Miss Dotty

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Material Information

Title:
Miss Dotty
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Farman, Sara Elizabeth ( Author, Primary )
Humphrey, Lizbeth Bullock, b. 1841
Sweeney, Morgan J
Weir, Harrison, 1824-1906
D. Lothrop and Company ( Publisher )
Publisher:
D. Lothrop and Company
Place of Publication:
Boston
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Pets -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Human-animal relationships -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1882   ( lcsh )
Baldwin -- 1882
Genre:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston

Notes

General Note:
Some illustratations by H. Weir.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
by Sara Elizabeth Farman, and other stories by famous authors ; twenty-one illustrations by Miss L.B. Humphrey, Boz, and others.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002226056
notis - ALG6338
oclc - 62627994
System ID:
UF00050317:00001


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DOTTY ON HER WA SCHOOL
LI I~;X F :li'~ i
DOTT ONHER AY O SCOOL







MISS DOTTY




BY
SARA ELIZABETH FARMAN
And other stories by famous authors















TWENTY-ONE ILLUSTRATIONS
BY
MISS L. B. HUMPHREY, BOZ, AND OTHERS




BOSTON
D. LOTHROP AND COMPANY
32 FRANKLIN STREET



























COPYRIGHT, 1882.

D. LOTHROP & COMPANY.













MISS DOTTY.

Miss Dotty
had never seen
Miss Adams
school.
MI But she heard
of it every day.
Miss Dotty's
Brother went to
Miss Adams'
school. It was
not far from
MISS DOTTY. Dotty's home.

One day Miss Adams heard a






MISS DOTTY.

wee knock on the school-room
door.
She opened it.
Miss Dotty was sure she should
like a teacher with so sweet a smile.
The little girls in the school-
room laughed to see so small a
visitor knock at the door.
Miss Dotty laughed too.
But she laughed at the little boy
who stood in the waste-basket up
to his chin.
How shamed the little boy looked
to have Miss Dotty see him in
such a place!
And Dotty looked shamed too;
for it was Dotty's brother in the
waste-basket.
He was put there for whispering.
















fs "






























FOR WHISPERING.






MISS DOTTY.

Dotty knew all about her mis-
chievous little hands.
She put them both in her little
apron pocket and made up her
mind to sit very quiet until school
should be out.
Dotty's eyes are black and roguish,
but they see all there is to be
seen.
She saw many things that day
at school.
She saw Miss Adams put a fly
under a glass goblet.
Then all the children in Miss
Adams' school came up, and looked
at the fly.
Dotty came up and looked too.
She saw the fly brush both sides
of its wings with its tiny back legs.






MISS DOTTY.

She saw it rub its back legs
against its middle row of legs.
Then she saw it rub its middle
row of legs against its front legs.
Then she saw the fly lick off its
front legs, just as she had seen
her kitty do so many times.
One of the girls said Mr. Fly
was washing himself to get ready
for his supper.
Miss Adams said no, the fly
was taking his supper.
She told them that Mr. Fly gath-
ered up a great many little grains
and tiny insects good to eat upon
his wings, when he flew about the
room.
The grains and insects are too
small to be seen unless you look





MISS DOTTY.

at them through a microscope.
Mr. Fly takes them off from his
wings with his legs and carries
them to his mouth.
Miss Adams asked, How many
wings has Mr. Fly?"
All the children answered, Six !"
It sounded like a very big voice.
Miss Dotty answered Six I too,
and felt very proud.
When Dotty went home she told
her mother how flies got their dinner.
But she did not tell that Charlie
had been put in the waste-basket.
Miss Dotty is too kind a girl to
do that.














GRAY AND ASHY.

Gray and Ashy belong to a
little girl.
The little girl lives in the next
house to mine.
Her papa's garden is between
her house and mine.
This little girl's name is Nell.
She is a very nice little girl,
with plump cheeks, blue eyes, wavy
brown hair and smiling lips.
I like her. I often kiss the
smiling lips.





GRAY AND ASHY.

