Our favourite nursery tales

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Material Information

Title:
Our favourite nursery tales
Uniform Title:
Cinderella
Goldilocks and the three bears
Puss in Boots
Tom Thumb
Spine title:
Nursery tales
Physical Description:
157, 1 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Cooper, Alfred W ( Illustrator )
Andersen, H. C ( Hans Christian ), 1805-1875
Frederick Warne and Co ( Publisher )
Publisher:
Frederick Warne and Co.
Place of Publication:
London
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Fairy tales -- 1883   ( rbgenr )
Nursery stories -- 1883   ( rbgenr )
Alphabet rhymes -- 1883   ( rbgenr )
Children's stories -- 1883   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1883   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1883
Genre:
Fairy tales   ( rbgenr )
Nursery stories   ( rbgenr )
Alphabet rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
General Note:
Some illustrations by A.W.C. (A.W. Cooper?).
General Note:
Publisher's advertisements follow text.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
with full page illustations on every alternate page.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002235233
notis - ALH5676
oclc - 62881324
System ID:
UF00050431:00001

Full Text

































The Baldwin Library
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OUR FAVOURITE

NURSERY TALES.




































































CINDERELLA.









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OUR FAVOURITE



NURSERY TALES.

WITH

FULL PAGE ILLUSTRATIONS
ON EVERY ALTERNATE PAGE,





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LONDON:
FREDERICK WARNE AND CO.,
BEDFORD STREET, STRAND.






















CONTENTS.



PAGE
A, APPLE PIE 15

JACK AND THE BEAN-STALK 27

ToM THUMB 39

Puss IN BOOTS 51

HoP o' My THUMB .63

CINDERELLA . 75

THE FAIRY AT THE FOUNTAIN; OR, THE TWO GIRLS 87

THE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG. . 99

THE STORY OF THE THREE LITTLE PIGS .111

THE THREE BEARS 123

LITTLE TOTTY 135

THE UGLY DUCKLING 147


















PREFACE.




IN this volume will be found one of the first
Play Alphabets that have been written for the
little ones. A, Apple Pie, from which even
Great-Grandpapa and Great-Grandmamma may
have learned their letters.

Next we have the dear old Nursery Stories of
which many generations of children have never
tired, and the two comparatively new ones,
quite worthy of being printed with them, which
came to English children from over the sea-








from the Princess of Wales's country-Den-
mark, where all the little ones knew and loved
their author, HANs ANDERSEN.

That the little readers of these charming
tales may spend many happy hours reading
them is the earnest wish of the Publishers.

















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A, APPLE PIE.

Swas a very good Apple Pie.
I could not make one, if I should try.

B bit it, his wee mouth's like a trap
And he has a plateful on his lap.

0 cut it, like a nice tidy maid,
That it might be touched, she was afraid.

D danced for it while she held her plate
And said that her wish for some was
great.





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E eat it while sitting on the ground
And very good the rich flavour found.

F fought for it like a naughty boy
(Quarrelsome children nothing enjoy).

G got it; but gave it up again,
To try and save it from F was vain.

H had it and held it, as you see,
For E to eat it, quite cheerfully.







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A, APPLE PIE.







J jumped for it as high as he could
And when he had it, eating it stood.

K kept it in her cupboard you see
As careful a housewife as can be.

L longed for it, the poor little thing,
And hoped that nurse soon a plate would
bring.

Mi mourned for it with a flood of tears;
How very silly her grief appears !






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N nodded for it her small fair head
And asked on Apple Pie to be fed.

o opened it with a kindly grace,
A gentle smile on her pretty face.

P peeped at it; the inquisitive boy;
And thought of dinner with hungry joy.

Squarrelled for it; how cross he looks,
I think he'll get in nurse's black books.







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lB ran for it; 'twas a foolish race
For nobody wished to give him chase.

Sstole it and the policeman came
And said the boy merited great blame.

T took it and held it very tight,
Although to the pie he had no right.

V viewed it with wonder in his hands,
With her arms behind her, here she stands.







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A, APPLE PIE.








W wanted it very much
And held out his hands the crust to touch.

X expected it and stood quite still,
He thought he was sure to gain his will.

Y yielded it, as a generous child,
She always was very kind and mild.

Z and & wished a small piece to hold,
And Apple Pie's story now is told.







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JACK AND THE BEAN-STALK.

