Title: Letter to SWFWMD enclosing a copy of Progress Report
CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00052271/00001
 Material Information
Title: Letter to SWFWMD enclosing a copy of Progress Report
Alternate Title: Letter to SWFWMD enclosing a copy of the Department of Environmental Regulation (DER) Progress Report on Implementation of The Florida Environmental Reorganization Act of 1975.
Physical Description: 52p.
Publication Date: Sept. 26, 1975
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Notes
General Note: Box 4, Folder 10 ( SF - ENVIRONMENTAL REORGANIZATION ACT OF 1975. FLORIDA. ), Item 3
Funding: Digitized by the Legal Technology Institute in the Levin College of Law at the University of Florida.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00052271
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text


SOUTHWEST' LORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRJ^
.Correspondence Action and Routing :

XEROX \ SENDER ORIGINAL TO1 -0 2

ROUTE_ RECEIVEDD ACTION

INFORMATION / (COORDINATE WITH )

Executive Director __ OT 14 1 F Ex. Dir. for I. C.
Dep. Ex. Dir. for I. C. L _- Dep. Ex. Dir. for M. & A.
Dep. Ex. Dir. for M. & A. L Dep. Ex. Dir. for Ops.
Dep. Ex. Dir. for Ops. -"--- -Dep-. -Ex, Dir. for WRD&R
Dep. Ex. Dir. for WRD&R .DI \j o Attorney________
Attorney Dir. Admin. Services
Dir. Admin. Services Dir. Employee Rel._
Dir. Employee Rel. Dir. Field Operations
Dir. Field Operations Dir 'Planning_
Dir. Planning________ Dir. Real Estate
Dir. Real Estate ____ Dir. Regulatory
Dir. Regulatory___ Dir. Resource Development
Dir. Resource Development Administrative Asst.
Administrative Asst.___ 'Special Projects Asst.
Special Projects Asst. _________ Other
M. Gibborns
L.M. Blain_____ ____ SUSPENSE:
Chairman, Gov. Bd. REMARKS:
District Board
Basin Boards
Other

i !
























_______ I / __jL











STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATION
oe-C:--" a2562 EXECUTIVE CENTER CIRCLE, EAST
MONTGOMERY BUILDING
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA 32301
REUBIN O'D. ASKEW JOSEPH W. LANDERS, JR.
GOVERNOR September 26, 1975 SECRETARY







Mr. Donald R. Feaster
Executive Director
Southwest Florida Water
Management District
Post Office Box 457
Brooksville, Florida 33512

Dear Don:

Knowing of your interest in environmental reorganization,
I thought you would like to see a copy of our first re-
port to the Governor and Legislature which outlines our
progress to date.

If you would like additional information, please let
me know.

Sincerely,




Jo eph Landers, Jr.
Secretary

JWL/lb

Enclosure





-J







-k t










E VIRONMENTAL









| i





A v4j SrA
/ '





-, ,
*t. > w-.z / Ii









-4 __,____________ __

















FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATION













PROGRESS REPORT





ON IMPLEMENTATION OF





THE FLORIDA ENVIRONMENTAL REORGANIZATION ACT OF 1975















Tallahassee August 1975











Content


INTRODUCTION.................................................1

SUMMARY......................................................2

INTERNAL REORGANIZATION

Division Structure.............. .................... 4

District and Subdistrict Centers........................ 10

Transfer of Functions to DER ...........................14

Personnel and Budgeting Constraints....................16

Legal Counsel...........................................18

Office of Local Programs......................... ....19

Water Management Districts..............................21

Environmental Regulation Commission.....................23

ENVIRONMENTAL PERMITTING PROCESS

Simplification of Environmental Permitting Process......25

Short Form Permits..... ...............................28

Exempt Activities.......................................29





Figures


1 DER Organizational Chart....... ...........................5

2 DER District and Subdistrict Map...........................11


Exhibits


1 Short Form Permit Projects.................................I

2 Projects Exempted From Permitting......................... .V

3 Florida Water Management Activities Newsletter............. .XIII






AOI




INTRODUCTION


This is the first of several progress reports on the imple-

mentation of the Environmental Reorganization Act of 1975

(CS/CS/SB 123) by the Department of Environmental Regulation

(DER).


On March 1, 1976, a final report covering the Department

organization will be submitted to the Governor and the

Legislature. This report will include a detailed description

of the placement of all authorized and administered programs

and functions.


This first progress report is a comprehensive overview of

the Department's initial response to the major goals and

requirements of the act. Information is presented in summary

statement format to facilitate use and review.






















1










SUMMARY


The major goals and requirements of the Environmental

Reorganization Act, which became effective July 1, 1975,

entail broad, sweeping changes in the state's environmental

regulation structure.


Environmental regulation functions formerly administered by

four separate state agencies became the responsibility of a

new department of state government-the Department of Environmental

Regulation.


The formidable task of implementing these functions was further

broadened by the statutory requirement to restructure Department

field offices and decentralize services throughout the state.


A number of obstacles must be overcome in implementation of

the act. These include a lack of additional funds for relocation

and moving costs, stringent budget and personnel limitations,

no lead time for advance preparation and a requirement to

continue uninterrupted services. These factors are discussed

in further detail in the report.


Significant progress has been made to date:


--Services have been continued without interruption during
reorganization.

--Permitting procedures have been simplified.

--Permitting processing has been speeded-up.

--An organizational structure has been established
incorporating the many environmental functions transferred
to the Department.


2











--District, subdistrict and branch offices have been
established and Department services are being decentralize
and delegated to the field.

--Job responsibilities have been assigned.

--Portions of the Department staff have been relocated.


A great deal remains to be done, much of which is temporarily

delayed due to state administrative difficulties, which are

also detailed in the report.


Every effort will be expended to fully implement the provisions

and intent of the act as quickly as possible.



















Si
















3
m\










INTERNAL REORGANIZATION


DIVISION STRUCTURE

Sections four and six of the act provide for establishment

of three divisions: Administrative Services, Environmental

Programs and Environmental Permitting.


The Division of Administrative Services will provide

personnel, fiscal, purchasing, education and information

services.


The Division of Environmental Programs will administer,

coordinate and supervise programs relating to planning,

grants, air quality, water quality and quantity, noise

and solid waste management..


The Division of Environmental Permitting will administer

the Department's permitting and certification program,

supervise district operations and coordinate all

enforcement activities.


The act directs the DER Secretary to organize the Department

structure, from the bureau level down, to promote efficient

and effective operation by March 1, 1976.


