Our parlour panarama

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Our parlour panarama
Physical Description:
92, 4 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Cupples, George, 1839-1898
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Dalziel Brothers ( Engraver )
Publisher:
T. Nelson and Sons
Place of Publication:
London
Edinburgh
New York
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
National characteristics -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Manners and customs -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1882   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1882
Genre:
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

General Note:
Some illustrations engraved by Dalziel.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
by Mrs. George Cupples ; with eighty-two illustrations.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002225117
notis - ALG5389
oclc - 62627974
System ID:
UF00050315:00001

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OUR PARLOUR


PAN RAMA.






By

MRS. GEORGE CUPPLES.







WITH EIGHTY-TWO ILLUSTRATIONS.








anbaRnit:
T. NELSON AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW.
EDINBURGH; AND NEW YORK.
1882.

















HIS series of pictures, under the title of
"Our Parlour Panorama," is intended to
show us some pleasant views and scenes
in many lands. It is to be hoped, too,
that the information conveyed along with them,
though necessarily brief, may prove profitable as
well as entertaining. Now that you are comfort-
ably seated, I would crave your attention, as the
curtain is about to rise on our journey. We take
for our starting-point London, the largest city in
the world, as no doubt you all know. Some of
you, however, may. not as yet have had the privi-
lege of visiting this great city, therefore I will do
my best to point out to you some of the most
interesting views as we sail down the river.































.. 1

















i





















OUTWARD BOUND.

































WEST INDIA DOCKS, LONDON, .... .. .. 11

-DOWN THE THAMES, .. .... ... 12

-A PET BIRD, .. .. ... .... 13

-AT GRAVESEND, .. .. ... .. 14

-GIBRALTAR, ...... .. 15

-IN ALGIERS, .. .. ...... 16

- POMPEY'S PILLAR, .. . .... 17

-THE PYRAMIDS, ... ... 18

-IN THE DESERT, .. .. .. 19

-THE DYING CAMEL, .. .... 20

-CROCODILES, .. .... . 21

THE SUEZ CANAL, .. .. .... .. 22

_ADEN, ...... .. .. 23

BOMBAY, ...... .. .. .. 24

-UP THE GANGES, .. .. .... .. .. 25

A TIGER-HUNT, . .... .. 26

-AN INDIAN ELEPHANT, .... ... .. 27

-A BOAR-HUNT, ........ .. 28

-A STRANGE NURSE, .. .. .. .. 29

'-A PLEASANT SCENE, .. ... 30

_A SPLENDID BUILDING, ... ... 31

IN CANTON, .. .. ... 82

"-A TEA GARDEN, .. .... .. .. 3

A A TEA MERCHANT'S BOUSE, .. .. .. .. 34









viii CONTENTS.


AN EMPEROR, .... .. 35

-A MANDARIN, .. .... 36

"A STATE DINNER, ... .. 37

"THE BAMBOO RAT, ..... .. 38

--OING TO A FEAST,.... 39

--A FAMOUS CITY, .. 40

-A CELEBRATED RIVER, ..... 41

-AN ASIATIC FOX, .... .. 42

"IN AUSTRALIA, .... .. 43

-KANGAROOS, ... .... 44

CTHE FRIENDLY ISLANDS, .... .. .. 45

TAHITI, .. .... .. 46

A FEMALE DANCER, .... .. 47

-AN ISLE OF BEAUTY, .. .. ... 48

"-RADACK ISLANDERS, .. .. .. .. 49

-A FLEET OF CANOES, .. .... .. 50

-BLACK MEN AND WHITE MEN, .. .... 51

NATIVES OF NEW CALEDONIA FISHING, .. .. .. 52

MONUMENTSS ON EASTER ISLAND, .. .. 53

AMERICAN SALOON STEAMER, .. .. .. .. 54

/NIAGARA FALLS, .. .. 55

-THE GRIZZLY BEAR, .. .... 56

A FRIEND IN NEED, .. .. .. 57

.A LOG CABIN, .. .. ... 58

-il GRAY WOLF, .. .. .. 59

-A BISON-HUNT, .. .. 60

-A USEFUL ANIMAL, .. .. .. 61

/A RIDE FOR LIFE, .. .. .. .. 62

-OUT OF DANGER, . .. 63

GAT oERING COTTON, .. .. .* .. 64

OFF BY RAIL, .. .. .. 65

IN SOUTH AMERICA, .. .. .* 66

WILD HORSES, .. .. 67

A BOAT'S CREW, .... .. 68










CONTENTS. ix


"A DELIGHTFUL SAIL, .. .. .. 69

"A STRANGE HOUSE, .. .. 70

"A NATIVE, .. .... .. .. .. 71

CAPE HORN, .. .... ... 72

CAPE OF GOOD HOPE, ... .. .. 73

AMONG THE KAFFIRS, .. .. 74

IN FRANCE, .. .. .. 75

FRENCH PEASANTS, .. .. .... .. 76

"A CURIOUS SIGHT, .. .. .... .. 77

"A GRAND BUILDING, .... ... .. 78

THE ALPS, .. ... .... .. 79

MONKS OF ST. BERNARD, .. .. .. .. 80

"A SWISS MAIDEN, .. .. .... .. 81

"A BROWN BEAR, .. .. .. .... .. 82

"A VIEW OF ROME, .. .. .. .. .. 83

MOUNT VESUVIUS, .. ... .. 84

MOSCOW, .. . .... .. 85

PURSUED BY WOLVES, .. .... .. 86

KILLED BY A BEAR, .. ... .. 87

LAPLANDERS, .. .... 88

THE NORTHERN LIGHTS, .. .. .. 89

AN ACCIDENT, .. .... .... 90

FAITHFUL COMPANIONS, .. .. .. .... 91

PARTING WORDS, .. .. .. .. .. 92















































a









OUR PARLOUR PANORAMA.