ONCE upon a time there was a poor widow who
lived in a little cottage with her only son Jack.
Jack did no work as yet, and by degrees they
grew dreadfully poor. The widow saw that there
was no means of keeping Jack and herself from
starvation, but by selling her cow ; so one morn-
ing she said to her son, Jack, you must take the
cow to market for me, and sell her." Jack liked
going to market to sell the cow very much; but
as he was on the way, he met a butcher who had
some beautiful beans in his hand. Jack stopped
to look at them, and the butcher told the boy that
they were of great value, and persuaded him to
sell the cow for them When Jack brought them
home to his mother instead of the money she ex-
pected for her nice cow, she was very vexed, and
scolded Jack well for his folly. Jack was sorry
himself; but he said he might as well make the
best of his bargain, so he put the seed beans into
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JACK AND THE BEAN-STALK.

the ground, close by the side of the steep hill,
under shelter of which their cottage was built,
and went to bed. The next morning when he
got up, he found that the beans had grown, till
the bean-stalk reached right over the top of the
hill, and was quite out of sight. Jack instantly
climbed up it, and came to a great plain, on which
stood a stately castle. As he paused to gaze on
it, an old woman came up to him, and said, Jack,
that castle belongs to you! A wicked giant
killed your father, and took it from your mother;
try and get it back." Then she suddenly dis-
appeared. Jack was much surprised; however,
he walked up to the castle door and knocked, and
an old giantess came out. She did not wait till
he spoke, but pulled him in, for she thought he
would make a nice supper for her when her
husband was asleep. But just at that moment
she heard the giant's step approaching, so she
put Jack into a press, and told him to hide there,
or the giant would eat him. As soon as the ogre
came in, he cried in a terrible voice:
"Fee, fa, fie, fo, fum,
I smell the breath of an Englishman."
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JACK AND THE BEAN-STALK.

"Oh said his wife, "there is nobody here.
You only smell a crow that is flying over the
chimney."
Then the giant sat down to dinner, which was
quite ready, and when he had eaten a whole sheep,
he said, Bring me my hen."
The giantess brought a hen, and put it on the
table before him, and then she went away.
"Lay," said the giant to the hen, and she laid
a golden egg. Jack could see all quite plain
through a little hole which he had bored in the
door.
Three times the giant said "Lay," and each
time the hen laid a solid gold egg. Then the ogre,
being drowsy, shut his eyes, and soon snored very
loudly. Directly Jack found that he was asleep,
he stole out of the press, caught up the hen, ran
out of the castle, and descended the bean-stalk as
fast as he could go.
His mother was glad to see him again, and
much surprised at recovering the long lost hen,
which laid them three gold eggs every day.
Jack's mother took them to the next town and
sold them, and soon grew quite rich.
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JACK AND THE BEAN-STALK.

Some time afterwards Jack made another
journey up the bean-stalk to the giant's castle;
but first he dyed his hair and disguised himself.
The old woman did not know him, and dragged
him in to eat him by-and-by; but again she heard
her husband coming, and hid him in the press,
not thinking that it was the same boy who had
stolen the hen.
Again the giant came home and cried:

Fee, fa, fi, fo, fum,
I smell the breath of an Englishman.

But his wife said, No, it was only a vulture
that flew over the chimney."
When the giant had dined, he bade his wife
bring him his money-bags as he wished to see
what gold he had. She obeyed him; brought
two great bags and left him. The giant counted
his money, put it back in the bags and fell fast
asleep.
Then Jack stole softly out, seized the bags, and
ran out of the castle, and down the bean-stalk to
his home, which he reached safely.
A long time passed away before Jack went
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JACK AND THE BEAN-STALK.

to the giant's castle again; but he did at last
venture. He had disguised himself so well that
the giantess did not know him at all, and drew
him inside the door as before. And once more she
heard the giant, and this time she put him on a
shelf in her huge'cupboard.
Again the giant's heavy steps sounded outside
and Jack heard him say,

Fee, fa, fi, fo, fum,
I smell the breath of an Englishman.

"Oh no, you don't," said the stupid giantess.
"It was a raven you smell which has just flown
over the chimney."
When the giant had dined, he said, Bring me
my harp," and the old woman brought it, and
left him.
The giant said, "Play," and the harp played
so beautifully that Jack was delighted. It soon
lulled the giant to sleep, and then Jack stole out
and seized it, and ran away with it.
But the harp was a fairy, and as he ran, he
cried out, "Master! master !" and woke the
giant, who sprang up and ran after Jack.
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JACK AND THE BEAN-STALK,

Jack ran as fast as he could to save his life,
but as he reached the bottom of the ban-stalk
he saw the giant's great feet just on it.
"Mother, mother, give me the axe !" he cried.
The widow brought it quickly, and just as the
giant ,was a little way down the bean-stalk, Jack
chopped it in halves, and the monster came
tumbling down, and was killed on the spot.
Then Jack called together his neighbours, and
they went to the castle and took it, and shut up
the giantess, who ate children, for all the rest of
her life.
Thus, Jack won his castle back again; grew
very rich, and became a brave knight'; and was
kind to his mother, who lived with him very
happily always afterwards; and people have told
ever since the story of Jack and the Bean-stalk.