Progress to Date

The Department organization plan was submitted to the

Department of Administration on July 10, 1975. (Figure 1, page 5,

shows the DER organizational chart). The total plan

submitted included: a statement of functions of the

divisions and bureaus; requested salary rates for certain
4









DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATION ORGANIZATION


(James Brindell) ( Joseph W. Landers Jr.)
ENVIRONMENTAL
GENERAL OFFICE OF THE REGULATION
COUNSEL SECRETARY COMMISSION

(vacant)
ASSISTANT
SECRETARY



DIVISION OF ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES DIVISION OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAMS
(Steven E. Wilkerson) (John A. Fcdmond)
Director's Office irectcr' Office (Ralph Baker)
S4------. RAssistant Director
(Tim Stuart) (Ben DruseActing)(Hward Phod)(ae Stham)
(Daef iitchell) (Bill Surner) (Dick Shelton) BuFrau Of Bureau cf i)xsu of i Buru cf

& Data %Aa3vsis trative_ Services tic and legisla- W_ FaciL_ ties [ rn
ti- Liaij son ati Plion.ng Plae &
Quality
Analysis .ala nt
ersr el W- astewa tar
Water solid Waste En gering
Quality (Walter Starnes) ticn &
Fn.an e & Planning uProgram Ocirdinaton
Acco. tsnnt
Biological
a -.Lndustrial E.uaYticn
Services I dtia

Air Planning
... Purchasng & Evaluaticn
Chemical CDcres tic Systes Drirndng
D-sign Water


DIVISION OF ENVIRONMENTAL PERMITTING
(Dan Farley)
(Terry Cole) Dir 's Office
(Steve Lewis) Eforceert .-- (Doug Jones)
Deputy Directr _Deputy Director of
Field COeratiois (Robert Hall) v. Pefrittifg (vacant)
Office of Tedmical Counseling Bureau of Bureau of
S-- ........ Permit .--itrr nq
br-.w.st St. Johns Southwest Central & Souther E
District District District District Data Sitin
([Qlf Breeze) (Orlrdo) (St. Pete) (Ft. Laud.) Analysis Standard
permit -
t ---'.j QD.-tli ty Sectionl
Sub^District Sib-District Stb-District ntrol
(Jacr.kville) (. Ie) r vn) nter.overrnen ta 1

(Ft~ ~Vp~3)F~it"T ~sVI1) r~ona Rui(











exempt positions, and proposed new positions to handle

specific identified responsibilities. The three divisions

and their functions are:


Division of Administrative Services:

1. Provide centralized administrative services

including personnel, purchasing, general services,

budgeting and accounting;


2. coordinate the flow and analysis of program output

data from district, subdistrict and divisional

offices to the DER Secretary and Environmental

Protection Agency;


3. plan, develop and execute the Department's legisla-

tive program;


4. disseminate information to the public concerning

department activities and responsibilities and

encourage citizen involvement in environmental

preservation.


Division of Environmental Programs:


1. Provide continuing assessment of air and water

quality and develop and update plans and programs

to protect and enhance that quality;


2. develop and coordinate plans and programs to

assure adequate water quantities and safe drinking

water supplies;
6









3. administer the federal wastewater and drinking

water treatment plant construction grant program


4. administer and coordinate noise control and soli

waste planning programs.


Division of Environmental Permitting:


1. Process power plant site applications, dredge an

fill permit applications associated with develop

of regional impact and other major permits

designated by the DER Secretary;


2. process and issue short form and standard permits

at district and subdistrict levels;


3. train and certify drinking water and wastewater

treatment plant operators and well drillers;


4. review environmental impact statements associated

with public works projects involving state waters


5. establish and maintain a uniform permit evaluation

system;


6. coordinate enforcement activities of the Departme


7. coordinate permit activities of the water manager

districts;


8. write and review National Pollutant Discharge

Elimination System permits;


9. provide technical expertise and supervision of
7











district operations.


Problems and Issues to be Resolved


The Department of Administration (DOA), which has authority

to determine budgeting centers, set salary rates, and

approve the establishment and abolishment of positions,

rs has not made any determinations on the organization plan,
except to set salary rates for the Secretary and division

directors (on a temporary basis) and to approve four

emergency appointments.


DOA has taken the position that such determinations must

be delayed until all state departments being reorganized

have submitted plans.


Until salary rates are set, position classifications

determined, and budgetary lines established, it will be

difficult to fill certain key positions, develop a detailed

Internal operating budget, initiate preparation of a

Legislative budget request for fiscal year 1976, or

J project expenditures in order to make essential fiscal

decisions.












8

..-c,~ 1-Ic~8rii~r-~~+n \
****^ I I ______________________ __ ___ -*^ O ? ___^r~,










Future Action


The Department organizational structure will require
periodic re-evaluation to ensure compliance with goals

of the act. Anticipated efforts include:


*Continuing identification of legal, administrative

and budget constraints;

*development and refinement of organizational

charts assigning functions to divisions, bureaus,

sections and individuals;

*development of internal management controls

such as time and task accounting systems, operational

procedures and management information systems.


?I








i














| 9









DISTRICT AND SUBDISTRICT CENTERS


Sections four and six of the Environmental Reorganization

Act provide for establishment of district and subdistrict

centers which are to be collocated, to the "maximum extent

practicable," with offices of water management districts.

These centers will accomplish, to the "maximum extent

Spracticable," all field services, inspections and processing

i required in support of Department decisions. The intent

i is to make Department services readily available to the
public through these centers.


Progress to Date
Four district and three subdistrict offices (as shown

in Figure 2, page 11) have been established.

Northwest District Gulf Breeze
Branch Office Panama City

4 St. Johns River District Orlando

Lower St. Johns River Subdistrict Jacksonville
Branch Office Gainesville

Southwest District St. Petersburg

- Central and Southern District Fort Lauderdale
Southwest Subdistrict Fort Myers
Branch Office Punta Gords

Central Subdistrict Winter Haven
Branch Office Fort Pierce





10


^-- -
------ -aa^ --- ^ ^aa^ -1^-^I ^r^>^K^i1gil^?gga^ rfg -*y '9 ^ ^.s w







2562 EXECUTIVE CENTER CIRCLE, EAST
MONTGOMERY BUILDING
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA 32301
904-488-4807



DISTRICT AND SUBDISTRICT OFFICES

LOWER ST. JOHNS RIVER SUBDISTRICT MANAGER
VILLIAM R. OPP
3426 BILLS ROAD
Saw : s,, ..s J ACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA 32207
-.. .: i .- (904) 396-6950
i "-- ,- .... *r (SUNCOM 221-2560)
...,. .. ^^^ i+^

,--- ., DISTRICT ST. JOHNS RIVER DISTRICT

I D*" DISTRICT MANAGER AND
NT T TT UPPER ST. JOHNS RIVER SUBDISTRICT MANAGER
NORTHrlST DISTRICT ALEX SENKEVICH
ALEX SEhKEVICH
3319 MAGUIRE BLVD., SUITE 232
- ACTING DISTRICT MANAGER ORLANDO, FLORIDA 32801
* ROBERT B. DILLARD, JR. ( COM 3-7811
1389 SHORELINE DRIVE (SU M
GULF BREEZE, FLORIDA 32561 "
(904) 932-5323 "



SOUTHWEST DISTRICT .
ACTING DISTRICT MANAGER CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN DISTRICT
ACTING DISTRICT MANAGERSTRICT MANAGE
W.E. LINE
9721 EXECUTIVE CENTER DR. N. CENTRAL SUBDISTRICT NA
SUITE 200 -WARREN G. STRAH,
SUITE 2007 500 E. CENTRAL AVENUE
ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA 33742 WINTER HENTALORDA 33880
813) 576-6420 (813) 299-1134
S(SUNCOM 325-1011)



DISTRICT MANAGER AND
SOUTHWEST SUBDISTRICT MANAGERMA ER
SOUTHwEST SUBDISRICT MANAGER PETER P. BALLET
PHILIP R. EDWARDS COURTHOUSE SQUARE BUILDING
2180 WEST FIRST STREET : / SUITE 504
SUITE 401 FRA 3 200 SOUTHEAST SIXTH STREET
ORT MYERSFLORIA 3901 FORT LADERDALE, FLORIDA 33301
(813) 332-2667 .. .. -" (305) 524-8593
S/20/75 (SUNCOM 352-7900) (SUNCOM W51-S005)
Fl fi Cri 2










District boundaries were established to conform with water

management district boundaries except that counties were

not split. This was to simplify identification of service
0
areas for county residents.


The district and subdistrict offices provide a one-stop

application process for most types of environmental permits.