I like her so well, that one day
I bought two
pet squirrels
for her.
lIT I "': They look-

9 ed like two
1 balls of gray
fur when I
carried the
cage into the
\ 1,* -^ Igarden where
LITTLE NELL AT CHURCH.
Nell was at
play. But Nell knew what they
were. Squirrels squirrels !" she
cried.
Why, they look exactly alike,"
she said next.
She carried them in at once.
She tied a red ribbon around





GRAY AND ASHY.

the neck of one of the squir-
rels.
"You are Gray," she said to
that one.
She tied a blue ribbon around
the neck of the other.
You are Ashy," she said to him.
"Now if Gray gets away, I shall
know it is Ashy that is left," she
said to me.
Ashy looked at his blue ribbon.
Gray looked at his red ribbon.
Then they both barked a sharp
little bark. "Chur-r-r!" they said.
Gray ran up and turned the wheel
like mad. Ashy sat down and
sulked.
They would not answer to their
names.






GRAY AND ASHY.

They would not eat while Nell
was near the cage.
Nell fed them with hickory nuts
and beechnuts and walnuts and
chestnuts.
But they said, as plainly as they
could, "We do not like these
ribbons; we do not like our names,
and we do not like you!"
One Sunday they were all alone
in the house.
Nell had gone to church with
her papa and mamma.
It was about eleven o'clock.
The choir was singing in the
church.
All the people were standing up.
All but Nell.
Poor Nell! She was so busy





GRAY AND ASHY.

|with her thoughts about her
naughty little pets that she
did not know the choir was sing-
"ing.
About that time, Nell's naughty
pets had burst open the door of
their cage.
Down they hopped!
Out of doors they ran!
Across the garden like a dart!
Up to the top board of the
fence, like a flash!
"Hurrah!" cried Ashy.
"" Three cheers for liberty!"
shouted Gray.
See, there are the woods !"
said Ashy.
Hurrah for a hollow tree 1" cried
Gray.





GRAY AND ASHY.

"A hollow tree for our own I"
answered Ashy, and such nuts as
we please!"
"No bars around our bedroom
there !" said Gray.
There they sat on the fence, be-
hind their bushy tails, and squealed
and chirred like two little mad-
caps.
Just then a boy came along.
He saw them.
He whistled at them.
Then he tossed a stone at them.
How those squirrels leaped from
that fence!
How they sped back across the
garden!
How glad they were to find the
door still open I






GRAY AND ASHY.

How quickly they mounted to the
cage again
How pretty they thought their
gay little neck-ribbons while they
waited I
How glad they were to see Nell
when she came home !
They came at once to the door
to eat the fresh beechnuts she
had picked up on her way
home.
How they frolicked and gam-
bolled !
Gray even bit Nell's rosy fore-
finger, he was so happy.
Nell was pleased, but she won-
dered about it much.
She wondered how the cage door
came ajar.






GRAY AND ASHY.

After that the pets were as playful
and happy as she could wish.
Nell never knew what happened
at home that Sunday.










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ROBBY'S DOG.

Trip is a friendly little dog.
He is a pretty little dog too.
He is gray and white. He has
long, silky ears.
Trip belongs to a boy named
Robbie.
One morning, while Robby was
asleep, Trip took an early walk.
While he was out, he saw how he
could do a kind deed to Billy
Gray.
He jumped over into Billy Gray's
I






ROBBY'S DOG.

yard, for he saw Billy Gray sitting
on the door-step.
He ran up and put his fore paws
on Billy Gray's shoulders.















WHAT TRIP SAW.

"Get down I" growled Billy. It
sounded like a big, cross dog's growl.






ROBBY'S DOG.