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TOM THUMB.

IN the days of good King Arthur, there lived
a ploughman and his wife, who wished very
much to have a son; so the man went to Merlin
the enchanter, and asked him to let him have
a child even if it were "no bigger than his
thumbb"
Go home and you will find one," said Merlin ;
aifd when the man came back to his house he
found his wife nursing a very, very, wee baby,
who in four minutes grew to the size of the
ploughman's thumb, and never grew any more.
The fairy queen came to his christening, and
named him "Tom Thumb." She then dressed
him nicely in a shirt of spider's web, and a
doublet and hose of thistle down.
Tom was a very healthy baby; but he grew
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very little. However, his parents were very
fond of him, and used to hold him on the palm
of their hands till he could walk and run about
on the table ; but then, as he was as mischievous
as .most children are, his small size caused him
to get into danger sometimes.
One day, while his mother was making a
plum-pudding, Tom stood on the edge of the
bowl with a lighted candle in his hand, that she
might see to make it properly.
Unfortunately, however, while her back was
turned, Tom fell into the bowl, and his mother
not missing him, stirred him up in the pudding,
and put it and him into the pot.
Tom no sooner felt the hot water than he
danced about like mad; the woman was nearly
frightened out of her wits to see the pudding
come out of the pot and jump about, and she
was glad to give it to a tinker who was passing
that way.
The tinker was delighted with his present;
but as he was getting over a stile, he happened
to sneeze very hard, and Tom called out from the
middle of the pudding, Hallo, Pickens which
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so terrified the tinker, that he threw the pudding
into the field, and scampered away as fast as he
could.
The pudding tumbled to pieces in the fall, and
Tom creeping out, went home to his mother, who
had been in great affliction because she could not
find him, and was very glad to get him back
again, though he was all over a crust of dough
and plums. Now this was not Tom's fault, it had
been an accident; but very often he got in
difficulties by creeping into all kinds of odd
places. One day he climbed over into the milk
jug, and was nearly drowned in the milk.
Luckily his cries brought his mother in time;
though his voice was so small one could scarcely
hear it a little way off.
Another time he was lost, and after seeking
for him everywhere, the poor woman saw his
head peeping out of the salt box which hung on
the wall, and she drew him out all covered with
sparkles of white.
A few days afterwards Tom went with his
mother into the fields to milk the cows, and for
fear he should be blown away by the wind,
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TOM THUMB.

she tied him to a thistle with a small piece of
thread. And there little Tom sat and sang as
merrily as a cricket. And a bee that buzzed by
quite longed to give him some honey from its
honey bag, but did not know how to manage it.
A butterfly came next, and Tom Thumb said to
it, Pretty butterfly, will you take me for a ride
on your back some day ?" But the butterfly did
not answer. It flew away at once, for it was
afraid, even tiny Tom would brush the pretty
downy feathers from its beautiful scarlet wings,
if he sat on them. By and by a field-mouse
came and looked at him with its little bright
eyes, and Tom said to it, May I come and sit
in your nest some day, Mrs. Mouse." But
mousey ran away, and never said a word he
could understand. Only I know she did not
want him in her nest with her large family of
little ones.
Very soon after a cow eat up the thistle and
swallowed Tom Thumb. His mother was in sad
grief again; but Tom scratched and kicked in
the cow's throat till she was glad to throw him
out of her mouth again.
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TOM THUMB.

One day Tom went ploughing with his father,
who gave him a whip made of a barley straw, to
drive the oxen with; but while he was playing
at being a herdsman a great eagle flying by
swooped down on him, caught him up in his
beak, and carried him to the top of a great
giant's castle.
The giant would have eaten Tom up ; but the
fairy dwarf scratched and bit his tongue and
held on by his teeth till the giant in a passion
took him out of his mouth and threw him into
the sea, when a very large fish swallowed him
up directly. It was not at all comfortable inside
the fish, there was so little air; but Tom was
not long in it, for it did not like him much as
food, and trying to get some more (for it was
very hungry) it bit at a fisherman's bait and was
caught.
The fisherman thought the fish such a fine
one that he took it as a present to King
Arthur, and when the cook opened it there
was Tom Thumb inside! He was carried to
the king, who was delighted with the little
man.
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TOM THUMB.