The small branch offices provide limited services and

serve primarily as contact points for the public.


Problems and Issues to be Resolved


It was found to be impractical to collocate the district

offices with water management district offices as required

Sby the act. Except for the Central and Southern Florida

Flood Control District, the water management district

offices are not located near population centers, and the

DER district offices must be.


Such collocation would require additional subdistrict
0
0 offices in order to make Department services conveniently

available to the public. It would 'result in extremely

high moving costs, approximately 300 state employees would

be displaced and Department services would be disrupted

for an extended period of time.


As a result, the former Department of Pollution Control

regional offices were retained as DER district offices,
and certain former Trustees of the Internal Improvement


12












Trust Fund, Department of Natural Resources and Bureau

of Sanitary Engineering offices were phased out.


Future Action


"The district and subdistrict boundaries that have been

established will continue to be reviewed in light of

public needs and service demands. It is anticipated

that within the next fiscal year one additional

subdistrict will be added in the northwest district,

probably at Panama City.


The Lower St. Johns River Subdistrict will provide

services presently required in the Suwannee River Basin

Area. As that area grows, a full service district

office will be located in White Springs.
























13










TRANSFER OF FUNCTIONS TO DER


Sections 8, 9, 10 and 11 provide for the transfer of certain

functions and parts of the former Department of Pollution

Control, the former Bureau of Sanitary Engineering of the

Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services, the Department

of Natural Resources and the former Trustees of the Internal

Improvement Trust Fund to the Department of Environmental

Regulation.


Progress to Date


Organization of these functions within the Department

has been completed as noted earlier.


Environmental permitting functions of these agencies

were specifically stressed in the transfer. Permitting

is presently being handled in the DER district/subdistrict

offices; in the former Bureau of Sanitary Engineering in

Jacksonville and in the Division of Environmental Permitting's

Bureau of Permitting in Tallahassee.


All permitting will be handled in either the district/

subdistrict offices or in the Bureau of Permitting by

September 1, 1975.


The Bureau of Permitting will process permits for major

dredge and fill projects and applications for water certifi-

cation and power plant site certification.



14



JI ________ _________











The district/subdistrict offices will process short form

dredge and fill permits, water quality certifications

and all other permits formerly issued by DPC under

Chapter 403, F.S. They will also review plans for potable

water supplies.


Problems and Issues to be Resolved


Personnel changes have not been fully completed. These

include changes in headquarters, and assignments to

divisions and bureaus. Integration of functions, especially

permitting, will not be fully completed until all personnel

matters have been settled and procedures are developed,

implemented and evaluated.


Future Action


Efforts will be directed toward integrating the various

} permitting, licensing and exemption responsibilities and

1 procedures received. This will include a review of

1 related Department rules and adoption of necessary changes

j to facilitate the consolidation of functions.














15
*)










PERSONNEL AND BUDGETING CONSTRAINTS


One purpose of the act is to reduce total personnel employed

by the state in environmental regulation and to accomplish

reorganization within existing resources.


Progress to Date


The Department must abolish thirty positions by

December 31, 1975. To meet that goal, the Secretary has

frozen all existing vacancies, except for emergency hiring.

Program directors were instructed to determined the essential

functions and personnel needed to accomplish Department objectives.


A task accounting system has been implemented to maintain

an accurate accounting of man-hours and salary expenditures

for all Department programs. All Department purchases

and expenditures are closely monitored.


Problems and Issues to be Resolved


The legislative mandate to accomplish reorganization within

existing resources did not anticipate several problem

areas. No funds were provided for moving expenses, either

in Tallahassee or the field, despite the requirement for

establishing new district, subdistrict and branch offices.


Due to the wide dispersion of former environmental regulation

agencies which were merged into DER, consolidation of

personnel is a major concern.



16










In Tallahassee, one division was functioning with 87i

employees housed in eight separate buildings, which

necessitated emergency leasing of facilities.


The eight per cent lapse factor in salary appropriations,

coupled with the mandate to abolish 30 positions,

presents difficult personnel decisions, especially since

the act provides no relief from the usual layoff

rules of the career service system.


Future Action


Program heads have been directed to examine various

organizational designs to accomplish Department

objectives with maximum efficiency and effectiveness.

It is anticipated that organizational changes will

occur as modes of delivering services to the public

are further refined and improved.





















17










LEGAL COUNSEL


Section six authorizes the Secretary to employ legal

counsel to represent the Department.


Progress to Date


The Office of General Counsel is composed of eight

attorneys, including the general counsel. Attorneys

have been assigned to assist each district and sub-

district office.


These attorneys will handle all legal work previously

handled by eight attorneys of the former Department

of Pollution Control, plus new responsibilities of

Chapters 253 (Trustees), 373 (Water Resources Act),

298 (Drainage Districts) and 381 (Water Supply), Florida

Statutes.


Problems and Issues to be Resolved


The general counsel position was temporarily established

under the career service system. It will be re-evaluated

as an exempt position.


Future Action


Revisions for the codification of Chapters 253, 403, 373,

j 298 and 381, F.S., and associated rules and regulations

will require a major effort. This work will be coordinated

with the Law Revision Council.

18









OFFICE OF LOCAL PROGRAMS


Progress to Date


An Office of Local Programs has been recently established

to insure effective coordination and liaison with

Florida's 14 local pollution control agencies.


Generally, these programs are funded and managed locally

and involve air, water, solid waste, and dredge and fill

activities. The Department has the authority to delegate

certain pollution control activities to these local

programs. In addition, many county health departments

have assumed functions dealing with the plan review of

public water supply facilities.


The scope of the responsibilities of the Office of Local

Programs will include: closely monitoring all approved

local programs; overall assessment of local program

activities and resources; integration of local activities

and resources with departmental activities; and the

coordination of applicable rules and standards for the

delegation of appropriate authority and responsibility

to the local programs.


Future Action


Resources of the local programs will be inventoried,

and local as well as departmental requirements identified.






1 19












Rules and uniform procedures and standards to delegate

departmental authority and monitor performance will be

prepared, and interagency agreements will be updated

or initiated.


The Office of Local Programs will coordinate and report

program output to various affected Department sections,

as appropriate, to ensure accomplishment of all

Department responsibilities.







































20
r J















WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICTS


Progress to Date


Coordination of activities with the water management

districts is being conducted through the Division of

Environmental Programs' Bureau of Water Resource

Management.


Quarterly meetings are planned with the governing board

chairmen and executive directors. The Department is

represented at each monthly governing board meeting, and

a monthly newsletter (see Exhibit 3, page XIII) has been

Established to foster new lines of communication between

DER and the water management districts.


Progress is continuing on the statewide water use plan,

with the water quantity and quality portions being

\ coordinated at the state level. The water quantity portion

is handled through quarterly meetings with the water

management districts. Original plans call for the completion

of the statewide plan by 1980, but efforts are being made

to have the plan complete by 1978.



Problems and Issues to be Resolved


i The act authorizes a delegation of diverse and complex



21











water, wastewater, dredge and fill and water management

permitting functions. The extent of authority to be

delegated will be determined by Department organization

and procedures and by capabilities of the water

management districts.


The districts' capabilities as well as legal, administrative,

budget and political constraints vary widely and delegation

must be accomplished with full integration of the districts'

program capabilities into the Department's overall

objectives if it is to be effective.


Water resource problems vary significantly from region to

region. One important common task ahead, however, is

obtaining a favorable vote on the constitutional amendment

which will provide ad valorem taxing authority to the

water management districts. Such local funding will enable

the districts to develop capabilities to assume water

quality and quantity responsibilities.


