The child's pretty page picture book

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The child's pretty page picture book a fire-side volume for the young
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : ill. (some col.), music ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Sunshine, Mercie
Ward, Lock and Company, ltd ( Publisher )
Unwin Brothers (Firm) ( Printer )
Gresham Press ( Printer )
Publisher:
Ward, Lock & Co.
Place of Publication:
London
Manufacturer:
Unwin Brothers ; Gresham Press
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Bible stories, English -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Pets -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1882   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1882   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1882
Genre:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
England -- Chilworth

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Mercie Sunshine.
General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
General Note:
Contains prose, poetry, and music.
General Note:
Frontispiece printed in colors.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002223113
notis - ALG3361
oclc - 62726132
System ID:
UF00053002:00001

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RUTH AND NAOMI.
"Entreatmenottoleve thee

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RUTH AND NAOMI.
Entreat me not to leave tliee
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THE CHILD'S


PRETTY PAGE PICTURE BOOK,




A FIRE-SIDE VOLUME FOR THE YOUNG.




EDITED BY

MERCIE SUNSHINE,
AUTJIIO OF "CHIATS ABOUT ANIJfALS," "DOTTIE AXI) TOTTIE,"
&cc., c., &c.





PROFUSELY ILLUSTRA TED.





lonbon:
WARD, LOCK & CO., WARWICK HOUSE,
SALISBURY SQUARE, E.C.


















































































UNWIN BROTHERS, PRINTERS, THE GRESHAM PRESS, CONDON & CHILWORTH.








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RUTH AND NAOMI.

The name Ruth means a female friend." We read in
the Bible how there was a great famine in Judah, and
Elimelech, his wife Naomi, and his sons went into the
land of Moab. There his sons married, and the wife
of one was Ruth. But the father and sons died, and the
widow wanted to go back to Judah, but did not like Ruth
and her sister-in-law to leave their native land. Ruth
would not leave Naomi. "Where thou goest I will go,"
she said, and so she and Naomi went to Judah. They
came to Bethlehem, where Naomi had relations, and
Ruth being poor had to glean in the fields, in those
very same fields where, hundreds of years after, the shep-
herds were keeping watch over the flocks by night, when
the angels came to tell them Christ is born in Bethlehem."
There she attracted the notice of the rich man Boaz,
who gave her corn to take home. Naomi was very much
surprised to see such a rich burden, and asked Ruth
how she had managed to get so much corn. Ruth told
her of the kindness of the farmer, who was related to
Naomi. Boaz afterwards married Ruth. Her son was
the grandfather of King David, and thus from the tribe
of Judah the Messiah came, as foretold by the prophets,
from Bethlehem, where Ruth lived, and the family of
David-to be born in Bethlehem years and years after
Ruth died. She was re-warded because she did right, and
can-not our young readers find an example in Ruth.





















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MARCUS CURTIUS LEAPING INTO THE GULF.
One day a great gulf opened in the forum, or square, at
Rome. The priests were consulted about it, and they said
it would never close until the most valuable thing the
Romans had was cast into it. Then Marcus Curtius
called out that valour was the costliest thing the Romans
possessed, and leaping on his war horse he plunged into
the gulf. The old story says it closed at once.























FAMOUS PLACES: ST. PETERSBURG.
Pe-ters-burg was found-ed by Peter the Great, and by
de-grees it has become a very hand-some city. The fine
build-ing in the pic-ture is the great church or ca-the-dral
of St. Isaac, and is one of the sights of the town. You
may re-member hear-ing of the wicked man who killed
the Czar in St. Peters-burg as he was out driving.
The river Neva flows through the city, and is crossed
by several fine bridges. In the Winter the cold is very
great, and people have to wrap up in furs and woollen'
things for fear of being frost bitten. They drive on
sleighs, drawn by horses, in Winter time, and go very
fast over the snow.











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FOUR LITTLE MICE SAT'DOWN TO SPIN."






FOUR LITTLE MICE.