Tom walked on the king's left hand, and
danced on the queen's. He became a great
favourite with Arthur, who made him a knight.
He was good and kind to his parents, and the
old ballad says,-

Such where his deeds and noble acts
In Arthur's court there shone,
As like in all the world beside
Was hardly seen or known.

At length with peace and quietness,
He left this earth below,
And up into the fairy land,
Tom Thumb did fading go.

For whom King Arthur and his knights,
Full forty days did mourn;
And in remembrance of his name,
That was so strangely born,

He built a tomb of marble grey,
And year by year did come,
To celebrate the mournful death
And burial of Tom Thumb.

"Whose fame still lives in England here,
Amongst the country sort;
Of whom our wives and children small,
Tell tales of pleasant sport.

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PUSS IN BOOTS.

ONCE upon a time there was a miller who had
three sons. When he was dying he left each of
them a legacy. To his eldest son he left his
mill; to the second his ass; and to the youngest
his cat.
The poor youngest son was very sad when he
found that he had nothing left to him but a cat;
but to his great surprise, puss jumped on the
table, and said in a friendly manner: "Do not
be sad, my dear master. Only buy me a pair of
boots and a bag, and I will provide for you and
myself."
So the miller's son, who had a shilling or two
in his pocket, bought a smart little pair of boots
and a bag, and gave them to puss, who put
some bran and sow-thistles into his bag, opened
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the mouth of it, and lay down in a rabbit warren.
A foolish young rabbit jumped into it; puss
drew the string and soon killed it.
He went immediately to the palace with it.
He found the king and queen sitting on their
throne; and bowing low, he laid the rabbit at
the king's feet, saying :
"Please your majesty, my master, the Mar-
quis de Carrabas, has sent you a rabbit from
his warren, as a mark of respect."
"I am much obliged to the Marquis," said the
king, and he ordered the rabbit to be taken
to the cook, and a piece of money to be given tq
the cat.
Puss, much pleased, took a rabbit daily to
the king, as a gift from his master, till his
majesty was well acquainted with the name of
the Marquis de Carrabas, and with his wonderful
cat.
There was a very rich and cruel Ogre living in
that country. One day puss went to call on him,
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and the ogre was quite amazed at hearing a cat
talk ; it was the first time too he had seen a
" Puss in Boots."
"Is it true, most wonderful ogre," said Puss,
that you can change yourself into any creature
you please ?"
Quite true, as you shall see," said the ogre.
and he changed himself into : lion, and roared
so terribly, that the cat climbed up the wall out
of his way.
Then the ogre resumed his own ugly shape,
and laughed at puss's fear.
"It was very surprising," said the cat; "you
Share of such a grand size that I do not wonder
you could become a lion-but could you change
yourself into some very small animal ?"
"You shall see," said the stupid .vain ogre,
and he turned into a mouse. Directly puss sav,
him in that shape, he darted at him and eat hin:
up. The ogre quite deserved it, for he had eaten
many men himself.
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PUSS IN BOOTS.

Then puss made haste back to his master, and
said, "Come and bathe in the river, and when
the king passes by, do exactly as I tell you, for I
see his carriage coming this way."
The miller's son obeyed his friend the cat;
undressed and jumped into the water, and cun-
ning puss ran away with his clothes and hid
them under a large stone.
By-and-bye the king drove by with his
daughter. Puss begn toi call very loud Help,
help or my lord Alquis de Carrabas will be
drowned." The king stopped the coach directly,
and asked what was the matter. Puss an-
swered, that while his master was bathing, some
thieves had stolen his clothes, and that therefore
the marquis could not come out of the water.
The king luckily had a dress suit with him, so he
sent it by a servant to the Marquis, and desired
him to accept a seat in the royal coach, and he
would drive him home.
The miller's son looked very well in his fine
clothes, and the king was pleased with his appear-
ance. Puss directed the coachman to drive to the
late ogre's castle, and then he ran on before.
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PUSS IN BOOTS.

