Bright thoughts for little ones

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Material Information

Title:
Bright thoughts for little ones
Physical Description:
8 p. : col. ill. ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Cogger, Edward P ( Illustrator )
McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Publisher:
McLoughlin Bros.
Place of Publication:
New York
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's poetry -- 1883
Picture books for children -- 1883
Bldn -- 1883
Genre:
Children's poetry
Picture books for children
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Poetry and prose.
General Note:
Illustrations signed Cogger.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001844481
oclc - 13486794
notis - AJR8753
System ID:
UF00050309:00001

Full Text

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COPYRICHTED--183
-BY McLOUGHLIN BROS.

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ADA'S PET LAMB.
Ada was a good, merry-hearted, happy little girl, loved by all who
knew her, and very dear to her mother's heart, She loved to run in the
meadows and woods, and pick the beautiful flowers; or wander in the
lanes with her pretty pet Lamb trotting at her heels. Ada and her
pretty pet might often be seen rolling together upon the grass, and when
the days were warm and fine, and her mother could spare her, she would
take her doll and cart, and followed by Curly," as she called her pet,
would pass the time pleasantly in the woods beneath the green leaves,
or sitting by the brink of some tiny brook.























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HARRY AND HIIS DOG.
What do you think of Harry in his Scotch dress, and what do you
think of Bob, his dog? Don't you think Harry looks very handsome in
his fine clothes, and that Bob is very clever, setting on his hind legs beg-
ging for a bit of sugar ? Bob is fond of sugar, and will play all manner
of antics to get a piece; he can leap, and swim, and walk on his fore
paws, and draw a little cart which Harry has made for him, and set upon
the Pony's back when it gallops across the fields without tumbling off
Bob is also a very faithful. Dog, for when Harry goes to bed, he will lie
down at the door of his room, and there he will stay until Harry makes
his appearance again in the morning,
The Baldwin Library
University
fonda







































VIOLETS.
Picking the Violets Pleasure and happiness
Kissing your feet, Gladden each breast,
Out in the country, No cares or troubles
Pleasant and sweet, Break your sweet rest,
Roaming through meadows There, amongg God's beauties,
Covered with dew; Happier far
Happier, children Than thousands and thousands
Than monarchs are you. Of bigger folks are,








































DOBBIN.
My dear little friends, if you look at Dobbin's straight ears, quiet face,
and plump round body, you will see that he is well cared for, Freddy,
his mister, is very kind to him, never beats him, feeds him well, and
takes him out every morning for a run, So greatly does Dobbin love his
master, that he will follow him all about the yard, and down the road
at times, when Freddy allows him; and once, when the stable door was
left open and he saw his master coming, he trotted out to meet him,
looking so pleased, and laid his great shaggy head upon Freddy's
shoulder, You see even dumb creatures know when boys and girls
are kind to them.








































JACK AND JANE.
Little Jack Toft sat up aloft Jack answered, "no! all that here
In the bough of an apple-tree; I shall want for myself; grow
Little Jane May said to him, pray, Any that fall, yours you may call;"
Throw down an apple for me, Oh, what a greedy young elf!

Then came a crack! crash! and, good lack!
Down tumbled Jacky. But, ah!
Kind little Jane, pitied his pain,
And carried him home to Mammal









































KITTENS.
Two Kittens being left alone in a room one evening, began to amuse
themselves with a ball belonging to baby. For some time they got on
very well and very good-naturedly together, but, at length, they grew
sulky, and Tom, who was the wildest of the two, began to spit, and
growl, and make such a noise, that Puss, their mother, who was passing
at the moment, slipped into the room to see what was the matter. She
purred and mewed, and talked to them in her own way, till they seemed
quite ashamed of themselves, and when she called them, the Kittens
obeyed, and followed her down to the kitchen, where they had their
milk, and went peac3ably to sleep together in front of the fire.









































THE ARBOUR.
We've built ourselves an arbour They make a splendid banquet,
Beneath the walnut tree, And in the arbour lay,
We've trained a hop across the top And if they cannot eat it all,
And there we take our tea, They put the rest away.
When Eva has an apple, We've built ourselves an arbour
And Lily has a pear, Beneath the walnut tree; [drop
And Agnes has a bit of cake, But sometimes flop! the nuts will
They all agree to share. Into your cup of tea.









































EMMA'S DOLL.
Emma and Mary were sisters. They had a brother named Jack, who
seldom allowed a day-to pass without playing off some of his tricks upon
them, It happened one night that Emma, instead of putting away her
doll, as usual, left it upon the table in the parlor, Poor Emma I what
was her grief next morning, on discovering poor dolly lying on the floor
without its head! Jack, mischievous Jack, had cut it off, and it was
nowhere to be found, But Emma said nothing, and Jack who expect-
ed a good scolding, was so ashamed of his conduct, that he begged
Emma's forgiveness, and atoned for his mischief by buying his sister a
new doll





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