens
 Summer
 A boy's wish
 The bicycle
 The clammers
 A boy and his drum
 Running away
 Who loves butter?
 The swing
 Weighing the baby
 Autumn
 Bugaboo
 Puss in the corner
 Johnny Jumper
 Kitty in trouble
 Minnie's fish
 Dolly's visit
 Jigg and Tigg
 Gathering apples
 Roller skating
 Winter
 Coasting
 The doll's tea
 Keeping store
 Fido's lunch
 Kitty at school
 Hide-and-seek
 Come, Santa Claus
 Rain and snow
 Back Cover






Title: Around the house
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00053007/00001
 Material Information
Title: Around the house
Physical Description: 46 p. : col. ill. ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Willett, Edward
Worthington, R ( Publisher )
Kendrick, Charles ( Illustrator )
Julius Bien & Co ( Lithographer )
Publisher: R. Worthington
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1882
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1882   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1882
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: rhymes by Edward Willett ; illustrations by Charles Kendrick.
General Note: Illustrated chromolitographed by Julius Bien & Co.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00053007
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002225259
notis - ALG5531
oclc - 03246946
lccn - 16010105

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
    Frontispiece
        Page ii
        Page iii
    Title Page
        Page iv
        Page v
    Table of Contents
        Page vi
        Page vii
    Spring
        Page 1
    Around the house
        Page 2
    Grandma Gray
        Page 3
    How do they grow?
        Page 4
    Please, don't bite
        Page 5
    Barefoot
        Page 6
    Grandpa's boat
        Page 7
    The early bird
        Page 8
    Queen Dolly
        Page 9
    The yellow-bird
        Page 10
    Dolly's morning call
        Page 11
    Hen and chickens
        Page 12
    Summer
        Page 13
    A boy's wish
        Page 14
        Page 15
    The bicycle
        Page 16
    The clammers
        Page 17
    A boy and his drum
        Page 18
    Running away
        Page 19
    Who loves butter?
        Page 20
    The swing
        Page 21
    Weighing the baby
        Page 22
    Autumn
        Page 23
    Bugaboo
        Page 24
    Puss in the corner
        Page 25
    Johnny Jumper
        Page 26
    Kitty in trouble
        Page 27
    Minnie's fish
        Page 28
    Dolly's visit
        Page 29
    Jigg and Tigg
        Page 30
    Gathering apples
        Page 31
    Roller skating
        Page 32
    Winter
        Page 33
    Coasting
        Page 34
        Page 35
    The doll's tea
        Page 36
    Keeping store
        Page 37
    Fido's lunch
        Page 38
    Kitty at school
        Page 39
    Hide-and-seek
        Page 40
    Come, Santa Claus
        Page 41
    Rain and snow
        Page 42
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
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ILLUSTRATIONS

BY Y

CHARLES KEN DRICK.









NEW YORK
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CONTENTS.


SPRING. WEIGHING THE BABY. i v

AROUKir IHE HOUSE. AUTUMN. UH NN

GRANDMA GRAY. BUGABOO. '

HOW DO THEY GROW? Pl"uS IN T1-E Ck-ORNER.

PLEASE, L.DN'r BITE. JOHNNY liM KER .^.

BARE-F.XT. KITT\ IN TROUELE.

GR.ANDPA'S BOAT. MINNIE'S FisH. --..,. ,-

THE EAR-L BIRD. DOLL"YS VISIT...-..,

QUEEN I'LLV. J:o'G ANT' TIG.

THE YELL,'W-BiRD. GArTHERING APPLES.

DOLLY'I MO:RNIN, (CAIL. ROLLER SKATING. -

HEN AND CHICKENS. WINTER.

SUi MMER. C-'AS I NG.

A B.v's Wis-. TIHEr DOLL'S TEA.

THE BlIVCLE. KEEPING SIT:RE.

J t THE CLAMMERS. Firr:'s LUNCH.

A Bi'v AND His DRUM. KirY .Ai b.iH-..:.L

RUNNING AiAV. HIE.E .iND .SEEK.

W'Ho L..v\LS BUTrER? C',IIE. 'ANTA U.LAUS

TiHE wN. RAIN AND SNow.