Coming to a large field in which reapers were
at work, he said, "If the king asks you to whom
these fields belong, you must say, to the Marquis
de Carrabas, or you shall all be chopped as small
as mincemeat."
The men were so astonished at hearing a cat
talk, that they dared not refuse; so when the
king came by and asked, whose fields are these ?
they said, "they belong to the Marquis de Car-
rabas." Next puss came to some meadows with
shepherds and flocks of sheep, and said the same
to them. So when the king asked them, "whose
flocks are these ?" they answered, "those of the
Marquis de Carrabas."
Puss ran on all over the dead ogre's land and
said the same words to all the labourers on it,
till she reached the castle. There she stood at
the door to receive the King and Princess when
they drove up to it.
"Will your majesty honour my lord by taking
some refreshment ?" he said; and the king, who
had not so fine a castle belonging to himself
as this one was, alighted from his carriage and
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PUSS IN BOOTS.

Now, the ogre was just going to his dinner when
puss had called and killed him, so there was a
very fine feast upon the table. Puss told the
ogre's servants they should be made into mince-
meat if they did not consent to take the Marquis
de Carrabas for their master, and they were glad
to serve him instead of the ogre. The king took
such a fancy to the rich Marquis de Carrabas,
that he gave him the princess for his wife. They.
lived in the ogre's fine castle (which puss pre-
sented to his master), and the most faithful and
the happiest of their servants was "Puss in
Boots."
The miller's son soon learned the manners and
habits of a gentleman from his wife, who (thinking
he was only eccentric in his ways) took pains to
make him renounce all his former awkwardness,
and he became very courteous and polished. He
also read and tried to improve his mind. On the
death of the King he succeeded to the throne in
right of his wife, and knowing the abilities of Puss
in Boots made him Prime-Minister.


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HOP O' MY THUMB.

ONCE upon a time, there was a woodman and
his wife, who had so many children that they did
not know how to find food for them. So one night,
when they were all in bed, the father told his wife
that they thought they had better take them into
the forest and lose them there. The youngest
child, who was so very small that he was called
Hop o' my Thumb, overheard his father, and as
he was a very clever boy, he made up his mind to
find his way home again. So he went down to the
brook very early the next morning, and filled his
pocket with large smooth pebbles as white as snow.
By-and-bye the woodman and his wife told the
children that they might go with them into the
wood to have a good game of play. They were
all glad, except Hop o' my Thumb, who knew
what his father intended. So they set out; the
woodman and his wife first, then the boys, and
lastly Hop o' my Thumb, who sprinkled pebbles
all the way they went.
They spent a very merry day; but by-and-bye
the parents stole away, and left the children all
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HOP O' MY THUMB.

by themselves. They were very much frightened
when they missed their father and mother, and
called loudly for them; but when Hop o' my
Thumb told them what he had heard, and how
they could find their way home by following the
track of the pebbles, which marked the way they
had come, they set out, and reached home safely,
and their father and mother pretended to be very
glad to see them back.
But soon after they again resolved to lose their
children, if possible, in the forest. This time all
the boys feared that they should be left behind, and
the eldest brother said he would take some peas
to sprinkle, to mark the pathway that led home.
By-and-bye the cruel parents stole away, and left
the little ones in the dark wood. At first they
did not care, for they thought they could easily
find their way home; but, alas when they looked
for the line of peas which they had sprinkled,
they found they were all gone-the wood-pigeons
had eaten them up, and the children were lost
in the wood. Holding each other's hands and
crying sadly, they walked on, to seek a place to
sleep in.
By-and-bye they came to a giant's castle, where
they were taken in, and told that they might sleep
in the nursery with the seven baby daughters of
the giant, who were lying all in a row in one bed,
with gold crowns on their heads. Hop o' my
S65









































muir -




'-V



THEGIANTINTHESEVENLEA BO






THE GIANT IN THE SEVEN LEAGUE BOOTS.






HOP 0' MY THUMB.

Thumb thought it strange that the giant should
be so kind, as he had been told that ogres eat
children. So in the night he got up softly, and
took off the little giantesses' crowns, and put
them on his brothers' heads and his own, and lay
down again.
It was lucky for him that he did so, for in the
night the giant came up in the dark to kill the
boys, that they might be ready for the next
day's breakfast. He felt the beds, and finding
the crowns on the boys' heads took them for
his own children, left them, and went to the
other bed and cut off the heads of his daughters
instead.
Then he went back to bed. Directly he was
gone, Hop o' my Thumb and his brothers got
up, stole down stairs, opened the door, and fled
away from the castle. But they did not go far.
Hop o' my Thumb knew that the giant would
come after them in his seven-league boots. So
they got into a hole in the side of a hill and hid.
Very soon after they saw the giant coming at a
great pace in his wonderful boots: but he took
such long steps that he passed right over their
67










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"" -



.._ __ .
- V. -





HOP 1* MY UT FT
HOP 0' MY THUMB TAKING OFIT THE BOOTS.