Trip got down. He stood still a
minute. He looked up into Billy
Gray's eyes.
They were not kind blue eyes, like
Robbie's. They were cross black ones.
Get out! Go home, sir!"
growled Billy Gray. Here's the
print of your muddy paws on my
clean jacket I"
Yes, Billy was very cross. But
Trip tried to tell what he had seen.
He had seen the two white rab-
bits among the lettuces and early
cabbages. He thought they were
tearing the cabbages in pieces.
He had seen Mooly, the cow,
going off down the road. He knew
she had not been milked.
He heard the little chickens peep






ROBBY'S DOG.

in the long, wet grass, because the
black cat sat by the coop so that
they dare not go in.















Trip wished to tell Billy about
all this mischief.
He ran out toward the coop.
He ran out toward the garden.





ROBBY'S DOG.

He ran to the gate and looked
down the road.
Then he ran up to Billy again.
He jumped up and down and barked.
He put his paws on Billy once
more.
Poor little Trip Billy caught
hold of the slender little legs. See
here, now he growled.
Yes, Billy was very cross indeed
Snow.
He swung poor, scared Trip
around his head, and threw him,
with all his might, over the fence,
into the street.
Now go home! said he.
But poor little Trip could not go
home.
Cruel Billy had thrown him

k





ROBBY'S DOG.

against a stone. One of his little
fore legs was bleeding.
Billy went back and sat on the
door-step, and poor Trip lay still in
the road.
Once he whined a little, and Billy
Gray came to the fence and looked
at him.
He felt sorry, and tears came in
his eyes. But he felt crosser than
ever and he would not go and help
Trip.
He knew that Trip was Robby's
dog. He did not like to think what
Robby would say when he knew his
dog was hurt.
But a good friend is on the way,
poor Trip !
Soon Farmer Bennett's great





ROBBY'S DOG.

Newfoundland came trotting along.
He stopped when he saw Trip.
Little Trip and big Major were
old friends.
Little Trip put up his cold nose.
Major touched it with his nose.
Then they had a little talk.
What is the matter, Trip?"
Major asked.
Lgc hurt," said Trip.
Fell down ? Major asked.
No," said Trip.
"Was it a boy? Major asked.
"Yes," said Trip.
"Then Ii.tjor growled a big growl.
Billy Gray, I presume," he said.
He barked over toward Billy Gray's
house deep and long.
Billy heard it, and went into the





ROBBY'S DOG.

house and sat down by the window.
Then Major took little Trip up
between his teeth very carefully.
He carried him home and laid him
in his little bed under the door-
step.
Then he barked until he wakened
Robby.
How bad Robby felt when he saw
his little lame Trip.
But Trip had good care and got
well. Major came to see him often.
Billy Gray was made very sorry
for what he had done.
He did not have a pleasant time
that day after Trip was carried
home.
He had to run two miles to find
Mooly and bring her home.















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"M C O R


























r N
; MAJOR COMES TO THE RESCUE.






ROBBY'S DOG.

The rabbits spoiled his flower
bed.
The black cat caught two of his
white chickens.
Robby did not speak to him at
school.
His papa did not allow him to go
fishing the next Saturday, because
he had hurt Robby's dog.














PERI AND PONTO.

Nell and Patty have always lived
by the sea-shore.
In winter it is lonely there.
The breakers dash high.
Great winds blow.
Once the winds blew down one of
the hotels.
But in summer Nell and Patty
have good times.
They like to look at the grand
people who come to stay at the
hotels.





PERI AND PONTO.

They like to watch the handsome
horses and carriages.
They like to see the bathers go
into the surf.
They like to see the beautiful chil-
dren and the handsome dogs.
One day while they were down on
the beach, Nell called out, See,
Patty! see! There are two new
dogs!"
Patty looked round. The new
dogs were two handsome fellows.
One was black. The other was
white.
They were frisking about a pretty
girl who was filling a basket with
sea-weed.
I'm going to whistle for them,"
said Patty.





PERI AND PONTO.

