Title: Trust For Public Land In Florida
CITATION PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00052555/00001
 Material Information
Title: Trust For Public Land In Florida
Alternate Title: Trust For Public Land In Florida.Pamphlet with photographs
Physical Description: 10p.
Language: English
Publication Date: September 1989
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Notes
General Note: Box 5, Folder 5 ( SF LAND ACQUISITION ), Item 2
Funding: Digitized by the Legal Technology Institute in the Levin College of Law at the University of Florida.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00052555
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text



T H E
TRUST
F O R
PUBLIC
LAND


CONSERVING LAND FOR PEOPLE











)8
,flr=.- ..I






iff -~lrL nI~L







L a
AN'- HY I'IMKN'I NY O E.1
Eu



Will Rogers
C;I




AAND -- THEY AIN'T MAKING' IT ANYMORE


W ill R o g ers -















'Ii
r k ~ ... ~~~~ I-' L PI
lm
1 1 4 I



toY


UT -
I -I4
L.












I
-I











B RINGING
PEOPLE AND LAND
TOGETHER

The Trust for Public Land
works with government
agencies, land trusts and other
conservation groups to add key
parcels to national forests and
parks, protect family farms and
design ways to blend open
space with needed develop-
ment, like affordable housing.
When we protect Clinton
Community Garden in New
York City, preserve Martin
Luther King's boyhood home in
Atlanta, expand the Sawtooth
National Recreation Area in
Idaho and open up miles of
California's Lost Coast to the
public, we are connecting
people to the land.
By bridging the needs of
private landowners, public Tom Ofutr
agencies and the conservation 0 The use of public lands The Cuyahoga Valley private lands as they came
most shows no sign of waning. National Recreation on the market, the Trust
The number of people Area in Ohio, a 30-mile was able to protect valuable
challenging land-use dilemmas visiting our nation's parks long greenway linking open space until purchase
and forge solutions suited to the is greater than ever before, Akron and Cleveland, by the National Park
land and the people who use it. particularly near urban serves millions of visitors Service was possible.
areas. annually. By securing





4 5











U UNITING PUBLIC
AND PRIVATE INTEREST

When desirable open land
goes on the market, public
funding may not be immedi-
ately on hand to buy it. Rather
than advocate for political
solutions, theTrust for Public
Land works in the marketplace.
We negotiate complex real
estate transactions to protect
the land until public funds are
available.
Because the passing of time
is making public land acquisi-
tion dollars worth less and less,
the ability to move quickly is
essential to compete in today's
real estate markets. Uncon-
strained by budget cycles and
bureaucracy, we're often called
on by public agencies to help
them achieve their land con-
servation goals. Dan Budnick
The Trust can move swiftly M The Trust works in Arizona's Oak Creek were ready to buy it.
to secure threatened land confidence to structure Canyon was a 160-acre The Trust for Public Land
land-saving transactions private inholding in one of provided the owner an
before it is lost forever. Since to meet the timing and the most heavily-used public alternative- an immediate
our founding, the Trust's work financial needs of private recreation areas in the sale and tax benefits.
has saved the public more than landowners as well as Southwest. When the Forest Protected from development,
$100 million in land acquisi- the broader goals of the Service was unable to meet Oak Creek Canyon was
public open space the owner's immediate need later added to the Coconino
tion costs, agenda. to sell the land, developers National Forest.


6 7











FOSTERING LOCAL
LAND PROTECTION

People are an integral part
of land conservation. An
alternative to public acquisition
is land trusts-community-
based nonprofit corporations
that manage and protect
cherished local landscapes.
Over 700 land trusts, many in-
corporated under the Trust's
guidance, now protect over
2,000,000 acres of urban,
suburban and rural land
throughout the country.
The Trust for Public Land
works with people to develop
conservation strategies to
preserve the character of their
communities. The Trust em-
powers groups that want to
establish local land trusts. Our
staff offers training and techni-
cal assistance in land trust Ted Wood
incorporation, real estate nego- The Trust has developed Lands that border national gateway to Wyoming's
tiation, tax incentives for tools for citizen-based and state parks are often Grand Teton National Park.
land conservation which under intense pressure for Similarly, the Trust assisted
potential donors of land andt
potential donors of land and we share through development. The Trust for the Adirondack Land Trust
joint venture land acquisitions. technical assistance and Public Land can help local in upstate New York and
training nationwide. citizens create park buffer the Marin Agricultural Land
zones. Founded with the Trust near California's
Trust's assistance, the Pt. Reyes National Seashore.
Jackson Hole Land Trust
protects ranchlands at the