HOP 0' MY THUMB.

heads. They were afraid to move out till they
had seen him go home again. So they remained
quietly where they were.
By-and-bye the giant, who had been miles and
miles in an hour or two, came back very tired,
and being also stupid with grief (for he had loved
his own children), he lay down on the hill-side,
and fell fast asleep.
As he lay snoring, Hop o' my Thumb stole put
of the hole, drew the seven-league boots off, and
put them on his own feet. They fitted him
exactly, for being fairy boots they would grow
large or small just as one liked.
The giant did not wake, so the boys all came
out of the hole, and hurried on as fast as they
could on their way home.
Hop o' my Thumb saw a woman sitting weep-
ing by the way-side, and asked her why she
grieved. "Alas said she, "our good king is
gone out to fight, and I have just heard that
his enemies are close to him, though he does not
know it, and I have no one to send and tell him
his danger." I will go," said Hop o' my Thumb,
"in my fast boots."
69






























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-- -- II




35'


HO 0'M






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HOP 0MV TUMB RRIVNG A THRCAMP







HOP 0' MY THUMB.

He started at once, and in two steps he was in
the camp. The soldiers were quite frightened,
when they saw Hop o' my Thumb step in on his
seven-league boots.
The king was very much obliged to him for
saving him from this great danger, and kept him
with him, that he might send messages by such
a swift servant.
When Hop o' my Thumb could be spared he
went back to his old home, where he found- all
his brothers; but his father and mother were
not there.
Hop o' my Thumb hastened to make en-
quiries for them, and found that they had been
suspected of murdering their children-who had
all disappeared suddenly-that they had owned
to leaving them in the wood, and that they were
to be put to death for the crime.
We must go and save them," he said.
So he took his brothers into the seven-league
boots, and set out to the place where their
parents were in prison.

71
















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HO 'MYTUBSAE I PRNS








HOP 0' MY THUMB.

They arrived only just in time, for the guards
were bringing out the woodman and his wife to
put them to death. Hop o' my Thumb took off
the boots, and all the children called out, "We
are alive we are alive Do not kill our mother
and father."
Then there was great joy. The woodman and
his wife were set free, and embraced their children.
They had repented of their wickedness and were
never unkind and cruel any more; and Hop o'
my Thumb kept them all in comfort, by going on
errands for the king in his seven-league boots.














73






















iii


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I; I













CINDERELLA.














CINDERELLA.

CINDERELLA'S mother died while she was a
very little child, leaving her to the care of her
father and her step-sisters, who were very much
older than herself; for Cinderella's father had
been twice married, and her mother was his
second wife.
Now, Cinderella's sisters did not love her, and
were very unkind to her.
As she grew older they made her work as a
servant, and even sift the cinders; on which
account they used to call her in mockery
"c Cinderella." It was not her real name, but she
became afterwards so well known by it that her
proper one has been forgotten.
She was a very sweet-tempered, good girl,
however, and everybody except her cruel sisters
loved her.
75
















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7- .11/ 7

i
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tl L





i: ,






CINDERELLA.

It happened when Cinderella was about seven-
teen years old, that the King of that country
gave a ball, to which all ladies of the land, and
among the rest the young girl's sisters, were
invited. So they made her dress them for this
ball, but never thought of allowing her to go
there.
"I wish you would take me to the ball with
you, sisters," said Cinderella, meekly.
"Take you, indeed!" answered the elder sister
with a sneer; "it is no place for a cinder-sifter:
stay at home and do your work."
When they were gone, Cinderella, whose heart
was very sad, sat down and cried bitterly; but
as she sat sorrowful, thinking of the unkind-
ness of her sisters, a. voice called to her from
the garden, and she went out to see who was
there.
It was her god-mother, a good old Fairy.
"Do not cry, Cinderella," she said; "you also
shall go to the ball, because you are a kind, good
girl. Bring me a large pumpkin."

77


























I~~~ /,~L


>-e 7































CINDERELL~A AT THE BALL.






CINDERELLA.

