Sugar and spice and all that's nice

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Material Information

Title:
Sugar and spice and all that's nice pictures and rhymes for the little ones
Physical Description:
4, 33, 1 p. : col. ill. ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
J. K
V. B ( Author )
Strahan & Co ( Publisher )
Mühlmeister & Johler ( Printer )
Publisher:
Strahan & Co. limited
Place of Publication:
London
Manufacturer:
Mühlmeister & Johler
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Picture books for children   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1882   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1882
Genre:
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Germany -- Hamburg

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by J.K. and V.B.
General Note:
Includes index.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002223965
notis - ALG4221
oclc - 12869721
System ID:
UF00052997:00001

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SUGARei SPICE
AND ALL TjAT'S llCE



PICTURES.g" RHYMES
for the little Ones
J.K. K" aV.B.


STRAHAN & COMPANY, LIMITED
34.PATERNOSTER Row. LONDON.
1882.


































Pag. Pag.
Annie Katherine, look behind you...... 31 The miller's four fat children, they took
Bow wow! bow wow! .................. 10 a walk one day......... ....... 16
"Come dance with me." the Wind said, The sun was setting all aflame......... 33
"all you who have the mind" .... 22 There, let it fall, nice woolly ball...... 3
Cuckoo, Cuckoo .................. ... 2 There was a little bright blue pond behind
Dear little Effie, ........ ............ 20 the busy town................... 26
Do you know the little red house of Mr. Three organ men, three organ men, did
Pimpernel ...................... 7 one another m eet ............... 8
Good morrow, friends, pray how doyoudo? 29 Wasp, wasp, how dare you! ............ 27
Here there comes a long tale and a We saw at the Circus yesterday ....... 24
strange tale too ................. 15 W hat a funny China man .......... ... 17
Jack, Jack, why do you cry?........... 23 What have you found there, little one?. 25
Little Harlequin. little Potato ....... 32 What is your rod like, Fisherman?..... 18
Now shallI tell you a dream thatI dreamed 4 What were they drawing, those three? 1
Oh! my dear little ball, mnny coloured Where can the Princess be?-up there
and round ..................... 28 still! ........................ 14
One day the chimney-sweepers fought; Why look you o'er the fence, my son? 30
they had a furious fight .......... i \ I., you little silly ........... ...... 11
Quack, qaack! qu quacquack ........... 19 Wipe your eyes, children, and no more
See the merry company ......... ..... 21 sorrow .................. .... 12
Six little travellers, here are we....... 9 Your servant, your grace ............. 5
Swing, swing, little wind......... ..... 13








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GERTRUDE, KATE, AND MARIE.
What were they drawing, those three,
Gertrude and Kate and Mi I! ?
Three men on their slates, three handsome portraits
For the Royal Academy,
The uncles of Gertrude and Kate and Marie.

Then they went out all three
To the sunny country,
Left the uncles then, three lonely men
Behind them, as you can see,
The dear uncles of Gertrude and Kate and Marie.






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CUCKOO. WHERE ARE YOU?

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LET IT FALL, NICE WOOLLY BALL.

There, let it fall, nice woolly ball,
Brother dear, brother dear;
Idle he, and idle me,
Brother dear, brother dear;
But don't be angry all the same,
As if poor Elsie were to blame.

My skein you will hold steady still,
Brother dear, brother dear,
Just to let me, lest it fret me,
Brother dear, brother dear,
Rest one little minute's space,
Then I shall work with smiling face.







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THE DANCE OF THE BABIES.

