Future Actions


Resources and capabilities of the water management districts

will be fully assessed along with Department requirements

in each district. As the water management districts display

the capability to assume various Department functions, agree-
ments will be executed to delegate those responsibilities

as provided in the act.



22











ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATION COMMISSION


Section six provides for an Environmental Regulation Commission

to exercise standard-setting authority and act as an adjudicatory

body for final actions taken by the Department.


Progress to Date


Governor Askew appointed the following to the seven-member

commission:


W. D. Frederick Jr., Chairman (Orlando)

John Robert Middlemas, Vice Chairman (Panama City)

Mark D. Hollis (Lakeland)

Susan Uhl Wilson (Miami)

Sonny Wright (Miami)

Terry McDavid (Lake City)

Jack C. Betz (Sarasota)


*The commission chairman has concurred, by letter to DOA,

with the reorganization plan submitted by DER.


A schedule of tentative dates for commission meetings and

public hearings during fiscal year 1975-76 has been estab-

lished. These dates include:


August 20, 1975, Tallahassee

September 24-25, 1975 West Palm Beach

October 29-30, 1975 Tallahassee

November 19-20, 1975 Lakeland

December No meeting scheduled.

23











January 7-8, 1976 Orlando

February 18-19, 1976 Tallahassee

March 24-25, 1976- Sarasota

1 April 14-15, 1976 Panama City

May 12-13, 1976 Tallahassee

J June 2-3, 1976 Tallahassee









































24








ENVIRONMENTAL PERMITTING PROCESS

SIMPLIFICATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL PERMITTING PROCESS


The act is directed toward minimizing the overlap, fragmentation

and lack of coordination between environmental permitting

agencies and toward reducing lengthy processing delays and

the complexity of the permitting process.


Progress to Date


Streamlined permitting procedures have been implemented.

The new system eliminates the separate inspections and

review by three different agencies. Also, the elimination

of interagency transmission of reports and files saves

additional permit processing time.


Now, an inspection report on a permit applicant's project

is required only from the DER field inspector. Although

comments are requested from the Florida Game and Freshwater

Fish Commission, absence of a response will not delay an

application.


The permit inspection report is now analyzed for

biological impact and water quality considerations by

a single office, and recommendations are made to the

Secretary or district manager, as appropriate.


This procedure is presently being applied to pending

and new permit applications. The time period allotted for

conducting a field inspection and submitting a biological/




25









water quality report has been reduced from 90 to

. 30 days.


Individual applications have already been processed from

submittal to permit issuance within the framework of this

i streamlined system. It is expected that the positive

effects of this procedure will be significantly felt

in the next 60 to 90 days.


Problems and Issues to be Resolved


Marina licenses, easements, dedications and other state

land ownership functions which were transferred to the

Department of Natural Resources from the Trustees of the

Internal Improvement Trust Fund have presented permitting

problems. Before passage of Chapter 75-22, Laws of Florida,

these responsibilities along with dredge and fill, were with

the Trustees of the Internal Improvement Trust Fund. Now

permits for dredging and filling are the responsibility of

the Department of Environmental Regulation while the issuance

of leases, right of way, easements, etc., is the responsibility

of the Department of Natural Resources.


Applications for easements, which will be handled by the

Department of Natural Resources, may require a biological,

ecological and hydrographic review by the Department of

Environmental Regulation; likewise, the review of marina

licenses, which was totally handled by the Trustees of




26












the Internal Improvement Trust Fund, will now be

processed by the Department of Natural Resources and

inspected by the Department of Environmental Regulation

to insure that the facility conforms to the permit and

license specifications. Also a problem exists with the

continuation of dual permitting of many types of

coastal structures by the Department of Natural Resources

Bureau of Beaches and Shores and the Department of

Environmental Regulation. Coordination of these functions

will present new and unanticipated problems.


Future Action


Reports on short form applications are currently analyzed

at the district level. In the future, reports on

standard applications not processed by the Bureau of

Permitting will also be analyzed at the district level.

The permitting procedures will continue to be monitored

and adjusted to achieve optimum effectiveness.


Procedures are being established with DNR to facilitate

handling of permit applications involving dual responsi-

bilities. The most efficient remedy for these problems

will require legislative action, however.











27














SHORT FORM PERMITS


Section 7 (1) authorizes the Secretary to adopt procedural

rules providing for short form permits for certain classes

of projects as defined. It also allows the expansion, by

S rule, of the class of projects that may receive short form

permits.


SProgress to Date

A new, revised application form has been prepared and is

expected to be available by September 1, 1975. An

interpretation of the types of projects that qualify

for the short form permit has been prepared so these

permitting procedures can be applied consistently

throughout DER districts pending adoption of formal

i procedural rules. (Exhibit 1, page I)


I Future Action


i The present short form permitting system being used in
the field will be accelerated and a review of other

types of projects the Secretary may want to delegate

to the districts will be conducted.







28










EXEMPT ACTIVITIES


Section 7(2) exempts certain activities from permitting

requirements under Chapters 253, 403 and 373, F.S.


Progress to Date


The Bureau of Permitting and the district/subdistrict

offices have reviewed all pending files and are

preparing notification to applicants in this category

that a permit is no longer required. All such applicants

should be notified by September 1, 1975.


Future Action


A revision of the permit forms is planned and an

interpretation of types of projects which will not

require a Department permit has been prepared.

(Exhibit 2, page V)






















29






S Exhibit 1


SHORT FORM PROJECTS


Section 7 (1) (a): "Projects not exceeding 4,000 cubic

yards of material placed in or removed from the navigable

waters of the state."

This category is fairly self-explanatory and encompasses the

total yardage involved in either the creation or elimination

of navigable waters or filling or removal of the submerged

lands under navigable waters of the state. For the purpose of

administrative efficiency, projects of similar cubic yardage

to be conducted in all other waters of the state listed in

17-4.28(2), F.A.C., shall be subject to the short form

application. The 4,000 cubic yardage limit shall not be a

cumulative limitation for a project involving dredging or

filling (i.e., a short form application may be processed for

a project encompassing both 4,000 cubic yards of filling and

an additional 4,000 cubic yards of dredging).


b. "Dockage or marina facilities not exceeding 20,000 square

feet of submerged lands."

This includes all facilities that conscript 20,000 square feet

or less of submerged lands as defined in 17-4.02 (17), F.A.C.

It should be pointed out that the footage includes all areas

excluded from public use by the facility or enclosed by a line

surrounding all components of the facility which are on

submerged lands, such as dolphins, pilings, etc. The category

includes docks in artificially-created waterways that do not fall





i I










within the category of Section 7(2)(i) of Chapter 75-22

(Laws of Florida).


c. "New seawalls or similar structures not exceeding 300

linear feet of shoreline."

This category includes projects that do not exceed 300 linear

feet of total existing shoreline distance on natural bodies

of water. It should be noted that the linear footage

limitation is related to the existing shoreline involved

and not limited to the resultant shoreline (i.e., that created

by the project). As an example of the type project, an

individual desiring authorization for a 400-foot seawall

consisting of a 100-foot section upon submerged lands; a

200-foot section upland of the transitional zone, and another

100-foot section on submerged lands may not have the appli-

cation for the project processed as a short form type.

Applications will not be processed on a cumulative basis

(i.e., submitting repetitive 300-foot seawall applications).

Applications for coastal structures that fall within the

provisions of Chapter 161.041 F.S., should be coordinated

with the Department of Natural Resources, Division of Marine

Resources, but will require permits from the Department of

Environmental Regulation (DER) as statutorily required.


d. "The installation of buoys, signs, fences, ski ramps,

and aids to navigation."