^amr yittk fitz.
AN OLD RHYME REVISED. TUNE, "HERE'S TO THE MAIDEN."
Arranged by ARTIIUR O'LEARY.


Four little mice sat down to spin, Pus-sy passed by, and




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she poep'd in. "What are you at, my fine lit-tie men?"



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"Mak- ing coats for gen- tle-men."" Shall I come in and

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FOUR LITTLE MICE.









cut off your threads?" No, no, Miss Pussy, you'll bite off our heada"

















"Shall I come in and cut off your threads?" "No, no, Miss Pussy, you'll




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bite off our heads."





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THE BOAT-GIRL.






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A BOAT-GIRL OF MANILLA.

Manilla is in the West Indies, and thence come mats
and straw goods. The girls row about to the ships in
large boats, with fruit and vegetables.

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JACK'S LIKE-NESS.






JACK'S LIKE-NESS.

Now Jack-y sit steady, and Min-nie hold tight,
We'll soon have your pic-ture, good dog-gie, quite right.
There, I have got you, I've just drawn your nose,
Now your round eyes I must sketch, I sup-pose;

For eyes with-out nose, or your nose without eyes,
Would cause you, dear Jack, a great deal of sur-prise;
There's his nose, and his eyes, and his legs and his feet,
And now, Jack-y dear, here's a biscuit to eat.
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THE QUEEN'S YACHT.
This is the steam-boat in which the Queen used to cross
over to the Isle of Wight. It goes very fast, and the.
rooms in it are, very handsome.










IN THE "LISTS."







MIN.
































A TOUR-NA-MENT IN OLD TIMES.








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AN AT-TACK ON A CASTLE.

Here is a bat-tie in old times. Sol-diers were dress-ed
dif-fer-ent-ly in those days. They had no guns, nor gun-
pow-der, nor can-non, so they wore ar-mour, as they fought
with spears, and arrows, and axes, or with great iron clubs
called ma-ces. We all have heard of the famous EKg-
lish arch-ers who shot ar-rows a yard long, and so fast,
that some-times the air was quite dark-ened with them.
In those old times a great deal of fight-ing went on,
and in the His-tory of Eng-land or Scotland you will
read some very in-terest-ing tales of battles' and sieges
and wonder-ful escapes.




















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THE POOR WOUNDED SOLDIER.







LOVE ONE ANOTHER.

Ella was a German girl, and one day she saw a poor
French soldier sitting wounded near a house, for a battle
had been fought there a day or two before. She did not
hes-i-tate an instant, but went and fetched the poor man a
jug full of cold water, for he was hungry and thirsty. She
then went home and brought him part of her dinner, for
her Bible told her to love her enemies, and the Germans
and French were then at war. The soldier lived, and was
very grateful to Ella all his life, for by her good-ness she
had saved him, although he was an "enemy."


















A PRETTY HOME PICTURE.






A GATE AT JERUSALEM.












perhaps we have not seen what they are like. Here we
THE DAMSCUS GTE, JERUSALE


perhaps we have not seen what they are like. Here we





have the Damascus Gate, so called because it led out
towards Damascus, along the way trodden by Saul, and
before him by Jesus on his journeys to Samaria and
Galilee. The places are still to be seen much as they were
in olden times, and the habits of the people are very much
the same as they were in the days of the Apostles.
The Turks have got Jerusalem at present, and guard it
with soldiers. To reach the city you must land at
Jaffa, or Joppa, as it used to be called.






A ROYAL PALACE.
































THE PALACE OF THE KING OF PRUSSIA.

This was the palace of the great king of Prussia, called
.Frederick the Great. It is at Pots-dam, near Berlin.
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LITTLE FAN.











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"THEN I WILL STAY WITH YOU."









'THE QUA-IRETE THAT BEGA.V AIOUT LITTLE FAX.






lfEt Quarrd flat hbgan abaut iiffth fan.

Merrily. GERMAN AIR.