Now shall I tell you a dream that I dreamed,
The foolishest thing-in my dreaming-it seemed-
As if all the babies, swaddled so tight,
Sat up on their pillows in the dead of the night;
Bottles and binders they threw all away,
And out of their beds crept forth to play.
Wonderfully pretty it was to see
How they danced round and round the Mulberry-tree,
Singing "Heigho! now we are free,
Now we're a merry company,
Now we'll sleep just when we've a mind to,
And eat all sorts of sweet things that we find too,
Candy, cakes, buns, and big sugar-plums,
And every sugary thing that comes;
Now we'll feed the nurses out of a spoon,
And put them to bed too soon, too soon;
We little sisters and we little brothers,
What they did to us we'll just do to others'"
So sang the children their roundelay,
That was my dream of yesterday



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THE CHIM' NEY-S\VEEPEI S AND THE SNOWMAN

I' l,-. l.i\- th. liln!,.v -w....,.!- ti'.n-' t; they had a furious fight;
T i.v :ill'.1 .. i ... i !.1 -. i in :1i i bst because he was so white.
.\it h. t! it . W- :i\ ],' \ obligedd to be
.\ 1 ,! p.i .t 1 I i i, it ,,,1 .1 1.. ._-i at a victory.
Tx\, r., i'. n- \'. i.-, l.1- .in.. ..ir .. 1 with tar-sauce and black bread,
SI!,-.-n ..,1.1.,. ... 1:1'., v it i w liitl- ii, began the feast, 'tis said.
STI,. li-h ,i,, IihU l.. J,1 I ,l l were black or brown,
'IL...,, i,.il- ...t !iii, i. i.'1 t t... !i'in:l to wash the viands down.
TI'l, i.I.it ii- '.,' lI! il: -t i.hen that black feast was
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31AIAY,"S MIAGNl' FE'AS'IT.


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S< T H RE E O R G A N M EN .

'i. .i-. ,i tien, three organ men did one another meet,
E IV ._l ,i ... his own organ at the corner of the street;
But these were not good organ men, not men, you
know, like brothers;
For each man of the three men was on bad terms with the others.
1. would not speak to No. 2, nor No. 2 to 3;
From whence they stood, they would not budge, so there they
stopped you see.
There was a feast of sounds, ,,i II say,-a feast of horrid food,
An irritation of the nerves to all the neighbourhood.
The mice even couldn't bear it, the rats all ran away,
Only one creature stopped to hear, a young dog brave and gay,
Poor little 1.. -_i. '--.-hlen he got home again
He had to go to bed at once with concussion of the brain.


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SIX LITTLE TRAVELLERS.

Six little travellers, here are we-
And here comes the 1,,ll;!i train, plain to see.
Hurrah! little engine, stop for one minute;
Who will stop the train for us, that we may get in it?




















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A COURAGEOUS DOG.
Bow wow bow wow!
Off you go now
The minute I bark; bow wowl
My word, if you don't mind what I say,
I'll tear you into bits. Good, they're running away.
The world, I can well see,
Still knows how to respect me.
Secretly I thought those children might
Have turned round and given me a fright.
Of course I couldn't have been seen to flinch,
Or moved from my position the quarter of an inch.
Yet to stand to be beaten and hit with stones too,
Is a thing that in my best 1.i-, I never was equal to.
Well-a-day, well-a-day! .--
All's well that ends well, and somebody ru- :\v



















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I DON'T KNOW.

WVIy yo little .illy
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SUGAR-PLUM AUNTIE.

Wipe your eyes, children, and no more sorrow,
Sugar-plum Auntie is coming to-morrow;
With her big cornucopia good Auntie comes,
And 'tis stuffed to the brim with big sugar-plums.
At the peep of the morning she'll stop at your gate,
| She has taken four horses, because of the weight.
If the sweets had been lighter, or there had been few,
""She'd have comen in her good coach drawn only by two.
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SWING, SWING, LITTLE WIND.

Swing, swing, little wind,
Whilst my children I shall swing,
To and fro, soft they go,
Gently back the cradle bring.
Little wind, be good to-day,
Lest you blow my pets away,
Lest away from me they fly
Up to heaven through the sky.

Good morning, Mrs. Dormouse, in your little house, how slept you?
Thank you, Mr. Marmot, pleasant sleep I got. -Did you too?










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S THE SICK PRINCESS.

Whlwi- can the Princess be?-up there still!
Yes, she stays in her Tower-ill, ill.
Oh, poor little Princess, she sits in her Tower
On an old wooden bench alone, hour after hour.

