• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Little Rosabell's adventure
 Outwitted
 Three model mice
 Three babies
 A little master
 Feeding kitty
 How Danny said he was sorry
 Baby Nell's mishap
 Willy's work
 Crossing the ferry
 Doll Emmie
 The great block train
 The bird that knew best
 Three queer dolls
 Mamma's Christmas lesson
 Freddy's pets
 Shoeing the baby
 Mary's turtles
 A puzzled boy
 Back Cover






Title: Rosabell's adventure
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00050432/00001
 Material Information
Title: Rosabell's adventure
Alternate Title: Rosa Bella's adventures
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 17 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Cox, Palmer, 1840-1924 ( Illustrator )
D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: D. Lothrop and Company
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: c1883
 Subjects
Subject: Christian life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1883   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1883   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1883
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: with twenty illustrations.
General Note: Contains prose and verse.
General Note: Some illustrations by Palmer Cox.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00050432
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002236757
notis - ALH7235
oclc - 62881339

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Plate
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Little Rosabell's adventure
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Outwitted
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Three model mice
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Three babies
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    A little master
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Feeding kitty
        Page 23
        Page 24
    How Danny said he was sorry
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Baby Nell's mishap
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Willy's work
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Crossing the ferry
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Doll Emmie
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
    The great block train
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    The bird that knew best
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Three queer dolls
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    Mamma's Christmas lesson
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Freddy's pets
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Shoeing the baby
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
    Mary's turtles
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
    A puzzled boy
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
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ROSABELL'S ADVENTURE





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With Tweenly Illustrations.




BOSTON
D. LOTHROP AND COMPANY
32 FRANKLIN STREET.































4
COPYRIGHT, I883.

D. LOTHROP & COMPANY.












LIT-TLE ROS-A-BELL'S AD-
VEN-TURE.

Lit-tle Ros-a-bel liked sto-ries
the best of any-thing in the
world ; and she be-lieved that
all her lit-tle pict-ure books
were true, and 0, how she did
wish she were a stor-y-book
girl her-self, and that such
things would hap-pen to her.
Dear lit-tle Ros-a-bel, she used
to go out in the green lanes






LIT-TLE ROS-A-BELL'S AD-VEN-TURE.

and grass-y dells and hunt for
fair-ies, and list-en for talk-ing
birds and talk-ing flow-ers.
And one day lit-tle Ros-a-
bel thought she would try one
of the sto-ries and see if it
would come true with her.
She chose the sto-ry of Lit-tle
Red Rid-ing-hood," be-cause
she had a red hood and be-
cause she knew a poor old
wor-an who lived a-lone in an
old house. So she put a pat
of but-ter and a cust-ard-pie in
a lit-tle bask-et,tied on her red
hood, and started a-way. But






LIT-TLE ROS-A-BELL'S AD-VEN-TURE.

there were no woods to go
through, and so no wolf came
a-long. Ros-a-bel called" Wolf,
Wolf!" man-y times, but no
wolf came. When she came
to the old house she tried to
reach the big knock-er. But
she couldn't, so she knocked
with her lit-tie knuck-les. A
ver-y thin, low voice said, Lift
the latch and come right in "
Ros-a-bel did, and there was a
poor old grand-moth-er right in
bed, just like the stor-y!
O, have you any thing to eat
in that bask-et ? said the voice.






LIT-TLE ROS-A-BELL S AD-VEN-TURE.

" I have sprained my an-kle
and I can't walk, and there has
no-bod-y been here for two
days, and I am al-most starved,
and I want some-bod-y to go
for a doc-tor. Can you go?"
Yes, Ros-a-bel could. A-way
she ran to mam-ma, ,and mam-
ma and the doc-tor both came.
So Ros-a-bel was not on-ly in a
real sto-ry her-self, but she al-so
did a great deal of good.










OUT WIT-TED.

Three lit-tle tab-by coats all
in a row
Moth-er Puss loves them,
this I know;
Pet nam-ed them Pearl-y, Fred
and Dick -
Nice lit-tie tab-by coats, so
smooth and slick!
"You can't keep them," broth-er
Ned said,
Fold-ing his arms, and shak-
ing his head;






OUT-WIT-TED.