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SPRING.
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OH! the Spring-time!
The mer'r, merry Spring-time
The blosoin- come quickly,
Th,.. berries grow thickly,
The earth wakes from sleep,
The April skies weep,
The sunshine of May
Makes everything gay,
We shut up our books,
And seek the bright brooks,
And freely run over
The grass and the clover,
"In the me, rr merry Spring-time.
kPIG
































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Around the house the pansies grow,
Roses and lilies make a show.
And all around the hul.Le are seen
AROUND THE HOUSE. The climbing vine and evergreen.

AROUND the house the storm winds go, Around the house the rabbit jumps,
The Summer rain and Winter snow, The petted puppy barks and romps;
And when the day is bright and fair, The kitten goes around the house,
The breezes, murmur in the air. And looks about to find a mouse.

Around the house the cherries fall, Around the house the children run,
Swallows and robins flit and call, And sing and play and have their fun;
And hens and chickens, ducks and geese, In Summer's sun and Winter's snow,
Pick up their food, and live in peace. Around the house the children go.









GRANDMA GRAY. v'.:

A rc;f:r, old to]ul was Grandma Gray, /
AnJ all the children Iv.d her well; '- ..
She tiaLluht them many a pleasant play, .
And fairy tales she liked to tell. / 9

Though she was I.ld, and lone, and '
--_ "*
poor.
And had no living kith or kin, AV /
The children came abo.:ut her door, .
And she 'va~ :;l:id to l:t them in.,

When she was g,,ne the children came,
And loved to lilir.ir near the pt;
Thouuh she was never known to fame,2 '
Good Grandma Gray was ne'er
fIJrgot.


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HOW DO THEY GROW?

i, p- THIS is only a blade of grass;
But how does it grow?
\ Does any one know ?
The seasons come, and the seasons pass,
fii / And with every year
S' / The grass we have here,
So green and bright in the sun and rain;
And then it is brown
When the snow comes down,
SBut young and fresh in the Spring again.



'







This is only a little girl;
But how does she grow? /
Does any one know? ,
With her hair of gold and her teeth of pearl ?
From a baby so wee
She will grow to be
A maiden as fair as a blooming rose; ,
But no one can say,
As day follows day,
How a blade of grass or a little girl grows.





















on ant t run about.























'\ith little sister May.
p"And why should you come barking out
Please, do not bite to-day.

\ ," Such little dogs were only made
STo run and romp and play,
And we are not a bit afraid;
PLEASE DON'T BITE. So, please don't bite to-day.

DEAR little dog, with eyes so bright, If you were Lion, we would run,
In long hair hid away, But not for little Tray,
Bark as you please, but do not bite; Who only barks at us for fun;
Please, do not bite to-day. Please, do not bite to-day.






















































BAREFOOT.

BAREFOOT, Barefoot, where are you going ? Barefoot, Barefoot, look out for brambles 1
"Out where the grass and the flowers are "None of them grow where a little girl
growing." rambles."

Barefoot, Barefoot, how will you get there ? Barefoot, Barefoot, bring me some posies !
"Two little feet will carry your pet there." "Yes, I will bring you. a bunch of red roses."
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Two little feet will- carry your pet there." Yes, I will bring you, a bunch of red rosm",










































-GRANDPA'S B

'"-G'o old Grandpa built a boat,
Put it in the pond to ,-..at
It was strong, and it wa. titht
Nicely painted green and u white.

Jack and Charley Icarned to row,
Did their best to m-ake it go;
-- Taking turns, they tried to pull,
Till they both could row and scull.

Soon the boys grew brown and stout,
Rowing all the girls about,
Rowing here, and rowing there,
While the Summer days were fair.
" ~While the Summer days were fair.












THE EARLY BIRD.

A ROBIN sat in the Sun, The robin his feathers shook out,
Just after a fall of snow; And said, as he opened a wing,
His comrades all had gone "I thought I would stay about,
Down where the south winds blow. To be early on hand in the Spring."

He found a nice hole in the hay,
And lived in the heart of the stack, -,
Until \intcr had passed \ ', -Iy,
And Spring brought the robins back.