We wanted some delicate present to bring,
Something to comfort her, poor little thing,
Flowers to smell at, three lilies sweet,
And a dozen ripe pears for the Princess to eat.

Open the window then, dear little pet,
Let the rope fall to us, see what you'll get;
The watchmen are idle, or v,.,i1 ., or -1...]'i,.,
Not a cat, not a dog, not a mouse even peeping.




















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THE GIANT PINKEPANK.

Here there comes a long tale and a strange tale too,
About the Giant Pinkepank, I wonder if it's true.
The Wicked Giant Pinkepank, that's what the story says,
Lived far away in Bog-Land, in his early days;
Once he stole a Princess and took her home with him,
The Princess lived in Bog-Land with the Giant grim
Once he went a walking, and then it came to pass
He got as far as Hungary, where he hungry was;
He tore the great roof off a house both high and wide,
And through the open space thus made he looked inside;
He saw a little stove there, all in a ruddy glow,
And ate it like a sausage, but it burned him so
That the wicked Giant Pinkepank fell down dead.
"There's good luck for me at last," Mrs. Pinkepank said.


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HfE MILLER'S FOUR FAT CHILDREN.

The miller's four fat children, they took a walk one day,
From the flour-mill to the village, a wonderful long way,
Three quarters of a mile or so, I've heard people say.

You can see them how they walked, little sister, little brother,

Taller some and shorter some, each as fat as is the other;
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Two fat pugs waddled after, they scarce could keep the pace,




At last they all grew weary and found a shady place
Where they nestled down into t he grass d sl!pt some hours'space.
But when they woke up merrily, lo it was growing late,
They'd had no meal since breakfast, so their hunger it was great!
They dined upon two penny rolls, for more they could not wait.

When all the six had eaten, just two crumbs did remain,
The full atoon rose, for it was night, they turned and home again;
It was such work to reach the mill across the tedious plain
"At last thank Heaven, we're home" they cried,ass a now thisis what we'll do,
SWe'll go to sleep for three days long."-And what they said was true.

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THE CHINA MIAN.

What a ftinny China man
To dress himself so!
SI never saw such clothes as his
On any one I know;
His cap has all the colours in it
8 THE CHINA MAN.






Of the rainbow
Perhaps he's a good China man,
Though he's so strangely made,
And though he has a queerer name
Than any I've heard said:
Look at his pigtail on the ground,
Puss will tear it I'm afraid.




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STHE FISHING ROD.







"What is your rod like, Fisherman? "Go out at night then, Fisherman
I pray you answer me." A lantern take with you,
"Its stick is just as high as heaven, And catch bright little stars for me,
That you can plainly see." Fisherman, just two."
























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QUACK. i ?
Quack, quack, quack, quack,
"There they go,
Helter-skelter, to and fro;
But they would rather swim I know.
Quack, quack, '
Don't run zig-zag zig-zag so,
Crush and cross and bond and bow,
Or by and by you'll grow t
Bandy-legged, I know. -- *



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KATE'S LETTER TO LITTLE EFFIE.
Dear little Effie,
How do you do? I said that I would write to you, and
I am doing so to-day. How long do you mean to stay away? The
gooseberries are all finished, Lizzie and Effie dished the very last up for
our doll's feast, and ate all from the 1i.., -fI to the least. Our doll with the
blue eyes, you know, had the measles a little while ago; for three whole
days she never stirred, so the christening had to be deferred. Therefore
you can still stand Sponsor for her, as we always planned. Diana had
seven little kittens to-day, and now I think I've nothing more to say. So
good bye, Effie; mind you are not late in answering this letter
of your loving KATE.









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More and more and more.
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True it is they make them
Only out of sand,
But some one's sure to take them,
There are so few upon the land.
When night comes, safely sleeping
In bed the builders lie,
Shut eyelids surely keeping
Harm from every eye













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WILD WIND.