Patty whistled a low, long, clear
whistle.
Both the dogs walked up to the
little barefooted girls. They stood
and looked at them.
The little girls patted their heads,
but the dogs stood still, as if they
did not know whether to like it or
not.
I wish I knew their names "
said Nell.
Ponto and Peri," said their little
mistress. "The black one is Ponto,
and the white one is Peri. They are
my dogs. They have never been
to the seaside before."
May we play with them ? asked
Nell.
"Oh, yes," said she. Then, like a






PERI AND PONTO.

little lady, she went farther off, so
that the little barefoot girls might
feel free to play with the dogs all
they liked.











"COME, HAVE A BATH I

Ponto looked as if he could play,
if only he would. His bright eyes
danced with mischief. He looked
up to Peri, as if he were saying,
"Would you play ?"






PERI AND PONTO.

"Come, Patty, let's play with
them," said Nell. "They are not
vicious dogs !" And she put her
hand on Peri's white head.
Peri gave a little growl. We are
vicious dogs," said she, "whatever
that is."
But Ponto rubbed his head against
Nell's hand. "No, we are not vi-
cious dogs at all," said he.
"Well, we will give them a bath
in the salt water," said Patty, and
then see them frisk away in the
sun.
"I will not have a salt water
bath," barked Peri.
But Ponto wagged his tail.
Nell said when a dog wagged his
tail it meant yes."





PERI AND PONTO.

So the little girls caught the
dogs. They pulled them down to
the water.
Ponto scrambled about as if it
were good fun; but oh, how angry
Peri was I She held back with all
her might. She planted her feet in
the sand and growled, and showed
her teeth at Patty.
Nell got Ponto down into the
surf, but Patty could do nothing
with Peri.
Let Peri go, little girl I" called
the dog's mistress.
She stood on a rock, a little way
off, watching them.
Let Peri go, little girl!" she
called, "or she will bite you !"
Let me go, or I will bite you,"






PERI AND PONTO.

























LET PERT GO, LITTLE GIRL, OR SHE WILL BITE YOU."

barked Peri. She snapped at Patty's
hand as she spoke.






PERI AND PONTO.

Then Patty let go, and the two
dogs bounded away to their mis-
tress.
"I don't like rude country girls,"
said Peri, as they all went back to
the hotel.
Pshaw said Ponto. You are
much too dignified. I had a jolly
"good play."








*E^^^^~=;C~-S--J^. .^..--^S~i















WHAT I SAW IN BOSTON

What do you think I saw one
morning last winter, as I walked
down Washington Street.
I saw three children and their
father.
Oh, they were having such a good
time !
I stopped and looked at them.
They were fat, rosy-cheeked little
children.
Their father was fat and rosy-
cheeked too.






WHAT I. SAW IN BOSTON.

They looked like Germans.
I think they were emigrants.
Emigrants are people who leave
their own country and go to another
country to live.
German emigrants come from a
country called Germany.
There were two little girls and a
little boy.
The little girls wore brown dress-
es, long-sleeved aprons and faded
sacques. They both had red hoods.
The little boy wore trousers, but
he had a big-sleeved apron like the
girls. He had a very shabby fur
cap.
Do you want to know about the
good time they were having ?






WHAT I SAW IN BOSTON.

Perhaps you would think it was
very poor fun.
But the German children did not.
They laughed and chattered until
their cheeks fairly shone.
They were at the drinking foun-
tain in front of Franklin Square.
Here is a high stone trough for
the horses to drink out of in sum-
mer.
In winter it is covered with a stone
plank.
The emigrant children were stand-
ing on this plank.
Their father must have put them
up there, for it was too high for them
to climb.
He would spread out his arms,
and the children would jump into






WHAT I SAW IN BOSTON.

them just as fast as he could catch
them, and set them down on the pave-
ment.
Then he would lift them up, and
the fun would begin again.
I think the man enjoyed it as much
as the children did.
It looked very funny to see a
whole family amusing themselves in
that way in the streets of Boston.
But they did not seem to know that
anyone was watching them.
Yet nearly everybody who passed
stopped to smile at the pretty sight.
I never saw any of them again.
But I would like to know more
about them.




A

























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THE LITTLE GERMAN CHILDREN.






WHAT I SAW IN BOSTON.