"Now what do ,yo:u here ? they said,
"' And where have \:ou been since Fall ? _-
We surely thou-ght you were dead.
And here you are first of us all." "











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QUEEN DOLLY. Fit to be a queen.

DOLLY is a May queen, Proud this day is Dolly,
Finely she is dressed; Happy, bright and gay,
She shall be to-day, queen Fresh and fair and jolly,
Over all the rest. Queen of all to-day.
Hold the blossoms o'er her, Now the day is over,
Just above her head; Pull the May-pole down,
Spread them well before her, Bring through grass and clover
Where her feet may tread. Dolly and her crown.
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Where her feet may tread. "'Dolly and her crown.












THE YELLOW- BIRD.

YELLOW-BIRD, yellow-bird, whither away? t SC
Going to seek a new nest to-day ?

Yes, for the sparrows are flying about;
Soon they will fight me and drive me out.

Yellhw-bird, yello%\-bird, stay where
you ar ;
Let the cross sparrows tly near and




far.







-m .--Four little eggs in my nest I
have laid;
Only for thcse I am sorely afraid.

!Yellow bird. ycll.w bird, stand
a -_.for your right.
Sharpen your bill and get ready
V '~to fivht.

Oh, but the sparrows are many
and stout;
Cmin,. in flRcks they \will frighten
me out.

Yell:,'w-bird, ye ll.w- bird, dcn't be
afraid
Xi, Call -.*n the bluc-birds to come
to ) our aid.
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DOLLY'S MORNING CALL.

SAYS this doll to that doll, Says that doll to this doll,
How do you do ? "Will you not stay ? "
Says that doll to this doll, Says this doll to that doll,
Pray, how are you ?" Wish you good-day."

Says this doll to that doll,
"Very fine day."
Says that doll to this doll,
"So people say."

Says that doll to this doll,
Take off your hat."
Says this doll to that doll,
Mustn't do that."

Says that doll to this doll,
"Think it will snow ?"
Says this doll to that doll,
Now I must go."




































HEN AND CHICKENS.


CHICKY, chick, chick, Chicky, chick, chick,
Come to me quick, Scranible and pick,
And see what a worm I have found! And talk as \ou run to and fro;
Come, while I scratch Scr.tch with your claws,
In the strawberry patch, And ill up your craws,
And dig them up out of the gr-.und. For that is the way you must grow.

Chicky, chick, chick,
Worms are so thick
That you can have plenty to-day;
Bustle about,
And dig them all out,
And eat and grow fat while you may.
























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SUUM MN ER.

O the Summer !




S-In sweet grass and hay
"We" rnmp and we play,
And under the trees
W1e rest at ,ur ease,
W\Vih frit god and sweet,

Sni t h: i13 ., Summer.


















A BOY'S WISH.

"I WISH I was a giant,"
Said little Jim one night,
"So proud and to defiant,
So big and full of fight.

"Then I could pick the cherries,
And never climb a tree,
And wade across the ferries,
So jolly and so free."

"If you would be a giant,"
- iThen Jimmy's mother said,
S"Be strong and self-reliant,
And fill your empty head.

I "Be honest, brave, and truthful,
Obey the teacher's rule,
And you shall be the youthful
Head-giant of the school"










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THE BICYCLE.

BRIGHT boy on the whirling wheel, "Suppose he should stumble and fall,
Where, now, are you going to-day ?" Would any one then get hurt?""
"I have mounted my horse of steel "Then horse and rider and all
For a ride so far away." Would tumble and roll in the dirt."

"But how do you ever get on ? "Bright boy on the whirling wheel,
And how does your horse stand still ?" I wish you good luck on your way,
" I mount when he starts to run, And hope that the horse of steel
And he must obey my will." May carry you safely to-day."





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II






THE CLAMMERS.

A HARD-SHELLED clam lived in the sand, They tried to coax him out to talk,
With food and drink at his command- Or trot about and take a walk-
Sing hey! sing ho! the clhmmers! Sing hey! sing ho! the shellfish!
Some merry children found him out, But when he would not stir, they said
As they were walking thereabout, The nasty creature must be dead,
With little spades and hammers. Or very, very selfish.