"Come, dance with me," the Wind said, "all you who have the mind "
The children heard the wind-call, and went to meet the wind.
The wind began to bounce and play, and shout "Halloo, Halloo;"
The children sprang and wheeled around, until they anxious grew.
"Now we can dance no more," they cried, "no more upon the heath.
You are too wild for us, wild wind, we're tired and out of breath."
"Go, if you like," the Wind said, "but leave your hats behind,
And they upon the heath shall dance for ever with the wind."



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JACK, JACK, WHY DO YOU CRY?

"Jack, Jack, why do you cry,
And poke your finger into your eye?
Jack, Jack where are you going?
Why do you leave the salt tears flowing?"
"First there came a bad damson year,
When damsons were scanty and sour and dear,
Now when the black plums thickly fall,
My pockets are all too small, too small.
Isn't that enough to make any boy moan,
That he can't get enoughI tliut t. t. i-t i'1.'!,
























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WHAT WE SAW AT THE CIRCUS.

We saw at the Circus yesterday
Two little harlequins. What did they say ?
Listen. I know:-
"We little harlequins, here we are-ha! ha!
We jumpo,one and two, that's what we do,-hu! hu!
Sometimes we fall, but we're not hurt at all,
As anybody can see-BIr! he1-
Ho! ho! ho! ho!"
And that's the whole of the play
That we saw at the circus yesterday.













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WHAT HAS THE CHILI) GOT?

"What have you found there, little one?"
"A poor old shoe."
"Don't take him to the shoemaker's.
The shoemaker would laugh at you

"Dig a hole and bury him,
Old shoe is dead;
Perhaps a lady's slipper
May come up instead,"




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THE WATER LILIES AND THE
CHILDREN.
There was a little bright blue pond behind
the busy town,
Four water lilies sweet and white lay on
the water blown,
Four little children fair and bright came
from the busy town,
And on the lilies sweet. and white they
lovingly looked down.
"Look there's a flower for each of us,"
't was thus the children said.
"Come," said the children to the flowers;
and "Come" the flowers prayed.
For the flowers could not come to them, _
but the children were afraid;
"Come," "Come," they called out each to
each, but still apart they stayed.
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WASP, WASP, HOW DARE YOU?
Wasp, wasp, how dare you!
Wasp, I cannot bear you!
If you sting our little Sis,
Wasp, I warn you well of this,
That I shall try to crush you,
Down to earth to push you,
If I can I'll kill you,
Something brave I will do,
)It.,l your wings, so that you can't
Fly home again however you want.
Fly away, wasp, fly away,
Fly very far,
Three miles behind Hackel wind,
Where naughty children are.



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THlE BALL AND TH.E CELLA -MI'.SE.






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STH E B IITH I'AY.
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\ NAUGHTY FRED.
-- "Why look you o'er the fence, my son?
thy baby sister lies alone."
"And if she does lie all alone, or even
scream, what harm is done?"
"Fred, Fred, my little son, the child is screaming
all alone."
"And if she does scream all alone, let her scream
till she has done.
"Fred, Fred, my son, my son, the child has fallen
the grass upon."
"If she has fallen the grass upon, amongst the flo-
wers, no harm is done."














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THE MINUET.
Annie Katherine, look behind you,
And a pretty sight you'll get,
Little sister has a mind to
Dance a little minuet.

Fairy figure, gentle measure,
Light as feather, fair as sprite,
IDoll Monica finds so much pleasure
That she falls down with 'elight














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LITTLE POTATO.

SI.ttlh IH;llh-TI;iII. little Potato,
Pr.niii.-Iy, iir,..-li.-v tell me ny fate oh!
.;lull i I .. i.l-vi- r at school, no or yes?
II,. wld..le-s i-l I*l.ld, he means "no" I guess.
Shall I tIl ni lnuc.-e be the whole of the day,
,li! iwli.n' I ',-t hlne, what will mother say?
N, ,l'lr '' 1 g I lv.- me. Is this then my fate oh !
('Lruel I-IHarllreqiil. ,uel Potato!




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