I am sure there are no happier
children in Boston than those little
Germans.














IN THE WOODS.

I tell you, I want to go and see
the woods for myself," said the little
baby deer.
The big deer looked down at the
baby deer. "I suppose you do,"
said he.
Indeed, I do," said the little
fellow
He kicked the soft black forest
earth as hard as he could with his
small hoofs.
He was a naughty little fellow.





4 IN THE WOODS.

He liked to have his own way.
Poor little Fleetfoot said the
big deer.
"I wanted to go on the chase,"
said little Fleetfoot. All the rest
of the young deer have gone. They
will have a grand scamper across
the plain."
The big deer licked Fleetfoot's
smooth head with a soft kiss.
Little pet," said he, I can
hardly feel your horns yet. They are
covered thick with velvet. You are
only a baby. You are not old enough
for a run on the long wide plain."
Fleetfoot butted the old deer with
the little horns. He felt very
naughty.
My horns are growing every





IN THE WOODS.

day," said he. "I can feel them
every time I rub against a tree.
To-morrow I will rub the velvet
all off. Then you will see that they
are quite large.
Besides, I should run with my
legs, not with my horns."
Your legs are not much bigger
than. dandelion stems, my child,"
said the old deer.
Little Fleetfoot kicked up his
hind feet when he heard that, and
was off. Down the green fresh
glade he went like a dart.
How graceful How nimble!
His legs were slender, but they
were good to run with.
His warm brown coat of hair
shone like silk.





IN THE WOODS.

He held his head high, and his
large ears stood up as though
listening for a call to come back.
Now and then he turned, stopped
short, and looked back at the big
deer with his large full eyes.
But the big deer did not call.
Fleetfoot ran on again, but only
for a few steps.
In a moment he turned round
again.
This time he came trotting back
to the big deer.
He leaned his head up against him.
He looked very pretty, and he
looked very sorry.
Of course you know best," he
said. "But when I have great
handsome antlers like yours, then













































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FLEETFOOT COMES BACK.






IN THE WOODS.

I shall not came back, no matter who
calls!"
The big deer laughed. Then he
took Fleetfoot for a nice little race
down the glade.
They went as far as the pool of
clear water.
Then they had a fresh, sweet
drink.
After that, they lay down in the
tall, green ferns.
There the big deer told the little
one what becomes of the antlers
when the deer shed them.
But Fleetfoot has kept the secret,
and nobody knows what does be-
come of them.













WHAT DAISY DID.

It was the middle of winter.
The snow lay deep and white
on the ground.
Daisy went sleigh-riding every
day.
Such good weather for little
girls I
But such bad weather for little
birds!
How the snow-birds wished for
"a thaw "
Even the seeds on the old weed
stems were almost gone.






WHAT DAISY DID.

But it did not thaw.
Those that used to hop around
the door-steps of Daisy's house
were almost discouraged.
They were afraid they should
starve before the "thaw" came.
But one day, before it was too
late, Daisy began to think about
the birds.
She knew they could not get
anything to eat unless they were
fed.
Then she remembered what she
had read about a man in England
who was very fond of all birds
and animals.
"I can do so too," said she.
"I will ask brother to help me.
And it will be such good fun "








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WHAT DAISY DID.

There was a large tree in front
of Daisy's house.
When Daisy talked with Jack.
about her plan, he went at once
and looked at the tree.
"Yes," said he, "I can climb
that."
Then Daisy went down stairs
and talked with Cook.
Cook said she would do her
part.
Cook's part was to save all the
bones, big and little, on which any
meat was left.
Jack's part was to climb the
tree and tie the bones to the
branches, every day.
The birds' part was to come
in flocks, and pick the meat off.






WHAT DAISY DID.

They looked very funny as they
swung about on the bones.
Daisy's part was to watch them
fly up into the tree to pick at the
bones, and to feel glad she had
thought to do it.
They all were happy-Cook, Jack,
the birds and Daisy.
Anybody can do this kind little
deed for the birds.
i














PRINK.