They laid him out upon a rock,
And there they gave him such a shock,
All with their little hammers;
That soon they broke his stony shell,
And then they saw him very well-
Sing hey! sing ho! the clammers.



























A BOY AND HIS DRUM.

BIM, bam, bum!
I beat my drum,
And people know me when I come.
I make a racket in the street,
And scare the ducks and geese I meet,
As I drum, drum, drum.






Bim, bam, bum Bim, bam, bum I
I beat my drum I've burst my drum!
Until my hands are stiff and numb; The hole's no bigger than my thumb,
And people say, who hear the noise, But such a hole I cannot mend,
There come those horrid, horrid boys, And it at last will make an end
With a drum, drum, drum. Of my drum, drum, drum.
































RUNNING AWAY.

Two little, bright little, gay little men,
One named Tommy. and the other I'
named Ben.
One of them nine, and one of them ten.

Both together one Summer day,
Tired inf study and tired ouf play,
Made up their minds to run away.

Running as faEt as ever they could,
Down the lane in the big green wood,
Soon they %ere off and gone f:r good.

Weary at last, the), sank on the ground,
Where at the close of day they)' were -.
found.
Wrapped in a slumber s%eet and sound ,

Broke the next morning bright and red, --
Findin the runaway, s hoine in bed. -.
"Hou diiid .\c.r t Iicrc they said. "

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BUTTERCUP, buttercup, yellow as gold, Now, Little Doublechin, hold it to mine:
You can tell secrets, as I have been told. Say if you see any yellow gold shine.

Come, Little Doublechin, let me try No, sir, says Doublechin, that's not fair-
Who loves butter best, you or I. Quite too much of a black beard there.

Under your chin the blossom I hold- Look! I am holding it up at your nose:
See, the white skin is yellow as gold. Now you love butter, as buttercup shows.
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THE SWING.






S' ing me .as ',Ir a.- a girl may .o. .

D-,wn again, up .gain, io nd h igh,
"Then let ihc old ct quietly di -.

I sin-! I zinI
ficar my v-.ice ringing!
My swin-! my ;ping V-
H :n s r as a girl r o



I sing! I 'ig!
sn msHinging! '
HO\\I m lOVe- s r inging! ^s *'"'4'*




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The gold and sugar high were piled,
While baby sister crowed and smiled,
Until the sugar and the gold
WEIGHING THE BABY. Were more than any' scale would hold.

How much does baby sister weigh ? How much does baby sister weigh ?
We put her in the scale to-day, I heard my mother softly say
And all the weights, as I am told, That she was much too sweet to-day
Were made of sugar and of gold. For any kind of scale to weigh.
























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'A -\ L NUTU I N.

OH the Autumn!
The quiet, happy Autumn!
Again the cool breeze
I. heard in the trees;
The leaves flutter down,
The grasses grow brown;
Ripe fruit on the bough
Is tempting us now;
The nuts in the wood
Are plenty and good,
And sports of the Fall
Are pleasing to all,
In the quiet. happy Autumn.
N.









BUGABOO.

BUGABOO, bugaboo, who are you. Oh my! what a sight, the children
With face so yellow, and eyes so blue, to fright,
And nose very red, and mouth wide As out of the darkness you come to
spread, the light !
And ears as big as a donkey's head ? Don't eat us, I pray, but let Johnny
and May
Get quietly by you and run away.

Oho! now I know; I thought it
AI was -,'
S'Ti, no one at all but jolly
old Joe.
SRun up. iile sis. and] give him

j F-r tl, i- thie p. lc wants
for this.




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PUSS IN THE CORNER

PUSS in the corner, change with me! Two little pussies start to run,
Come, we will do it as nice as can be, Puss in the middle jumps at one,
Puss in the middle never will see. Catches her place and spoils her fun.

L F 'uir little pu--sie run ab:,ut,
Si f Changi;; i:-ners they laugh and shout.
Pu-s in thi. mn iJdd st;l left out
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I FiVe litIc p iS. i full of gract,
"- Pl:-.-urc .id h-lth in : verv- lace
Ruining about and chang'in- pln"ac-









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JOHNNY JUMPER.

