Ted, Goldlocks, and others

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Ted, Goldlocks, and others
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Bates, Clara Doty, 1838-1895
Lawson, Lizzie ( Illustrator )
Closson, William Baxter Palmer, 1848-1926 ( Engraver )
D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Rockwell and Churchill ( Printer )
Publisher:
D. Lothrop and Company
Place of Publication:
Boston
Manufacturer:
Rockwell & Churchill
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1883   ( lcsh )
Genre:
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
verses by Clara Doty Bates ; pictures by Lizzie Lawson.
General Note:
Some illustrations engraved by Closson.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002222740
notis - ALG2986
oclc - 25052037
System ID:
UF00050399:00001

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-,I' s SERM ON,







TED, GOLDLOCKS,


AND OTHERS.



VERSES BY CLARA DOTY BATES.



PICTURES BY LIZZIE I,AWSON.



--'- --' '- -.

{- ' ^ '/






BOSTON
D. LOTHROP AND COMPANY
FRANKLIN STREET.
















































COPYRIGHT, 1883.

D LOTHROP & COMPANY.







































PRESS OF ROCKWELL AND CHURCHILL,
39 Arch St., Boston.





THE CHRIST-MAS CARDS.


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THE CHRIST-MAS CARDS.

A RING at the door ; And mine has a heart
The post-man said : On the cov-er too,"
Some-thing here Glee-ful-ly shout-ed
For the cur-ly-head- Lit-tle Boy Blue.

For the cur-ly-head Leave the ten-pins,
A bon-bon box ; And drop the ball,
And a big en-vel-ope Christ-mas cards
For sweet Gold-Locks." Are bet-ter than all

Who could have sent them ? San-ta Claus' let-ters
"Af-ter a pause, They are? In-deed,
Some-bod-y whis-pered, You lit-tle folks
San-ta Claus! Should learn to read
AftrapueVhyaeI-ed
Soebdywi-eeYulttefl>





A FISH-ING AD-VEN-TURE.










"! LL

TED-DY'S LUCK.

A FISH-ING AD-VEN-TURE.

Pa-tient lit-tle fish-er boy, sit-ting by the brook,
Has a pole, and has a line, and has a pret-ty hook;
Up come the lit-tie trout, speckl-ed gold and red,
Catch them-selves on pur-pose, be-cause it is our Ted.

Glad lit-tle fish-er boy puts them in a pail
Ev-er-y 4it-tle fin-ny fel-low flound-ers like a whale;
Home he runs, home he runs, cry-ing out with joy,
" Mam-ma, see what I have done your bold fish-er-boy !"

Pail is old and rus-ty what will Ted-dy do ?
Bot-tom part has fal-len out, fish-es have slipped through!
Stop a bit -wait a min-ute somt-thing is a-wry !
Hold it up poor lit-tle Ted! will he laugh or cry ?





GRAND-PA S GUESTS.












GRAND-PA'S GUESTS.

When once a year his birth-day comes
The chil-dren are de-light-ed,
For grand-pa gives a par-ty then
To which they are in-vit-ed.
Their very pret-ti-est clothes they wear,
And they crowd a-round the great arm-chair,
Where he sits with beau-ti-ful white hair.

And such a ta-ble as is spread
With sweet-meats by the doz-ens,
E-nough to feed an-oth-er score
Of ea-ger lit-tle cous-ins.
And sure to see each has his share,
And the jol-li-est, kind-est, dear-est there,
Is grand-pa, with his snow-white hair.





A NEW KIND OF PUS-SY-CAT.

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PRET-TY, PRET-TY KIT-TY NAUGH- IY, NAUGI(l-TY KIT-TY I

A NEW KIND OF PUS-SY-CAT.

"< Here is a pus-sy-cat, One lit-tle lov-ing pat
A new kind of pus-sy-cat, Gives the ba-by on-ly that
An odd, queer pus-sy-cat, The new kind of pus-sy-cat,
Lying on the sand; Lying on the sand,

" It does not look like Top-sy, That does not look like Top-sy,
It does not look like Tab-by, And does not look like Tab-by,
And when I call it Wink-ie And when she calls it Wink-ie
It does not un-der-stand. loes not un-der-stand,


" Come and see me, kit-ty, That's neith-er soft nor fur-
Pret-ty, pret-ty kit-ty, ry,
Poor, lit-tle kit-ty, Nor full of play, nor pur-ry,
I'll stroke you with my Seiz-es in a hur-ry
hand." And bites the ba-by's hand.





