Ted, Goldlocks, and others

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Ted, Goldlocks, and others
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Bates, Clara Doty, 1838-1895
Lawson, Lizzie ( Illustrator )
D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher:
D. Lothrop and Company
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1883   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1883   ( rbgenr )
Genre:
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
verses by Clara Doty Bates ; pictures by Lizzie Lawson.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisements follow text and on endpapers.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002222730
notis - ALG2976
oclc - 25052037
System ID:
UF00050398:00001

Full Text













I ;



ji 1- -C
i:..<. .r '".















I If
7 ..:-o-,.




.. ., ,

......., .

,. ,!' '-.
'4



Y'. V. ..C'
:'' i "L : ''miE' ';
"" .- ...




r ". .. ... _
' 4 *



.4.. .

















4-. ..... -' ;
"- : ':h,. "-; ?









#." .4 '.,
'A'


1 r L ..
4-



















~' '

h ''9
"*vn
..................................................... 4
~ frC4 I










Books by Margaret "Sidney.
"'There is so strong a love of humanity impelling the pen of Margaret Sidney that in whatever she
writes she makes interesting the homeliest and wost ordinary aspects of life and imparts to duty the glory of
doing, and to virtue its own reward." Chicago Inter-Ocean.
Our Town. Hester.
A story for the home. I2mo, $ .25. And other New England Stories. I2mo, $1.25.
A splendid story of town life, full of stirring incidents, forcefill "As studies of New England life these stories are noticeable for
action and realistic description, of bright and clever things told in the faithfulness of their local color and the naturalness of their
crsp, bright language, and is sure to hold the attention of the read- narration."- Christian Union.
ers to the end." Book News.
The Pettibone Name. So As By Fire.
2 .mo, illustrated, $1.25.
I mo, ..5. "The title indicates the teaching of this entertaining story.
"Samantha Scarritt, the dressmaker, and her mother. the id,...- TIh, r.. tr i,.. iery interesting, showing how much love in its
are as life-like as the very best of Mrs. Stowe's or Mrs Whi,,.-', dt i, .l.i ,,, Ii can do,"-Presbyterianjournal.
pictures of New England life."- The Churchman, N. Y.
Tom and Dorothy. A New Departure for Girls.
S eyMade and Kept a Christian Home. I2mo, illustrated, cloth, 75 cents.
How They Made and Kept a Christian It opens up a new field for women.
I2 m". 7 5 C .ents. "When such books appear from the press, we are justified in
"One longs to give a copy of it to every young bride, that she dappiig our hands for joy." Gospel Banner, Augusta.
may learn the art of making and keeping such a home."-Home
Guardian. Five Little Peppers
How They went to Europe. And How They Grew. T2mo, illustrated, $1.50;
I2mo, illustrated, 75 cents. 4to, illustrated, boards, 25 cents.
"A new and entirely practicable plan for interesting the young Of all books for juvenilee readers not one possesses more of the