This category is fairly clear. Previous Trustees of the

Internal Improvement Trust Fund memoranda have identified


"II











the Department of Natural Resources as the sole permitting

agency for these types of projects, however, these memoranda

are no longer in effect. Applications will be coordinated

with the Department of Natural Resources, Division of Marine

Resources. Additionally, any applications involving the

private use of sovereign lands may require a lease from the

Department of Natural Resources and must be coordinated

appropriately. DER permits will be issued without delay,

even if required leasing arrangements have not been made

with the Department of Natural Resources. In these cases,

however, the issued permits will contain the stipulation that

the permit is not effective until any applicable leasing

requirements have been made.


e. "The installation of subaqueous transmission and distri-

bution lines laid on, or embedded in, the bottoms of waters

of the state carrying water, electricity, communication

cables, oil, and gas."

Any transmission lines which transmit any material identified

above from one shoreline to another without interruption

(without regard to length, cost or amount of services carried)

may be processed as a short form application. This is

limited to lines which are either laid on the bottoms or

embedded without dredging or filling activities (i.e., excava-

tion by dragline of a trench). The term embeddment is

defined in Section 17-4.02(14), F.A.C., as "the placement of

lines into the bottoms of waters of the state by minimal

displacement of bottom material and without the creation of
III










a trench, or trough, through the use of techniques such as

plowing in, weighting in, or non-trenching jets."


f. "The performance for 10 years from the issuance of the

original permit of maintenance dredging of permitted

navigation channels, port harbors, turning basins, and

harbor berths. The Trustees of the Internal Improvement

Trust Fund may fix and recover from the permitted an amount

equal to the difference between the fair market value and

the actual cost of the maintenance dredging for material

removed during such maintenance dredging. Provided, however,

no charge shall be exacted by the state for material removed

during such maintenance dredging by a public port authority.

The removing party may subsequently sell such material,

provided that proceeds from such sale that exceed the costs

of maintenance dredging shall be remitted to the state and

deposited in the Internal Improvement Trust Fund."

This category will be reviewed at a later date. Some doubt

exists concerning the correct interpretation of the language.


















IV








Exhibit 2

PROJECTS EXEMPTED FROM PERMITTING


Section 7 (2) of the act identifies activities for which

permits are not required under Chapters 373, 403, and 253,

F.S. This does not relieve an individual from compliance

with any applicable local pollution control programs

authorized by Chapter 403, F.S. or with any other requirements

of county, municipal, or federal government. Nor does this

exempt the person from compliance with all other applicable

rules and regulations (i.e., DER water quality standards, etc.)


a/ "The installation of overhead transmission lines, with

the support structures not constructed in waters of the

state and which do not create a navigational hazard."

Transmission lines with the support structures located land-

ward of both the transitional zone and submerged lands (as

defined in 17-4.02, F.A.C.) which do not create a navigational

hazard are included within this category. The overhead

lines should be at a height compatible with Coast Guard

clearance requirements and above or equal to any adjacent

facilities. It is suggested that the involved persons be

encouraged to review these types of projects on a preliminary

basis with the district offices.


b. "The installation of mooring pilings and dolphins

associated with private docking facilities, and the installa-

tion of private docks of 500 square feet or less of over-

water surface area constructed on pilings so as to not


V











substantially impede the flow or create a navigational hazard,

and involving no fillinga"

This category would include all private docks occupying

surface areas of 500 square feet or less that are supported

by pilings or are floating and do not involve any dredging

and filling. The category also includes the installation of

mooring pilings and dolphins associated with private dockage

facilities. It should be noted that the term private dock

will refer to a single pier associated with a single family

residence unit. The language does not include the construction

of boat houses, etc., associated with the piers and any such

structures will require permits. The computation of area

will include only the over-water surface area occupied by

the pier itself.
J
c. "The installation of boat ramps on artificial bodies of

water where navigational access to the proposed ramp exists."

This category is self-explanatory. Artificial bodies of water

will include existing.upland residential canal systems.

Otherwise, an artificial body of water will be defined as a

body of water that has been totally dredged dr excavated

and did not overlap historically submerged lands (see 17-4 F.A.C.).

This does not include artificially-altered natural bodies

of water. This definition would specifically exclude most

sections of navigational waterways, such as the Intracoastal

Waterway, that would not be considered a residential canal.




VI










d. "The replacement or repair of existing docks, provided

that no fill material is to be used and provided that the

replacement or repaired dock is in the same location and of

the same configuration and dimension as the dock being replaced

or repaired."

This category is self-explanatory. It should be noted that

it does not include any reference made to materials. It

simply states that the replacement or repair of the docking

facility must result in the same configuration and dimensions

and that no fill be utilized. This category would include

all types of docks--private, commerical, etc. Also, prior

to the work, some semblance of a functional dock must be in

place and individuals are encouraged to coordinate with

the district offices on a preliminary basis. The replace-

ment of an abandoned, non-functional dock will require

permits.


e. "Seawalls restored at their previous location or upland

of, or within one foot waterward of their previous location."

The language in this section does not include any reference

to the filling of submerged lands, and states that seawalls

may be replaced or restored without a permit when the relocated

seawall is to be upland or within one foot of the previous

structure. Essentially, the seawall to be repaired or replaced

must be functional, in that the line of mean high water must

be located at, or waterward of, the seawall. The category does

I iLclude any filling of submerged lands (other than that created

j by the relocation one foot waterward of the previous location).

i VII








The intent of this section is not to reclaim or extend the

upland, therefore the replacement of seawalls solely to extend

upland areas is not included within this section. Applications

to replace seawalls waterward of existing structures should be

coordinated with the Department of Natural Resources. As with

Section 7 (l)(d), our responses will be provided without delay,

even if the project encompasses the one foot of sovereign

lands. Individuals should, however, coordinate with the

Department of Natural Resources to clear the land title

problems that could result from replacing a seawall one foot

waterward of an existing seawall on a natural shoreline. Any

reclamation-type restoration (i.e., the filling of several

feet of submerged lands to the location of a previous seawall

which is currently defunct--consisting of a few pilings) will

require permits from DER. This interpretation is also

consistent with Section 7 (3) of the act.


f. "The performance for 10 years from the issuance of the

the original permit granted prior to July 1, 1975, of maintenance

dredging of existing man-made canals, channels and intake and

discharge structureswhere the spoil material is to be

removed and deposited on a self-contained, upland spoil

site which will prevent the escape of the spoil material into

the waters of the state; provided that no more dredging is to

be performed than is necessary to restore the canal, channels,

and intake and discharge structures to original design

specifications. The Trustees of the Internal Improvement

Trust Fund may fix and recover from the permitted an amount


VIII


1 __ __











ecual to the difference between the fair market value

and the actual cost of the maintenance dredging for material

removed during such maintenance dredging. Provided, however,

no charge shall be exacted by the state for material removed

during such maintenance dredging by a public port authority.

The removing party may subsequently sell such material,

provided that proceeds from such sale that exceed the costs of
maintenance dredging shall be remitted to the state and deposited

in the Internal Improvement Trust Fund."


The maintenance dredging of an existing man-made canal,

channel, etc., to original specifications within ten years

of the original permit (issued before July 1, 1975, by the

Trustees of the Internal Improvement Trust Fund)will not

require additional permits. The spoil material must be placed

on a self-contained, well-identified upland spoil site (an

area which is neither transitional nor submerged--see 17-4,

F.A.C. An original permit for either the maintenance dredging

or original excavation is necessary. Original permits, again,

do not refer to any typebut are merely the first permits issued.