A LIT-TLE TIFF.













THE QUAR-REL. MAK-ING UP.

A LIT-TLE TIFF.

Once when I tru-ly on-ly meant to speak,
I struck my lit-tie broth-er on the cheek.
Dear me- he put his fin-gers to his eyes,
Though he is brave, and hard-ly ev-er cries.

'Twais naugh-ty as it could be, and the place
Looked, oh, so red, up-on his lit-tie face,
The ver-y spot where dim-ples play bo-peep,
And mam-ma kiss-es most when he's a-sleep!

I was so sor-ry right a-way ; I said,
"I did-n't, did-n't mean to do it, Ted!"
And then I cried so ver-y hard, you see,
He had to come and coax and com-fort me.


V'' ,





A SPRING SHOW-ER.

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A SPRING SHOW-ER.

" My gyp-sy hat But there's wa-ter e-nough,
For my lit-tie head My lit-tle lass,
I can't wait a min-ute! Stream-ing and drip-ping
Gold Locks said. Out-side the glass,

Look out, lit-tie girl, With-out your tears
Through the win-dow pane; To help the wet!
You'll have to wait Have you thought to look
Un-til af-ter the rain. For a rain-bow yet?

With a flood like this Ah, see through the clouds
Straight from the sky, A glimpse of the sun !
Not ev-en um-brel-las And hark to the thrush-es -
Could keep you dry. The rain is done.





A PEN-NY TO SPEND.
















If I wouldn't cry; Would a pen-ny buy ?
We'll spend it to-geth-er, We nev-er can tell
You and I. Un-til we try.

Look in the win-dow- You must be fair,
What shall we take ? You see, and di-vide:
There is a beau-ti-ful I like the ones
Frost-ed cake. With the cream in-side.

Cook-ies in plen-ty, A whole bag full!
All one needs, Well, that' will do!
Speck-ed in the mid-doe These are for me
With car-a-way seeds. That one for you.





BUT-TER-CUP, THE BOS-SY.










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HERE WVE'LL WAIT "

BUT-TER-CUP, THE BOS-SY.
The lit-tie new bos-sy is so red,
Al-most the col-or of a clo-ver-head !
Lit-tle red But-ter-cup, lit-tle red But-ter-cup -
This is the path she will come up.
Here we'll wait at the mead-ow gate
For half an hour, at an-y rate,
Till, klin'g-i-ty-kling, the cow-bells ring,
And we catch a glimpse of the pret-ty thing.
From the top-most bar, for ev-er so far,
We see to the green field where they are;
O, But-ter-cup, But-ter-cup, lit-tle red But-ter-cup
This is the path she will come up.









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A BRAVE GIRL.



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SEE HOW BRAVE! WHAT IF SHE lITESI

A BRAVE GIRL.

See what a nice brave girl I am,
To feed my lamb!
I go right up to her, close as I can,
And say, Nan-nan,
Here is a pinch of salt or two,
Pret-ty Nan-nan, that I brought to you-
Pret-ty Nan-nan !

Oh, my! how big she is! Only see
Her look at me!
What if her teeth were long and white,
And she should bite?
She's al-most like the wolf in the wood
That ate up lit-tle Red Rid-ing Hood-
Naugh-ty Nan-nan!





IN THE SWING.










ISN'T THIS FUN ? AND ISN'T THIS FUN?

IN THE SWING.

Bet-ter tFan al-most any-thing
Do the chil-dren love an out-door swing;
With their soft little hands they hold and cling
Like birds just out of a nest.


Try it which-ev-er way they please,
'Tis good as a green bough in a breeze;
They kneel in it with their chub-by knees,
To see if they like that best.


O-ver and o-ver they do it all,
Sit in it, stand in it, laugh and call;
And then if by an-y chance they fall-
Why, then you know the rest.





JACK AND JILL.


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OH;, -it-te l s J l, oh lit-te l s Jill,












Will you come, will you come with ne
I've a new tin pail, and the wa-ter in the well
-O, bold boy Jack, you bold boy Jk,
- % -'.*.. #: "" -S.- .


You are tell-ng is not true,

WILL YOU COME? AT THE SPRING.

JACK AND JILL.