"Our fish they'd catch, our
birds they'd kill,
I'll find them a place by
the old red mill!"
In-to his lap, lit-tle Pet
climbed,
Round his neck her chub-by
arms twined,
But coax-ing was vain, though
a close em-brace
Drew the ro-sy mouth to her
broth-er's face.
Ned was gone, on-ly Pet and
Puss,
To guard the dar-lings, but
now, for-sooth!









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OUT-WIT-TED.

Where should they go, to be
safe from harm,-
Up-stairs, down-stairs, or in
the big barn?
No trace of tab-by coats, in-
doors or out;
"Moth-er Puss stares at this
bust-ling a-bout;
Pet smiles de-mure-ly when
none ocn see,
Whis-pers No-bod-y knows,
Tab, but you and me!"
Mam-ma found in her hat-box
three fun-ny things,
All curled up in soft, wool-ly
rings






OUT-WIT-TED.

Called, Pet, Pet! Oh look!
oh do!"
Laugh-ing, she said: "Tab lug
ged one, and I lugged two!"











THREE MOD-EL MICE.

Once on a time-the sto-ry-
book time when an-i-mals wore
clothes and could talk --there
were three mod-el mice. Their
names were Gray Cloak, Fine
Ear and Sat-in Slip-per.
Sat-in Slip-per had a spoon of
her own, Fine Ear had a knife,
and Gray Cloak owned a fork.
One day they thought they
would club the knife and the






THREE MOD-EL MICE.

fork and the spoon to-geth-er,
and keep house. As they
were mod-el mice, they eas-i-ly











THEY ATE FROM THE SAME EGG.
a-greed where to live. They
chose Farm-er Jones cel-lar,
be-cause there were bar-rels of
ap-ples, bas-kets of eggss,and






THREE MOD-EL MICE.

shelves loaded with good-ies,
and an egg, or an ap-ple, or a
stray cake would not be missed.
I lived once," said Gray
Cloak, "in the cel-lar of a
wom-an who bought by the
doz-en or the dime's worth,
and she missed the least lit-
tle thing at once, so that fi-
nal-ly I left in dis-gust."
Such good times as those
three mice had! The cel-lar
had a smooth, wa-ter-limed
floor, a beau-ti-ful place to play
mar-bles, blind-man's-buff and
Kit-ty-Kit-ty-cor-ner. They al-






THREE MOD-EL MICE.

ways ate from the same egg,
and as Farm-er Jones kept his
cats at the barn, there was
noth-ing to spoil their com-
fort for many years.












THREE BA-BIES.

Three ba-bies sit-ting in a row,
Sweet-er than hon-ey is, I know.
Said Ba-by Em, to Ba-by Jay:
"I think we'd bet-ter run a-way.

"Out in the gar-den we will go,
To see the ro-sy, po-sies blow,
To see the plums hang ripe
and sweet,
And get us one a-piece to eat!"










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THREE BABIES.

" yes, O yes," said Ba-byJay;
" It is a love-ly, sun-ny day;
And plums are nice! let us go!
I'm tir-ed of sit-ting in a row."

Said Ba-by Em to Ba-by Zee:
"If you'll be one, we will be
three.
The plums are good; you'd
bet-ter come."
But Ba-by Zee just sucked his
thumb.

So Ba-by Em and Ba-by Jay,
Two naugh-ty ba-bies, ran
a-way.






THREE BA-BIES.

And two mam-mas ran aft-er
them,
And caught the ba-bies, Jay
and Em;

And bore them home in sad
dis-grace,
While tears rolled down each
ba-by face;
And gave them sups of milk
and bread;
And put them in their lit-tlebed ;

And one mam-ma gave Ba-by
Zee,
Who didn't run a-way, you see,





THREE BA-BIES.

But stayed at home and sucked
his thumb,
A great big, nice big, sweet big
PLUM!












A LIT-TLE MAS-TER.

Floss and Fluff were the
hap-pi-est dogs in the world.
Floss knew how to snap, and
Fluff knew how to whine,
and if they had been let to
go hun-gry, or cold, or had
been scold-ed, they'd have
been cross, naught-y dogs.
But Floss and Fluff had
a good mas-ter. Hle was a
lit-tie boy on-ly six years






A LIT-TLE MAS-TER.

old, but he was a first-rate
mas-ter. His pa-pa said when
he brought Floss and Fluff
home:
Now, Fred-dy, just as
long as these lit-tie fel-lows
are hap-py, just so long they
are yours!"
Fred-dy knew what that
meant. He fed his beau-ti-ful
pets at reg-u-lar hours ev-er-y
day, and e-ver-y day he combed
and brushed them, and ev-er-y
day he took them out for a
a frol-ic, and they had their
baths at the right time, and




































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FLOSS AND FLUFF.