1. A lit tie lad, a lit tie lass, Were cou sins true and





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tried; And they were friends, such hap -py friends, Un-





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til- ah, woe be- tide!- A dis mal quar-rel





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THE QUARREL THAT BEGAN ABOUT LITTL; FAX.









they be gan A bout a lit tie dog called Fan. Oh,




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dear! oh, dear! oh, dear! oh,dear! oh, dear!


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2. 4.
The little lad the little lass The little lad was sorely grieved.
The little dog had shown, And wrung his hands and mourned-
And bought the dog to give to her, To think his gift, the little dog,
To be her very own; Should be despised and scorned :
Now surely this was very kind, You're so unkind and cross," said he,
At least it seems so to my mind. '11 go away across the sea."
Oh, dear! oh, dear! &c. Oh, dear! oh, dear! &c.

3. 5.
Now when the little dog was brought But when his boat was on the
This little lass to see, shore,
The mnailen laughed, and tossed her The good ship riling by,-
head, The maiden came to say farewell,
As scornful as could be: And both began to cry:
Said she, "That dog will never do, S;iys she, I love the dog, I do,"
I want a gonldn collar too." Sjys he, Then I will stay with you."
Oh, dear! oh, dear! &c. Oh. dear! oh, dear! &c.













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FAMOUS PLACES-VENICE: THE DOGE'S PALACE.
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MAPLE-S UGAR.





































MAKING THE SUGAR.






HOW THEY MAKE SUGAR.

The tree from which sugar is extracted is called the
Sugar Maple. It is found in North America. Holes
are bored in the trunk of the tree early in spring, when the
sap is rising. This sap is put into boilers, and when the
mois-ture has been boiled away, the sugar is found at the
bottom. The cane-sugar is prepared in another way.
When the canes have been cut, they are put into the mill,
and all the sweet juice is crushed out by heavy rollers. A
little lime is then put in, and the mixture is made hot,rand
then the scum is taken off, and the clear liquid remains.


















A GREAT TEMPTATION.







THE TOMN-TOM.








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"DONi' B E Af'ft Ai O Til OIt_ L0 W IAN."






THE TOM-TOM PLAYER.

What is a Tom-tom ? It is a sort of drum played by
the natives of India with their fingers, instead of beating it
with sticks as our drums are played. In the picture you
see the children have met a poor Indian in the street who,
is beating his drum, and hoping some kind-hearted person
will give him a penny. As he goes along he happens to
meet two little girls, one of whom runs immediately to her
parents who are behind, and getting a penny, gives it to.
her little sister to hand to the poor Indian man.
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This is Mr. Kavanagh, who disguised himself as an
Indian, and entered Lucknow during the Indian Mutiny. He
came safely through all danger, and on the Victoria Cross


This is Mr. Kavanagh, who disguised himself as an
Indian, and entered Lucknow during the Indian Mutiny. He
came safely through all danger, and won the Victoria Cross.






THE SAILOR'S RETURN.

"'Annie, my darling, lie still, dear; to-morrow
Father will come to us over the sea;
Fret not, my dear one, we never should sorrow,
God will protect him where'er he may be.
"" Yes, love, he's coming; the great sails are spreading
As white as the wings of the gulls that we see,

















" Father! dear father "-the child's arms around him,


And brought him back quickly from over the sea."
And brought him back quickly from over the sea."









THE SAILOR'S RETURN.















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DANCEC, DOGGIE, DA NCE."






"DANCE, DOGGIE, DANCE."

" Now, Fido, I have dressed you up,
In cap and coat and cape;
No, no, indeed my little friend,
You cannot yet escape!
" Come, Fido, now you must be good,
I will not hurt you-there;
Now stand upon your hinder legs
And lift them in the air.
" Listen-I will hum the tune
And you must dance with me;
I.want both paws, sir, if you please;
Come, Fido-one, two, three!"


















WAIT ING FOR HIS MASTER.







THE OLD SAILOR
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MENDING HIS NETS






JACK BUNCE.