St. George and the Dragon. Half Year at Bronckton:
Also, Kensington, Jr. 2Imo, illustrated, $1.oo.
"Excellent portraits of bright, honest and sturdy lads." Bo- 2mo, illustrated, $1.25.
ion Advertiser. A story of the haps and mishaps of life at a boy's boarding-
school.
Who Told it to Me. The Little Red Sop.
Square 8vo, illustrated, boards, $1.25; cloth, $1.75. mo, i $.o
Neighbor boys and girls growing up together in the old New Imollustrated, cloth, $t.oo.
England. lot (,f the brightest a;d breeziest stories for boys and girls
th i ha- btcn published for many month."-Boston Transcritt.
The Golden West. What the Seven Did.
As seen by the Ridgway Club. 8vo, illustrated r, the Dh C Square
boards, $1.75; cloth, $2.25. .Or, the D og ...f \ rdorth Club. Square
"The record of the journey is delightfully written and to the 8vo, llu.traidl bard., fo t he young folks.- r
young reader almost as instructive as the real j.:u.-.y it:e "- Chlmn arel for the young folks. Christian
Pacific Rural Press, San Francisco. Os erver, Lou.inlle
Two Modern Little Princes. The Minute Man.
And other Stories. I .:mr,, illustr teJ. boards, $1.oo. Square 12mo, ill.stratid by Sandham, $1.25; fancy
It is just the book for a gift to a boy or girl of nine or ten." leather, $1.50
Detroit Advertiser. A stirring ba" of the fight that gave birth to the American
Polly and thNation, and of "the shot heard round the world," in unique and
Polly and the Children. beautiful setting.
Square 8vo, boards, 12 full-page pictures by Mar- Ballad of the Lost Hare.
garet Johnson, 35 cents.
The story of a funny parrot and two charming children. 4to, outline illustrations, boards, 50 cents.
Dilly and the C ap n. "A bright little story is here wrought into one of the loveliest
y an e aptainpicture books we have met with."- Children's New Church
L -Mlagazine.
Illustrated by F. Childe Hassam. 12mo, $1.oo.
A little boy and girl set out for a place where they can find out Old Concord
things without asking older people.
t a g o p Her Highways and Byways. Illustrations from
On Easter Day. photographs by A. W. Hosmer of Concord, and by
t-, L. J. Bridgman. 8vo, cloth, $2.oo.
Ribbon-tied, 24mo, o illustrations, 25 cents. "Both a practicable guide-book to his historic locality and an
A heart poem for young girls, agreeable fireside itinerary."- The ivn.
At the Bookstores, or sent postpaid, by the Publishers,
D. LOTHROP COMPANY, BOSTON.





The Baldwin Library


--r- a \
"~f i.


































Babyland is a little magazine that mothers and,'
babies ike in different ways. The baby likes it, ok
course, because it makes'him happy. That is reason
S. enough. The mother likes it because with such
pictures and tales and talk-stuff she has no end of
Resources for keeping the baby good."
What is a good baby 2" Why, a baby that Ia
contented and doesn't squall when he is properly
Taken care of: a baby brought up on Babyland.
Send five cents to D. Lethrop Company, B uston fo:
Sa copy of it
I 'iBlii lll6^ ^^BfH I ? rsucsfrken tebb"go.I
'I, ^ ^ l'^ y ^ l^ a aI-Wa sa" odbbr? habb ht1






^. ^^^ ^T^ ^fcfrrJ~ ~tti^ onentd ad ..dosnt sual whn e I prpery(









































































',.
AF-


































TED'S SERMON.








TED, GOLDLOCKS,


AND OTHERS.



VERSES BY CLARA DOTY BATES.



PICTURES BY LIZZIE LAWSON.











BOSTON
D LOTHROP COMPANY
FRANKLIN AND HAWLEY STREETS

























































COPYRIGHT, 1883,
BY
D. LOTHROP & COMPANY.






THE CHRIST-MAS CARDS.














THE CHRIST-MAS CARDS.
A RING at the door; And mine has a heart
The post-man said: On the cov-er too,"
" Some-thing here Glee-ful-ly shout-ed
For the cur-ly-head- Lit-tle Boy Blue.

" For the cur-ly-head Leave the ten-pins,
A bon-bon box; And drop the ball,
And a big en-vel-ope Christ-mas cards
For sweet Gold-Locks." Are bet-ter than all !

Who could have sent them ? San-ta Claus' let-ters
Af-ter a pause, They are? In-deed,
Some-bod-y whis-pered, You lit-tie folks
San-ta Claus! Should learn to read!







A FISH-ING AD-VEN-TURE.










::,; x _~L LL
TED-DY'S LUCK.

A FISH-ING AD-VEN-TURE.

Pa-tient lit-tle fish-er boy, sit-ting by the brook,
Has a pole, and has a line, and has a pret-ty hook;
Up come the lit-tle trout, speckl-ed gold and red,
Catch them-selves on pur-pose, be-cause it is our Ted.

Clad lit-tle fish-er boy puts them in a pail;
Ev-er-y lit-tle fin-ny fel-low flound-ers like a whale ;
Home he runs, home he runs, cry-ing out with joy,
" tam-ma, see what I have done your bold fish-er-boy !"

