Crawhall's chap-book chaplets

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Material Information

Title:
Crawhall's chap-book chaplets
Physical Description:
8 v. in 1 : col. ill. ; 30 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Crawhall, Joseph, 1821-1896
Field & Tuer ( Publisher )
Simpkin, Marshall and Co ( Publisher )
Hamilton, Adams, & Co ( Publisher )
Scribner & Welford ( Publisher )
Publisher:
Field & Tuer
Simpkin, Marshall & Co.
Hamilton, Adams & Co.
Scribner & Welford
Place of Publication:
London
New York
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1883   ( lcsh )
Chapbooks -- 1883   ( rbgenr )
Ballads -- 1883   ( rbgenr )
Genre:
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Chapbooks   ( rbgenr )
Ballads   ( rbgenr )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
Joseph Crawhall.
General Note:
Reprints of eight old ballads, each of which has special t.-p. and illustrated cover.
General Note:
Title vignettes in color.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002223392
notis - ALG3641
oclc - 02855433
System ID:
UF00050404:00001


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CRAWHALL'S


Chap-book Chaplets.






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f* 1 love a Ballad in print, life; fr then we
are fure they are true."
WVinter's Tale, At iv., Sc. il.

AHNO.M.DCC.C
-L-XXX-XIX"
LONDON:
Field <" Tuer. Simpkin, Marfhall & Co.
Hamilton, Adams & Co.
NEW YORK: Scribner & Welford.


































" re maidens & men, come for what you lack,
And buy the fair Ballads I have in my pack."
Pedlar's Lamentation.









T O T,1 A
Great Variety

RE AD E RS
From the moft able to hia
that can but
Spell,

WZ/f J'-E



































"Antique Ballads jung to crowds of old
Now cheaply bought at thrice their weight in gold."















TABLE
of the Matter reincontaind
I. The Barkefhire Lady's Garland.
II. The Babes in the Wood.
III. I Know what I Know.
IV. Jemmy & Nancy of Yarmouth.
V. The Taming of a Shrew.
VI. Blew-cap for me.
VII. John & Joan.
VIII. George Barnewel.


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T HE
Barkefhiire Lady's
GARLAND.















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THE

Barkefhire Lady's

GARLAND.









ANNO.M.DCGC.
*L*.XX Xflx.
LONDON:
Field 6 Tuer. Simpkin, Mahai & Co.
Hamilton, Adams & Co.
NEW YORK: Scribner & Welford.





































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The

Barkefhire Lady's Garland:
in Four Parts.

PART I.
Shewing Cupids Conqueft omr a coy Lady of
fir thousand a year.
PART IL
7he Ladfs Letter of Chalenge to fight
him upon refufing to wed her in a ma/k
without knowing who fhe was.
PART III,
How they met by appointment in a Grow,
where Jhe obliged him to fight or wed her.



















PART I.
Showing Cupids Conquef over a coy Lady of Five
thouJand a year Vc.
Tune--" The Royal Forefler.



BACHELORS of every Station,
Mark this firange V true relation,
Which in brief to you I bring:
Never was a Stranger thing.

You fall find it worth the hearing:
Loyal love is moft endearing,
When it takes the deepeft root,
Yielding charms & gold to boot

7











SOME will wed for love of treasure,
But the fweeteft joy V pleasure
Is in faithful love you'll find,
Gracid with a noble mind.


Such a noble difpofition
Had this Lady, with fubmiffion:
Of whom I this fonnet write,
Store of wealth & beauty bright.


She had left by a good Grannum,
Full five thousand pounds per annum,
Which the held without control:
Thus fie did in riches roll.


Though fhe had vaft ftores of riches,
Which fome perfons much bewitches,
Yet the bore a courteous mind-
Not the leaft to pride inclined.

8




















SoR rLIE





I












-M ANY noble perfons courted
This young Lady, 'tis reported,
But their laboring proved in vain,
They could not her favour gain.


Though the made fuch ftrong refiftance,
Yet, by Cupid's kind affiftance,
She was conquered after all:
How it was declare I fall.


Being at a noble wedding,
Near the famous Town of Redding,
A young gentleman the faw,
Who belonged to the Law.


As fhe view'd his fweet behaviour,
Every courteous carriage gave her
New additions to her grief:
Forc'd the was to feek relief.

II












PIVATELY fhe then enquired
About him fo much admired,
Both his name & where he dwelt:
Such was the hot flames the felt.

Then at night this youthful Lady
Calrd her Coach, which being ready,
Homeward straight ithe did return,
But her heart in flames did bum.















PART IV.
How they rode together in her Gilded
Coach to her noble Seat or Cajile.