A LIT-TLE MAS-TER.

he nev-er held up a bone and
did not give it to them. Be-
cause he was so prompt and
true and kind, Fred-dy was
hap-py, and so were Fluff
and Floss.













FEED-ING KIT-TY.

You see I have a bit of meat,
I want the pus-sy-cat to eat;
I'd give it to her on a fork,
But mam-ma says that is-n't
neat.

I'll feed her at the kitch-en
door,
Her lit-tle dish is on the
floor;






FEED-ING KIT-TY.

And when she's eat-en this, I
know
She'll mew, and mew, and ask
for more.















MEAT FOR KIIT-Tl










HOW DAN-NY SAID HE WAS
SOR-RY.

Dan-ny was a hand-some lit-
tle boy, but not al-ways a
good lit-tle boy. Some-times
he was so naught-y that you
could see sparks of fire in
his soft black eyes, and he
would dou-ble his chub-by lit-
tle hands up in-to fists, and
stamp his feet, and look ex-
act-ly as though he were go-
ing to strike some-bod-y.






HOW DAN-NY SAID HE WAS SOR-RY.

One day when mam-ma
was sick with head-ache he
had one of these bad times
with his tem-per.
I don't wish to walk with
El-len," he cried, an' I won't
I want a play-walk with you,
mam-ma! El-len don't talk
with me, an' she won't let
me drive her at all! I want
a play-walk with my mam-ma,
I say! Do you hear, mam-
ma ?
Mam-ma heard. She felt
as though the naught-y lit-tle
boots had come down with













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HOW DAN-NY SAID HE WAS SOR-RY.

a stamp right on her head.
She knew ver-y well it was
nicer for a lit-tle boy to walk
with a mam-ma who would
a-muse him and fake part in
his lit-tle plays, than with a
nurse, but she could not go,
and when Dan-ny stamped
and roared, he had to be sent
out of the room quick-ly, and
with-out e-ven a kiss.
It was a much-a-shamed
lit-tle boy that went stub-bing
a-long in the dust right in
the mid-die of the road a
half-hour aft-er. His lit-tie






HOW DAN-NY SAID HE WAS SOR-RY.

heart was strug-gling to find
some way to say how sor-ry
he was. There were no flow-
ers to pick for a nose-gay, and
it was too late for e-ven a
stray black-ber-ry.
But just be-fore din-ner
mam-ma woke, and there was
a great cloud of col-or, red
and gold, right be-fore her,
and shin-ing o-ver it, a pair
of silk-en-fringed black eyes,
so soft and lov-ing and sor-ry
that mam-ma gath-ered her
lit-tle boy, and the great
arm-ful of au-tumn leaves






HOW DAN-NY SAID HE WAS SOR-RY.

right in-to her arms, and
in one lit-tle min-ute all
the naugh-ti-ness was loved
a-way.












BA-BY NELL'S MIS-HAP.

What do you think hap-
pened to Ba-by Nell the oth-er
day ?
Nurse had dressed her and
put her down on a rug in the
hall near the front door. You
nev-er saw any thing look
sweet-er than she did. She
looked like a lit-tle bun-die of
white ruf-fles tied round the
mid-dle with a wide blue rib-






BA-BY NELL'S MIS-HAP.

bon that was not tied tight
e-nough, so that the lit-tle curls
and blue eyes and dim-pies and
wee blue boots were spill-ing
out at the ends of the bun-
dle.
Just then lit-tle Nell's big
broth-er Jack came round the
corn-er of the house with the
gar-den hose. He was sprink-
ling the grass and the flow-ers;
he was al-so sprink-ling the
cats and the dogand the birds,
when they would let him. -
Jack is a ver-y great rogue.
I don't be-lieve he fixed the


















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BA-BY NELL S MIS-HAP.

noz-zle of the hose ver-y tight,
for while nurse was gone to get
ba-by a crack-er, a lit-tle puff of
wind turned the noz-zle o-ver
and the spray shot in-to
the hall and came pour-ing
down-right on ba-by!
She gave a lit-tle scream and
caught her breath, and kicked,
and fought at it with her
hands.
Mam-ma rushed out of the
par-lor and snatched her up, all
wet and drip-ping. Mam-ma
looked just like a bun-die of
ruf-fles her-self, but by the time






BA-BY NELL S MIS-HAP.

she had thrown that hose out,
she and ba-by both looked like
clothes they take out of a
wash-tub and hang on a
line.
They don't let Jack play
with the hose any more.