" My name is Jack Bunce, and I live on the sea,
That is when I'm not laid ashore!
As happy as fisherman ever can be:
I've got my deserts, ay and more;
I'm content with my lot (there's a hint for you all),
Though hard times may run us aground in a squall.
















MACKEREL-FISHIN? \VITH HiOOK AND LINE.
" Content! to be sure; and who'd not be the same,
With life and with children like mine,
So trim and so taut ?-it's all thanks to my dame,-
And then there's the glorious brine!
No wonder contented I be, you will say;
Ay, ay! I thank God for it every day."







LIGHT AT EVENING.





































IT SHALL COME TO PASS THAT AT EVENING TIME IT SHALL BE LIGHT."





THE DEATH OF NELSON.
About noon on the 2ist October, 180o, the battle of
Trafalgar began, and as it proceeded Nelson and Captain
Hardy walked up and down the deck. After a time, and
just as Nelson was turning round, a shot struck him, and
fell upon his arm and then on the deck. He said:-
They have done for me at last, Hardy."
I hope not," said Captain Hardy.
Yes," replied Nelson, my back-bone is shot through."
But he would not permit the surgeons to attend to him,
saying they could do nothing for him, and they had better
look after those less severely hurt.
After the "Victory had beaten off her assailants, Hardy
returned to the dying admiral, and told him that fourteen
or fifteen ships had surrendered.
"That's well," said Nelson, "but I bargained for
twenty." Then he added, "Anchor, Hardy, anchor.
Make the signal, for if I live I'll anchor."
As Hardy was about to return on deck with tears in his
*eyes, Nelson called him, and said, Kiss me, Hardy."
Hardy knelt and kissed him sorrowfully. Now I am
satisfied," he said. Thank God, I have done my duty."
He then prayed with the chaplain, and murmuring,
"Thank God, I have done my duty!" he expired, at
half-past four, without a groan.
Thus the battle of Trafalgar ended with the death of the
hero who had fought and won so many great battles, and
who has left behind him an immortal name, and a death-
less memory!"








THE DAISY-CHILD.





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THE GIRL AND HER WILD PET RA BBIT.






LITTLE MARGUERITE.

" Little Daisy-Marguerite, "Bees come humming all around,
Sitting so with naked feet, Telling me they've honey found;
Tell me why you linger there, Little birds hop up for bread,
With that leaf upon your hair ?" Oft a worm pops up its head.

" I am plucking oxeyes sweet," Bunnies here-I love them too,
Said the gentle Marguerite; They do as they're told to do;
" Daisies, grasses, all combine, Dine with me whene'er they can,
Making up a nosegay fine. I eat bread, they eat their bran."





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B'RU:HFETHW___________INDOW.


BOB'S IEETUN: THE FACE AT THE WINDOW.























A DUTCH VILLA AND PLEASURE BARGE.

In Hol-land most of the traffic is carried on upon the
canals. Some-times you will find a rail-road running beside
the canal, and a road crossing both. The roads are very
direct in that flat country, and you can see for a very long
way in front. The houses look like your toy houses, only
much bigger. When you go to Hol-land you will not be
able to talk to the country people unless you learn Dutch,
but they under-stand French in many places. In the
Winter time the canals are frozen hard, so people skate
along to market at a great rate, carrying the things for sale
on their heads. Perhaps you have heard of the Dutch
Roll" in skating. That is the way they skate in Holland.







THE YOUNG SMITH.

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THE YON ,IHCACIGAFY







THE CRU-EL BOY.

A young smith was fond of catch-ing flies, and he
pull-ed their wings off some-times. One day a great tall
man saw him, and caught him, and twisted his arms till he
cried loudly with pain. Now," said the big man, "how
do you like it ? Don't you think flies can feel too ?"
The boy never caught any more flies, and he grew up a
kind-hearted lad, for he never forgot his lesson.





















DEER IN THE FOREST: WIINTER.







OLD MANNERS AND CUSTOMS.
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In old days people went to worship at Beckett's tomb at
Can-ter-bury. Here you see a knight, a monk, a nun, and
others on the way to the shrine."
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others on the way to the shrine."














































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THE MILL IN WINTER.