)



















PART II.

2Te Lady's letter of a Challenge to fight him
upon ref fing to wed her in a mafk, without
knowing whoje was.


N GHT V morning for a feafon

In her clofet would fhe reason
With herfelf, & often faid-
Why has Love my heart betrayed.

I that have fo many flighted
Am at length fo well requited,
For my griefs are not a few:
Now I find what Love can do.

'3






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H E that has my heart in keeping,
Though I for his fake be weeping,
Little knows what grief I feel,
But I'll try it out with iteel.


For I will a challenge fend him,
And appoint where I'll attend him:
In a grove, without delay,
By the dawning of the day.


He hall not the leaft discover,
That I am a virgin lover,
By the challenge which I fend:
But for justice I contend.


He has caufed fad diftration,
And I come for fatisfaftion,
Which if he denies to give,
One of us fall ceafe to live.

14.












HAVING thus her mind revealed,
She her letter clofed and feal&d;
Now when it came to his hand,
The young man was at a ftand.


In her letter the conjur'd him
For to meet, & well affur'd him,
Recompence he muft afford,
Or difpute it with the fword.


Having read this strange relation,
He was in a confternation:
Then advifing with his friend,
He perfuades him to attend.


Be of courage & make ready,
Faint heart never won fair Lady,
In regard it muft be fo,
I along with you will go.

'5






















PART III.
How they met by appointment in a Grove,
where jhe obliged him to fight or wed her.


EARLY on a Summer's morning

When bright Phoebus was adorning
Every bower with his beams,
The fair Lady came, it feems.

At the bottom of the mountain,
Near a pleafant, cryftal fountain,
There fhe left her gilded coach,
While the Grove the did approach.

'7













OVER'D with her mafk, V walking,
There the met her Lover talking
With a friend that he had brought,
Straight the alk'd him who he fought.


I am challenged by a gallant,
Who refolves to try my talent
Who h% is I cannot fay,
But I hope to thow him play.


It is I that did invite you,
You fall wed me or ITl fight you
Underneath thofe spreading trees,
Therefore choofe you which you pleafe.


You fall find I do not vapour,
I have brought my trufty rapier,
Therefore take your choice, fays the,
Either fight or marry me.

18













AID he, Madam, pray what mean you?
In my life I've never feen you:
Pray unmalk-your vifage fhow,
"Then I'll tell you Aye or No.


I will not my face uncover
Till the marriage ties are over,
Therefore, choofe you which you will,
Wed me, Sir-or-try your Ikill.


Step within that pleafant bower
With your friend one single hour:
Strive your thoughts to reconcile,
And I'll wander here the while.


While this charming Lady waited,
The young bachelors debated,
What was beft for to be done:
Quoth his friend-the hazard run.

19





C












F my judgment can be trufted,
Wed her firft-you can't be worfted:
If file's rich, you'll rife to fame,
If 1he's poor-why, you're the fame.


He consented to be married:
In her coach they all were carried
To a Church, without delay
Where he weds the Lady gay.


The fweet pretty Cupids hover'd
Round her eyes-her face was covered
With a malk-he took her thus,
Juft for better or for worfe.


With a courteous, kind behaviour
She prefents his friend a favour,
And withal difmiff'd him straight
That he might no longer wait.

20








L


















PART IV.
How they rode together in her gilded Coach
to her noble &at or Cafle.



S the gilded Coach flood ready,
The young lover & his Lady,
Rode together till they came,
To her houfe of fate & fame.

Which appeared like a Caftle,
Where he might behold a parcel
Of young cedars, tall & firaight.
Juft before her Palace gate.

23












HAND in hand they walked together,
To a hall, or parlour rather,
Which was beautiful V fair-
All alone fhe left him there.


Two long hours there he waited
Her return-at length he fretted,
And began to grieve at laft,
For he had not broke his fait.


Still he fat like one amazed,
Round a spacious room he gazdt,
Which was richly beautified:
But, alas! he loft his bride.


There was peeping, laughing, fneering,
All within the Lawyer's hearing:
But his bride he could not fee-
Would I were at home thought he.

24












WHILE his heart was melancholy,
Said the Steward, brifk &. jolly,
Tellme, friend, how came you here?
You have fome design I fear.


He reply'd-dear loving after,
You hall meet with no difafter
Through my means in any cafe-
Madam brought me to this place.


Then the Steward did retire,
Saying, that he would enquire
Whether it was true or no:
Never was love hampered fo.


Now the Lady who had fill'd him
With thofe fears, full well beheld him,
From a window where the dreft,
Pleafed at the pleafant jeft.