Cinderella obeyed, and the Fairy, touching it
with her wand, turned it into a grand coach.
Then she turned a rat into a coachman, and
some mice into footmen; and touching Cinderella
with her wand, the poor girl's rags became a rich
dress trimmed with costly lace and jewels, and
her old shoes became a charming pair of glass
slippers, which looked like diamond. The Fairy
told her to go to the ball and enjoy herself, but
to be sure to leave the ball-room before the clock
struck twelve.
"If you do not," she said, "your fine clothes
will all turn to rags again."
So Cinderella got into the coach, and drove off
with her six footmen behind, very splendid to
behold, and arrived at the King's Court, where
she was received with delight.
She was the most beautiful young lady at
the ball, and the Prince would dance with no
one else.
But she made haste to leave a little before
the hour fixed, and had time to undress before
her sisters came home.

79











4151/











CIN
/






CINDERELLA HURRYING HOME.







CINDERELLA.

They told her a beautiful Princess had been
at the ball, with whom the Prince was de-
lighted. They did not know it was Cinderella
herself.
Three times Cinderella went to royal balls in
this manner, but the third time she forgot the
Fairy's command, and heard twelve o' clock
strike.
She darted out of the ball room and ran
downstairs in a great hurry. But her dress all
turned to rags before she left the palace, and she
lost one of her glass slippers.
The Prince sought for her everywhere, but the
guard said no one had passed the gate but a poor
beggar girl.
However, the Prince found the slipper, and in
order to discover where Cinderella had gone, he
had it proclaimed that he would marry the lady
who could put on the glass slipper. All the
ladies tried to put on the slipper in vain. Then
Cinderella's sisters made great exertions to get
it on also; but they could not. However, their

81













































AWC.

TRYING ON THE SLIPPER.







CINDERELLA.


young sister begged to be allowed to try it also,
it was found to fit her exactly; and, to the
Prince's delight, she drew the fellow slipper from
her pocket, and he knew at once that she was his
beautiful partner at the ball.
The rage and envy of her sisters was sad to
see, but suddenly the fairy god-mother appeared,
touched Cinderella again with her wand, and her
dress changed into one of silver and white satin
meet for a bride.
Take her for your wife, my dear Prince," she
said, "she is worthy of being loved, for she is
patient, gentle, and industrious, and will make
you a good wife."
Then turning to the sisters, Learn," she said,
"that it is always wise and prudent as well as
generous to be kind to all alike, rich or poor,
sister or half-sister ; now you will have to trust
to Cinderella's kindness for your pardon."

83














































A W.CW

CINDERELLA'S WEDDING.







CINDERELLA.

And so Cinderella was married to the Prince,
and children strewed roses in their path as they
came out of church.
Cinderella forgave her sisters, and was so kind
to them, that she made them truly sorry for their
past cruelty and injustice. She proved a good
queen, for she had learned to feel for others, and
her husband and children loved her always
tenderly.
The glass slippers were put under a glass shade,
and the Prince often showed them to his children,
and told each in turn the story of how Cinderella
went to the ball.













85


























ii
i' P I





',., 1,
















ROSE SE NT TO THE FOUNTAIN.











THE FAIRY AT THE FOUNTAIN;
OR, THE TWO GIRLS.

ONCE upon a time there was an old dame who
lived in a cottage close to a large wood. She
had only one child, a daughter, whom she spoilt
by the most foolish indulgence, allowing her to
spend all her time in dressing herself up like a
lady, and idling about the village. A niece also
lived with her, who had no home, and no father
or mother to take care of her and love her. The
cruel aunt used to make this poor girl do all the
work of the family; never spoke a kind word to
her, and scarcely gave her clothes enough to
keep her warm. But poor Rose was gentle and
sweet-tempered, and bore her hard fate very
meekly; while the old woman's daughter was so
rude and ill-tempered that people called her
"Cross Patch."
One day while Cross Patch was dressing herself
up to go to the fair, the aunt told Rose to take
the pitcher, and fill it, at the well in the wood:
87
























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f ( I









i.. I' '--












RO' GIVES W T T
-\ P







VAR-


































RO6E GIVES WATER TO THE POOR WOMAN.






THE FAIRY AT THE FOUNTAIN.

"for," she said, "a poor creature like you, without
shoes, cannot go to the fair with my daughter."
A tear rolled down Rose's cheeks as she heard
these unkind words, but she did not answer.
She took the pitcher and went out meekly to do
as her aunt had ordered.
When she reached the well, she filled the
pitcher, and then she sat down to rest under the
trees. She was crying softly, and wishing she
had a mother to love her, when she heard a voice
say: "My good child, will you be so kind as to
give a poor woman a draught of water ?"
She looked up and saw a very poor old woman
standing close by her side. "With pleasure,
good mother," said the girl, kindly. "Let me
hold the pitcher for you; it is heavy when it
is full." So she held the pitcher for the old
woman to drink.
"Thank you," said the dame, when she had
drunk, "you speak gently. I will bestow on you a
gift. Every time that you speak, you shall drop
from your lips diamonds, roses, and pearls." And
as the old woman spoke she suddenly dis-
appeared.
89



































iXl






























ROSE DROPPING ROSES AND PEARLS.