"OH, lit-tie lass Jill, oh, lit-tie lass Jill,
Wliill you come, will you come with me ?
I've a new tis-tled pail, and the wa-ter in the well
Is the cool-est that can be."

" Oh, bold boy Jack, you bold boy Jack,
You are tell-ing what is not true,
For sweet as any-thing is the wa-ter in the spring,
And I'd ra-ther go there, thank you!"

So off whis-tled Jack with his new tin pail,
To the cool well on the hill,
And-cun-ning lit-tle thing to the sweet-wa-ter spring,
With her cup in hand, went Jill.





LIT-TLE GOLD HLAD.


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"PUT OUT." GLAD TO MEET.

LIT-TLE GOLD HEAD.

The lit-tle Gold Head was so "put out,"
Though none but her-self knew what a-bout,
That she sat on the door-steps a-while to pout-
Oh, greed-y lit-tle Gold Head!


So, I'll run a-way -that's what I'll do!"
And she found White-wool in the mead-ow dew
Crop-ping the clo-ver red.

The two were friends, and glad to meet.
She cried: Nan-nan, is the clo-ver sweet?
And can you have all you want to eat?"
Ba-a ba-a-a! he said.





AN OC-TO-BER PIC-NIC.







And make be-lieve she's queen -the lit-tle lass.
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a-rotind ;
cold, will sneeze,' -















And throw her crusts and crumbs up-on the ground.
Oh, nee-er, neh-er mind, oh, ne,-er, ne-er mind,






If at a din-ner on the green some fun-ny things you find-
All sort of bugs that want the cake; or if a crick-et by mis-take
Crawls on the sand-wiches, oh, ne-er mind!
AN OC-TO-BER PIC-NIC.

Out on the sun-ny grass, out on the sun-ny grass,
Goes for an hour's play the kin-der-gar-ten class.
The ba-by is so fat and odd, they twine a wreath of gold-en-rod,
Anrd make be-lieve she's queen the lit-tie lass.
And af-ter she is crowned, and af-ter she is crowned,
They'll fetch their bask-ets full of lunch, and seat them-selves
a-round ;
The queen will nib-ble bread and cheese, will catch a lit-tIe
cold, will sneeze,
And throw her crusts and crumbs up-on the ground.
Oh, nev-er, nev-er mind, oh, nev-er, nev-er mind,
If at a din-ner on the green some fun-ny things you find--
All sort of bugs that want the cake; or if a crick-et by mis-take
Crawls on the sand-wiches, oh, nev-er mind!





A WIN-TER DAY S STO-RY.










GO-ING TO SCHOG.

A WIN-TER DAY'S STO-RY.

"Whith-er, oh, whith-er, Whith-er, oh whith-er,
So dole-ful-ly ? So joy-ful-ly ? "
We are go-ing to learn We are run-ning a-way
Our A. B. C. From our A. B. C.


Go-ing to stud-y We've learned as much
Our Ps and Os; As we care to know -
But what is the use, Crook-ed is S,
What is the use ? And round is O.


One thing is sure, The lit-tie old man
They're a crook-ed set, At the cor-ner sells
And that's all there is Taf-fy and pea-nuts
To the al-pha-bet. And car-a-mels.








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THE SNOW FORT.




THE SNOW FORT.





All of them of-fi-cers, Ban comes a snow-ball



THE SNOW FORT.

Look at this reg-i-ment, Oh, for a fife it is!
Brave and strong, Oh, for a drum !
For-ward to vic-tor-y For-ward! the en-e-my
March-ing a-long! Quake as they come!

All of them of-fi-cers, Bang! comes a snow-ball
That is clear Out from the fort!
Cap-tain one, Colo-nel one, Buzz! bum a score of them!
One Brig-a-dier. No-bod-y hurt!

See what a bat-tie line Yet Cap-tain and Colo-nel run,
They have formed! Scared most to death,
Look at the fort a-head And runs the bold Brig-a-dier-
That must be stormed! All three out of breath!





AN A-PRIL DAY.







4 \







SUN-SHINE. SIHOW-ER.
AN A-PRIL DAY.
With song and ban-ner they marched a-way;
The sky was blue that A-pril day;
There was no one to shake a head, and say,
"The house is the bet-ter place to play."
'Twas warm, and the grass was green and gay,
And they marched with a ban-ner, marched a-way.