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RO OM London we make our start round
the world; but as our ship is not quite
ready to carry us to foreign climes, we
cannot do better than take a walk along
the quays to see the ships and steamers coming
into the West India Docks.







12 DOWN THE THAMES.

















" "OW we are fairly aboard, and sailing down
the river Thames; and here we are oppo-
site the well-known hospital of Green-
wich. Once upon a time all the wounded
men-of-war sailors used to live here; but I think
they prefer to be boarded with their friends
instead of living in this large house. You may
think that odd, but there is no place like home,
you know. In one of the rooms you can see the
coat and other things that belonged to the great
Admiral Horatio Nelson. The old sailor-wardens
are very proud to show all the curiosities.







A PET BIRD. 13



--- ---

























ROM our ship we see some very jolly-look-
ing sailors. They are on their homeward
voyage, and are bringing a gay bird of
paradise. They seem to be very pleased
that it has become so tame.


A







14 AT GRAVESEND.





















-I Ti E are now about to say good-bye to the
SThames, for here we are at Gravesend,
the avenue to the port of London.
Here are many outward-bound vessels
at anchor, waiting to be examined by the Custom
House officers, or for their clearance papers. What
with the boats coming out with provisions, and
the passenger boats to London, it is a very bus-
tling scene.







GIBRALTAR. 15















HIS is our next halting-place. We have
left the Atlantic Ocean, and are sailing
up the Mediterranean. Gibraltar consists
of a great rocky mountain running from
north to south, about three miles in length, and a
little more than half a mile in breadth. On the
top of the mountain the British soldiers have some
of their barracks and forts. On the western side
of the rock the town is built, as well as the great
batteries and works of defence. If we had time
we might explore the wonderful caverns on the
north side of the rock.


* .






16 IN ALGIERS.























"middle one is a soldier. The other man is
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2 EEE are three natives of Algiers. The
middle one is a soldier. The other man is
either a juggler by profession, or is only
amusing himself by playing with this
string and balls. The woman is a water-carrier.
See how cleverly she is pouring the water from
her skin bag into the stone jar!
(1)







POMPEY'S PILLAR. 17




















+ E pause for a few minutes in Alexandria
to view the famous Pompey's Pillar.
It consists of three pieces of the finest
granite, about ninety feet high and
twenty-five in circumference. At one time Alex-
andria was a celebrated city of Lower Egypt, and
for a long time its capital. It was built by Alex-
ander the Great. There, too, was a famous light-
house, erected on the island of Pharos, which used
to be one of the wonders of the world.
(1) 2







18 THE PYRAMIDS.








~'~---=--;"--=----~= -








HE Pyramids are a range of very old and
very enormous monuments in Egypt, on
the opposite side of the river from Cairo.
The three largest are situated close to
Ghizeh, the highest one of which is called the
Pyramid of Cheops, from the prince by whom it
is supposed to have been erected. You must read
for yourselves all about these strange buildings,
when you will find that they are not solid masses,
as they were once supposed to be. It will amuse
you very much to read how the openings were
found out, and what was discovered there.







IN THE DESERT, 19














W--~














ERE are a number of camels preparing
to set off across the Desert with their
masters. Some of them are standing up,
as if impatient to be off, while others
are lying down resting.
'-<"~~--~~







20 THE DYING CAMEL.

























I-I, how sad! See, one of the camels has
"fallen down, and is dying. We do not
see his master, but perhaps he is away in
search of water, in the hope that it will
restore the poor beast to life. The camel is called
the "ship of the Desert."







CROCODILES. 21

t -F- -- ---- -- L - --












ES, you may well shudder, and be glad you
are sitting safe in this comfortable room,
instead of being in the Nile, where the
crocodile of Northern Africa still ranges.
It is certainly a most destructive and greatly
dreaded animal, but it is as valuable in the water
as the hyena and vulture are upon the land. It
rather prefers tainted to fresh meat, and is of great
service in devouring the dead animals that would
pollute the waters and the air. It is strange to
think, is it not? that the crocodile comes out of
an egg about as large as that of a goose. There
are many eggs laid at one time, but they are
very often devoured by other animals.







22 THE SUEZ CANAL.











4 E are now sailing along the Suez Canal
en route for the Red Sea and Aden.
SThe making of this canal gave employ-
ment to ten thousand labourers; and now
that it has been opened, it shortens the journey
to India very much. It was such a good thing
that before the Suez Canal was made there was a
fresh-water canal from near Cairo to Ismailia, mid-
way, and then on to Suez itself. A supply is
conveyed from Ismailia to Port Said by a large
iron pipe. If this. fresh-water canal had not been
there the workmen could not have lived. Egypt
is one of the driest countries in the world-which
accounts for the wonderful preservation of its
architectural monuments-and if it were not for
the river Nile, it would be wholly barren.