Pail is old and rus-ty what will Ted-dy do ?
Bot-tom part has fal-len out, fish-es have slipped through!
Stop a bit -wait a min-ute some-thing is a-wry!
Hold it up poor lit-tle Ted! will he laugh or cry ?







GRAND-PA'S GUESTS.












GRAND-PA'S GUESTS.

When once a year his birth-day comes
The chil-dren are de-light-ed,
For grand-pa gives a par-ty then
To which they are in-vit-ed.
Their very pret-ti-est clothes they wear,
And they crowd a-round the great arm-chair,
Where he sits with beau-ti-ful white hair.

And such a ta-ble as is spread
With sweet-meats by the doz-ens,
E-nough to feed an-oth-er score
Of ea-ger lit-tie cous-ins.
And sure to see each has his .share,
And the jol-li-est, kind-est, dear-est there,
Is grand-pa, with his snow-white hair.







A NEW KIND OF PUS-SY-CAT.





-~ --;






PRET-TY, PRET-TY KIT-TY! NAUGH-TY, NAUGH-TY KIT-TY

A NEW KIND OF PUS-SY-CAT.

" Here is a pus-sy-cat, One lit-tle lov-ing pat
A new kind of pus-sy-cat, Gives the ba-by on-ly that;
An odd, queer pus-sy-cat, The new kind of pus-sy-cat.
Lying on the sand; Lying on the sand,

" It does not look like Top-sy, That does not look like Top-sy,.
It does not look like Tab-by, And does not look like Tab-by,
And when I call it Wink-ie And when she calls it Wink-ie
It does not un-der-stand. Does not un-der-stand,

" Come and see me, kit-ty, That's neith-er soft nor fur-
Pret-ty, pret-ty kit-ty, ry,
Poor, lit-tle kit-ty, Nor full of play, nor pur-ry,
I'll stroke you with my Seiz-es in a hur-ry
hand." And bites the ba-by's hand.
7,fs )Bk 1
k LVA



























hand." And bites the ba-by's hand.








A LIT-TLE TIFF.


-1

-"4.








THE QUAR-REL. MAK-ING UP.

A LIT-TLE TIFF.

Once when I tru-ly on-ly meant to speak,
I struck my lit-tle broth-er on the cheek.
Dear me he put his fin-gers to his eyes,
Though he is brave, and hard-ly ev-er cries.

'Twas naugh-ty as it could be, and the place
Looked, oh, so red, up-on his lit-tle face,
The ver-y spot where dim-pies play bo-peep,
And mam-ma kiss-es most when he's a-sleep!

I was so sor-ry right a-way; I said,
"I did-n't, did-n't mean to do it, Ted!"
And then I cried so ver-y hard, you see,
He had to come and coax and com-fort me.







A SPRING SHOW-ER.
/






lk-









For my lit-tle head My lit-tle lass,
I can't wait a min-ute! Stream-ing and drip-ping
Gold Locks said. Out-side the glass,

Look out, lit-tle girl, With-o'ut your tears
Through the win-dow pane;- To help the wet!
"You'll have to wait Have you thought to look
Un-til af-ter the rain. For a rain-bow yet?

With a flood like this Ah, see through the clouds
"Straight from the sky, A glimpse of the sun!
Not ev-en um-brel-las And hark to the thrush-es-
Could keep you dry. The rain is done.







A PEN-NY TO SPEND.






-. i<,- -



L U


A PEN-NY TO SPEND.

They gave me a pen-ny How man-y buns
If I wouldn't cry; Would a pen-ny buy?
We'll spend it to-geth-er, We nev-er can tell
You and I. Un-til we try.

Look in the win-dow- You must be fair,
What shall we take ? You see, and di-vide:
There is a beau-ti-ful I like the ones
Frost-ed cake. With the cream in-side

Cook-ies in plen-ty, A whole bag full!
All one needs, Well, that will do!
Speck-ed in the mid-die These are for me -
With car-a-way seeds. That one for you.







BUT-TER-CUP, THE BOS-SY.

















This is the path she will come up.





Here we'll wait at the mead-ow gate
For half an hour, at an-y rate,
HERE WE'LL WVAITI "





Till, linBUT-TER-CUPklng, the cow-bells ring,BOS-S
The lit-te catch a glimpse of the pret-ty thing.