LANCHE and Al-
ice Hill live in
,' -. Kansas.
'*-. . II ," o l'' ' '
" Blanche is six
-- years old. Alice
is four.
Their grand-
mother lives near Boston.
Last summer these little girls
came all the way from Kansas to
Boston to visit their grandmother.

i
















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THE LTLTRVLE S





















THE LITTLE TRAVELLERS.
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PRINK.

They were on the cars several
days.
Another traveller came with them
to Boston.
His name was Prink.
He had a little car of his own.
This car was a cigar-box !
Narrow strips of wood were nailed
across the top; Prink often peeped
out between them.
At one end of his car was a slid-
ing door. But Prink was not often
allowed to come out.
Prink is a prairie-dog.
He was born in Dog-town,"
Kansas, near a pretty creek.
When many prairie-dogs live to-
gether, the spot is called a town or
village.


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PRINK.

Prairie-dogs dig holes in the
ground for their homes. Long
under-ground streets lead to these
homes.
These narrow, winding streets are
like tunnels.
Prairie-dogs use their paws as
shovels, when they dig these holes
and streets.
They use their funny little tails
as brushes. With these brushes
they sweep up the loose earth, into
round piles.
These mounds of loose earth are
always put just in front of the en-
trance to their homes.
When the frisky little fellows are
tired they come out and sit on these
mounds to rest.





PRINK.

Then they look like their cousins,
the squirrels.
They are called dogs, because
their shrill, sharp bark is much like
the snap of a cross little lap-dog.
Each family of prairie-dogs has
its own home.
In every dog-town there is one
dog who is a leader. Hunters and
trappers call this leader, Big-dog."
Big-dog has charge of the village.
All the other dogs must obey his
orders.
He watches everything from his
own door-way.
He sits on a very high mound.
When he hears any strange noise,
or sees a hunter, Big-dog gives a
loud sharp cry.






PRINK.

When this cry is heard, all the
other dogs in the village scamper
through their narrow under-ground
streets, and curl down in their snug
homes.
When all danger is over, Big-dog
gives a long shrill whistle.
Then the other dogs come out
again to play.
Prairie-dogs are very kind to each
other. If one is sick or gets hurt,
his dog-friends take care of him
until he is well.
It is not easy to catch a prairie-dog.
But a hunter caught Prink; he
gave him to the father of Blanche
and Alice.
The children named the funny pet
" Prink."





PRINK.

He soon learned this name.
He soon grew fond of the little
girls.
They fed him with berries, apples
and cakes. They made a bed for
him in a dark closet.
Prink had a lovely reddish-brown
coat, and a pretty white spot at his
throat.
He had quick, bright, dark eyes.
His small teeth were white and sharp.
He had a squeaky, fine voice and
he used it a good deal, for he was
a baby-dog.
Blanche and Alice lent their funny
pet to a lady in the cars.
She fed him with strawberries,
and played with him a long time.
Then she put him into his own






PRINK.

little car, and he had a nap.
The Boston grandmother was very
much astonished to see Prink.
This is a true story.











_ - ---------- --
-- -- ._-














RALPH AND ROVER.

Rover is a Newfoundland dog.
Ralph is a raven.
Ralph and Rover are great friends.
Ralph often perches on Rover's
back.
Sometimes he rides on Rover's
back all around the yard.
Rover lets Ralph pick the same
bones with him.
One day Rover got run over.
His leg was broken.
He had to stay in the stable.





RALPH AND ROVER.

Then Ralph brought bones to
Rover every day.
Ralph would not sleep on h;s perch.
He slept in the stable with Rover.
But one night the hostler forgot
that Ralph had not come.
He locked the door before Ralph
got in.
What do you think Ralph did?
Ralph has a strong, sharp beak.
He pecked the stable-door with
this strong, sharp beak.
In the morning there was a hole
through the stable-door.
The hole was not quite big enough
for Ralph to get into the stable.
If he had worked one hour longer,
he would have got in.
This is a true story.









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