ADEN. 23


















ERE we are at Aden, the best harbour on
the coast of Arabia, and where our Suez
steamer goes in to take on coal at the
dep6t. Aden is a fortified station, situ-
ated like Gibraltar on a rocky peninsula connected
with the mainland by a low and narrow isthmus.
It will astonish you very much when I tell you
that rain falls but once in three years here, and
only for a fortnight when it does come; but then
it is collected and stored in very large reservoirs
behind the towi. 0






24 BOMBAY.

















E now see Bombay; the word meaning
"good bay," as it has a very good har-
bour and anchoring-ground, formed by
several islands. On one of these the
city is built. In the streets the bright and many-
coloured costumes of the Parsees make the scene
quite gay. It is said that the number of Parsees
in the world is under one hundred thousand, and
that half of them live in Bombay. On account of
its good harbour, it has become the chief emporium
of the East, especially in the trade with Europe
by Egypt.







UP THE GANGES. 25













E have had a fine long sail from Bombay to
Point de Galle, and then on to Calcutta;
and now we are going to have a river
journey from there to above Allahabad,
so we must keep our eyes very wide open, as there
will be interesting sights to see. We will land
occasionally, and camp out for the night in any
healthy district we come to. Yonder are boats tak-
ing merchandise up the Ganges, such a celebrated
river that I need not tell you anything about it,
for of course you know it is the most sacred of all
the Indian rivers. It is an act of religion to bathe
in its waters, wherever it flows northward, as well as
elsewhere, and especially where it joins the Jumna.






26 A TIGER-HUNT.




.-N












E have arrived in good time if you care
to see a tiger-hunt. Very likely this
is a "man-eater," and so the people
have come out to kill it. In some parts
of India the tiger is considered sacred, and is not
allowed to be killed without consent of the native
chief, who often preserves them as foxes are pre-
":;:,served in England. No doubt he has come out
with some honoured guests to give them a few
hours' amusement, and has ordered out his best
trained elephants and beaters.







AN INDIAN ELEPHANT. 27

















HIS is an Indian elephant. How do we
know that? By its head and ears; for
the African one has a much shorter head,
and very large, long ears. In its native
state the elephant lives in herds, and as close to
water as possible, as they are very fond of water.
They can lay up a store of it in their interiors,
somewhat like the camel, and when they want to
cool their bodies they draw the water out again by
means of their wonderful trunk. The elephant
could not live without its trunk, as the short thick
neck and the tusks prevent it from grazing.



A







28 A BOAR-HUNT.





















-I-t OU will easily see that this is a boar-hunt.
S See how the little pigs are scampering
off, flying here, there, and everywhere,
to escape from the spear of the hunter !
The poor mother pig has been stuck, and the great
boar is so. angry that he is boldly charging at the
horse, determined to do him an injury if he pos-
sibly can. There are no wild pigs in this country
now, though there used to be long ago.







-A STRANGE NURSE. 29







~ s - .. ..






SDON'T wonder at you laughing at this
very strange nurse. This is a sight often
seen in India; and let me tell you the
elephant is often far more careful of its
little charge than many a nursemaid. I remember
hearing a gentleman (an officer) telling about one
he saw from his room window. It had been left
in charge of a very small baby, and it allowed the
baby to crawl about round and round its thick
legs; but the moment it crawled away it lifted the
baby up with its trunk and brought it back again to
the shelter of its huge body. Every now and
then it would twist its trunk round the waist of
the child and swing it gently to and fro.







30 A PLEASANT SCENE.

I







C I



I




-_ -
--.-_ -- -. -. -




HIS man has done some deed worthy of
honour, and the chief is presenting him
with a beautiful robe called a khelaut. I
hope every one of his companions is
pleased; but it is a well-known fact that much
jealousy exists at the courts of Eastern princes,
which leads to much unhappiness.







A SPLENDID BUILDING. 31




















HIS is the wonderful Taj, which holds with-
in its lovely dome of white marble the
remains of the beautiful and greatly be-
loved wife of the Emperor Shah Jehan.
If I had time I could tell you a great deal about
the beauty of its carving, its inlaid work, and the
wonderful echo in the dome. When people look
upon the Taj for the first time, they are greatly
impressed at the sight of its wonderful beauty.







32 IN CANTON.





















' E are now in Canton, China, aniii have
arrived in time to see the Feast of
S Lanterns. The procession is intended
to show the respect the Chinese have
for the spirits of their departed ancestors; and lasts
for five or six days. On large tables adorned
with lights and flowers, all kinds of refreshments
and fruits are laid out, which are eaten at mid-
night, when everybody carries a paper lantern.
L







A TEA GARDEN. 33



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S- ^ -' 4, -t











./ E now pay a visit to a tea garden.
The men are gathering the tea leaves
from the old plants and carrying them
away in baskets. Tea shrubs must be
three years old before the leaves are gathered.
Some of the men are watering the young plants,
so that there may be a good crop in the years
to come. The tea plant is a hardy evergreen,
grows from three to six feet in height, and is
of the same order as the camellia, the flowers of
which are also used to give fragrance to tea.
() 3


,







34 A TEA MERCHANT'S HOUSE.


















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IHIS is the house of a tea merchant; and
'D i- very plain it looks. The houses of the
ILri mandarins are very different, the sloping
" 'roofs being all done over with points and
pinnacles, and little bells and coloured tiles. These
are found in the country-houses, but never in the
town ones. At the entrance there are always two
painted gods; these, according to the belief of the
Chinese, keep off evil spirits, of which they are
much afraid. There is a dog, too. I wonder he
is not afraid he will be eaten.