WIL-LY'S WORK.

[MORN-ING.]

The sun has ris-en o'er hill-top
and tree,
The blue-birds are sing-ing as
blithe as can be,
The lambs are a-feed-ing where
clo-ver grows thick,
And our lit-tie Wil-ly is rid-
ing a stick.





























































THE LIT-TLE HORSE-MAN.






WIL-LY'S WORK.

[NOON.]

The hot thirs-ty cat-tie all stand
in the pool,
The teach-er dis-miss-es the
schol-ars from school,
The men to their din-ner are
hur-ry-ing quick,
But our lit-tle Wil-ly is rid-ing
a stick.

[NIGHT.]

Ag-gy is put-ting her dol-ly to
bed,
Each lit-tle chick-en has hid-
den its head,






WIL-LYS WORK.

The shad-ows of even-ing are
gather-ing thick,
And our little Wil-ly is sta-
bling his stick.












CROSS-ING TIE FER-RY.

Miss Bell, are you go-ing
A-long with me row-ing?"
Said the fer-ry-man, John Eb-
e-ne-zer;
I'll row you right o-ver,
As fast as a plo-ver
When he feels in the morn-ing
the breeze stir."

I wish to go o-ver,
And take my Doll Clo-ver,
























































MISS BELL AND
DOLL CLO-VER.






CROSS-ING THE FER-RY.

But my mon-ey is spent, Eb-e-
ne-zer.
I do not wish a-ny
From you, but a pen-ny
From Clo-ver," said he, just to
tease her.

I will not go o-ver
With-out my Doll Clo-ver,
So good-bye, Mr. John Eb-e-
ne-zer.
"Well, sing me a song, then,
And bring her a-long, then,"
Said the fer-ry-man wish-ing to
please her.










DOLL EM-MIE.

A dear lit-tle dol-ly
Is Em-mie the fair,
With her bright eyes of blue,
And her gay gold-en hair.

In her own lit-tle cra-die
She sleeps through the night
And then in the morn-ing
She wakes up so bright,

And says, Now, dear ma,
Please put on my dress;"






DOLL EM-MIE.

And dear mam-ma does so
In a mo-ment or less.












REA-DY FOR A RIDE.

Then soon in her car-riage
Miss Em takes a ride,
And a lit-tie gray kit-ten
Runs close by her side;






DOLL EM-MIE.

While mam-ma be-hind her
With man-y a smile,
Wheels the bright, paint-ed
car-riage
For a make-be-lieve mile.










THE GREAT BLOCK TRAIN.

Hur-rah! With a rat-tie, a
bang, and a roar,
A train rush-es o-ver the nur-
se-ry floor.
The Great Block train of the
Nur-se-ry line -
A train of blocks with a track
of twine.
And the en-gi-neer, No-ah,
stands prim and straight,
Per-haps mus-ing dark-ly, the
while, on Fate,










/





LZAD






A SPLEN-DID-LY MAN-ACED ROAD.






THE GREAT BLOCK TRAIN.

That, from sail-ing for ages
a-cross the main,
Has brought kim to man-age
the Great Block train.
Six pas-sen-ger cars, with a
freight," and a mail,"
Fol-low the en-gine that trav-
els the rail;
There's a cow-catch-er, smoke-
stack, and bell in view,
For the build-er, though small,
knows a thing or two;
And an ea-ger "di-rect-or," on
ei-ther side,
Watch-es over the safe-ty of
folks that ride.






THE GREAT BLOCK TRAIN.