25












W1 HEN fhe had herself attired
In rich robes to be admired,
She appeared in his fight,
Like a moving angel bright.


Sir-my fervants have related,
How you have fome hours waited
In my parlour-tell me who,
In my houfe you ever knew.


Madam-if I have offended,
It is more than I intended;
A young Lady brought me here-
That is true, the faid, my dear.


I can be no longer cruel
To my joy V only jewel-
Thou art mine, & I am thine,
Hand &' heart I do refign.

a6












ONCE I was a wounded lover,
Now, thefe fears are fairly over,
By receiving what I gave
Thou art Lord of all I have..

Beauty, honour, love & treafure,
A rich, golden ftream of pleafure
With his Lady he enjoys-
Thanks to Cupid's kind decoys.

Now he's cloth'd in rich attire
Not inferior to a Squire :
Beauty, honour, riches, ftore,
What can man defire more ?









27








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jetatic tet foottb & atWorn 4 oittb

culptutre, crrouflie engraen bi

Jofeph Crawhall, Newcaftle upon Tyne:

Editor of the Newcaftle Fifhers' Garlands"

Author of "The Compeatef Angling Booke,"

"*Border Notes & Mitty-maxty,"

"Chaplets from Coquetfide,"

d&c.















I

Q-mptnteb at e Leatenbafle 1rdere,
London, by Field & Tuer,
ANN o M.DCCC.
.L.XX X. t.














































































































































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THE

BABES

in the Wood.









LONDON !
Field & Tuer. Simpkio, Marihall Co.
Hamilton, Adams 6 Co.
NEW YORK: Scribner & Welford.










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THE

BABES

in the wood.










AINO.M.DCCC.
*L.XX X.III*
LONDON:
Field& Tuer. Simpkln, Marfhall &f Co
Hamilton, Adams 6& Co.
NEW YORK: Scribner & Welford.






























































































4k











The
moft Lamentable

Deplorable
HISTORY
of the
TWO CHILDREN IN THE WOOD.
Containing:
The happy Loves & Lives of their Parents,
Te Treachery & barbarous Fillany of their Unkle,
The Duel between the Murthering Rufians,
the unhappy V deplorable death of
the two innocent Children.
As alfo an account of the cuflice of God that overtook
the Unnatural Unkle : & ofthe deferred Death of
the two murthering Ruffians.





ANNOoM.DCGC.
*L *XX X.uIl.












































































































II











































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''
ow.















The
Children in the Wood:
or
The Norfolk Gentleman's laft will

Teftament.
[Appears to have been written in 595, being entered in that year
on the Stationers books. But the oldest Edition now known in
print is that entitled The Cruel Uncle,' 12, 1670.]

OW ponder well, you parents dear,
The words which I hall write:
A doleful ftory you hall hear,
In time brought forth to light:
A Gentleman of good account
In Norfolk liv'd of late,
Whofe wealth and riches did furmount
Moft men of his estate.

5











ORE Sick he was, & like to die,
No help that he could have;
His wife by him as fick did lie,
And both poffefrd one grave.
No love between thefe two was loft,
Each was to other kind:
In love they liv'd, in love they died,
And left two babes behind.


THE one a fine & pretty boy,
Not paffing three years old;
The other a girl, more young than he,
And made in beauty's mould.
The Father left his little Son,
As plainly doth appear,
When he to perfe& age should come,
Three hundred pounds a year.

6













Qnife ot cartsie


^ onfie pfcrxtre











Ms












ND to his little daughter Jane
Five Hundred pounds in gold,
To be paid down on marriage day,
Which might not be contrould:
But if the children chance to die
Ere they to age should come,
Their Uncle should poffefs their wealth:
For fo the will did run.



NOW, brother, faid the dying man
NLook to my children dear:
Be good unto my boy & giri,
No friends elfe have I here;
To God V you I do commend
My children night day;
But little while, be fure, we have
Within this world to flay.

9.





















































































A4











yOU muft be Father & Mother both,
And Uncle all in one:
God knows what will become of them
When I am dead & gone.
With that befpake their Mother dear,
0 Brother kind, quoth fhe,
You are the man muft bring our babes
To wealth or mifery.


ND if you keep them carefully,
Then God will you reward;
If otherwise you feem to deal,
God will your deeds regard.
With lips as cold as any ftone,
She kiffed her children finally:
God blefs you both, my children dear,
With that the tears did fall.
:/" I i












THESE speeches then their Brother fpoke
To this fick couple there:
The keeping of your children dear,
Sweet filter do not fear;
God never proper me nor mine,
Nor aught elfe that I have,
If I do wrong your children dear,
When you are laid in grave.