AN EMPEROR. 35














I


HIS is a picture of a late Emperor of China,
in his splendid robe of gold brocade and
his necklace of pearls and other jewels.
In his cap he has a peacock's feather,
which is a sign of his high station. He is called
the Father of the Celestial Empire, and his power
is without bounds over nearly a fourth part of the
human race. He looks very good-natured and
"stout; but that is what all Chinamen like to be-
as fat as they possibly can. That is not what we
like to be in this country; for here most people
do their best to keep themselves thin.







36 A MANDARIN.





: -- -










^ E now ask you to look at another
Chinaman. He is a mandarin, and
looks almost as grand as the emperor,
"though his hat is not the same. A
mandarin is a magistrate, and has great power
given to him. We know his rank by the knob,
or button, on the top of his cap, and by the badge
of embroidered silk on his breast, with some sort
of animal on it. He has one of the same kind on
his back also; and his necklace of large beads
hangs down quite to his waist. Of course he will
have a long queue hanging down his back, and
trou ers like bags, and shoes with turned-up toes.







A STATE DINNER. 37









L11








HIS is a state dinner; and a very fine affair
it seems to be. The Chinese eat with
chop-sticks; and though it is supposed
"they live upon rats and mice, and all sorts
of things we shudder to think of, still they have
fine feasts, and eat all sorts of good things, and
drink wine. It is a pity we cannot see the very
small feet of the ladies. I am sure it would make
you laugh to see them, though I daresay they
suffer a good deal from having them cramped up
when they are young.







38 THE BAMBOO RAT.
-....-^- /
--



Eg
*: ', ''








j,, JIIS creature is very injurious to the bam-
S. lo:o canes, on the roots of which it feeds.
You would not like to meet one of them.
In size it is somewhat like a small rabbit,
and its colour is brown, with a slightly paler shade
on the throat and lower parts. The long incisor
teeth are faced with bright enamel, and this, as
you may well suppose, gives it a very curious ap-
pearance. The tail is short and marked, and, I
may add, very stubby-not at all like the tail of
our common rat; but you see the bamboo rat is not
such a lover of cream as the rat I saw the other
morning in my pantry, busily engaged drawing off
the cream with its tail, and then licking it.







GOING TO A FEAST, 39













7* T ERE is a very great personage indeed
being carried in his sedan chair by his
four bearers, most likely to a great feast,
almost the only amusement the Chinese
of rank indulge in. He has had his three invita-
tions, as is customary in China-one the evening
before, another on the morning, and a third im-
mediately before dinner. When he arrives at the
house of his friend, he will be conducted to his
place with great ceremony. The gentlemen gener-
ally sit in pairs at small square tables, and are
served with food used by other nations, besides
other viands, served up in porcelain dishes, and
eaten with porcelain spoons and with two little
ebony chop-sticks.






40 A FAMOUS CITY.










.--- --------
A














+- E now find ourselves in the famous Nan-
king, once distinguished for covering a
r greater extent of ground than perhaps
"any other city in the world at the time.
It was once the imperial city, and the capital of
Southern China; but the seat of government and the
great tribunals were removed to Peking, and Nan-
king lost its importance. This is the famous Por-
celain Tower, two hundred feet high. Look well
at it, for now it has been demolished.







A CELEBRATED RIVER. 41















S-E must, before leaving China, pay a visit
to the celebrated Hoang-ho, or Yellow
River. Though broad and rapid, it is
in many places so shallow as to be
scarcely navigable. It often overflows its banks,
forcing the people to raise dikes along its sides in
many places. The name is taken from the colour
of the clay or sand at the bottom and sides. On
all Chinese rivers a very busy scene is presented,
as they are crowded with barges for passengers
and barques for burden, all as different from each
other as they are different from anything of the
kind in the rest of the world.







42 AN ASIATIC FOX.














HIS fox is quite as cunning-looking as our
own Master Reynard; but as it is an
Asiatic fox, it is not quite the same. It
is greatly admired for the beauty of its
form and the brilliancy and variety of its colours.
It is much smaller than the European fox, though
it has the same black marks on the back of the
ears and in front of the hind. and fore legs. The
coat consists of long, close, rich fur, as fine as that
of any of the American varieties, but much brighter
in colour. No doubt it is quite as great a robber
as our own common fox, and lies hidden in the
bushes by the swamps to waylay some of the many
ducks to be found by the Chinese rivers.







IN AUSTRALIA. 43



I I







S,4





E have now found our way to Australia;
\ and here we see two of the natives
sitting before each other having a pri-
vate "palaver." They would be looked
upon by us as a set of lazy fellows; for they neither
farm the land nor are they shepherds, and never
think of putting a seed or a plant into the ground
for themselves, though they are very fond of the
fruit introduced by the white men. Their prin-
cipal food is the opossum, and if they are near a
river they fish a little, and when very hungry
even eat reptiles and insects.







44 KANGAROOS.





















angaroos. Do you notice that their






and by this means they get along at a great speed.
The mamma kangaroo has a pouch, and she puts
her little young ones into it, and jumps away with
them hidden quite snugly.







THE FRIENDLY ISLANDS. 45














HIS is a canoe belonging to the Tonga or
Friendly Islands, in the South Pacific
Ocean. When you are old enough, you
will be able to read all about them, and
how Captain Cook thought this would be a good
name for them, because the natives all seemed to
live on such friendly terms with one another, and
from their politeness to strangers. They live upon
cocoa-nuts, yams, hogs, fowls, fish, and shell-fish.
They are very fond of bathing themselves in ponds;
and even though stagnant, they prefer them to
the water of the sea. The natives are tall, strong,
and handsome, but inclined to be rather indolent.
The church is built on the highest point of the island.