Ah, a splen-did-ly man-aged
road, it's plain,
Is that run o-ver by the Great
Block train!
The trav-el-lers, in-deed, are a
mot-ley crew,
For there's Shem and Ham
and Jap-het too,
With their sev-er-al wives;
then a duck and a horse,
And a mon-key climb-ing a
stick, of course,
And a jump-ing-jack and a
tall gi-raffe,
And a Jap-an-ese tur-tle-
I'm sure you'd laugh






THE GREAT BLOCK TRAIN.

At the com-i-cal crowd a list
would con-tain
Of the pas-sen-gers on the
Great Block train.
"Let hergo, Char-lie!" "Send
her off, Ted!"
" Hi, Mr. No-ah, hold on to
your head!"
"Toot, toot!" goes the whis-tle;
the bell, "Ding, dong!"
Whizz Bang! The fast train
rat-ties a-long.
Down the line, round the
curve, now with a roar,
It flies, fast and fu-ri-ous, o-ver
the floor!






THE GREAT BLOCK TRAIN.

"Ding, dong!" Toot, toot!"
Here it comes up a-gain,
Hur-rah, for the fun of the
Great Block train!












THE BIRD THAT KNEW
BEST.

This is a sto-ry of a sil-ly
young bird that thought she
knew best. When they flew
up from the South, the oth-ers
set to work to build nests;
but this bird said, What's
the use! See how thick the
ap-ple blos-soms are! I will
live in a-mong them.
So she did not build un-der






THE BIRD THAT KNEW BEST.

the eaves, but flew in and out
of the pink ap-ple-tree. But
one night came a great rain-
storm, and then this sil-ly bird
wished she had built a nest.








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*THREE QUEER DOLLS.

Be-neath the shade an oak-tree
made,
Up-on a sum-mer day,
Three lit-tle girls played par-ty
once-
A mer-ry three were they.


Sweet blue-eyed Prue, and
brown-haired Sue,
And pret-ty, win-some Bess;






THREE QUEER DOLLS.

And what they had for dolls;
I'm sure
You'd nev-er, nev-er guess.


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Prue had a fun-ny yel-low
squash,
And Sue a two-legged beet,






THREE QUEER DOLLS.

And Bess an ear of corn, my
dear,
Which like her-self was
sweet.










MAM-MA'S CHRIST-MAS LES-
SON.

What mam-ma said came
true. There were no pres-ents
Christ-mas, no pres-ents New
Year's. Mam-ma had said the
week be-fore that there would
be none. My lit-tie daugh-
ters," she had said, "you can-
not think you are to have
Christ-mas gifts this year."
Why should she have spok-
en so ? She had looked ver-y







MAM-MA'S CHRIST-MAS LES-SON.

so-ber. And they knew she
had bought wax dolls, and
they were ver-y sure there were










TALK-ING IT O-VER.

hand-some crim-son sash-rib-
bons too.
But Christ-mas had gone,
and New Year's, just like oth-






MAM-MA'S CHRIST-MAS LES-SON.

er days, and there had been no
sashes, no dolls.
The lit-tle nurs-er-y fam-i-ly,
the three sis-ters, and Doll
Fran-ce-lia, sat a-round the
play ta-ble and talked it over.
"Can it be 'cause we don't
'mem-ber p'lite-ness at ta-ble ?"
said Nel-ly.
Or cause we don't pick up
play-things ? said An-na.
An' cause, may-be, we ask
ques-tions an' don't wait when
pa-pa an' mam-ma talk," said
lit-tle De-lia.
No-bod-y an-swered. But






MAM-MA'S CHRIST-MAS LES-SON.

Doll Fran-ce-lia stood right up
in her chair and looked sur-
prised that her three lit-tie
mam-mas could have ex-pect-
ed pres-ents when they had
done these naugh-ty things.










FRED-DY'S PETS.

Fred-dy's blue eyes spar-kle
open ver-y ear-ly. Grand-ma
thinks the house is com-ing
down when she hears him
jump out o-ver-head. Mam-ma
says she rath-er have three
ducks to bathe. He can hard-
ly stand still to be dressed
- he wants to go see his pets.
One fam-i-ly live down in a
cor-ner of the gar-den fence-
a hill of ants. Fred-dy leaves






FRED-DY'S PETS.

them six grains of wheat.
When he comes a-gain at noon
the wheat is gone.
Then he runs to a lit-tie hole
in the ground, cov-ered with a
flat stone. He looks in. There
is a crick-et, a spi-der, a chinch-
bug, and four oth-er bugs.
Fred-dy knows how man-y legs
each bug has, and he says they
all like sugar. He says ev-
er-y-tIing likes sug-ar.
Af-ter break-fast he fish-esin
his fish-pond with his pin-fish-
hook. Once he caught asil-ver
min-now, once a crab. But
























































I-- ^ WITH A PIN HOOK.