THEIR parents being dead & gone,
The children home he takes,
And brings them home unto his houfe,
And much of them he makes.
He had not kept thefe pretty babes
A twelvemonth V a day,
But, for their wealth, he did devife
To make them both away.











HE bargain'd with two ruffians rude,
Which were of furious mood,
That they should take the children young,
And flay them in a wood.











HE told his wife, & all he had,

He did the children fend,
To be brought up in fair London,
With one that was his friend.

S'3













WAY then went thefe pretty babes,
Rejoicing at that tide,
Rejoicing with a merry mind,
They should on cock horfe ride.














THEY prate & prattle pleafantly,
As they rode on the way,
To thofe that should their butchers be,
And work their lives decay.

14



*












S O that the pretty speech they ha-
Made murderers hearts relent;
And they that undertook the deed,
Full fore they did repent.
Yet one of them, more hard of heart,
Did vow to do his charge,
Because the wretch that hired him
Had paid him very large.



THE other'd not agree thereto,
So here they fell at firife;
With one another they did fight,
About the Childrens' life:
And he that was of mildeft mood.
Did flay the other there,
Within an unfrequented wood,
While Babes did quake with fear

'S








































































































t












Took the Children by the hand
SWhen tears flood in their eye,
And bade them come & go with him,
And look they did not cry:
And two long miles he led them on,
While they for food complain:
Stay here, quoth he, I'll bring you bread,
When I do come again.



HESE pretty babes, with hand in hand,
Went wandering up & down:
But never more they faw the man,
Approaching from the town
Their pretty lips with black-berries,
Were all befmear'd & dyed,
And, when they faw the darkfome night,
They fate them down cried.

17













aTHUS wandered thefe two pretty babes,
Till death did end their grief,
In one another arms they died,
As babes wanting relief:
No burial thefe pretty babes
Of any man receives,
Till Robin-red-breaft painfully
Did cover them with leaves.



ND now the heavy wrath of God
Upon their Uncle fell:
Yea--fearful fiends did haunt his houfe,
His confcience felt an hell:
His barns were fir'd, his goods confum'd,
His lands were barren made,
His cattle died within the field,
And nothing with him ftay'd.

18 -


















V.-
^ ^














ND in the voyage to Portugal,
Two of his fons did die;
And, to conclude, himself was brought
To extreme mifery;
He pawn'd & mortgag'd all his land
Ere even years came about
And now at length this wicked ad
Did by this means come out.



HE fellow that did take in hand
Thefe Children for to kill,
Was for a robbery judg'd to die
As was God's bleffed will:
Who did confess the very truth,
The which is here expreff'd;
Their Uncle died while he, for debt
In prison long did reft.

20o













LL you that be executors made,
And overfeers eke,
Of children that be fatherlefs,
And infants mild &( meek,
Take you example by this thing,
And yield to each his right,
Left God, with fuch like mifery,
Your wicked minds requite.















21































































































































a













:'i

-L



















Setolie fett foortb & abomrW tomb
aulptures, cutiouflie ngratoen tp
Jofeph Crawhall, Newcaftle upon Tyne:
Editor of the Newcaftle Fifhers' Garlands,"
Author of "The Compleateft Angling Booke,"
""Border Notes & Mixty-maxty"
"Chaplets from Coquetfide,"




fil

























qtgtrpntteD at pe LeatenbalIte lPrefle
London, by Field & Tuer,

ANyPTo.M.DCGC.






VLX XXX




































C-.



































































'-I.1














I:








C RAWHALL'S

SChap-book 9

Chaplets.



I. The Barkejhire Lady's Garland
II. The Babes in th1. Wood.
II!. I Know what I Know.
IV. Jemmy & Nancy of Yarmouth
V. The Taming of a Shrew.
VI. Blew-cap for me.
VII. John 6 Joan.
VIII. George Barewel.



LONDON:
Field 6 Tuer. Simpkin, Marlhall & C
Hamilton, Adams & Co.
NEW YORK: Scribner 6 Welfowd









I
KNOW
what I knov.








LONDON:
Field & Tuer. Simpkin, MarfhaU d& Co.
Hamilton, Adams & Co.
NEW YORK: Scribner & Welford.
S1


























SProba&4 of the lattr part of the rf of Elkaa6I."
Pritd "d & tie A,-sfi Thoar Symcoke" a
"At 1Tits "Fewy rr ldetr" Collier.




$g1










I
KNOW
what I knovv.