A canal permitted January 17, 1970, could be restored to

its original design specification by maintenance dredging

within the January 17, 1970 through January 17, 1980 time-frame

without further permits from DER. Coordination should be

effected with the Department of Natural Resources concerning

payment of fees.



IX











g. "The maintenance of existing dikes and irrigation and

drainage ditches, provided that spoil material is deposited

on a self-contained, upland spoil site which will prevent

the escape of the spoil material into waters of the state;

provided that no more dredging is performed than is necessary

to restore the dike*, or irrigation or drainage ditch to its

original design specifications."

An irrigation or drainage ditch should not be

used for or be capable of navigation (i.e., a drainage ditch

used as a navigational canal is in fact a navigational canal).

The most applicable types of projects would include maintenance

of mosquito-control dikes, ditches, etc. It should be noted

that spoil materials from the maintenance of dikes or ditches

must be placed on an upland spoil site and this category

does not include the dredging of any adjacent sovereign

lands to acquire spoil for the maintenance. It also limits the

work to that necessary for restoration of the dike or ditch

to its original design specification. This would not include

any temporary dredging or filling required to provide a work

area for the equipment in excess of the original design

specification. Also, payment for any sovereign materials

removed and placed upon privately-owned upland spoil sites

should be coordinated with the Department of Natural Resources.


h. "Repair of existing pipes for the purpose of discharging

storm water runoff."

This category is not limited to artifically-constructed waterways.


X










The repair would be limited to the replacement or repair of

the structure to the original design configuration, without

change in configuration or dimensions, and involves discharge

pipes for storm water runoff only.


i. "Construction of private docks and seawalls in artificially

created waterways, where such construction will not violate

existing water quality standards, impede navigation, or affect

flood control."

The construction of private docks would be limited to those

associated with single family residence units. The construction

of seawalls is not limited to upland locations. The subsequent

backfilling (i.e. location of seawall at platted property line

requiring several feet of horizontal filling) would not require

permitting from this agency. Again, an artifically-created

waterway will include existing upland residential canal systems.

Otherwise, an artifically-created waterway will be defined as

a body of water that has been solely dredged or excavated and

did not overlap historically submerged lands (see 17-4 F.A.C.).

Also, even though permits are not required, compliance is

still necessary with other applicable rules and regulations

(i.e., water quality standards, etc.)


j. "The construction and maintenance of swales."

The construction and maintenance of swales or drainage areas

containing contiguous areas of water only immediately after

rain or flooding do not require permits under Chapters 403, 253,

and 373, F.S. A swale is defined in Section 3 (11) of the

act as a "man-made trench which only contains contiguous areas

XI

I--`










of standing or flowing water following the occurrence of

rainfall or flooding." As such, the construction and main-

tenance of swales would be limited to upland areas as defined

in 17-4.02, F.A.C. As with the other categories, compliance

with other applicable rules and regulations is necessary.













































XII







S cExhibit 3

FLORIDA '

WATER MANAGEMENT ...-- :....

ACTIVITIES '''



iVIFION OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAMS
Vol. 1 No. 1 August, 1975
DER,-- P~-----------Page 1
SWFWMD-----------------------------------Page 2
C&SFFCD--------------------------------- Page 4
SJRWMD-------------------------------------Page 7
NWFMD------------------------------------Page 7
SRWMD--------------------------------------Page 8
R&LGCWMD------------------------------- ---Page 9


Florida Water Management Activities is a monthly newsletter aimed at
keeping the Department of Environmental Regulation and the Florida
Water Management Districts informed of activities of mutual interest.
News items and questions concerning information in this newsletter
should be directed to Pratt Finlayson (904/488-7778) or Jane Smith
(904/488-6895). Correspondence should be sent to: Florida Water
Management Activities, Department of Environmental Regulation, Bureau
of Water Resources Management, 2562 Executive Center Circle E.,
Tallahassee, Florida 32301


DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATION

LAND3RS DISCUSSES WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICTS

In a letter to the executive directors and chairmen of the governing
boards of the Water Management Districts, DER Secretary Jay Landers
called for a close working relationship between the Water Management
Districts and DER. The following are excerpts from that letter:

"As I enter into my responsibilities as Secretary of the new
Department of Environmental Regulation, I am acutely aware
of the tremendous need for wise management of the water resources
of Florida and the key role that you are playing in this regard.
I hope to have a very close working relationship with you and
others in positions of similar responsibility for the management
of the water and related land resources of the state.

"It is my belief that combining the water quality and quantity
responsibilities of state government into a single department will
facilitate the multi-objective planning required to provide for
the needs of the people in a way which is most beneficial and in
a way which causes minimum environmental damage. The determination
of water and related land use in our modern society must be
directed toward obtaining maximum benefit from those resources
without undue detriment for other purposes. I expect our planning
to progress logically and in a manner that will preclude crisis
situations.
_________________________________ _------ T_ T T-------- --.--- -------------------------------------------__________






"I fully sup't the policy stated in C! iter 373, Florida Statutel
which recogi,.zes that the water resource problems of the state
vary from region to region and therefore authorizes delegation
of powers to the Water Management Districts. I also believe that
the best management decisions can be made at the lowest level at
which all the facts required to form sound decisions are available
I therefore intend to use this reasoning in delegating all
appropriate powers, including those under Chapter 403, Florida
Statutes, to the Water Management Districts that are consistent
with fulfilling my responsibilities for coordinating and assuring.
the proper protection and management of this vital resource on
a statewide basis."

FY 1976-77 BUDGET PROPOSALS UNDERWAY

Reorganization activities delayed delivery of the budget instructions
fox FY 76-77. All Water Management Districts should have received
copies of the instructions by this time, however. The department regretS
the delay and any resulting inconvenience, but urges the submission of
budget proposals within the remaining available time period.


SOUTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
ROMP NETWORK PROPOSED

Don Feaster, executive director of the Southwest Florida Water Managemen:
District, announced plans for a Regional Observation and Monitor-Well
Program (ROMP). This plan was proposed on the premise that knowledge of
regional groundwater resources is a prerequisite to their sound manager.

The -ROMP network will consist of 122 inland monitor-well sites and 24
coastal monitor transects, with two to four wellseach. Of these, six
coastal and 32 inland sites will be considered high priority areas, and
are expected to be operational within three to four years. These will
serve as fundamental data-collecting sites on which further planning
of the water resources can be based.

There are five basic objectives of this program: to define aquifers and
confining layers, and also determine their geometric and hydrologic
characteristics; to map the potentiometric surface of the artesian aquif
to locate a fresh, salt water interface in the coastal zone and monitor
changes in its position; to check on water quality; and finally, to
establish a reliable data base for the purpose of determining the
relationship between climate (barometric pressure, temperature, humidity
and rainfall) and groundwater.

Locations for the regional monitor wells to be constructed in 1976 have
already been selected, and preliminary surveys have been made. Long-ter:
easements at these sites are in the process of being secured.

SWFWLD estimates the projects will be completed in 10 to 12 years.


QWIP GOING INTO PRODUCTION PHASE

Project QWIP, the district's program for stopping the flow of
contaminated water between aquifers is moving from an experimental
phase to a production phase.

The 'taff has now begun to advertise for private contractors to plug

_____________-------------








up 20 flowing wells in C Lrlotte County. The plugg .g operation stops
the flow of contaminated water between aquifers but does not prevent
at the flow of better-quality water to the surface.

ble Until recently, plugging operations were performed by the district staff
on a small scale and on an experimental basis. "Now that the methodology
has been established, we can tell private contractors what we want done,
how it can be done, and what materials should be used," John Darling of
ng the District's Bartow office explained.