46 TAHITI.


















S HIS island in the South Pacific is called
o-~- -s-~-~-: --:- --- -T= --_








-4--






Tahiti. The canoes seem to be very dif-
ferent from those of the Friendly Islands;
but the people are very different. They
used to be in manners quite savages; but the mis-
sionaries have done them a great deal of good, and
_ --- '--=- =- -- ----









they are becoming just like people in this country.
All sorts of roots and plants grow here,-and fra-
grant sandal-wood.







A FEMALE DANCER. 47


















very funny figure she has made of herself.
The things like fans at her back must be
intended for wings, I think, and will add
much to her grace when she dances. She seems
to have no shoes on her feet; but she has been
careful to provide herself with a very fine head-
dress. You must read all about this beautiful
island when you grow bigger, and about its brave
inhabitants. You will be very much amused, too,
to hear about the strange wooden pillow they lay
their heads on when they go to sleep.







48 AN ISLE OF BEAUTY.









_-.- -_- _-:_E~ . .. _ L,---- .-






ERE is a view of another island in the
Pacific Ocean. It is called Raiatea. Do
you notice what a number of strange-
looking trees grow here ? It would be
very nice to be able to get fresh cocoa-nuts off the
trees, and drink the sweet milk for breakfast.
And then it would be delightful to paddle about
in that canoe, and look through the clear water,
down to the very bottom, and watch the lovely
fishes swimming about, blue and yellow, and with
crimsbn spots sometimes. How we should laugh,
too, at the funny coloured crabs.







RADACK ISLANDERS. 49









_4 v%, :.* = .= ..







Radack Islands out for a pleasure sail
EIRE are some of the natives of the

round about the group of islands. The
sea there between the islands is very
deep; but you see the chief is doing his best to
guide the boat steadily, and his family are sitting
very quietly under the strange-looking sail. The
natives of this group of islands speak quite a dif-
ferent language from the inhabitants of the other
islands-of the Pacific. They are very good-natured
and simple, and have made some progress in civili-
zation, living on the produce of their orchards.
(1) 4







50 A FLEET OF CANOES.




-. .=--. .- -.













UCH a gathering of canoes It must be a
great battle that is 4oing to take place.
All the fighting-men are ready with their
bows and spears; while their chiefs are
standing up in each canoe, telling them how they
are to fight. No doubt the enemy is making ready
too; and they will indeed require to be careful,
for here is the king himself, in the largest canoe,
sitting on a chair of state. He is a very big man,
and has his club ready.







BLACK MEN AND WHITE MEN. 51



C -Z -:- = .












OU would laugh if you knew why these
black savages are looking so surprised.
It is at sight of the white men. They
never had seen such people before. Some
of their friends had, and had got pieces of cloth
from them, which they are wearing now; but this
company had never seen a white man. They are
holding out their hands to them, and showing by
signs that they are glad to see them. Coming
slowly forward to meet them, it is no wonder
if they are somewhat afraid, as savages are often
treacherous.







52 NATIVES OF NEW CALEDONIA FISHING.

















2f--






e ]EW CALEDONIA belongs to the French,
and the island is as large as Ireland. It
is situated between Fiji and Australia,
on the margin of the Coral Sea, so called
because scarcely a league of it is without some
island or reef of coral. The trepang-fishery is a
source of wealth. Cyclones are an annual scourge.







MONUMENTS ON EASTER ISLAND. 53



S- - _











"RASTER ISLAND is an island in the
Eastern part of the Pacific Ocean. The
island has no safe anchorage, no wood
for fuel, no fresh water, and no domestic
animals except a few fowls; and the in-
habitants live on yams, potatoes, and sugar-cane.
Strange to say, on this island are found a number
"of colossal statues, some of which are fifteen and
even eighteen feet high. They stand on platforms,
which have been made with a considerable degree
of art. Some people suppose that these monu-
ments were erected by a nation more numerous
than the present inhabitants.







54 AMERICAN SALOON STEAMER.


















E have now arrived in America, and have
embarked on board one of the large
saloon steamers for a sail up one of the
rivers. You will notice an American
steamer is very different in construction from the
steamers we are accustomed to see on our rivers
or sailing from our ports; but no doubt they are
found more useful and more convenient for Ameri-
can passengers. It must be very pleasant to sit in
the saloon looking out at the houses built by
the margin of the river, as we sail along.






NIAGARA FALLS. 55


--













HIS is considered one of the grandest sights
in the world. The water has come down
from the lakes into the river St. Law-
rence. The falls are made by a sudden
break in the level of the rapid river, and over the
ledge all the waters thunder in a volume that
never ceases, and is never less in quantity at any
season of the year. The spray rises to a great
height, and in the rays of the sun forms beautiful
rainbows.






56 THE GRIZZLY BEAR















EE what I have to show you now. You
may well shrink back and look frightened,
E what I have to show you now. You

when I tell you this is a great grizzly
bear. He looks very hungry indeed, and
his mouth seems to be watering for something to
eat. What sharp claws he has, too We may be
very thankful he is a native of the Rocky Moun-
tains in the Far West, for it would not be agree-
able to meet him of a stray night on our way
home from some nice picnic or Christmas party.
The next time you visit a menagerie or a zoological
garden, look out for him.







