Title: Memorandum re: Investigations of the effect of Pinellas County
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 Material Information
Title: Memorandum re: Investigations of the effect of Pinellas County
Alternate Title: Memorandum re: Investigations of the Effect of Pinellas county Eldridge-Wilde Well Field's Aquifer Cone of Depression of Cypress Pond Water Levels and Associated Vegetation - 1973.
Physical Description: 8p.
Language: English
Publication Date: Sept. 10, 1973
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida
 Notes
General Note: Box 3, Folder 5B ( WATER SHORTAGE, VOL. I. B3F5 ), Item 90
Funding: Digitized by the Legal Technology Institute in the Levin College of Law at the University of Florida.
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Bibliographic ID: UF00051659
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text


cSeptember 10, 1973


MEMORANDUM


TO: Rodney N. Cherry, Director, Water Resources

FROM: William D. Courser, Biologist /

RE: Investigations of the Effect of Pinellas County Eldridge-Wilde
Well Field's Aquifer Cone of Depression of Cypress Pond Water
Levels and Associated Vegetation-1973.

In order to update the observations reported by Courser (1972) concerning
the effects of well field pumping on cypress ponds, the 1972 study was re-
peated on August 2, 1973. The same sites visited in June, 1972 were re-
visited on August 2 by the authors, S.A.Putnam and P.M.Dooris. Appendices
A and B detail the observations at each site.

In June, 1972, cypress ponds, marshes and a hardwood swamp within the
Eldridge-Wilde Well Field were devoid of water, soils were dry and were
undergoing invasion by terrestrial vegetation such as dog-fennel, pokeweed
and groundsel. In August, 1973, ground cover withi-n.the ponds, swamp and
marsh areas was again devoid of aquatic plants (i.e. water lily, pickeral
weed, etc.) normally observed in cypress ponds. At all sites terrestrial
plants typical of disturbed areas (wax myrtle, groundsel, dog-fennel, poke-
weed, ragweed, pigweed, blackberry and various grasses) were established.
With the exception of Stations 0, 1A and 1C, no standing water was observed
in August, 1973.

At Station 0, wax myrtle trees estimated to be at least two years old were
observed growing at ground level. A ten to twelve foot specimen of pokeweed
was photographed at Station 1B. It was estimated to be two years old. At
several stations the vegetation fringing the cypress heads had changed from
semi-aquatic to more terrestrial in composition. Stressed cypress trees
were observed in the area. Mud cracking was observed at Stations 4, 5, 6
and 9. Station .3, formerly a hardwood swamp, was dry. The understory
vegetation was not typical of a hardwood swamp.

At Lake Dan, Station 8, the original littoral zone has been taken over by
dog-fennel. Willow is now colonizing the new shoreline area. At the August
2 visit, the level of the lake was 23.21 Teet mean sea level. In late June,
1973 the lake was 20.30 feet mean sea level. Sedges that had grown during
the low water in early summer were either inundated or partially covered by
the higher water. These sedges do not establish nor do they survive in deep
standing water.





-2-
MEMORANDUM September 10, 1973

RE: Investigation of the Effect of Pinellas County Eldridge-Wilde
Well Field's Aquifer Cone of Depression of Cypress Pond Water
Levels and Associated Vegetation-1973.

Because standing water (Appendix A) was observed in Station 0, 1A and 1C,
these cypress ponds were revisited on August 22, 1973. On the August 2
visit, irrigation water was being pumped into irrigation ditches South of
Station 0. The ditches carried water toward Station 0. In addition, the
area had received about five inches of heavy rainfall several days prior
to our visit. Station 1A was dry August 22 and Station 0 contained only
scattered pools of water. The irrigation pump South of Station 0 was not
in operation on August 22.

The irrigation pump several hundred feet North of Station 1C was not pumping
on August 2. On August 22 it was in operation. Water was flowing down a
ditch that led directly to the cypress head. Even with the irrigation system
in operation on August 22, water levels (Appendix A) were down about six
inches from the August 2 observations. Because cypress ponds in immediate
proximity to those with standing water were dry, it was concluded that the
standing water observed in Stations 0, 1A and 1C on August 2 and Station 0
and 1C on August 22 was caused primarily by irrigation and not by rainfall.

The isolated heads along Tarpon Springs Road were also examined as a contrast
against the observations within the well field. The results were essentially
the same as those recorded in 1972 when cypress ponds progressively farther
from the well field increased in soil moisture, water levels and the occur-
rence of semi-aquatic and aquatic vegetation. Additional observations noted
in August 1973 included:

1. The soil at the cypress pond 1.5 miles East of the well field was
dry to the touch this year as compared to moist in 1972.

2. No aquatic vegetation was observed at the 1.5 mile station.

3. Only a small pool of water two inches deep as observed at the pond.
3.0 miles East of the well field. Last year standing water covered
a large area of the cypress pond.

4. Lichens (the growth on cypress trees that form a distinct line near
the average high water mark) have begun to grow further down the
cypress trees at two locations, indicative of the lack of deep
standing water.

These observations reveal that as one moves further East from the well field,
the dry condition observed in cypress ponds within the well field gradually
changes toward a more normal condition further and further from the well
field.

Cypress heads, ponds, and hardwood swamps within Pinellas ,lHillsborough and
Pasco Counties have been observed randomly over two years. Conditions with-
in cypress heads in most of the areas, with the exception of the well field
and deliberately drained swamps, have been wet even during the present
drought period with standing water and typical aquatic vegetation present.
'As there is no indepen It evidence to indicate that tV 'e are highly signif-
icant local differencefin rainfall rates, rainfall efrects are ruled out






-3m .;

MEMORANDUM September 10, 1973


RE: .Investigation of the Effect of Pinellas Coutny Eldridge-Wilde
Well Field's Aquifer Cone of Depression of Cypress Pond Water
Levels and Associated Vegetation-1973.


as a major contributing factor to the dry conditions observed in cypress
ponds in and around the Pinellas County Eldridge-Wilde Well Field.




Literature Cited

Courser, W.D. 1972 Memorandum of July 14, 1972
























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