THE FAIRY AT THE FOUNTAIN.

Rose was very much astonished at her words,
and walked slowly home with her pitcher (which
she refilled) thinking them over. Her aunt met
her at the door, and began to scold her for being
late.
"I beg your pardon, aunt," said the girl,
meekly, and as she spoke, quite a shower of
diamonds fell from her lips.
Oh, what is this !" cried the old aunt, picking
them up; "Real sparkling diamonds ? Where did
they come from, Rose ?"
"From my lips!" said poor Rose, half-frightened;
but dropping more as she spoke.
Her aunt was greatly astonished. Then Rose
told her about the old woman in the wood, and
the gift she had bestowed upon her, dropping
diamonds and pearls all the time she spoke, till
quite a little heap was made, which her aunt
greedily gathered up.
"I shall send Amy to the well to-morrow,"
said she, jealous that the poor niece should be
more highly gifted than her daughter, "and no
doubt the old woman will give her something
still better."
91

























L.-





































CROSS PATCH AT THE FOUNTAIN.







THE FAIRY AT THE FOUNTAIN.

The next day she bade her daughter go and
fill the pitcher at the well, warning her to be
very civil to any old woman who might ask for
some water. But Cross Patch was in one of her
bad tempers, and then she always did just the
reverse of what she had been told. She said at
first that she would not go. But her mother
insisted, and at last she went. Just as she had
filled the pitcher, a very poor woman came up
and begged for a draught of water.
Now Cross Patch was generally rude to badly
dressed people; and she was very cross now at
having been made to go to the well. "If you
want some water, you may draw it for your-
self," she said sharply, "I did not come here to
wait upon beggars."
You are a very rude, unkind girl," said the old
woman, "but I will bestow a gift upon you.
Every time you speak there shall drop from your
lips a viper and a toad." And as she spoke she
disappeared.
Cross Patch did not believe her words; but
took up her pitcher, and went sulkily home.
Her mother met her in the porch, and ex-
93










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C A DO. I T S AD VIE
\ I4P ut








"s~ -- j
-- __ .. .


CROSS PATCH DROPPING TOADS AND VIPERS.







THE FAIRY AT THE FOUNTAIN.

claimed, "Well, my darling, did you see the old
woman ?"
"Yes, mother," said Cross Patch, "a miser-
able old creature."
As she spoke there dropped from her lips a
large toad and a viper. "Oh, what is this!"
cried the mother.
Cross Patch, now a little frightened and very
angry, began to tell her what the old woman had
said, and vipers and toads fell fast from her lips
as she spoke.
It is all that wicked Rose's doings," cried the
angry mother, "she gives me no end of trouble; I
will punish her very severely for it."
"Yes, do, Mother," cried wicked Cross
Patch, and as she spoke heaps of vipers fell
out of her lips, till the old woman ran away
in a fright.
And she ran for a stick, and was just going to
beat poor Rose, who implored her pity on her
knees; when, suddenly, a cloud filled the room,
and on it appeared a lady with a diamond star
on her head and a sceptre in her hand.

95














"" e













THE FAIRY SAVES ROSE.





THE FAIRY SAVES ROSE.






THE FAIRY AT THE FOUNTAIN.

It was the queen of the fairies, who had before
assumed the form of an old woman.
Do not strike Rose," she said, in a command-
ing tone. "She has done no wrong. Your
daughter brought her fate on herself by her ill-
temper. I shall take Rose away with me and
place her with kind people, whose care of her will
be rewarded by the treasures that fall from her
lips. When your daughter learns to speak
kindly, I will take away the spell that makes her
drop toads. But remember, cross and unkind
words are as bad, dropped from the lips, as toads
and vipers; while kind and gentle words are
better than roses and diamonds."












"97













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IAT



































THE OLD WOMAN FINDS SIXPENCE.
c~i"I -iI~Iig




















/ /,














THE OLD WOMAN FINDS SIXPENCE.
















THE OLD WOMAN AND HER PIG.

AN old woman was sweeping her house, and
she found a little crooked sixpence.
"What," said she, "shall I do with this little
sixpence ? I will go to market, and buy a little
pig."
As she was coming home. she came to a stile:
the piggy would not go over the stile.









99








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