THE MEADOWS.




(HCy lbatwts.
POETRY BY MUSIC BY
ANN AND JANE TAYLOR. J. M. BENTLEY, Mus. Doc.
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"1. e' 1 go to the mea dows where cow slips do
2. The lit tie bee hum miig a bout them is
3. The birds and the in sects are hap py and

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grow, And but ter cups look ing as yel low as
seen, The but ter fly mer ri ly dan ces a-
gay, The beasts of the field they are glad and re -



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gold, And dai sies and cow- slips be gin ning to
long, The grass- hop F per chirps in the hedg es so
joice, And we will be thank ful to God ev' ry


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THE MEADOWS,





blow, For it is a most beau ti -ful sight to be-
green, And the lin net is sing ing his hv Ii est
day, And praise His great Name in a loft i er










rally.
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Shold, It is a most beau ti ful sight to be hold.
song, And the lin net is sing ing his liv li est song.
voice, And praise His great Name in a loft i er voice.
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MATN UHR NHS EL






MARTIN LUTHER
Luther was born at Eisleben, on the ioth November,
1483. At Mansfeld, whither his parents went while he
was still young, he was sent to school, and when he was
*eighteen he went to the University of Erfurt. There he
,devoted himself to a religious life, and withdrew into the
Augustine Convent, where he spent three years. This
was the turning point of his life. In the solitude of the
-convent he diligently searched the scriptures of the Vulgate
version. He was soon ordained priest, and lectured at
Wittenberg. After he went to Rome, and when he came
back, he began to preach the reformed faith. His books
were burnt, but still for years he continued his work.
















THE CHILDREN'S HOME.





























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A HOT AY INTHE CON-TRY







AN OLD TREE.

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THE OAK OF AIBu1AHAM AT IEBRON.







BE,-KIND, NOT RUDE.




































THE BEGINNING OF A QUARREL.








FAMOUS PLACES.



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ST. ALBAN'S ABBEY.

St. Albans derives its name from the Saint and Martyr
Alban, who was born at Ver-u-lam-ium, or Ver-u-lam. He
was executed about 286 A.D. About four hundred years
after he died, Offa, king of the Mercians, built the
monastery and church now at St. Albans. The old
Roman road, called Wat-ling Street, went close under the
walls of Verulam. There were two very great battles
fought at St. Albans in the times of the Wars of the Roses,
when Henry VI. was taken, and after-wards rescued by
his wife.
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THE FISH-MAID.

" My pretty fisher-maid, who art thou ?"
" I'm Patty, sir," she said,
"And I earn my daily bread
Down upon the water there below.

"I've got money in my hand for the rent,
And I've earned a bonnie fee
By my fish, as you can see."
With a pleasant smile at me, Patty went.




-COMING HOM















COMING HOME

































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"V"WHAT SHALL WE DO, JOCK, ER?"
____________ ___ _ ___ .________________






THE LOST SHEEP.

There is one sheep missing, Jock," said the Scotch
shepherd to his dog; "what shall we do, eh?" Jock
looked up in his master's face, and waited to be told what
to do. He fancied it was use-less to try to find the sheep
in the snow. But the shepherd went, and Jock stayed to


















guard the flock. The poor man had not gone very far
when the snow blind-ed him, so that he tumbled down a
bank. A traveller found him in the snow, but the sheep
was never found. The good dog took care of the flock,
and was glad to see his master come back safe-ly.













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F U A R R S T T E V
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FAMOUS PLACES--RO~ME. RUINS OF THE TEMPLE OF VENUS,






FAMOUS PLACES.