A FRIEND IN NEED. 57



























been out after a bison. It looks as if
it meant to gore him; but the North
American Indian is hastening to help
him. See what a long, sharp knife the hunter has
in his hand







58 A LOG CABIN.















SDO not think there is a boy or a girl in
Great Britain who has not thought to
himself or to herself, Oh, how I should
Q like to live in the backwoods of America !
I should have everything to do for myself,
and live such a free, happy life!" If you were
there, this is the kind of house you would build
and live in. How do you like its appearance ?
You see the very pig has a free, happy life, and
roams about at its own sweet will; but its master
intends to shut it up in that wooden erection he
is standing near. He has heard strange sounds
at night from the wolves and other wild animals.







THE GRAY WOLF. 59





----
_-- ---- = -- ---- i--^ ^s-~r^ ]:-"-

._ _ -- -::- =----




A i _







F you lived in the backwoods, this is one
of the gray wolves you would most likely
see, as they are very common throughout
the northern regions of America. They are
particularly numerous to the eastward of the
Rocky Mountains, where they watch the bison
herds and prey upon the sick and straggling calves.
They rarely attack a full-grown animal, and hun-
ters state that they often see wolves' walking
through a herd of bulls without exciting the least
alarm. The marksmen, knowing this, often wear
a cap with two ears, to imitate the head of a wolf.







60 A BISON-HUNT.





---------




_/'- ----~ -. "__--



















"always do when running. The hunter has
shot his arrow from his bow, and is looking anxi-
i'-_--
















ously to see if it has taken effect; for he knows
well that the bison when wounded may turn upon
him with its sharp-pointed horns.







A USEFUL ANIMAL. 61



---









0OU will be surprised when I tell you that
though the North American bison looks
so heavy and so fierce, it runs very
swiftly, and is a very timid creature.
It is very valuable to the Red Indian, as its
body supplies him with almost every necessary of
life. From its flesh he gets food, which is eaten
fresh, or cut into long strips and dried in the
sun; it is then called jerked beef. The hide of
the bison supplies the Indian with his tent, some
part of his dress, his bed, and his shield; and as it
is now his chief article of trade with the whites, it is
thus the source whence he derives blankets, knives,
beads, and every other produce of civilization.







62 A RIDE FOR LIFE.


----

'i---~-:- -- -~--- -:.
-"--_^..^

















ERE is a terrible scene. The prairie is
on fire. See how the Indians are gal-
loping away. The horses know as well
as their riders that they must exert them-
selves to the utmost to escape to a place of safety
before they are overtaken by the flames or the
suffocating smoke. It is a ride for life.







OUT OF DANGER. 63






















"T is delightful to look at this picture, is it
not ? for now we see the chief and one of
his companions have managed to make
Their escape. How tired the horse must
be. He is looking very proud to find he has been
able to bear his beloved master to a place of safety.
The poor chief is looking back anxiously to see if
his friends have escaped also.







64 GATHERING COTTON.





.. ,- --- "-.










ERE we see some negroes on a cotton
plantation in the Southern States of
America. See how busy they are. The
cotton plant is a beautiful shrub, some-
what larger than a gooseberry bush, bearing large
flwers, generally yellow, and not unlike those of
the hollyhock. The fruit is a pod about the size
of a pigeon's egg, in which are seeds not unlike
small brown peas, and covered all over with fine
white hairs sometimes more than an inch in length.
When these hairs are separated by machinery from
the seeds they become cotton wool.







OFF BY RAIL. 65























OW we must get into this train, and set
out for another country. See what a fine
starry night it is; and there's the moon
at its first quarter. You may go to sleep
for a little, if you like, as we have a long journey
to make; so shut your eyes, unless you prefer to
look a little longer at the stars. I think we can-
not do better than pay a visit to South America.
(1) 5







66 IN SOUTH AMERICA.


















SE must now pay a very hurried visit to
South America. Here is a novel bridge
used by travellers to cross from one
part of the Andes to another. The
people there would require to be good gymnasts,
you will say, and I think so too. Just look at
the great crevasse between the two sides of the
mountain. If either of the men were to lose hold
he would fall to a great depth, and very likely
be dashed to pieces. Their companion, who has
reached the other side, is cheering the others on.







WILD HORSES. 67

-


-c-r








ERE we see a herd of wild horses, the
mustang of the South American pampas.
They are always under the guardianship
of one leader, who is able, in a wonder-
ful manner, to give his orders to every one of the
herd at once. They are galloping away from the
hunters, who have come out with their lassos to
catch them. When the mustang is caught, it is so
furious at finding itself a prisoner that it nearly
strangles itself by its plunges and struggles; but
it exhausts itself at last, and is forced to stand
and gasp for breath. The hunter then dismounts,
and keeping his hand on the lasso, advances cau-
tiously towards the poor animal, hauling the rope
tight whenever it tries to escape.







68 A BOAT'S CREW.







,= -__ --_














S ERE is a boat's crew of South American
Indians. See how regularly they are
using their queer flat oars. They are
more like paddles in shape than oars, the
handles are so short; but I daresay they manage
to get along quite quickly, the water is so smooth.
If the boat were away, we would know this was a
foreign country by looking at the trees.







A DELIGHTFUL SAIL. 69



















; ERE is a little boy having a delightful
sail in a little canoe all by himself, and
he is getting along through the water
without either paddle or oar. This is,
I feel certain, the son of one of the chiefs, and he
has got his servant-a slave, perhaps-to take the
rope between his teeth and go swimming about
the water. It is to be hoped there is no horrid
creature lurking about under the water, ready to
snap off the legs of the poor fellow.