From the top-most bar, for ev-er so far,
WAl-most the col-or of a who-vere they are;
,Lit-te redcup, But-ter-cup, lit-tle red But-ter-cup -
This is the path she will come up.
Here we'll wait at the mead-ow gate
For half an hour, at an-y rate,
Till, k/ing-i-ty-kling, the cow-bells ring,
And we catch a glimpse of the pret-ty thing.
From the top-most bar, for ev-er so far,
We see to the green field where they are;
0, But-ter-cup, But-ter-cup, lit-tie red But-ter-cup !
This is the path sh'e will come up.



































J 1' -J,
















-I:






A BRAVE GIRL.










SEE HOW BRAVE WHAT IF SHE BITES

A BRAVE GIRL.

See what a nice brave girl I am,
To feed my lamb!
I go right up to her, close as I can,
And say, Nan-nan,
Here is a pinch of salt or two,
Pret-ty Nan-nan, that I brought to you-
Pret-ty Nan-nan !

Oh, my! how big she is! Only see
Her look at me!
What if her teeth were long and white,
And she should bite?
She's al-most like the wolf in the wood
That ate up lit-tle Red Rid-ing Hood -
Naugh-ty Nan-nan!






IN THE SWING.










ISN'T THIS FUN ? AND ISN'T THIS FUN?

IN THE SWING.

Bet-ter than al-most any-thing
Do the chil-dren love an out-door swing;
With their soft little hands they hold and cling
Like birds just out of a nest.


Try it which-ev-er way they please,
'Tis good as a green bough in a breeze;
They kneel in it with their chub-by knees,
To see if they like that best.


O-ver and o-ver they do it all,
Sit in it, stand in it, laugh and call;
And then if by an-y chance they fall-
Why, then you know the rest.







JACK AND JILL.





'. ---3





WILL YOU COME? A I THE SPRING.

JACK AND JILL.

" OH, lit-tle lass Jill, oh, lit-tle lass Jill,
Will you come, will you come with me ?
I've a new tin pail, and the wa-ter in the well
Is the cool-est that can be."

" Oh, bold boy Jack, you bold boy Jack,
You are tell-ing what is not true,
For sweet as any-thing is the wa-ter in the spring,
And I'd ra-ther go there, thank you!"

So off whis-tled Jack with his new tin pail,
To the cool well on the hill,
And-cun-ning lit-tle thing to the sweet-wa-ter spring,
With her cup in hand, went Jill.






LIT-TLE GOLD HEAD.




tii -' -'II







"PUT OUT." GLAD TO MEET.

LIT-TLE GOLD HEAD.

The lit-tie Gold Head was so "put out,"
Though none but her-self knew what a-bout,
That she sat on the door-steps a-while to pout-
Oh, greed-y lit-tle Gold Head!

"I had one tart, but I want-ed two,
So, I'll run a-way-that's what I'll do!"
And she found White-wool in the mead-ow dew
Crop-ping the clo-ver red.

The two were friends, and glad to meet.
She cried: "Nan-nan, is the clo-ver sweet?
And can yIu have all you want to eat?"
Ba-a, ba-a-a!" he said.







AN OC-TO-BER PIC-NIC.

"I /- -, -_- -_ z. p" -,.











AN OC-TO-BER PIC-NIC.
Out on the sun-ny grass, out on the sun-ny grass,
Goes for an hour's play the kin-der-gar-ten class.
The ba-by is so fat and odd, they twine a wreath of gold-en-rod,.
And make be-lieve she's queen- the lit-tle lass.
And af-ter she is crowned, and af-ter she is crowned,
A. 4"
















They'll fetch their bask-ets full of lunch, and seat them-selves
a-round;
The queen will nib-ble bread and cheese, will catch a lit-tle
cold, will sneeze,
And throw her crusts and crumbs up-on the ground.
Oh, nev-er, nev-er mind, oh, nev-er, nev-er mind,
If at a din-ner on the green some fun-ny things you find-
All sort of bugs that want the cake; or if a crick-et by mis-takc
Crawls on the sand-wichesh,oh, nev-er mind!