JOHNNY JUMPER came to town, He jumped across a muddy ditch,
To beat the boys at leaping; And, when they followed after,
And when they tried to jump with him, They tumbled in, and all the town
You'd think that they were sleeping. Stood by and roared with laughter.

He jumped three feet beyond them all, He jumped upon a bony cow,
And, when they tried to match him, His heels began to thump her;
He made a bigger jump than that, The cow was scared, and out of town
And dared the boys to catch him. She ran with Johnny Jumper.











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KITTY IN TROUBLE.

Com, you bad Kittv, at once to me!&

How did you cver ,et up io high ?

How did )tiu do it, bad Kitty, and why ?

Only. just n, on a cushion you purred, ._
Then you .jumped up, and went chasing a bird.
Did not you know that you never could fly ?
Ah 'tis no wonder you me% and cry.
NCoc, .ou are up, and afraid to come down
or didt little Kitty in all the town !

There you must stay. naughty
i.. cat, for a time;
Trces were not made for small
"ladies to climb.


















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MINNIE'S FISH.


*a As we were fishing in the brook,
One sunny summer-day,

And dragged her float away.

"I've caught a fish," said little Min.;
-. "I know It weigh a pcund,
And you shall see m haul it in,
.- And watch the ieel go round."

So, swiftly came the fish to sight;
But oh, it was an eel
Poor Little Minnie screamed with fright,
And dropped her rod and reel.

She said that it was always so;
She never got her wish;
She dearly loved to fish, but oh,
An eel was not a fish!
_ .















An eel was not a fish!







































DOLLY'S VISIT.

OH! dolly, my darling, come here,
And soon I will dress you, my
dear,
Because you must visit to-day
My cousin right over the way.

See dolly, so fair and so fine!
Her face and her eyes, bh, they
shine!
The people will talk and will stare .,
When dolly is taking the air.

Come, dolly, your carriage is here,
Your carriage and horses, nmy
dear;
And Katie's sweet dolly, s. gay,
Is watching you over the -av.
-MONSOONS";
















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JIGG AND TIGG.

JIGG was a giant, tall and strong,
Tigg was a dwarf as small as could be;
Yet together they jogged along,
Friendly as any folks you see-
Tigg and Jigg, little and big,
Gay and happy, jolly and free.

Tigg praised Jigg for his monstrous size,
Jigg praised Tigg because he was
small;
Each was fine in the other's eyes,
Each thought the other best of all-
Tigg and Jigg, little and big,
One so short and the other so tall.

Jigg carried Tigg on his mighty arm,
Tigg pleased Jigg with his dance and
song;
Both of them free from fear of harm
Gayly and merrily jogged along-
Tigg and Jigg, little and big,
One so weak and the other so strong.











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U NDER the apple-tree,
Out in the sun, Q f-, "(7
"Having their fun. .C






Hamr- awe them there, See, as he drops. them down

High overhead, Letting them f1all,
Gathers the fruit i\ith care, J,:nnie's or Katie's gown .
Apple so red t them a
UiDER the apple-treel









Soon is in the basket fu n,
Under thand tr ate you see,;
Homeward their a un.

they pull,
Gay as can lb.


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ROLLER SKATING.

SSEE the girls strapping their roller skates,
First upon Mary's feet, then on Kate's.
Now they are ready, and hurry off,
Over the sidewalks, smooth or rough.

Out in the park the day is fair,
Hundreds of girls and boys are there,
Walking, rolling, sliding along,
Lively with laughter and talk and song.

Now they strike out with the left and right;
Say what you may, 'tis a merry sight;
Some of them stumble and slip and slide,
Others so neatly and gracefully glide.

See the two girls, so gay and so sweet,
Showing the skates that fit their feet.
Kate, who is clumsy, gets many a fall,
Mary is nimblest and best of all.

















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WINTER.
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Of! the Winter!
The cold and stormy Winter.
The hills are all snow,
But fast the sleds go;
The ponds are all ice,
But skating is nice;
The trees aRc all bare,
The children know where
"The Iruit is wcll stored-
A bountiful hoard.
With bOk and with play
The 'in- dlipr s way,
In the cold and stormy Winter.
















COASTING.

DOWN they go, up they go, swift and slow--
See the bright boys and girls come and go,
Under the moonlight and over the snow.