8 9











TO LEARN MORE

The Trust maintains
regional and field offices
around the country. To learn
more about our work, how
you can help and how we can
help you, please contact the
office nearest you.

National Office Southwest Regional Office New England Field office
The Trust for Public Land Post Office Box 2383 33 Harrison Avenue
116 New Montgomery Street Santa Fe, NM 87504 Boston, MA 02111
Fourth Floor (505) 988-5922 (617) 451-7208
San Francisco, CA 94105 FAX (505) 988-5967 FAX (617) 451-0488
(415) 495-4014
FAX (415) 495-4103 Western Regional Office Great Lakes Field Office
116 New Montgomery Street 401 Euclid Avenue
Northeast Regional Office Third Floor Cleveland, OH 44114
666 Broadway San Francisco, CA 94105 (216) 241-7630
New York, NY 10012 (415) 495-5660 FAX (216) 241-1569
(212) 677-7171 FAX (415) 495-4103
FAX (212) 353-2052 Minnesota
Northwest Regional Office (218) 745-5501
Southeast Regional Office Smith Tower, Suite 1510 Chesapeake
322 Beard Street 506 2nd Avenue (301) 547-7375
Tallahassee, FL 32303 Seattle, WA 98104 Washington D.C.
(904) 222-9280 (206) 587-2447 (202) 543-7552
FAX (904) 224-5445 FAX (206) 382-3414 Southern California
(818) 703-7609
Oregon
(503) 228-6620



Opposite: Our acquisition of 3,000
The Trust helped resolve a acres doubled the size of
long-standing conflict over the Sinkyone Wilderness
logging in an ancient State Park and protects a
redwood forest on Califor- 17-mile stretch of pristine
nia's Lost Coast. shoreline.




12

I , .. - "!'! --'













Cover :
Dog Mountain Trail,
winding for miles along
W n C n the Washington rim of
the Columbia Gorge,
arden a geen oas o eais one of more than 30
protection projects the
vacaTrust has undertaken
in the National Recrea-
tion Area. When this
riverfront slope was
threatened with logging,
Srsthe Trust purchased it,
protecting the land
until it was added to
the Gifford Pinchot
National Forest.

Cover photo Craig Collins

















Geraldine Wang
When Clinton Community inches of the garden for $5
Garden, a green oasis on each, they raised more than
vacant City-owned land in $100,000. The outpouring
Manhattan's Hell's Kitchen, of support convinced the City
was slated for development, to keep Clinton as a park and WEEDS IN A CITY LOT CONVEY THE SAME LESSONS AS THE REDWOODS
neighbors joined with the helped the Trust establish a Aldo Leopold
Trust for Public Land to fund for urban gardens in
save it. "Selling" square New York City.





T H E
TRUST
F O R
PUBLIC
LAND

TRUST FOR PUBLIC LAND IN FLORIDA



A key focus for the Trust for Public Land (TPL), since its founding
in 1973, has been the State of Florida. The Southeast Regional Office,
based in Tallahassee, has protected over 71,000 acres in Florida
including downtown parks, rural wildlife habitat, and coastal wetlands.

TPL's earliest involvement in Florida began in the lower Florida
Keys. Assisting the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service with protection of
habitat for the endangered Key Deer, TPL has acquired over 5000 acres
in the Keys. Our work with the State CARL program, since 1979, has
provided consistent opportunities to secure and protect State lands.