A WIN-TER DAY'S STO-RY.










GO-TNG TO SCHOOL. COM-ING HOME.

A WIN-TER DAY'S STO-RY.

"Whith-er, oh, whith-er, Whith-er, oh whith-er,
So dole-ful-ly ? So joy-ful-ly? "
We are go-ing to learn We are run-ning a-way
Our A. B. C. From our A. B. C.


Go-ing to stud-y We've learned as much
Our Ps and. Qs; As we care to know -
But what is the use, Crook-ed is S,
What is the use ? And round is 0.


One thing is sure, The lit-tle old man
"They're a crook-ed set, At the cor-ner sells
And that's all there is Taf-fy and pea-nuts
To the al-pha-bet. And car-a-mels.

























































" Whn te ea's waY
Themic wili ay,






THE SNOW FORT.













MARCH-ING ON THE FORT.

THE SNOW FORT.

Look at this reg-i-ment, Oh, for a fife it is!
Brave and strong, Oh, for a drum!
For-ward to vic-tor-y For-ward the en-e-my
March-ing a-long! Quake as they come!

All of them of-fi-cers, Bang! comes a snow-ball
That is clear- Out from the fort!
Cap-tain one, Colo-nel one, Buzz! bum! a score of them!
One Brig-a-dier. No-bod-y hurt!

See what a bat-tie line Yet Cap-tain and Colo-nel run,
They have formed! Scared most to death,
Look at the fort a-head And runs the bold Brig-a-dier-
That must be stormed! All three out of breath!






AN A-PRIL DAY.














-j-

SUN-SHINE. SHOW-ER.
AN A-PRIL DAY.

With song and ban-ner they marched a-way;
The sky was blue that A-pril day;
There was no one to shake a head, and say,
"The house is the bet-ter place to play."
'Twas warm, and the grass was green and gay,
And they marched with a ban-ner, marched a-way.

But sud-den-ly rain be-gan to fall;
They ran to the house for a cape, or a shawl,
And bor-rowed their moth-er's par-a-sol,
Quite sure that she wouldn't care at all.
A squall it was but an A-pril squall,
And ter-ri-bly fast the drops did fall.







RICH AND POOR.
*







Sj
--no





IS THIS FAIR?

RICH AND POOR.

Pit-y the lit-tie child-ren that stop
In long-ing and won-der as they pass,
To see the pret-ty and gild-ed toys
In-side the glit-ter-ing win-dow glass.
0, they see so ver-y, so ver-y man-y
And yet, oh, alas! they can't have an-y.
I wish the lit-tle and beau-ti-ful girl
So wrap-ped in her pret-ty cloak and furs,
Would hap-pen to turn and see them there
And smil-ing-ly give them some of hers;
For she has so ver-y, so ver-y man-y,
She cer-tain-ly would-n't miss them an-y.






THE WA-TER-ING POT.


THE WA-TER-ING-POT.
Of all the play-things, large or
small,
L That mon-ey could have
bought,
.._! ___ None ev-er pleased the ba-by
like
Her lit-tle wa-ter-ing-pot.

SNot larg-er than a pep-per-box
j It was, and yet the spout
Could send a doz-en ti-ny rills
'. ._t Of wa-ter trick-ling out.

She made it rain up-on the grass,
/ =--She sprin-kled plant and seed,
And mam-ma's pret-ty pan-sy patch
/ Kept ver-y fresh in-deed.

-li One day a storm came, and the walks
Were all too wet for play,
;k And ba-by had to stay in-doors
iT The whole long, lone-some day.

She played with stove, and doll, and blocks,
And wash-tub by the hour;






THE WA-TER-ING POT.
At last she filled her wa-ter-ing-pot,
But what was there to show-er ?

Now ba-by had a gyp-sy hat,
And all a-bout the crown
Were dai-sies thick and white; she took
The dain-ty tri-fle down.

And such a sprink-ling as she gave
Its po-sy-wreath-ah me!
And such a wilt-ed thing it was
You would have laughed to see.

And did we scold our lit-tle girl-
Our bus-y bee? Oh, no.
How could we ? for she on-ly thought
To make the dai-sies grow.











MAM-MA'S LIT-TLE DRAW-ING CLASS.






FLOS-SIE S TOOTH.


FLOS-SIE'S TOOTH.

And then, be-cause she sob-
bed and cried,
Threw it a-side.
SAt last he said- and it was
"true -
i He did-n't know what to
do.

"- So mam-ma said, Come here
"to me,
I want to see;
=Show me the place- which
is it, dear? "*
FLOS-SIE CAN-NOT UN-DER-STAND.
This one right here?
What lit-tle Flos-sie calls her I'm sure it does-n't need a
toose string,
Was grow-ing loose White, pret-ty thing!"
And pa-pa stirred him-self She bare-ly touched it out
a-bout it fell!
To pull it out. And Flos-sie -well,
From mam-ma's work-box the Al-though they put it in her
first thing, hand
He got a string, She could not un-der-stand.






READ-ING THE PA-PER.


READ-ING THE PA-PER.

It is pa-pa's pa-per,
Come and see!
I can read it quite
"As well as he.
Here is an A,
And here a D,
A fun-ny Q, 1
And a crook-ed Z.
And here, oh, here -
Is a toss-it and bake-it
Pat-ty-cake T. THE NEWS.



A LIT-TLE MOTH-ER.
I must make my dol-ly a dress that fits;
'Tis a shame to have her look this way;
Her oth-er was torn in-to lit-tle bits,
When Ton-y shook her so yes-ter-
day.
SHere's nee-dle, and thread, and thim-ble
S -- too,
so BUsi Oh, I've so much to do-so much to do!






READ-ING THE PA-PER.


READ-ING THE PA-PER.

It is pa-pa's pa-per,
Come and see!
I can read it quite
"As well as he.
Here is an A,
And here a D,
A fun-ny Q, 1
And a crook-ed Z.
And here, oh, here -
Is a toss-it and bake-it
Pat-ty-cake T. THE NEWS.



A LIT-TLE MOTH-ER.
I must make my dol-ly a dress that fits;
'Tis a shame to have her look this way;
Her oth-er was torn in-to lit-tle bits,
When Ton-y shook her so yes-ter-
day.
SHere's nee-dle, and thread, and thim-ble
S -- too,
so BUsi Oh, I've so much to do-so much to do!






ON THE BRIDGE.--IN THE DOOR-YARD.


ON THE BRIDGE.
A la-zy dog and a la-zy boy
S Find so much they can en-joy;
One with a bent pin for a hook,
S^ The oth-er sit-ting by to look.
What do they see by gaz-ing in?
A min-now with a sil-ver fin?
SOr on-ly a sun-beam glanc-ing
bright
"O-ver the peb-bles smooth and
GOOD FUN FOR BOTH. white?



IN THE DOOR-YARD.
This is not Miss Muf-fet
Who sat on the tuf-fet,
And who by a spi-der
Was fright-ened a-way;
'Tis Ba-by come out to play. ,_E! ^ '
She has a poke bon-net, '7"
With feath-ers up-on it, -'
And Grass-hop-per bows to -' K
her: ".
Ba-by, good-day" DOOR-YARD AC-QUAINT-ANC-ES.






ON THE BRIDGE.--IN THE DOOR-YARD.


ON THE BRIDGE.
A la-zy dog and a la-zy boy
S Find so much they can en-joy;
One with a bent pin for a hook,
S^ The oth-er sit-ting by to look.
What do they see by gaz-ing in?
A min-now with a sil-ver fin?
SOr on-ly a sun-beam glanc-ing
bright
"O-ver the peb-bles smooth and
GOOD FUN FOR BOTH. white?



IN THE DOOR-YARD.
This is not Miss Muf-fet
Who sat on the tuf-fet,
And who by a spi-der
Was fright-ened a-way;
'Tis Ba-by come out to play. ,_E! ^ '
She has a poke bon-net, '7"
With feath-ers up-on it, -'
And Grass-hop-per bows to -' K
her: ".
Ba-by, good-day" DOOR-YARD AC-QUAINT-ANC-ES.







MAK-ING BE-LIEVE. FEED-ING KIT-TY.


MAK-ING BE-LIEVE.

Oh, I'm a la-dy like the rest,
With puffed-up dress and fan,
And I can dance as pret-ty a dance
As a-ny-bod-y can.

'Tis first the heel, and then the toe,
And then a bow and whirl;
I'm a la-dy at a par-ty now,
And not a lit-tle girl. "I'M A LADY



FEED-ING KIT-TY.
You see I have a bit of meat
,,.. I want the pus-sy-cat to eat;
I'd give it to her on a fork,
But mam-ma says that is-n't neat.

I'll feed her at the kitch-en door;
Her lit-tie dish is on the floor;
And when she's eat-en this, I know
MEAT FOR KITY. She'll mew, and mew, and ask for more.
MEAT FOR KITTrY.o







MAK-ING BE-LIEVE. FEED-ING KIT-TY.


MAK-ING BE-LIEVE.

Oh, I'm a la-dy like the rest,
With puffed-up dress and fan,
And I can dance as pret-ty a dance
As a-ny-bod-y can.

'Tis first the heel, and then the toe,
And then a bow and whirl;
I'm a la-dy at a par-ty now,
And not a lit-tle girl. "I'M A LADY



FEED-ING KIT-TY.
You see I have a bit of meat
,,.. I want the pus-sy-cat to eat;
I'd give it to her on a fork,
But mam-ma says that is-n't neat.

I'll feed her at the kitch-en door;
Her lit-tie dish is on the floor;
And when she's eat-en this, I know
MEAT FOR KITY. She'll mew, and mew, and ask for more.
MEAT FOR KITTrY.o







THE FIRST TIME.















THE FIRST TIME.
Here are bon-ny Bess cries, I can-not
Bess and Kate, Stand at all."
And the lit-tle Nan-ny, And Kate screams out,
Come out to skate. I know we'll fall !"

Three lit-tie girls, And the lit-tle Nan-ny
So bold and gay; Shrieks, Oh my! "
In a min-ute more, And all three to-geth-er
A-way a-way, Be-gin to cry.

We shall see them fly ing, And that is the way
I sup-pose, That Bess and Kate,
Each with her cheeks And the lit-tle Nan-ny,
Red as a rose. Learn to skate.





























An Oyster-Catcher.

These are some of the pictures in My Land and and there is nothing in it that isn't borne out b3
llivtt Fre;tis. a book of which the author says: it the learning of learned men.
%was write with the hope of interesting boys and D. Lothrop Company, Boston, publish it; book.
girl6 in the wonderful little neighbors around them; sellers have it, of course.



























,. Ailanl-Moth. (Goliath Beetle.














4 A
snapping Tnrde.















THE PANSY BOOKS.

There are substantial reasonsfor the ircat p.:.pularlry ..ih 1 Pansy Books," and'f.:.imoin among tihc
is their truth to nature and to life. The :n-i.nl:. .:.f lb- i..l|es of character which the, portray I need
remarkable; their heroes bring us face ti.- ,ilrh ei.e:. phase of home life, and pr-e-ntr graphic and
inspiring pictures of the actual struggles through which victorious souls must go.
Her stories move alternately to laughter and tears." .1 Bimful-of ich,: %.cec ,.- of evangeli,.al
religion." . "Influence cannot fail to be beneficent."... "Girl life aid 1haracier portrayed
with rare power." . "Impressive and fascinating." . ."A wondrous freslnei and witalir
appearing on every page."... "The cause.of t:nipcrarnc. is sustained.with rare power, tact ari.1
interest." ." The value and happiness of trustiiL ; n Gr. I ha il, exemplified." ". Nothing
for the young surpasses this collection." . "To.: nimrh cannot be said df -he insight given into :he
true way of studying and using the word of God."
These are a few quotations from words of praise ever-where spoken. '

ESTER RIED SERIES. The ,r.: '-,'.' cannot well be classified. They are
To be read in order as here mentioned: adated to various ages in the family circle;
always in demand at the libraries :
I. Ester Ried. The first book of a series of relig- Interrupted. 1.50.
ions stories unequalled in popularity. 1.50. From Different Standpoints. 1.50.
2. Julia Ried. 1.5o. Modern Prophets. i.5o.
3. The King's Daughter. .50.. Household Puzhles. 1.50.
4 Wise and Otherwise. 1.50. A New Graft on the Family Tree. 1.50.
SThe Randolphs. paing. Spun from Facti I. 5o.
6. Ester Ried Yet Speaking. 50. Mrs. Solomon Smith Looking On. i.50.
7. An Endless Chain. 150. One Commonplace Day. i.5o.
I The Pocket Measure. 1.50.
THE CHAUTAUQUA GIRLS SERIES. Thg Hall in the Gtove. i:50.
Eighty-Seven. 1.50.
Intensely vivid pictures of the sou-. : . girls Divers Women. 1.5o.
distinctly individual, but all r..... .. .. Links in Rebecca's Life. 1.50.
Profiles. I.50.
I. Four Girls at Chautauqua. 1.50. A S i- nfol'd Trouble. 1.50.
2. The Chautauqua Girls at Home. :.go. C (r-'_i, Christmas. 1.50.
3. Ruth Erskine's Crosses. 1.50. Chrissy's Endeavor. 1.50.
4. Judge Burnham's Daughters. 1.50. Echoing and Re-Echoing. 1.50.
Cunning V.:'rkni,.n 1.25.
Dr. Deane'' \Vj" 1.25.
No books for boys have wielded a wider influence for Mr. Deane' \k a 1.25.
good than the following: Grandpa's Darlings. 1.25.
Miss Priscilla Hunter. 1.25.
Tip Lewis and His Lamp. 1.50. What She Said. 1.25.
Those Boys. 1.50. At Home and Abroad. I.oo.
Little Fishers and Their Nets. 1.50. Bobby's Wolf, and Other Stories. 1.oo.
The Man of the House. 1.50. Five Friends. .oo.
Sidney Martin's Christmas. i.5o. In the Woods and Out. I.oo.
Three People. 1.50. Mrs. Harry Harper's Awakening. r.oo.
New Year's Tangles. 1oo.
Choice Illustrated Libraries for Children. Next Things. I.oo.
Pansy's Scrap Book for Teachers. I.oo.
Pansy's Half Hour Library. S vols., quarto, boards, Some Young Heroines. I.oo.
30 cents each. Young Folks Worth Knowing. .oo.
Pansy's Boys and Girls Library. 12 vols., quarto, Bernie's White Chicken. .75-
boards, 25 cents each. Couldn't be Bought. .75.
The Pansy Intermediate Library. 10 vols., 4.50 net. Docia's Journal. .75 Getting Ahead. -75.
The Pansy Primary Library. No. I. 30 vols., Helen Lester. .75. Jessie Wells. .75.
7.50 net. Mary Burton Abroad. .75. Monteagle. .- .
The Pansy Primary Library. No. 2. 20 vols., Six Little Girls. .75. That Boy Bob. .75.
5.00 net. Stories from the Life of Tesus. '.7 .
The Pansy Primary Library. No 3. 24 vols., Pansies. .75. Two Boys. .75.
6.00 net. Her Mother's Bible. .50. We Twelve Girls. .50.
D. LOTHROP COMPANY, PUBLISHERS, BOSTON.













I ).






II
-,~~~~~'a; r1 .- ,,. ."

~ ~ i ... ,. .,,,- .... .: 7
""" "~ ' J, "' : ': 4,, [:, ;,
:" ,*6 ... .... .
!.,; l "' "' '5 .,"i ". ,. .
: ' i
: . .. . .: , : ," ; . ";".
r',
1'.
1,, -" ,* L.A, ,.
"a ."-. ,
.,. .t -, .






I' : .:v
,, !! .tl' jiY






W ".A- .' "

. *'ti *' 4 .t
. .
.; ; .' i,
S. ,, -' ,



: :i,. -" ,.















--, -. kill

r ,i. .\1 i."












=44..,l,. 6.II
i ". "
'I. ~ t~~:. A I
As d~.; 4?
4, 4,. 1'
.4.i
9-4 ~r- *'*?
N` ir -4
~'W A~~