ANNO.M.DCCC.
*L* XX X.1IX
LONDON:
Field & Tuer. Simpkin, Marfhall 6 Co.
Hamilton, Adams &' Co.
NEW YORK: Scribner 6' Welfoe







































































































































i'


















Come, buy this new Ballad, before you de goe :
Ifyov rail at the Authour - -

I know what I know.



To the Tune of 'Fle tell you butf.'

I T is an old fa'ying,
That few words are beft,
And he that fays little
Shall live moft at reft.

3












ND I, by experience,
SDoe find it right fo,
Therefore I'le fpare fpeech,
But-J Itwotl toat 3 knoto.







YET fall you perceiue well,
Though little I fay,
That many enormities
I will difplay.
You may guefs my meaning
By that which I fhow:
I will not tell all-
But-3 noto oat k3 oto.

4













THERE be fome great climbers
Compofd of ambition,
To whom better-borne men
Doe bend with fubmiffion:












PROUD Lucifer, climbing,
Was caft very low
I'le not ftay thefe men-
But-3 Iwnot tbat 3 tole.
































































































Sr












THERE be many Foxes
That goe on two legges,
They fteale greater matters
Than Cocks, Hennes, & Egges:













T 0 catch many Guls
In iheepes clothing they goe:
They might be deftroy'd,
But-3 knoaD bbat 3 fWnob

7












THERE be many men
That Deuotion pretend,
And make us belieeue
That true Faith they're defend:












T HREE times in one day
To Church they will goe:
They cozen the world,
But-3 knob tIbat 3 nua .

8






































































































c







































































THERE be many rich men,
Both Yeomen & Gentry,
That for their own priuate gain,
Hurt a whole country













1 Y closing free Commons:
Yet they'le make as though
Twere for common good:
But-J tnoto boiat 3 tao0.


10











THERE be many Vpitarts,
That spring from the Cart,
Who gotten to th' Court
Play the Gentleman's part:
Their Fathers were plaine men,
They fcorne to be fo:
They think themselves brave
But-3 kUnoa tiat 3 tkno0.









till a























































































*I .













THERE be many Officers,
Men of great place,
To whom if one fue
For their favour & grace,
He muft bribe their feruants,
While they make as though
They know no fuch thing
But-J fknovb at 3 Itno.















'3
*
\*












THERE be many Women
That feem very pure;
A Kiffe from a firanger
They'le hardly endure.

O A












THEY are like Lucretia,
Modeft in thow;
I will accufe none:
But-j3 kotA bnat 3 knoW.

14











IKEWISE there be many
SDiffembling men
E That feem to hate Drinking,
And Frollick, yet when














LIKE companies comes
To the Taueme theyle goe,
They are fober all day;
But-3 hutno tofat 3 Itnot.

IS











HERE be many Batchelors
That, to beguile
Beleeuing kind Laffes
Vfe many a wile:












< HEY all fweare that they loue
When they mean nothing fo,
And boaft of thefe trickes-
But-j tnob Wtoat j 1noto.












""HERE'S many an Vfurer
That, like a Drone
Dooth idly liue
Vpon his money's Lone:












F ROM tens unto hundreds
His money dooth grow:
He fayes he doth good,
But-3 ItuMto oat 3 twtob

'7










4












THERE be many Gallants
That goe in gay Rayment,

For which the Taylor
Did neuer receive payments

They ruffle it out
With a gorgeous fhow:
Some take them for Knights-
But-3 Iutwo toDat 3 Itnoto,




THERE be many Rovers,
That fwagger 6& rore

As though in th' warres had been
Seuen yeeres & more:

'9
















aND yet they neuer lookt
In the face of a Foe:
They feeme gallant fparkes-
But-3 knobto boat 5 knoto.



THERE'S many, both Women
An' Men, that appeared
With beautiful outfides,
The World's eyes to bleare
But all,.is not Gold .
That dooth glifer iii Show:
Patch, powder an' paint--
But-3 tkote tobat 3 IMtd.

SI















THERE'S many rich Tradefmen
Who live by Deceit,
And in weight & measure
The Poore they doe cheate:













T HEY'LE not fweare an Oath,
But indeed, I, and No:
They truely protect'
But-3 tknot toaat 3 tnoti.

13











HERE be many people
So given to ftrife,
That they're go to Law
For a two-penny Knife:












T HE Lawyers nere alke them
Why they doe fo:.
They get by their hate-
But-3 fuoto Ubat 3 tnotb.

44













I KNOW there be many
Will carpe at this Ballet,
Because it is like
Sowre Sawce to their Pallet:














(7UT'he, fhee, or they,'
-- Let me tell ere I goe,
If they fpeake 'gainft this Song-
3 IaotD toat 3 itnot.

25