Scenic, recreational and historic lands in 18 urban and rural
counties in Florida have been protected with the help of TPL. (See map
on reverse side.) As local governments respond to the increasing need
for public parks and recreation areas, TPL's focus has also broadened
from large state acquisitions to urban and metropolitan park projects:
TPL secured an abandoned hotel site along Cocoa Beach's dense
commercial strip on A1A. Brevard County acquired the property,
demolished the hotel and improved the site for a beach access point.

When a railroad abandonment threatened the City of Winter Haven's
downtown park, the right-of-way was acquired by TPL and transferred
to the City.
Surrounded by residential and commercial development, over 200
acres in Joe's Creek Preserve were purchased by TPL in order to save
the nesting habitat of the most productive eagle pair in Pinellas
County.
In Tallahassee, Florida, the 4.83 acre site of Hernando de Soto's
winter encampment was acquired and protected by TPL until the State
was able to acquire it through the CARL program.

Complementing TPL's work with public agencies, our land trust
program supports private community initiatives. TPL provides technical
knowledge to community organizations wishing to preserve local scenic
or recreational resources. Ten land trusts in Florida have begun
specific community-oriented conservation programs with the assistance
of TPL.

TPL has the experience and the commitment to work with concerned
citizens, neighborhood groups, the business community and public 1
agencies to protect Florida's open space opportunities.



322 BEARD STREET
TALLAHASSEE
FLORIDA 32303
(904) 222-9280






TPL ACTIVITY IN FLORIDA








COMPLETED PROJECTS

A -TPL- ASSISTED LAND TRUSTS



t 4





IL

I, ""^ t7L iL
't--------------------J ^ ___ ^

| *I' f '






T H E
TRUST
F O R
PUBLIC
LAND September 1989



... FACT SHEET


The Trust for Public Land (TPL) conserves land as a living resource for present
and future generations. As a results-oriented organization, TPL works closely with urban and
rural groups and government agencies to:

1) acquire and preserve open space to serve human needs;
2) share knowledge of non-profit land acquisition processes; and,
3) pioneer methods of land conservation and environmentally sound land use.

Since its founding in 1973, TPL has protected 440,800 acres of scenic, recreational,
urban, rural and wilderness land in 34 states and Canada. These lands reach from
Massachusetts' Parker River National Wildlife Refuge and the Florida Keys to waterfront parks
in downtown Seattle, Washington and Cleveland, Ohio. In 1987, TPL helped add 3,000 acres
of canyons and beaches along the northern California coast to Sinkyone Wilderness State Park.

Because donations of land value to the Trust are tax-deductible, individuals or
corporations may be able to take advantage of substantial tax benefits. Computerized tax
benefit analysis aids landowners and TPL in structuring customized transactions that benefit
all parties. By sharing land and cash donations with acquiring public agencies, TPL has
transferred 572 parcels of land valued at $445.5 million into publicly protected ownership--
ranging from single lots to tracts of thousands of acres--representing a savings of $102.7 million
to public agencies and other non-profit organizations.

In metropolitan areas, TPL works with community organizations to revitalize and
enhance neighborhood life. Typical projects include organizing land trusts and identifying and
acquiring key parcels of land, principally for open space preservation or other important
public-benefit purposes. These TPL actions frequently provide open space or enhance
recreation at reduced cost to local governments because of the participation of citizen groups.
Some projects result in compromise negotiations where community lands are preserved as open
space while adjoining lands are utilized for appropriate development such as housing.

The Trust also works with concerned citizens to preserve significant land resources
in suburban and rural communities. Successful projects range from protecting the dramatic
coastline of Big Sur, California, to helping ranching and farming communities in Colorado.
To date, TPL has helped or established more than 150 local land trusts.

The national office of the Trust for Public Land is in San Francisco. Regional offices
are located in Boston, New York, Cleveland, Tallahassee, Santa Fe, and Seattle. --

116 NEW MONTGOMERY
FOURTH FLOOR
SAN FRANCISCO
CALIFORNIA 94105
FAX (415) 495-4103
(415) 495-4014

Printed on recycled paper




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs