At the seaside

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Material Information

Title:
At the seaside
Physical Description:
96 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
E.P. Dutton (Firm) ( Publisher )
J.J. Little & Co ( Printer )
Publisher:
E.P. Dutton & Co.
Place of Publication:
New York
Manufacturer:
J.J. Little & Co
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1882   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1882   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1882
Genre:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

General Note:
Contains prose and verse.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002221351
notis - ALG1573
oclc - 62510104
System ID:
UF00050339:00001


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"LOUIS WAS ALL READY TO GO TO THE SEA-SHORE."











AT THE SEASIDE






















NEW YORK
E. P. DUTTON & COMPANY
39 WEST TWENTY-THIRD STREET


















































COPYRIGHT,

1882,

BY E. P. DUTTON & CO.






























PRESS OF J. S. LITTLE & CO.,
NOS. 10 TO 20 ASTOR PLACE, NEW YORK.











AT THE SEA-SIDE.



Louis was all ready to go to the sea-shore. He
-had on his little blue sailor suit and hat, and looked
like a dear little sailor-boy himself, with his golden
curls around his little eager face.
His papa and mamma, his brother Jack, and
his sister Florence were all going, and a good time
they were all going to have.
First, they were all going in a carriage down to
the boat. Then the boat would take them down
to the sea-shore, where the waves came splash,
splash up on the sand, and then went rolling back
out to the ocean again, like gentlemen bowing them-
selves out of a door.
Here comes the carriage," said Jack, who had
been on the lookout.
I'm all ready," said Louis, coming down
5







6 AT THE SEA-SIDE.

the steps, one foot at a time, and holding on to
the banisters.
Let's go get in," said Jack.
No, I'm going to wait for my own mamma,"
said Louis.
Mamma was not long in coming. Papa picked
Louis up, and put him in mamma's lap. Florence
sat by mamma, and Jack by papa, and they all
drove off.
I 'faid the big water," said Louis, when they
were going aboard the boat.
"Oh, the water cannot touch you," said his
mamma.
But I 'faid it," said Louis.
So his papa took him up in his arms, and car-
ried him up on deck. There he felt safe.
The wheels went round, and the boat went
puff, puff, till the bell rang, and everybody got off.
"You're not afraid of this water, are you,
Louis ?" said Florence.
No, Louis wasn't, and he wanted to run right














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8 AT THE SEA-SIDE.

into it; but when a big wave rolled in, he ran
away from it as fast as his little fat legs would carry
him.
Don't want the big water to catch me," he
said.
"Well, we wont let it," said Florence. "Come
over here on the nice sand, and dig."
"What fun it was to feel the sand pouring over
their hands; to dig big holes, or to make little hills.
Jack had off his shoes and stockings, and was
wading about in the water, having a fine time.
But Louis was not quite used to it yet, and thought
he would rather dig in the sand.
There were plenty of other little boys and girls,
some wading, and some digging; bare-footed, and
with their dresses tucked up.
Louis had never seen the sea before, and every
now and then he would stop digging, and look out
at the white ships that were sailing away.
Little white birds," he called them, and would
not believe they were anything else.







AT THE SEA-SIDE. 9

After a while Florence went to ask her papa
something, and Louis thought he would stop dig-
ging, and sit and look at the water. Florence
found him sitting all by himself, and talking to the
water.
"Louis isn't 'faid the big water," he said.
"Come, see me, curly water. How you do? Why
don't you tell the little white birds to come ? Why
don't you stay longer? Do you want to go back
and see the fisses?"
But the waves didn't answer him, and came in
one after another, always in such a hurry to come
and -go, as if they had no time at all, and only
stopped to say, How do you do ?"
Pretty soon Louis got up, and waited for the
next wave to come. Then he 'stuck out his little
toe, but instead of the water just coming up to it,
it was very rude, and went curling all over his feet,
so his shoes were all wet.
Bad old water," said he. I don't love you;"
and he went off to find his mamma.







Io AT THE SEA-SIDE.

She took off his wet shoes, and let him run
about barefoot while his shoes were drying in the sun.
Then he and Florence ran races on the sand,
and had the best sort of a time.
There was a little boy who had a boat, and he
sailed it all about. He had a string tied to it, so
it would not get away. Louis thought it was very
nice to watch the boy sailing the little boat, and
laughed loudly when the boat upset.
The boy laughed too, and looked up to where
Louis was sitting.
Have you a boat ? said he.
No," said Louis. I wiss I had."
Mine is a nice one," said the boy, "and is
loaded with sugar and monkeys."
"Where are the monkeys?" said Louis. I
want to see funny linty monkeys."
Oh, you can't see them," said the boy. They
have all been upset now, and will have to swim for.
their lives."
Poor monkeys! said Louis, sorrowfully.









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12 AT THE SEA-SIDE.

Oh, they won't get drowned," said the boy.
"Theyare only make-believe monkeys, anyhow ; the
next time I am going to load my boat with cotton."
"Where did you get your nice linty boat?"
asked Louis.
My mamma got it for me," said the boy, "the
last time we came down here. I was walking along
with my mamma, and I had my spade that I had
been digging with. We met a little sailor-boy.
He had this boat, that he had made himself. I
wanted it so much that mamma asked him if he
would sell it, and he said yes, he would take a dollar
for it. So mamma gave him a dollar, and I had
the boat."
Louis watched the boy some time, and after he
had gone away, he and Florence sailed chips, and
pretended they were boats.
Where shall we send our boats ?" said Flor-
ence.
I don't know," said Louis. Let's send 'em
to heaven."









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14 AT THE SEA-SIDE.

Oh, no! We can't said Florence.
"Yes, we can. Don't you see all the big white
ships sailing right into the sky ?"
That isn't heaven! said Florence. Heaven
is over our heads."
Well my linty boat is going to heaven, I don't
care," said Louis; and I am going to make it
bring me back a whole lot of linty white angels."
"Well, mine is going to Florida, for oranges,"
said Florence.
I will give you a linty white angel, if you will
give me a orange," said Louis.
You mean AN orange," said Florence. "All
right; I will give you a great big orange."
I wiss it would hurry," said Louis; I am
so firsty"
Go, ask mamma to give you a drink of milk,"
said Forence. "The oranges won't come for ever
so long."
Louis got up and went to his mamma. He
was tired as well as thirsty ; so she held him until










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*.- *







16 AT THE SEA-SIDE.

he went to sleep, and then put him down on a pile
of shawls to take a nap.
In the meantime, Jack was watching a lot of
boys who were going out on the water in a row-
boat.
There were six boys in the boat, and a man
was going to row them.
How I should like to go, too! thought Jack.
" I wonder if I have time to go and ask papa ?"
How soon are you going?" he asked the
man.
Right away," said he.
Have you room for me, and will you wait
until I ask my father if I can go ?" said Jack.
I reckon," said the man. Be spry, though."
Jack ran off, and came back with his father,
who, on finding out that it would be safe, said Jack
might go, and the boat pushed off with its load.
When the boys came back, Florence and Louis
were waiting for them, and the man was so pleased
at the sight of Louis's happy little face and golden







AT THE SEA-SIDE. 17

curls that he insisted on taking him out a little
way, and Florence too.
Louis was a little afraid to be so near the big
water at first; but the man told him such nice
stories, that he forgot his fear, and was sorry when
the boat grated on the sand, and his papa lifted
him out.
Then it was time to go home, and they got all
the bundles and shawl-straps together, and left the
sea-shore.
"Good-bye, big water said Louis. I had a
nice time. Will come back soon."
But the water was used to seeing little boys,
and it didn't say a word, but just splashed up on
the shore, just as it has always done, and as it is
doing still.







18 AT THE SEA-SIDE.





CHIP, CHICKY, AND CHEE.

THREE little chickens, Chip, Chicky, and Chee,
Were nice little chickens as chickens could be;
With three roosters, twelve hens, and a turkey,
Lived these little chicks, Chip, Chee, and Chicky.


They picked, and they scratched, and they peeped
around,
To see what was on and under the ground;
Chee was quite timid, and Chicky was brave;
Chip never knew how he ought to behave.

One day these chickens were looking about
For something new that they hadn't found out;
All of a sudden-never once stopping-
Up came a grasshopper, jumping and hopping.
















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20 AT THE SEA-SIDE.

Over went Chee, almost frightened to death,
Almost on top of him Chip, out of breath.
" Deary me," Chicky said, pray, what is it?
Don't you believe it's come here to visit ?"


" Six legs how peculiar that is," he said;
" And what queer things growing out of its head
Don't you see the poor thing is a stranger ?
I don't think we're in one bit of danger."


" Perhaps not," said Chip, but it is quite clear;
That I do not think it is wanted here;
Do not touch it, my dear brother Chicky,
For its manner, you see, is so jerky."


Off went the grasshopper then, with a hop,
Thinking 'twas not worth while longer to stop.
Then the three chickens looked at each other,
And all toddled off to tell their mother.







PUFFY'S PAR TY. 21




PUFFY'S PARTY.

PUFFY, you are going to have a party," said
Hetta to her kitten, "and you must have a new
ribbon on. Hold still while I tie it! There.
You look quite dressy. Now, be good, and stay
here, while I go and invite the people, and see
about the things to eat."
Puffy said Me-eow," which meant, "Very
well," in cat-talk; and Hetta went down to invite
the guests.
She found Tatters, the dog, and the toy ele-
phant; but these were all she could muster.
There must be four, at least," she said. I
will have to ask Anna, I suppose." Anna was the
doll. I don't know how she will like to eat with
the animals, but we will pretend they are people.
Come, Anna, be dressed for the party," and
Anna sat very still and had her best dress on.







22 AT THE SEA-SIDE.

Oh, dear! I don't think it is much fun to
play by myself. I think I will ask Flossy to come
over.
Flossy lived next door, and when the two little
girls wanted to speak to each other, they went to
the window, and rang a bell. So Hetta opened
the window and rang the bell, and presently Flossy
came to her window and opened it.
Puffy is going to have a party," said Hetta;
"can't you come over ?"
Wait till I finish my French exercise," said
Flossy. I only have to write, 'Have you the
shoe of my uncle?' and 'What has the grocer?'
then I'll come in."
Very well; I will be setting the table," said
Hetta.
Then they shut down the windows and went in.
"Let me see," said Hetta; "what must we
have? I guess the animals will like bread and
milk best; we can have that, and an apple for the
elephant. Flossy and I can eat it for him."















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24 AT THE SEA-SIDE.

When Flossy came in, everything was ready.
A large bottle of milk, two wine-glasses, a big apple,
and a plate of bread.
Puffy sat on one side, and the elephant opposite.
I will have to feed Anna, I suppose," said
Hetta. Won't you put a bib on Tatters, and
keep him from putting his paws on the table?
Puffy has her bib on."
Flossy had hard work to manage Tatters; he
kept getting his bib off, and would not sit up in his
chair.
Puffy, too, was rather rude, and lapped up all
her milk before the company had begun on theirs.
The elephant really behaved better than any
one. Even Anna spilt some of her food on her
dress, and Tatters was not satisfied with his share
of the bread and milk, but helped himself to what
was on the elephant's plate. Then Puffy got right
up on the table and upset the milk-bottle; but as she
lapped up all that was spilt, there was not much
harm done.












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26 AT THE SEA.SIDE.

I don't think they behaved very well," said
Hetta; but I suppose you couldn't expect much
of them except Anna. I am surprised that she
spilt her food so."
I think it was very nice," said Flossy, "and
I am sure they all enjoyed it. I think I will let
my kitten give a party next week, and you can
bring Puffy to it. We might dress them up in
doll-clothes, and it would be ever so much fun."
"So it would," said Hetta. "All right. I'll
come.
Good-bye," said Flossy.
Good-bye," said Hetta. "Shake hands with
Puffy, and don't forget. about your party."


















Isaid









And she slept upon a bed,
In a greatbig house, she

And she slept upon a bed,







28 AT THE SEA-SIDE.

Tall and high, so big almost
In it children might be lost.
'Round the house sweet flowers grew,
Herbs too-thyme, and sage, and rue;
High-backed chairs, a queer old spinnet,
Fire-place, with great logs in it;
Tables too, with spider legs;
Cups and saucers thin as eggs;
Spinning wheel, that spun their thread-
These were in the house, she said.
Grandma wore a flowered gown,
And a little hat tied down;
Shoes with red rosettes she wore,
Open was her gown before,
Showed a skirt of quilted stuff;
Then she was dressed fine enough.
All these things to church she wore,
But at school a pinafore.
Grandma called her teacher Dame,"
Wasn't that a funny name!
Folks then travelled in a stage,

















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30 AT THE SEA-SIDE.

And it seemed to take an age
Just to go a little way;
Now, it wouldn't take a day!
I should think that folks would cry,
Always when they said good-bye;
For they used to be so slow-
I'm glad now it isn't so.
Grandma said that she would, stand,
Wave her kerchief, kiss her hand,
When the stage went by. Said she,
It was quite a sight to me! "
Grandma says, My, how times change!
Now-a-days things seem so strange! "
Will it seem as strange to me
When I am as old as she ?"
Will I tell grand-children so ?
Will they call this "long ago ?"







WASH-DA Y. 3




WASH-DAY.

DEAR, dear, what a large wash I have to-day!"
said Belle; "three sheets, two dresses, an apron,
a skirt, and a pair of pillow-cases.. I must go to
work, or I shall not get through to day."
So she got out her little tub and washboard,
and went to work to wash out her doll-clothes; then
she hung them all on a line in the yard, and went
into the kitchen to ask Bridget if she could have
an iron, and a corner of the table to iron on.
Bridget was very good-natured, and gave her
everything she wanted ; and she was soon ironing
away, and chattering to Bridget.
"This sheet doesn't look very clean, does it,
Bridget ? I think I must have spilt some medicine
on it the other day when Pauline was sick."
"What made her sick?" said Bridget.







32 AT THE SEA-SIDE.

"She caught cold," said Belle, and had to have
mustard plasters on her back."
It seems to me she is sick very often," said
Bridget.
Yes, she is very delicate," said Belle. I
really don't believe I shall raise her. She is the
most delicate child I have-she is quite sick to-day
with the measles. One good thing, though, she
never is sick very long at a time."-
"There, I believe I am through," she said.
" Now, Bridget, if you will give me some hot
water, I will put Pauline's feet in it. You see that
is the reason I have her sick so much, because she
is china, and it doesn't hurt her to put plasters on
her, and soak her feet, as it does the other dolls."
Then Belle went up to her sick doll, Pauline.
Dear me," she said, I don't wonder she is
sick. Here is one leg hanging by a thread. I
will take it off altogether, and send for the doctor.
But first I must change my apron, for this is all
slopped from the washing."
























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34 AT THE SEA-SIDE.

Just then her brother Edgar came in.
"Oh, Edgar," said Belle, "won't you be the
doctor and come to see Pauline ?"
"Yes," said Edgar; "I. will dress up, and
bring you some medicine in a bottle."
I will dress up too," said Belle, and we can
pretend it is a hospital."
So she put on a big bonnet and a clean apron,
and Edgar put on a long coat, and came in with a
big hat in one hand and a bottle in the other.
"My poor child has broken her leg, and she has
the measles too!" said Belle.
Let me look at her," said the doctor. "Ah,
yes, I see; her pulse is very rapid. I suppose she
cannot put out her tongue."
No, but I can put out mine," said Belle, "if
that will do."
No, never mind; give your daughter, a tea-
spoonful of this mixture every hour; and I will call
to-morrow and set her leg. How did she break
it?"




































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36 AT THE SEA-SIDE.

"Well, you see it was wash-day," said Belle,
" and I think she must have been out of her head
while I was doing the washing, and jumped out of
the window or something, for when I came up-
stairs her leg was broken."
"A very sad case," said the doctor "but I think
she will get well. Good-morning."
"Good-morning," said Belle, and then she took
Pauline and put her to bed.
"Dear me, how tiresome washing is when you
have a sick child," she said. "I should think people
would be worn out."







WONDERINGS. 37



WONDERINGS.
WHAT is my Mildred thinking about,
Sitting so still, I wonder,
Looking right up at the blue, blue sky
That soft white clouds float under?

Does she think of tricksy little sprites ?
Does she dream of an elfin,
Who takes the heart of a dainty rose
To hide his little self in ?

Or does she think of some fairy fair
Rocking a-top a lily,
Making her mirrors of clear dew-drops
And laughing fine and shrilly ?

Does she wonder where the south wind lives,
That rocks the pinks and roses?
Or where the fire-fly lights his lamp?
Or why the four-o'clock closes?







38 AT THE SEA-SIDE

Does she guess how birdies find their way
From South to North in summer?
Or who is the first to sing the song
That welcomes the next comer ?

Would you like to know, my little girl ?
My girl with soft brown tresses.
Dearie, there is much in this great world
That nobody ever guesses.



















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40 AT THE SEA-SIDE.




TOBY.

ToBY was a funny little yellow dog, not so very
little either; he had bright black eyes, and a tail
that he wagged a great deal.
His master's name was Joe, and if ever a little
dog were fond of a master it was Toby, and if ever
a master were fond of a little dog it was Joe. If
you saw Joe coming up the street, you might know
Toby was at his heels, and if you saw Toby frisk-
ing around the door, you might know that Joe
would be out in a minute.
But the funniest thing about Toby was his
fondness for music. Joe had a flageolet, and as soon
as he began to play on it, Toby would hop up on
a chair, put his head to one side and listen, as if
he were delighted, as no doubt he was.
By and by Joe taught him to dance on his
hind legs, and he liked to do it. As soon as the








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42 AT THE SEA-SIDE.

music would strike up, Toby would begin to turn
around and around.
There was one particular tune that he liked
better than any other, and he would bark, and bark,
when Joe began to play it, and then he would
dance.
Joe used to say that if ever any one should
steal Toby, he would go everywhere and play that
tune, and then he knew he could find Toby.
A man once offered Joe a great deal of money
if he would sell Toby, for he said he could train
him, and have him perform at a circus; but Joe
would not sell him.







THE MOWERS. 43




THE MOWERS.

EARLY one summer morning
The mowers went out to mow,
Blue was the sky above them,
Green were the meadows below.
Swing the scythes
To and fro,
From dawn to dusk
The mowers mow.

Low down in the clover,
Meadow-lark builded her nest,
Oh, so well did she hide it,
Not you or I would have guessed.

Merrily sang the mowers,
Meadow-lark low at their feet
Uttered her notes of pleading,
So tender, and low, and sweet.







44 AT THE SEA-SIDE.

Out in the early morning,
Dear little Janet and Phil
Came down to watch the mowers
Swinging their scythes with a will.


Down fell the clover about them,
As the scythes gave mighty swings;
Suddenly meadow-lark rose up,
Beating the air with her wings.


Phil darted forward, snatching
A nest full of downy things-
Poor little frightened birdies,
Too tiny to use their wings.


Down in a clump of clover
Phil put the nest, and then
The mowers mowed all around it,
Nobody touched it again.


























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46 AT THE SEA-SIDE.

Meadow-lark found her darlings,
Chirping, and safe, and well;
Oh, what a glad bird-mother!
How glad, your mamma can tell.







A HEAVY SHOWER. 47




A HEAVY SHOWER.

RAIN, rain, rain. My, how it did pour down!
All the chickens ran under the bench by the grape-
arbor, and there they stood, some of them on one
leg, to watch the shower.
"This is very stupid," said the big rooster,
Brigham.
"So it is," said one of the hens. "I, for one,
am tired of it, and I am going out a little way to
see if it looks like clearing up."
So she went out to the edge of the bench, put
her head on one side, and said, "Caw, caw,
ca-w-
But just as she got to the third caw, whiz!
splash! dash! came a great stream of water down
on her back, and frightened her almost to death.
Brigham came running out as fast as his legs could
carry him, to see what in the world had happened







48 AT THE SEA-SIDE.

to his favorite wife, thinking surely all the rain in
the sky had come down at once.
He lifted up one foot, poked out his head, and
looked all around, to see where so much water
could come from.
He found out in a few minutes, and what do
you think it was ?
The iron hoop had burst off the rain-water hogs-
head, and the water was pouring out in every di-
rection, and had come splashing down on the poor
hen till she was nearly drowned.
It will soon be over," said Brigham; "let us
go back under the bench, for I am rather wet my-
self standing out in the rain."
His tail feathers did droop.a good deal, and
the poor hen looked rather forlorn; but they-went
back, and if you had passed by that way you would
have heard them saying, "Cau, cau," to each other
for a long time.












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50 AT THE SEA-SIDE.




DOLLY'S BATH.

EFFIE took up her dolly one morning, and said,
" Now, Margaretta, you must have a good bath
this morning. I know a nice place where you
can swim and have a good time. I won't let you
get drowned, so don't you be afraid when you see
how deep the water is."
Margaretta didn't say anything, so Effie took
her up in her arms and carried her down to the
yard.
There was a big cask there that held the rain-
water, and this was the place Effie had chosen for
her doll's bath; she took off all Margaretta's clothes,
and got a big sponge to wash her with.
"You must have your head wet first, Marga-
retta," she said, so she doused the water all over
Margaretta's head, then she tied a string to her
waist, and told her she must learn to swim, but her









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52 AT THE SEA-SIDE.

head would go down, and her legs up, and Effie
made up her mind that Margaretta could not learn
to swim; so she took her out, and splashed the
water over her with a sponge. Margaretta looked
pretty miserable, and held down her arms in a very
dejected way; but Effie scrubbed away, and finally
took her out, and told her that would do.
I don't believe you liked it much, Margaretta,"
she said, "but people have to stand a great many
things in this world, so you might as well make up
your mind to it."
Then she took Margaretta to the house and
rolled her up in a piece of flannel to dry, before
she was dressed.
"You can pretend you have had a Turkish
bath," she said; "mamma says that's the way they
do."
It took Margaretta such a long time to get dry,
that Effie never tried to wash her in the big cask
again.







BENNY'S BIRDS. 53





BENNY'S BIRDS.

" BENNY'S birds they were, so he said ?
And he shook his dear little head,
Saying, "Yes they are, don't I know,
My own dear mamma told me so."


Five tiny birdies in the tree,
With scarce a feather, you could see.
Benny called them my naked birds,"
-Talked to them, in queer baby words.


Birdies cried from shrill, piping throats,
Mother bird answered in soft notes,
Gave them each a nice little bit;
Ev'ry one wanted more of it.







54 AT THE SEA-SIDE.

How would my baby like to be
Little birdie up if a tree ?
Shall I put you there ?" mamma said;
Benny laughed, and then shook his head.


Dess I would wadder not be one,
Dess I'll be mamma's littlee son;
Don't want to live up in a tree-
Don't want bird for mamma," said he.


The birdies grew, and learned to fly
Way up in the clear blue sky,
Then at last, one late autumn day,
All Benny's birdies flew away.









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56 AT THE SEA-SIDE.




JIM'S KNIFE.

JIM had a new knife given him for a birthday
gift, and how proud he was of it!
He .met Ed Mills on his way to school, and
showed it to him; then at recess every boy in
school wanted to see it, and the next day every one
of them wanted to borrow it, and five of them offered
to trade with him; but Jim had no idea of parting
with it then.
That same day he was cutting something, the
knife slipped and made a bad gash in his finger, so
it was several days before he could use that finger
very wel.
Then he lost the knife. He was pulling some-
thing out of his pocket, and pulled the knife with it;
he never missed it till some one asked him to
trade, and then he found it was gone.
Pshaw! said he, I wish I had traded, now.









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58 AT THE SEA-SIDE.

I could have had another knife with only one blade
gone, a new lead pencil, and six marbles."
After awhile, Tom Baxter came to him, and
said: "Do you know, I believe Charlie Knight
has your knife; it looks just like it, and he says he
found it."
"Well, I have lost mine," said Jim; and he
went off in search of Charlie.
I say, Charlie," said he, "let me see your knife."
Charlie displayed it.
That's mine," said Jim, after he had turned
it over two or three times.
No, you don't," said Charlie.
But I know it is, for I have lost it."
"Where ?"
"Down in the lot, I think, by our house; at
least I had it there, and haven't seen it since."
"That's where I found it," said Charlie; but
it's kind of hard on a fellow, I think."
Mine had a little nick in the small blade,"
said Jim.







YIM'S KNIFE. 59

Charlie opened the blade, and there was the
nick. "All right," he said; "it's yours, I suppose."
Jim took it, but he only kept it a week before
he broke the small blade, and then he traded it off
for a ball, a piece of gingerbread, and a chicken;
and he thought it was a pretty good trade.







60 AT THE SEA-SIDE.





TRAILING ARBUTUS.

UNDER the dry leaves hiding away,
Delicate, pink, and sweet as the May,
Trailing arbutus was to be found
Creeping along so close to the ground.


Cold blew the wind, but then, never mind,
Trailing arbutus wind couldn't find,
Though it blew hard in a manner unkind,
Trailing arbutus laughed at the wind.


Into the woods went Edith and Ray
To look for arbutus that April day,
Scarcely a leaf was there to be seen,
The grass had scarcely begun to be green.







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62 AT THE SEA-SIDE.

"See, Ray," said Edith, see what I've got,
Trailing arbutus, oh, such a lot!
Let's make a big bunch and carry it home;
Won't mamma be glad when she sees us come!"


They gathered a great big bunch, and went
Home through the meadows right well content;
The wind whistled round, before and behind,
But Edith and Ray just laughed at the wind.







A HARD TASK. 63





A HARD TASK.

"COME in now, and do your sewing," said
Helen's grandma.
Helen was taking her doll to walk down the
steps, and didn't want to go in; but she knew she
must mind, so she turned around and went slowly
into the house.
Helen had no father and mother. She lived
with her grand-parents, who were very kind to her.
Her grandma taught her to sew and knit, and
heard her lessons every day, but Helen did not
like to sit in-doors when the flowers were in
bloom and the birds singing outside.
"( Oh, dear, I wish I didn't have to do this old
sewing! she said; "it is just as puckery as it can
be, and every stitch I take makes it puckerer, my
hands are so sticky. I wish grandma wouldn't make







64 AT THE SEA-SIDE.

me sew. I don't see why people can't wear clothes
made of leaves, as Eve did!"
"Come, Helen, you are not doing your work,"
said her grandma.
Helen took up her sewing and did a few
stiches, but her eyes would wander out of the win-
dow, where the bees were busy among the flowers,
and a little bird was building its nest in the vine
near by. She watched the sunlight dancing
among the leaves, so her work did not get on very
fast.
At last her grandma said, Helen, come here
and let me see how you are getting along."
Helen took her sewing to her grandma, who
put on her spectacles and looked at it.
My child," she said, I don't think you have
been taking pains to do this very nicely, see how
you have drawn it. This will all have to be picked
out."
Oh, dear!" said Helen, beginning to cry; I
don't see how I can do it over, the needle don't













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66 AT THE SEA-SIDE.

go through when I want it too, and the thread gets
so dirty, and then it breaks."
"Pick it out," said her grandma, "then you
may go and play for half an hour, if you will prom-
ise to be in a better humor, and will do your work
cheerfully when I call you."
Helen sat down again, and soon had the work
picked out; then she went up and kissed her
grandma, and said:
Grandma, you are so good! I wish I could be
as good as you are. Were you ever anything like
me ?"
"Very-much, I think," her grandma said. "I
know just as well as you do how hard it is to sit
in-doors and sew when everything seems to be
calling you to- come out. Now run along, and have
a good time."
Helen went out into garden, oh so fresh and
sweet as it was.
I wonder if there are any cherries ripe ? I will
go and ask Dan."

















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68 AT THE SEA-SIDE.

Dan was a boy who did all sorts of odd jobs,
such as watering the horses, weeding the garden,
and running errands.
Helen found him in the kitchen, blacking her
grandpa's shoes.
"Dan," she said, are there any cherries
ripe ?"
I think there are a few," he answered, on
the tree back of the barn."
"Won't you go with me to get some?" said
Helen.
As soon as I have finished these shoes."
Helen waited, and then Dan went with her to
the cherry-tree, and gathered as many as a hat-full
of cherries.
I am going to take some of these to grandma,"
said Helen. "I will make a little basket out of
leaves, and it will be so pretty."
So she did, and when grandma called she took
it in to her, and then she sat down, and did her
sewing without puckering it a bit.














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70 AT THE SEA-SIDE.





ROVER.

How are you Rover? Bid me good-morning;
What a great racket you made last night!
Was it the moon at which you were barking?
Didn't you want it to shine so bright ?


Give me a paw, sir-not that, the other-
Well, if you will not, I must take this.
That's a good fellow, speak to your mistress-
No-no-Down, sir! I don't like to kiss.


Rover, my dear, I think you look sleepy,
You were awake, sir, so much last night.
Don't shake your head; remember, I heard you!
Don't you tell stories, that isn't right.








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72 AT THE SEA-SIDE.

Yes, sir, I heard you, barking and barking;
Aren't you ashamed to keep us awake ?
I don't see how you ate any breakfast;
I really should think your throat would ache.


Why should you bark when the moon is shining?
It don't hurt you, you silly old thing!
I think it's lovely-maybe you do too,
And you are only trying to sing.


Well, I must go now, off to my garden.
Good-bye, Rover; I'll come again soon.
After a while we will go out walking,
When you've slept off your bark at the moon.







A BREAKFAST FOR THE BIRDS. 73




A BREAKFAST FOR THE BIRDS.

SNOW everywhere-all on the ground, covering
the roofs, clinging to the branches of the trees,
piled up in little heaps on the tops of the fences
-so thick everywhere that a flock of little birds
looking about for breakfast could find nothing at
all to eat, and sat around on the least snowy
branches, twittering and chirping at a great rate.
Jessie and Bettie were looking out of the win-
dow at the new-fallen snow.
"It looks like ice-cream, doesn't it, Jessie?"
said Bettie.
Something," said Jessie; "but more like the
icing on top of cake. What a great big cake it
would be, wouldn't it ?"
Re-mense," said Bettie. Oh, Jessie! look at
all those little birds. Don't they look pretty, out







74 AT THE SEA-SIDE.

among the trees ? I wonder what they are making
such a fuss about."
Maybe they are cold," said Jessie.
I wonder where they are going to get their
breakfast?" said Bettie. I do believe, Jessie, that
is what is the matter with them; do let us go out
and give them some crumbs."
Just then their mother came in, and they both
begged her to go with them to feed the birds.
I am going to take a big handful of crumbs,"
said Bettie, and she ran out of the house quickly
to feed the birds.
Put something over you, Jessie," said their
mother; "you have a cold now."
Jessie followed her mother out-doors to where
Bettie was already scattering the crumbs for the
hungry little things that flew down from bush and
branch to pick up the nice breakfast.
Don't go too near, you .will frighten them,
Bettie," said her mother.
Bettie stood still, and they watched till














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76 AT THE SEA-SIDE.

every crumb was eaten up, and the birds flew
away.
Now, hurry in," said the children's mother;
" or I am afraid I won't have any birdies of my
own.
It was pretty cold, and they went in to get
warm.
"Wasn't it lovely," said Bettie, "to be able to
give the poor little birds something to eat, when
everything was covered up in the snow! I am so
glad we saw them."
"So am I," said Jessie; "we will feed them
every morning, won't we, Bettie ?"
And every morning while the snow lasted the
birdies had a good breakfast.







MISS LOU. 77





MISS LOU.

-ALLEN, and Hattie, and dolly,
All went to see Miss Lou;
She sat by the open window,
Where woodbine and roses grew.


"I've brought my new doll," said Hattie,
Because you have been so sick."
"I've brought you some flowers," said Allen,
"The biggest ones I could pick."


" Oh, what a beautiful dolly !
And flowers so bright and red;
I know they will make me better;
Thank you, dears," Miss Lou said.







78 AT THE SEA-SIDE.

What makes you so pale?" said Allen,
Because you are sick, Miss Lou ?
I would make you well to-morrow,
If I knew what to do."


She answered, "Your bright red flowers
-And Hattie's lovely new doll
Will certainly make me better,
If I'm to be well at all."


Hattie smiled and looked happy,
Allen smiled and said "Good !"
The roses outside the window
Would all have smiled if they could.



























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80 AT THE SEA-SIDE.




THE PICTURE BOOK.

LOOK at these pictures, dolly dear; you know
they are pretty. There, I will turn over the leaves;
you must nod your head when you are through
one, so I will know."
Maud was looking at a picture book, and
showing her doll Genevieve the pictures too.
"Now, Genevieve," she said, "this is a pic-
ture of a man giving a poor woman some money.
He is a very good man, I think, and the woman will
buy some bread and tea for her poor little children.
Shall I turn to the next ?"
Genevieve nodded her head in a very violent
way, and Maud went on:
This is a picture of a man and his dog; the
dog is named Rollo, and the man is named John."
Genevieve nodded her head again, and Maud
turned over another page.
























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82 AT THE SEA-SIDE.

"This is Kitty Brown, going to take a pail of
soup to a sick woman. Kitty is a very kind child
and loves to do good to the sick and poor. That
is just what it says in the book, so I know it is
right. She may be very good, but she wears very
queer clothes. I am glad I don't look like her.
Now, here is a nice picture.
"These are four little girls going to drive in a
pony carriage. Won't they have a nice time ?
Now I think you are tired, Genevieve. You
may go sit before the fire and warm your feet, if
you don't burn your shoes, and then I will take
you out in your carriage."
So Genevieve sat up before the fire and warmed
her feet, then Maud dressed her up in a brown
coat trimmed with fur, and a blue hat with white
feathers in it, and took her out in her carriage.







SUPP R. 83





SUPPER.

" Bow-wow-wow !" "Me-ow, me-ow, me-ow !"
Supper is ready, we want some now.
This great big dog, and this little kit,
This little girl all want some of it.


Hasty pudding and milk are nice,
But little black cats ought to want mice;
Big black dogs ought to like meat,
And not want to have what children eat.


" Go, little kitty, go and lie down!
How can I eat with such lookers on ?
Watching ev'ry mouthful-go away-
You look so hungry-go off, I say!"







84 AT THE SEA-SIDE.

How can I eat, and what shall I do?
I don't sit and gaze so at you.
Go away, Turk-I will give you a bone
If you will only let me alone.


Go away, kitty-I'll leave you some,
I will tell you when it's time to come;
Go take a nap, or play with my ball;
Go right away, or I'll eat it all."


Dear me such beggars I never saw;
Very well, Turk, then give me your paw.
I'll give you some, puss, in a minute;
I'll get a pan and put some in it.










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86 AT THE SEA-SIDE.




THE BAD LITTLE DONKEY.
RoUGH-coated donkey, ugly and gray,
Where do you think he was going to-day?
Going to market, to carry some eggs
Fast as he could with his four clumsy legs.
Bad little donkey, what do you think?
Bad little donkey wanted a drink.
Into the water, splashity-splash,
Bad little donkey went with a dash.
"Whoa-ho," said Tommy, that will not do;
What in the world is the matter with you ?
Take that, you rascal! see how that feels."
Then bad little donkey kicked up his heels.
Over went Tommy into the brook,
Donkey ran off without stopping to look;
Down went the basket, bumpity-bump,
Down went the eggs, too, all in a lump.































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83 AT THE SEA-SIDE.

"Oh dear," said Tommy, "what shall I do?"
"Ya-ha," said donkey, "that's good for you."
"Just let me catch you," said Tommy, you'll see."
" All right," said donkey, "try and catch me."
Bad little donkey went off like a shot,
Tommy right after him, trotity-trot;
Bad little donkey came ,to a hill,
Bad little donkey stood very still.
"Aha, now!" said Tommy, "I'll have you, you scamp,
I'll make you pay for giving this tramp."
Donkey just gave then his hind leg a hitch,
Knocked Tommy over, right into a ditch.
Then little Tommy he got very mad,
'Cause little gray donkey would be so bad.
" If I once get you," said Tommy, I'll give
You such a beating you hardly will live."
Bad little donkey, although such a teaze,
Went off to eat thistles as much as you please.
Tommy got up and said, "Oh, you don't care !
Wait till you come home, sir, I will be there."


















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90 AT THE SEA-SIDE.




THE UMBRELLA BIRD.
DID ever you see such a funny bird ?
Now, doesn't it really look absurd
With a queer umbrella over its nose,
That is carried about wherever it goes ?

What does it do when it goes to bed,
With an umbrella always over its head ?
Shouldn't you think it must seem odd
To have it flopping whenever you nod ?
I wonder if all the other birds say,
Whenever they see him, It rains to-day,"
Or if they exclaim, It must be quite hot,
See what an umbrella our friend has got."
How would you like an umbrella like that
Always on your head ? You would need no hat.
The sun might shine, or the rain might come,
You would never be caught too far from home.

















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92 AT THE SEA-SIDE.



MAMMA'S BIRTHDAY.
NINA, I have three dollars in my money-box
for mamma's birthday gift," said Kate, what would
you get ?"
Kate and Nina were taking their dolls out for
an airing.
"There are ever so many nice things," answered
Nina. "Why don't you get her something Jap-
anese ?
So I can," replied Kate, I will go get the
money now, and we can leave the dolls at home
and go to the Japanese store right away."
Oh dear, I don't know what to choose," said
Kate, looking about her, as they stood in the store.
"I see just the thing," said Nina. "Those
little tea-sets, with such cunning tea-pots."
Perfect !" said Kate, clasping her hands, and
you know mamma has been sick, and is just sitting
up. I can take her breakfast to her to-morrow."
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94 AT THE SEA-SIDE.

"That is just what I want," said Kate, as she
was shown one set within her means. Now you
can send it home;" and she paid the money and
gave the address, feeling very important, and danced
nearly all the way home on the tips of her toes.
Kate was up bright and early the next morning,
so as to be sure that her mamma's breakfast was
ready just at the right moment.
I want to carry it all myself, Bertha," she said
to the servant; only you will have to open the
door, I expect, and perhaps you had better bring
some hot water, too."
Bertha was quite as much interested as Kate,
and she watched the little girl as she carried the tray
to her mother's door, opening the door for her, and
getting the stand ready for her to place it on.
Her mother was sitting by the window in her
wrapper, and looked up with a smile as Kate came
in.
It is your birthday, mamma-don't you
know ?" said Kate.







































Jil







96 A THE SEA-SIDE.

"So it is," said her mother; but where did
those lovely dishes come from ?"
It is your birthday gift," said Kate. I got
it with my own money, and Nina helped me. 0,
mamma, I hope you like it."
Indeed I do," she replied, and I expect my
breakfast to taste better than any breakfast I have
ever had, because there is so much of my little
girl's love to season everything."
Kate stood by, and her mother ate every mouth-
ful, and drank all the tea. Now," said she,
" mamma, that was a big breakfast, and I am so
glad, for that means you are better."
Indeed it does," said her mother, and I
think it must have been my lovely birthday gift
that gave me such an appetite. I shall always use
it when I am sick, and think of my daughter all
the time."
Just at that moment, I don't think there was in
the world a happier little girl than Kate.










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