70 A STRANGE HOUSE.



















ERE is a very strange house. How would
you like to live in it ? See, the natives
have selected four suitable trees, and
"have made a floor with planks of wood,
and mats they have woven. They have also got
a roof overhead; arid seem to be quite as happy as
we are in our homes. There are ever so many
of these peculiar-looking dwellings on the opposite
side of the river; but you see the people have got
boats, and ferry across from one side to the other.







A NATIVE. 71

















HIS man belongs to a tribe of Fuegians
"who inhabit both sides of the Strait of
Magellan. They live entirely on fish and
wild fowl, and they spend most of their
time in their canoes. The canoes are made from
the bark of trees, sewed together and glued. It
must be winter with him, for in summer they wear
very little clothing. But he has got on his white
robe made of the skin of the sea-wolf, which they
kill with their spears and arrows. The Fuegians
who live on the island of Tierra del Fuego wear
no head-dresses.







72 CAPE HORN.


















ERE is Cape Horn, where a bright look-
out is always kept in case of storms. It
is a very cold part of the sea, and ships
often pass great icebergs floating about,
and the sailors are very much afraid of them.
Cape Horn is the southernmost point of America,
and is a high, steep, and bare rock. Many birds
fly about here, especially the great albatrosses.
When their wings are spread out they sometimes
measure fourteen feet.
-^-*c .blJ^r







CAPE OF GOOD HOPE. 73

_- .- _-.---f'sfy^'^-





~-~~~ __:_ --- -






ND now we find ourselves transported to
Africa, where we land at the Cape of
Good Hope to take a look at the coun-
try of the Hottentots. This is Table
Mountain. Cape Town is prettily situ-
ated at the head of Table Bay, on a plain slop-
ing downwards. The town is well and regularly
built, the houses being-of red brick or stone, with
a veranda in front. There is a castle on the
right-hand side of the town; it is a fortress of
considerable strength. Many of the public offices
of Cape Colony are within its walls, as well as bar-
racks for one thousand men. Table Bay is large
enough to give safe anchorage to many ships.







74 AMONG THE KAFFIRS.


















ERE are some of the Kaffirs travelling
from one part of the country to another,
perhaps to secure better pasturage for
"their cattle. It is not a very difficult
matter to remove their goods, as all the furniture
of a common Kaffir hut consists of a few mats,
coarse earthenware pots of native manufacture, a
rush basket so closely woven as to contain liquids,
a calabash, and a bundle of assegais. Some have
milk-sacks made out of bullocks' hide, and wooden
carved vessels.







IN FRANCE. 75


















E now find ourselves at Marseilles, the
chief commercial city of France. As
it is situated far enough eastward from
the mouth of the Rhone to have deep
water in-shore, wines, silks, oil, soap, and various
fancy articles are exported from it. The harbour
is formed by a small inlet of the sea running east-
ward into the very heart of the city, which is
built round it. The port is capable of accommo-
dating seventeen hundred vessels, and is surrounded
by fine quays.






76 FRENCH PEASANTS.



:, r ,: '_

-



-jl -----


--_-: :-_ -_- -


ERE are some French peasants. The
women have come out to purchase fruit
at the fruit-stalls, and are taking the
opportunity to have a little gossip. A
Frenchman likes to be out in the open air as much
as possible; and so should we too, if our climate
were as delightful as it is in sunny France. It
must be very queer to see the people taking their
meals out of doors, and sitting with their work,
while the men smoke their pipes. The French are
a very happy, light-hearted people.







A CURIOUS SIGHT. 77











Me-~




E now take a peep at Landes, a depart-
\ ment in the south-west of France. The
population of the wilds is scanty, and
the peasantry live in solitary cabins.
The head of the family cultivates the soil at home,
and the younger members go either to the forests
to make charcoal or to watch their flocks, mounted
on their long stilts, that they may pass through
the morasses dry-footed. The shepherds watch
their flocks mounted on these stilts, and rest on
their staves, the tops of which are generally broad
and round to afford them a seat. All their leisure
time is occupied in knitting large woollen stockings.







78 A GRAND BUILDING.

















OW we find ourselves at Paris, considered
by many the most beautiful city in Europe.
Originally built on a small island in the
Seine, on which is the Cathedral of Notre
Dame, it now covers both sides of the river, and
is next to London in size. From one of the square
towers of the cathedral you can not only see many
of the grand old palaces and buildings, but the great
strong wall built round the city. Paris is the
admiration of the world for its architectural monu-
ments, its libraries, its museums, and its gaiety.







THE ALPS. 79


_-.& -...--- -












TfET tiii now tabk a







po-itr on off the- Alps. O
thi heights w is al-
ways to be found. But where they approach the
open, level country, which is much warmer, they
are often crowned with large forests. Vast masses
of snow and ice often separate from the mountains,
and sliding down, overturn everything in their
course, and sometimes cause great loss of life.







80 MONKS OF ST. BERNARD.








',*-- -b --












ERE we now see two monks of St. Ber-
nard (a mountain of the Alps) sending
off one of their faithful and most intelli-
gent dogs in search of travellers. The
snow is falling very thickly, and the monks are
afraid that some one may have set out and have
now been overtaken in the storm. In a very
few moments the path will be covered, and the
traveller may become confused, and lose his way.