But sud-den-ly rain be-gan to fall;
They ran to the house for a cape, or a shawl,
And bor-rowed their moth-er's par-a-sol,
Quite sure that she wouldn't care at all.
A squall it was but an A-pril squall,
And ter-ri-bly fast the drops did fall.





RICH AND POOR.












S T HIS AIR




RICH AND POOR.

Pit-y the lit-tie child-ren that stop
In long-ing and won-der as they pass,
To see the pret-ty and gild-ed toys
In-side the glit-ter-ing win-dow glass.
0, they see so ver-y, so ver-y man-y
And yet, oh, alas! they can't have an-y.
I wish the lit-tle and beau-ti-ful girl
So wrap-ped in her pret-ty cloak and furs,
Would hap-pen to turn and see them there
And smil-ing-ly give them some of hers;
For she has so ver-y, so ver-y man-y,
She cer-tain-ly would-n't miss them an-y.





THE WA-TER-ING POT.


THE WA-TER-ING-POT.

Of all the play-things, large or
Small,
S-"' h That mon-ey could have
bought,
,' None ev-er pleased the ba-by
. .i. ,like
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-4 -" t Her lit-tle wa-ter-ing-pot.
-- it a% -, "" ',

Not larg-er than a pep-per-box
---- It was, and yet the spout
-..,--, Could send a doz-en ti-ny rills
S.,, Of wa-ter trick-ling out.

/ She made it rain up-on the grass,
She sprin-kled plant and seed,
And mam-ma's pret-ty pan-sy patch
-7,, Kept ver-y fresh in-deed.

4 0f '- One day a storm came, and the walks
'' ' Were all too wet for play,
S,"; i And ba-by had to stay in-doors
S -'- The whole long, lone-some day.

-' She played with stove, anid doll, and blocks,
And wash-tub by the hour;





THE WA-TER-ING POT.
At last she filled her wa-ter-ing-pot,
But what was there to show-er ?

Now ba-by had a gyp-sy hat,
And all a-bout the crown
Were dai-sies thick and white ; she took
The dain-ty tri-fle down.

And such a sprink-ling as she gave
Its po-sy-wreath-ah me!
And such a wilt-ed thing it was
You would have laughed to see.

And did we scold our lit-tle girl -
Our bus-y bee? Oh, no.
How could we ? for she on-ly thought
To make the dai-sies grow.









MA AS L-TLE DRA-ING CLASS.


MAM-MA'S LII-TII DRAWV-ING CLASS.





FLOS-SIE S TOOTH.


FLOS-SIE'S TOOTH.

I' And then, be-cause she sob-
i bed and cried,
SI I, "Threw it a-side.
At last he said -and it was
"I -J true-
I 'i He did-n't know what to
I do.
A L

So mam-ma said, Come here
to me,
SI want to see;
S-- Show me the place-which
is it, dear?
FLOS-SIE CAN-NOT UN-DER-STAND. This one r ht here
This one right here ?
What lit-tie Flos-sie calls her I'm sure it does-n't need a
toose string,
Was growing loose White, pret-ty thing!"
And pa-pa stirred him-self She bare-ly touched it out
a-bout it fell!
To pull it out. And Flos-sie -well,
From mam-ma's work-box the Al-though they put it in her
first thing, hand
He got a string, She could not un-der-stand.





READ-ING THE PA-PER.


READ-ING THE PA-PER.

It is pa-pa's pa-per, '
Come and see! /
I can read it quite
As well as he. % -
Here is an A,
And here a D,
A fun-ny Q, "
And a crook-ed Z. -
And here, oh, here
Is a toss-it and bake-it
Pat-ty-cake T. E N.



A LIT-TLE MOTH-ER.
S, I must make my dol-ly a dress that fits;
Y "''N 'Tis a shame to have her look this way;
Her oth-er was torn in-to lit-tie bits,
When Ton-y shook her so yes-ter-
day.
Here's nee-die, and thread, and thim-ble
"too,
so BS-! Oh, I've so much to do so much to do!





READ-ING THE PA-PER.


READ-ING THE PA-PER.

It is pa-pa's pa-per, '
Come and see! /
I can read it quite
As well as he. % -
Here is an A,
And here a D,
A fun-ny Q, "
And a crook-ed Z. -
And here, oh, here
Is a toss-it and bake-it
Pat-ty-cake T. E N.