FRED-DY'S PETS.

Fred-dy's fish-es like him bet-ter
when he comes with bread-
crumbs. They do not un-der-
stand at all how a lit-tle boy
can feed them so kind-ly in the
morn-ing, and then catch them
in the af-ter-noon on a cru-el
fish-hook.










SHOE-ING THE BA-BY.
Pa-pa's Let-ter.

I send some shoes to shoe the
ba-by,
The trou-ble-some, the bless-ed
ba-by,
The dain-ty, coo-ing, ty-rant
ba-by,
The wake-ful elf that mur-ders
sleep,
The trick-sy dear that plays
Bo-peep;
Here are some kids to case her
toes






SHOE-ING THE BA-BY.

That hav'-n't learned their
comes and goes."
The lit-tie pigs that go to mar-
ket,
That kick in bed and on the
car-pet -
What will she do, what will
she think,
When mam-ma shall, as quick
as wink,
Shut both of the lit-tle ro-sy
rows
Of sweet and dim-pled pig-gy-
toes
Right in these pens be-fore she
knows ?
















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THIS IS TIIF. BA-IIY.










MA-RY'S TUR-TLES.

Ma-ry likes pets. She has a
frisk-y dog that jumps as high
as her head to kiss her. He
is of-ten up in her lap morn-
ings be-fore she is dressed.
She has thir-ty pet wa-ter tur-
tles. She goes ev-er-y day to
feed them. At first, not a tur-
tle is to be seen. She whis-tles
soft-ly, twice, three times. Lit-
tle round bub-bles come on top
of the wa-ter. They come clos-









































P..;

















__. A HRDG


MA-RY AND HER DOG.






MA-RY'S TUR-TLES.

er. Now they look like the
end of a man's thumb. They
come still clos-er. Ah, they are
tur-tles' heads, not bub-bles.
You can see their bright eyes.
Just be-low the wa-ter you can
see the black and yel-low shells.
They swim up close. They
eat bread from Ma-ry's hand.
They are so ea-ger, they tum-
ble over one an-oth-er. Ma-ry
picks one up. It tries to shut
its shell, but the shell of the
wa-ter tur-tle is not made to
shut tight. She puts it back,
and it sticks out its head and






MA-RY S TUR-TLES.

legs and its tail, and swims off
af-ter a crumb. It gets it, then
dives to swal-low it.
Ma-ry is ver-y fond of them,
and the tur-tles know it.











A PUZ-ZLED BOY.

I'd just like to know whose
boy I am. Ev-er-y morn-ing
when the post-man comes,
he says, "Hal-lo! whose lit-tle
boy are you ? "
Then I have to say: Pa-
pa's, an' mam-ma's, an' grand-
pa's, an' grand-ma's, an' great-
grand-ma's, an' un-cle Char-
lie's, an' aunt-y Lou's, an
aunt-y Mav's, an'-"
But when I ain't through,






A PUZ-ZLED BOY.

he's gone, an' he al-ways














laughs when
he is go-ing. /i
I like to be 'D LIKE TO KNOW.
some folks' boys, but not ev-






A PUZ-ZLED BOY.

er-y-bod-y's. When I do
things pa-pa likes, such as
pick up chips, an' don't
cry when I'm hurt, then I'm
pa-pa's boy. An' when I'm
hurt, an' do cry, then I'm
mam-ma's boy. An' when a-ny
of my gran'-ma's come, they
say, when I'm right there be-
fore 'em, An' where's gram-
ma's boy to-day ?" An' cook
says, "Be my good lit-tle
boy," an' las' night a man
came on our steps an' he said,
" My son, is this Mr. Nel-son's
house?" an' when I said no, he






A PUZ-ZLED BOY.

said, Thank you, my boy;" an'
a p'lice-man said jus'now, "Run
in, my boy, or you'll freeze." I
don't like to be a man's boy
that I nev-er hav-n't seen a-ny
be-fore at all, I don't.






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