At the mouth of the She-chem Valley is Jacob's Well.
It is the very same well which was sunk by Jacob himself
to give drink to his children, his cattle, and himself,
There were plenty of springs not far off, but Jacob would
not trust the water which was in the territory of his enemies,
the Ca-naan-ites. The well is about 70 feet deep, but must














JACOB'S WELL.
have been deeper in olden times. Mount Ge-rizim looks
down upon the well still; and now tra-vellers stop, as the
disciples and their Lord stopped, at the well. Even now
women come to draw water, and stay to talk around the
fields of corn. Close by is the Tomb of Joseph, on the
other side of the valley.








JESUS IS KING.









1. There'sa song in the air! There's a star in the sky! There's a





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I i mo-ther's deep pray'r, And a ba by's low cry, And the






star rains its fire, while the Beau ti ful sing, For the
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man ger of Beth le hem cra dies a King.




CHORUS.
Ciuonus.


S Je sus is King, yes, Je sus is King, We shout to the love-ly e-
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JESUS IS KING.





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Svan gel they bring, And the star rains its fire, while the

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Beau-ti -ful sing, For the nan-ger of Beth-le-hem cra-dles a King.





2.
There's a tumult of joy
O'er the wonderful birth,
For the Virgin's sweet boy
Is the Lord of the earth.
Ay the star rains its fire, and the Beautiful sing,
For the manger of Bethlehem cradles a King.
Chorus-Jesus is King, &c.

8.
In the light of that star
Lie the ages impearled,
And that song from afar
Has swept over the world.
Ev'ry heart is aflame, and the Beautiful sing
In the homes of the nations, that Jesus is King.
Chorus-Jesus is King, &c.

4.
We rejoice in the light,
And we echo the song
That comes down through the night
From the heavenly throng.
Ay! we shout to the lovely evangel they bring,
And we greet in His cradle our Saviour and King.
Chorus-Jesus is King, &c.









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THE. DIS-OBEDIENT MOUSE.

One day a little mouse was caught
Because a piece of cheese he sought.
"What shall I do ?" the mouse exclaimed.
" I do not think I should be blamed;
I've done no harm-please let me go,
I'll never steal again. Oh, oh!
Oh, mother dear, please get me out !"
" Oh, dear! what have you been about ?
I told you not to touch the cheese!"
" Oh, mother dear, don't scold me, please."
" I told you not to go near there,
And you replied, 'I do not care.'
So now you see what is-your fate."
"Oh, mother, help me! "-" It's too late!"












HUNTING A BEAR.
HUNTING A BEAR.






A PEEP AT MOSCOW.

Moscow used to be the capi-tal of Rus-sia. The Church
of St. Basil on the left of the picture is a very curious
building. It has 20 towers and domes, and was erected
for Ivan "the Terrible," who put out the eyes of the


















FAMOUS PLACES-MOSCOW.
ar-chi-tect for fear he should ever build another like it. This
was a very cruel thing to do. We learn from history that
the French marched as far as Moscow, but the Russians
set fire to the town, and the great Emperor nearly lost his
whole army in the retreat back to France.






















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FAMOUS PLACES-Ei DINBURGH: THE HIGH STREET.








THE KNITTER.




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THE MILK MAID.







THE MILK-MAID.

The girl you see knit-ting in the picture opposite is a
native of Germany, and she is going to milk the goats on
the hills. She has a long walk to take, and so she takes
her knitting with her, as she does not like to be idle.










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THE ORYX.
This is a kind of An-te-lope called the Gems-bok, and it
lives in South Africa. It is also called the Oryx. Its
horns are very sharp, and even the lion is some-times
beaten in a fight with the gemsbok. The horns are nearly
a yard long, and are very pointed at the top,







SOLOMON'S POOLS.




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CISTERNS, OR POOLS, OF SOLOMON.
We read of Solomon's Pools in connection with the
great gardens, like botanical and zoological gardens, in
which King Solomon had collected plants and animals.
The pools were three in. number, and the water was
conducted by an aqueduct to the city of Jerusalem. One
of the pools seems made for sham naval fights to take place
in, for there are remains of seats for the audience. The
pools were made by building with masonry across the
valley. The water was run from one pool into another as
it was wanted.
























































































































WILLIAM ,S(0i T
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