A LIT-TLE MOTH-ER.
S, I must make my dol-ly a dress that fits;
Y "''N 'Tis a shame to have her look this way;
Her oth-er was torn in-to lit-tie bits,
When Ton-y shook her so yes-ter-
day.
Here's nee-die, and thread, and thim-ble
"too,
so BS-! Oh, I've so much to do so much to do!





ON THE BRIDGE.- IN THE DOOR-YARD.


ON THE BRIDGE.

A la-zy dog and a la-zy boy
"" r Find so much they can en-joy;
One with a bent pin for a hook,
"The oth-er sit-ting by to look.
S'W!i hat do they see by gaz-ing in ?
A min-now with a sil-ver fin?
Or on-ly a sun-beam glanc-ing
bright
'- O-ver the peb-bles smooth and
GOOD FUN FOR BOTH. white?



IN THE DOOR-YARD.

This is not Miss Muf-fet -.
Who sat on the tuf-fet, -
And who by a spi-der "
Was fright-ened a-way; /
'Tis Ba-by come out to play.
She has a poke bon-net, -
With feath-ers up-on it,'" '
And Grass-hop-per bows to .'I
her: '
"Ba-by, good-day!" DOOR-YARD AC-QUAINT-ANC-ES.





ON THE BRIDGE.- IN THE DOOR-YARD.


ON THE BRIDGE.

A la-zy dog and a la-zy boy
"" r Find so much they can en-joy;
One with a bent pin for a hook,
"The oth-er sit-ting by to look.
S'W!i hat do they see by gaz-ing in ?
A min-now with a sil-ver fin?
Or on-ly a sun-beam glanc-ing
bright
'- O-ver the peb-bles smooth and
GOOD FUN FOR BOTH. white?



IN THE DOOR-YARD.

This is not Miss Muf-fet -.
Who sat on the tuf-fet, -
And who by a spi-der "
Was fright-ened a-way; /
'Tis Ba-by come out to play.
She has a poke bon-net, -
With feath-ers up-on it,'" '
And Grass-hop-per bows to .'I
her: '
"Ba-by, good-day!" DOOR-YARD AC-QUAINT-ANC-ES.





MAK-ING BE-LIEVE. FEED-ING KIT-TY.


MAK-ING BE-LIEVE.
Oh, I'm a la-dy like the rest,
With puffed-up dress and fan,
And I can dance as pret-ty a dance
As a-ny-bod-y can.

'Tis first the heel, and then the toe, f
And then a bow and whirl;
I'm a la-dy at a par-ty now,
And not a lit-tie girl.I'M A LADY



FEED-ING KIT-TY.
You see I have a bit of meat
I. I want the pus-sy-cat to eat;
I'd give it to her on a fork,
But mam-ma says that is-n't neat.

I'll feed her at the kitch-en door;
"Her lit-tie dish is on the floor;
And when she's eat-en this, I know
MFAT FOR KIT-TY. She'll mew, and mew, and ask for more.





MAK-ING BE-LIEVE. FEED-ING KIT-TY.


MAK-ING BE-LIEVE.
Oh, I'm a la-dy like the rest,
With puffed-up dress and fan,
And I can dance as pret-ty a dance
As a-ny-bod-y can.

'Tis first the heel, and then the toe, f
And then a bow and whirl;
I'm a la-dy at a par-ty now,
And not a lit-tie girl.I'M A LADY



FEED-ING KIT-TY.
You see I have a bit of meat
I. I want the pus-sy-cat to eat;
I'd give it to her on a fork,
But mam-ma says that is-n't neat.

I'll feed her at the kitch-en door;
"Her lit-tie dish is on the floor;
And when she's eat-en this, I know
MFAT FOR KIT-TY. She'll mew, and mew, and ask for more.





THE FIRST TIME.















THE FIRST TIME.

Here are bon-ny Bess cries, I can-not
Bess and Kate, Stand at all."
And the lit-tle Nan-ny, And Kate screams out,
Come out to skate. I know we'll fall "

Three lit-tle girls, And the lit-tle Nan-ny
So bold and gay; Shrieks, Oh my!"
In a min-ute more, And all three to-geth-er
A-way a-way, Be-gin to cry.

We shall see them fly-ing, And that is the way
I sup-pose, That Bess and Kate,
Each with her cheeks And the lit-tle Nan-ny,
Red as a rose. Learn to skate.





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