A SWISS MAIDEN. 81



F
',v












ERE is a Swiss maiden resting under
a vine. She has been playing the tam-
bourine, and dancing with her com-
panions; but now she is tired, and has
sat down for a little. What a beautiful bunch of
"grapes is hanging right over her head! She
surely cannot be thirsty, or she would pluck some.
Perhaps she does not value them so much as we
do in this country. There, in her sunny land,
they grow in such quantities; and she may be
tired of eating them. Grapes are what wine is
made from; and you must get some one to tell
you how it is made.
(, 6







82 A BROWN BEAR.




















HIS great brown bear has been prowling
about, and has come upon some goats.
Oh, how frightened the poor things must
be! See, the bear has put his great paw
upon one, and is holding it down. I fear he
means to kill it and carry it away to where he
has left his wife and young cubs, and a very fine
supper they will have. The shepherd made this
little shed for the goats to shelter under, but it
was not strong enough to keep the bear out.







A VIEW OF ROME. 83















OW we pay a visit to Rome. The dome-
shaped building in the centre is the
Church of St. Peter's, the largest and
most splendid Christian church in the
world, and said to have cost 12,000,000 sterling
to build it. It was begun in 1506, and many
great architects died while having charge of it.
The dome was finished in May 1590, the work
having been carried on from 1588 night and day
by six hundred workmen; and when the last stone
had been blessed by the Pope, it was fixed in its
place at the sound of a discharge of cannon from
the Castle of St. Angelo, the building to the right.







84 MOUNT VESUVIUS.




--














a peep at Vesuvius; but we must keep
at a safe distance from the mountain,
as it is at present in active eruption.
It is celebrated as one of the principal volcanoes
of Europe. It must be a very exciting thing' to
live close to a burning mountain. Have you
ever read how the cities of Pompeii and Hercu-
laneum were overwhelmed by showers of cinders
and fragments of rock, and later on by streams
of lava?







MOSCOW. 85



















HE view of Moscow is very fine indeed.
The numerous towers give the city quite
an Oriental appearance. The most re-
markable of the hills on which Moscow
stands is the Kremlin. It is enclosed by a wall
two miles in circuit, and is crowded with palaces,
churches, monasteries, and museums. Near the
cathedral is the largest bell in the world, weighing
nearly two hundred tons, and believed never to
have been rung.







86 PURSUED BY WOLVES.



Ik -^




A AfV'' ~ ~
'l





















haste they can to escape from the
wolves, who are in close pursuit after
"them. See how terrified the poor horses
are, and how they are straining every muscle to
gallop as fast as they can. The gentleman is
trying to shoot one of the wolves with his pistol.








KILLED BY A BEAR. 87













Al-












HIS hunter had gone out with his bow
and arrows to shoot game. I hope he
left no wife and little children at home;
for he has been overtaken by a great bear,
and now he is quite dead. The bear is looking
round at its companion, and growling to warn it
not to come near.







88 LAPLANDERS.


___ -- _
__ = -.-- --.. u- '---















E are now in Lapland; and a very cold
country it is, too,-quite the opposite
to Algiers and the Desert. The Lap-
lander we now see has even his hands
covered; and he seems to be as glad as the rein-
deer that his wife has finished the milking. What
a useful animal the reindeer is to the poor Lap-
lander! It draws his sledge, provides him with
warm clothing, and supplies him with milk. You
can see some tents, to the left; and very queer
they look, too.







THE NORTHERN LIGHTS. 89


















T is in the ice-bound regions of the North
that the Aurora Borealis is seen in all its
grandeur. It is more commonly known
as the Northern Lights. How it must
help to cheer the inhabitants of those dark regions.
See, the reindeer belonging to this Lapland village
is walking about in search of its supper, and has
found a nice tuft of coarse grass sheltering behind
a stone. This floating wall of light completely
blocks out the sky, so that nothing can be seen of
the stars for several hours at a time.







90 AN ACCIDENT.

















ERE are two Eskimos, and one has fallen
into the water. His friend is doing his
best to stop his dogs, that he may pull
him out. Now, you must know that
Eskimo dogs are sometimes very provoking. If
a sledge remains fast in the deep snow, these
animals, instead of helping to get it out by pull-
ing all together, actually lie quietly down, and
appear full of joy at the accident. Now, you would
think, to see the determined way they are dashing
off, that they meant to leave the poor Eskimo in the
water to drown; but I hope the man will be saved.







FAITHFUL COMPANIONS. 91






--- -Y_. ---- _










..E, --.P1

'H PHIS is a pair of Eskimo dogs, and very
..,od ones they are. They help the
Es kimo to draw his sledge over the
frozen sea, and are very hardy and strong.
Sometimes an Eskimo has as many as forty dogs;
and he takes great pleasure in them, and can hardly
be persuaded to sell them. You may see that
their skin is very shaggy indeed, and that they
have splendid bushy tails. They seem to be very
good-natured, and are very fond of their masters,
who treat them with much kindness and affection.







92 PARTING WORDS.

AND now the pictures in my Panorama are ex-
hausted, and the curtain must once more fall. I
thank you for your attention, and hope that what
you have seen and heard may induce you to read
for yourselves accounts of foreign lands and their
inhabitants. Every one cannot travel, but all can
find out much-either by reading, or listening
while others read aloud-about the different coun-
tries of the globe; and no pleasanter hour can be
spent than with a good atlas spread out before
you, and a friend willing to answer your intelligent
questions.







THE END.










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