Now they are dragging the sleds to the top,
Now they turn round with a skip and a hop,
Now they are off, and care not to stop.

Smooth is the track, and clear is the way,
Moonlight is nearly as bright as day,
All the coasters are glad and gay.

Shadows so dark on the snow so white
Make it a queer but a merry sight,
Sliding down hill on a moonlit night.




























































-- "' .



























_*










THE DOLLS' TEA.

ONE fine French doll,
Handsome and big;
One little Dutch doll,
Fat as a pig;
One large China doll,
Dressed all so gay;
One broken-nose doll,
Stuffed full of hay;
Two little rag dolls,
Clean as can be;
All at a table,
Sat down to tea.






















Angry or spiteful speech
Ever was heard.
All dolls were well-behaved;
Not a cross word,
Angry or spiteful speech
Ever was heard.
Six dolls so lady-like,
Sitting up straight,
Each with her eyes fixed
Over her plate.
Six dolls' owners then
Sat down to sup,
Found the dolls' supper, and
Ate it all up.









KEEPING STORE. I've nice little dollies, but none that are big,
A little gray mouse, and a china pig,
HERE is my store-come, buy! come, buy! A dog that will bark, a cat that will cry,
The prices I ask are not too high. And many good things you will want to buy.
I've cakes and candies, and tarts and toys,
And tops and balls for good little boys. Here is my store-come, buy while you can!
S'What shall I show you, my nice little man?
I __. jt I A ball, or a top, or a soldier's hat ?
Two pennies for this, one penny for that.

S--- Here is my store-come, buy while you may,
I For all of the stock must be sold to-day;
S-- The prices are low, if the counter is high,


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FIDO'S LUNCH.

How do you do, little dog, to-day ?
Often you bark when I come this way;
Now have you nothing at all to say ?

Bow-wow, said doggie, I know you well; Well, little dog, have you any cash ?
You are the boy who has meat to sell, Give me a penny, and quick as a flash
Going about and ringing a bell You shall be helped to a plate of hash.
































Never a penny have I, he said; No, little dog, just keep your seat;
But, if you wish, I will stand on my head, Open your mouth, and hold up your feet;
Just as I do when I want to be fed. Then I will give you a bit of meat.
















































KITTY, you must learn your letters- Keep your eyes upon the book,
Don't you cry Just like that.
You must study like your betters, This is A-why don't you look,
Such as I. Naughty cat?

Sit on Gracie's lap, my dear, Kitty will not read at all,
Just this way. I suppose,
Why, this foolish cat, I fear, Now he wants to roll the ball-
Wants to play. Off he goes!









HIDE-AND-SEEK.

THE west wind blows around the house,
But not too cold and bleak
For romping all about the barn,
Or playing hide-and-seek.

There Harry sits and shuts his eyes,
And covers up his head,
While Susie runs to hide within
A corner of the shed. .













Sly Katie creeps within a box,
A blanket covers Jim,
-And Tommy finds behind a door
A hiding place for him.








Just like an ostrich little May
Has hid her head and ears;
Because she cannot see at all,
No search the baby fears.

Now Jim cries coop, and Harry starts -
To see what he can do;
He passes over baby May,
And finds his sister Sue.










COME, SANTA CLAUS.

SANTA CLAUS, Santa Claus, come to-night! See! my stockings are hanging there,
Please, dear Santa Claus, do! Ready and waiting your will;
Christmas would never be gay and bright, Only two little ones, just a pair,
Santa Claus, but for you. Handy and easy to fill.













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Santa Claus, Santa Claus, come to me! Santa Claus, Santa Claus, come to-night
Bring me whatever you please! Come, you blessed old dear!
Though but a little the gift may be, So may the morning's peep of light
No one shall call me a tease. Show me that you've been here.













































LITTLE maid, little man,
Guess this if you can.

When I go up, up, up,
Nobody sees me at all;
When I come down, down, down, When over your head I sail,
Every one sees me fall. I am dark and almost black;
But when I lie under your feet,
In Summer I drop on the ground, I whiten the dusty track.
And hasten to run away;
But when in the Winter I come, Little maid, little man,
Wherever I fall I stay. Guess this if you can.





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