According to Darling, after several contractors have gained some experience
in well-plugging for QWIP, it is likely that the cost per well will be
reduced to $600-$800 each.


PINELLAS-ANCLOTE BOARD APPROVES PLAN

S' "Getting back to nature" will be a little easier in Pinellas County when
King Helie Planning Group's "Park Use Plan for the Sawgrass Lake Area"
is put into operation by the Pinellas-Anclote Basin Board. The board
accepted and approved the final draft of the study at its June meeting.

From its inception, a major goal was to preserve the native beauty and
environment of the area as much as possible while still allowing the
public to see and experience that environment.
Included in the Sawgrass Lake Plan is a 5,800-foot elevated broadwalk
of that winds through the swamps and woodlands and around the lake.
The primary use of the Sawgrass Lake area is as a water management
facility.. The 330-acre site will serve as a retention area for storm
runoff and, through a water control structure and a series of interior
td and exterior canals, will help alleviate flooding in the surrounding
urbanized area.


NEWS BRIEFS
.nd
Locations for regional monitor wells to be constructed in 1976 have been
if. selected. Staff personnel have visited the actual sites, made preliminary
field surveys, and are now providing assistance to the Real Estate
Division in securing long-term easements at these locations.



Salt water intrusion into the East Lake Road Well Field well #3, which
e was first noted in April 1975 with chloride levels reaching 350 ppm,
erm has possibly stabilized as the chloride level in this well for the month
of May was still 350 ppm.



The district and the Pinellas-Anclote River and Pithlachascotee River
Basin Boards have agreed to hire a consulting firm to study the hydrology
of the J. B. Starkey Wilderness Park, as well as to develop a recreational
Use plan. An agreement, between the City of New Port Richey, Pasco
County, and the Water Production Authority, stated that the cost of
consultant's services will eventually be paid by users.


XV







The project budget-.ig efforts that have been j opposed to all the basins
for FY 75-76 have proven a decided advantage for the various board
members as far as understanding where the money is and why it was placed
There. Even though this effort has bee. a tremendous workload for the
staff to test, calculate and re-work, this will now give a history of
work-up which should make next year a pleasure for all project managers
and supporting staff.



Microfilming of records continues at a realistic pace. Although quite
time consuming, the file maintenance, indexing and documentation occurri:
concurrently with the microfilming is expected to greatly facilitate
access to and retrieval from the files.
i

Participation in a free demonstration of computer terminals and tele-
processing modems given the staff by representatives of Scientific Time
Sharing Corporation provided many beneficial ideas for implementing
advanced water resource programs such as flood forecasting, development
of a computer digital model, and aquifer modeling.



CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN FLORIDA FLOOD CONTROL DISTRICT
FCD PUTS FREEZE ON AD VALOREM TAXATION

An inflation-fighting tentative 1975-76 budget was adopted by the FCD
at its July Governing Board meeting. The $21.9 million budget is down
almost $2 million from last year. During the 1974-75 fiscal year the
FCD levied a millage rate of .394 of a mill amounting to $15,621,650,
which is the same total amount as that predicted in the new tentative
budget. Because of recent developments and additions to the tax rolls,
the village rate levied will probably decrease for this fiscal year, howc

Also included in the proposed budget are the following appropriations for
major FCD programs: $8.9 million for operating and maintaining the water
management canals and structures; $2.9 million for resource planning,
including the Regional Water Supply Plan and permitting of water uses;
$1.6 million for land acquisition and relocation; $955,654 for resource
management, including design and right-of-way functions; and $794,000
for district construction, primarily for continued work on the Communicat
Control System.


SOUTHPORT PARK OFFERS CHANCE TO GET-AWAY-FROM-IT-ALL

Southport Park, the second full-service FCD recreational complex, was
officially opened at a dedication and barbeque, July 19, attended by
more than 450 guests. Located in a remote spot on the southern shore of
Lake Tohopekaliga, about 20 miles south of Kissimmee, Southport takes
full advantage of the natural oak and cypress setting. The 32-acre park
has 41 campsites, (26 full service and 15 with water and electrical
hookups), a park center, two comfort stations, two picnic shelters, and
a fish-cleaning station.


XVI







s The first FCD recreation. facility was Okee-Tantit located where the
Kissimmee River meets Lake Okeechobee. Both Okee-Tantie and Southport
ed should be full, commissary facilities by the first of the year.

Informational brochures detailing recreation within the FCD boundaries
s are available through the district's Public Information Office.


FCD TO HAVE NEW SYMBOL

When the Central and Southern Florida Flood Control District becomes
rir, the South Florida Water Management District on December 31, 1976, the
district will be far along as far as a new symbol is concerned. FCD
employees had the opportunity to win $50 in a "Logo design" contest,
to which more than 80 entries were submitted. A group of employees
served as judge to select the top ten entries and the winning contribu-
tion was chosen by the FCD Governing Board.



t NEW KISSIMMEE GUIDE AVAILABLE

The newest FCD brochure, "Recreational Guide to the Kissimmee Waterway,"
is now available to all camping, boating and fishing enthusiasts who
want information on the Kissimmee River, Lake Istokpoga, and the upper
chain of lakes. Included in the guide are tips for passing through
locks, schedules of local operations, after-hour procedure, distances
between locks, fishing prospects, requirements for obtaining fishing
licenses, and public fish camps and facilities. Also included is a
map that plots the locations of the fish camps, the public parks, locks,
and boat launching ramps along the way.


DRY SEASONS HIT HARD IN THREE OF LAST FIVE YEARS

)wel Its beginning to look like the 1970-71 "drought" was not as unique as
many experts first thought. William V. Storch, Director of Resource
.or Planning, has issued a "Summary of the Condition of South Florida Water
;er Storage Areas in the 1974-75 Dry Season," the third such report since
the original 1970-71 dry season summary. This report not only describes
the rainfall, evaporation, water delivery and use, water transfers to
S the lower east and the west coasts, reservoir inflow, and storage-demand
for this past dry season, but also compares the last five dry seasons.
:ati
The 1970-71 dry season was one of the most severe dry periods experienced

in South Florida, but the 1973-74 and 1974-75 dry seasons closely I
resembled it. Water delivery rates were similar for those three dry
seasons, although the 1974-75 period resulted in the greatest amount of
delivery because of the severely deficient rainfall in October, 1974.
The accumulated deficiencies of the four water storage areas, Lake
Okeechobee and the three conservation areas, were greater this past dry
f season than in 1970-71. Due to the greater-than-average storage in
Lake Okeechobee at the beginning of this past dry period and the increased
k rainfall in May, however, the FCD was able to meet its water supply
responsibilities.


FCD ACCEPTS NEW PUMP STATION

Pumping station number four, a $2,480,486 structure located in the Herbert
__ xyII







Hoover Dike on the -outhwest of Lake OkeechobeS, six miles northwest
of Clewiston, has been accepted for operation and maintenance.

The station has three vertical pumps that will give it the capacity of
pumping 2,905 cubic ft. per section, to serve a 116 square-mile area
in aLd around Clewiston. The new structure is designed to remove
three-fourths of an inch of rain daily from the 111.7 square miles of
agricultural land and four inches per day from the 4.3 square-mile urban

Completed in March, 1974, the station has been operating on a test basis
prior to being accepted by the FCD. The station was built by the
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the FCD was required to contribute
14 per cent of the construction costs, provide all lands and relocations,
and to take over operations and maintenance when the station was complete


POLLUTION SOURCES IDENTIFIED IN UPPER CHAIN OF LAKES

According to a recent FCD technical report, Shingle Creek, which drains
southwest Orlando and the City of Kissimmee, and small tributaries
flowing into the north end of Lake Tohopekaliga are the major sources
of pollution in the upper chain of lakes. The study was conducted by
the Environmental Sciences Division of the Resource Planning Department
during July, 1974 through June, 1975, and ran concurrently with the FCD's
chemical and biological investigation of Lake Okeechobee.

The study shows that Lake Tohopekaliga, which has generally poor water
quality, is acting as a trap for high concentrations of nitrogen and
phosphorous compounds and other trace elements that are flowing into the
lake from the north. The amount of ortho-phosphate and total phosphate
in Shingle Creek and the north end of Lake Toho were usually ten or more
times greater than concentrations in the south end of the lake on the
same date.

The report No. 75-2 submitted to the Governing Board at its July meeting,
is entitled 'Progress Report: Upper Kissimmee Chain of Lakes Water
Quality Benthic Invertebrate Sampling Period".


USERS HELP WITH WATER INVENTORY

Advances in the study of the Floridan Aquifer are being made by the FCD
with the help of water users in the St. Lucie County area. Land owners
in that section of the state are cooperating with the district in
inventorying the water uses and needs in the area.

Water users are meeting with the FCD to offer information and fill out
permit applications. The information submitted on the applications will
be ued to help form the body of knowledge necessary for effectively
evaluating the resources in that area.

The number of wells, their size, location, types of use, and pumpage
data are some of the things the FCD is gleaning from the applications.
This data, along with information already known about the water systems
in that area and technical studies now under way by the district's
staff will allow determinations of"reasonable-boneficial"use to be made
more efficiently.



XVIII
i -







ST. JO...S RIVER WATER MANAGEMENT S TRICT

FOUR NEW MEMBERS APPOINTED

Four new members were appointed by Governor Reubin Askew to the
St. Johns River Water Management District Governing Board. Dr. Jasper
Joyner, Gainesville, was appointed to succeed Art Marshall of Interlachen.
niD Dr. Joyner is assistant director of the Department of Ornamental
Horticulture at the University of Florida. Gene Shaw, Kingsley Lake,
s was named to succeed Bobby White, Hastings. Shaw is the attorney for
Bradford County and has a law practice in Orange Park as well. Mike
Braddock, Deland, was appointed to replace Tommy Shave, Fernandina.
"ns, Braddock is with the Volusia County Farm Dureau and is a fern grower.
et(c Frank Friedmann, Jacksonville, was named to fill the vacancy left by
Jim Terrell, Jacksonville, who had previously resigned. Friedmann is an
attorney and a member of the Jacksonville Area Planning Board.

Reappointed to the Board were George Brown, Castleberry, president of
S Southernline Corporation; Dr. Suzanne Bayley of the Environmental Sciences
Department at the University of Florida; and John Dicks, Jr., who is a
representative of the Jim Dandy Company.

t Returning board members are Tommy Clay, Putnam County agricultrual agent
D's and rancher, and Dr. Jim Knapp, chairman of the Department of Biology,
Stetson University.


ELECTION SCHEDULED FOR AUGUST 20
he
e The Governing Board will elect new officers in the meeting scheduled
re for August 20, 9:30 a.m. in the district headquarters in Palatka.
Art Marshall served as the first chairman of the Governing Board.


ng, BOARD APPROVES BUILDING PURCHASE

After renting .office headquarters for a number of months, the Governing
Board, in the February meeting, approved purchase of the district
headquarters building at the appraised value of $85,000. At that time,
the building contained 1500 square feet of office space, with approximately
300 square feet of warehouse space. The board additionally approved
CD the expenditure of $20,995 for an expansion program utilizing the existing
s warehouse area. This provided 2663 square feet for offices, laboratory,
computer facility, meeting room, and library. They have since approved
the purchase of 4.06 acres of additional land surrounding the headquarters
building at the appraised value of $20,300.

11

NORTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT

ADMINISTRATIVE RULES ADOPTED

s A set of rules, designated Chapter 16G-1, which establish administrative
procedures, define the organization's authority and provide for hearings
e and appeals on additional rules, has been adopted by the district. The
action was taken at a meeting of the Governing Board in Milton, July 22
after the fourth public hearing.

XIX








IMPROVEMENT AUTHORITY REORGANIZED

Chronic flooding of the Choctawhatchee and Pea River valleys has
prompted NWFMID to call local interests and all governmental agencies
with jurisdiction in water management and flood control together to
initiate a plan of action designed to prevent flood damage and improve
the streams.

The defunct Choctawhatchee-Pea Rivers Improvement Association has been
reorganized and efforts are under way to fund a feasibility study to
determine a course of action,

Some local interests have rallied behind the so-called "Pujol Plan"
which envisions a series of small impoundment areas upstream on tribu-
taries of the two rivers. The plan was proposed by Maurice Pujol,
editor of the Washington County News, and is patterned after small
watershed development projects. NrMED plans to coordinate the activities
of governmental agencies which may get involved in flood prevention
programs and will advise local interests in their efforts to develop
a solution to heavy flood losses which occur in the area on a regular
basis.


REPORT BEING PRINTED

The Water Resources Assessment Report for the district has been completed
and is in the process of being printed.


ALTERNATIVE WATER SUPPLIES BEING STUDIED

Due to a significant potential for salt water intrusion as a result of
steadily increasing drawdown of the Floridan aquifer, hNuJD has been
working closely with officials in the Ft. Walton Beach-Destin area to
determine the seriousness of the problem. A number of alternative
water supply methods have been detailed and efforts toward construction
of a computer model to predict aquifer response are nearing completion.
A more intensive ground water monitoring network has been initiated
for the coastal area in order to detect any intrusion as early as pbssiJh


WATER USE INVENTORY PLANNED

NWFD has scheduled a detailed water use inventory for Escambia, Santa
Rosa, and Okaloosa counties during the last two weeks of August.
District staff will cooperate in the effort with the West Florida Regior
Planning Council and a unit of the Army Reserve. All major categories
of use will be inventoried and the results will be a significant first
step toward a district-wide inventory to be completed by Spring of 197.



SUWANNEE RIVER WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT

BOARD ACTION TAKEN IN JULY

At a meeting on July 17, the Governing Board endorsed the March
constitutional amendment and authorized funds to carry out an educati('
program in support of the proposed ad valorem taxation amendment. I
XX






odSat
were also initiated to develop rules to implement inapter 373.106,
Florida Statutes.

The following officers were elected:

John Camp (Jasper) Chairman
Jerome Johns (Starke) Vice Chairman
B. W. Helvenston, III (Live Oak) Secretary-Treasurer
H. J. Woodard (Live Oak) Assistant Secretary-Treasurer



RIDGE AND LOWER GULF COAST WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT

Governor Askew appointed the Governing Board of the Ridge and
es Lower Gulf Coast Water Management District. The board will meet for
the first time in Tallahassee on August 26, 1975, for orientation by
the secretary and staff of the Department of Environmental Regulation.

Members of the board are: Jack P. Brandon, Lake Wales;
Stanley W. Hole, Naples; Ms. Mary A. Kumpe, Sarasota; James W.
Ringo, Immokalee; Donald F. Schloesser, Tavernier; Latimer H.
Turner, Sarasota; Robert Blake Whisenant, Parrish; Maurice Plummer,
Fort Myers, and Joseph F. Pulte, Fort Myers.
ed












>le.


















1
ts'
XXI





University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs