• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Historic note
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Table of Contents
 Main














Title: Commercial vegetable insect and disease control guide
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00049936/00001
 Material Information
Title: Commercial vegetable insect and disease control guide
Translated Title: Circular / Agricultural Extension Service ; no. 193C ( English )
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Brogdon, James
Marvel, M. E.
Mullin, R. S.
Publisher: Agricultural Extension Service, University of Florida
Publication Date: 1963
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00049936
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    Historic note
        Historic note
    Front Cover
        Page i
    Front Matter
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
    Main
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida















I



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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, AGRICULTURAL
EXTENSION SERVICE, GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA
Circular 193C May, 1963


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Commercial Vegetable Insect

And Disease Control Guide


J. E. BROGDON, M. E. MARVEL and R. S. MULLIN


Prepared in cooperation with the following Agricultural Ex-
periment Station workers (alphabetically by Experiment Sta-
tions and workers within each station):

Central Florida Station, Sanford: J. F. Darby, J. W. Wilson
Everglades Station, Belle Glade: W. G. Genung, E. D. Harris, P. L.
Thayer, C. Wehlburg
Gulf Coast Station, Bradenton: J. P. Jones, E. G. Kelsheimer,
A. J. Overman, J. M. Walter
Indian River Field Laboratory, Ft. Pierce: N. C. Hayslip, R. E.
Stall
Main Station, Gainesville: A. A. Cook, M. K. Corbett, P. Decker,
L. C. Kuitert, D. A. Roberts, A. N. Tissot, C. H. Van Middelem,
R. E. Waites, G. F. Weber, E. West
North Florida Station, Quincy: W. B. Tappan
Plantation Field Laboratory, Fort Lauderdale: H. I. Borders
Potato Investigations Laboratory, Hastings: A. H. Eddins, R. B.
Workman
Strawberry Investigations Laboratory, Plant City: A. N. Brooks
Subtropical Station, Homestead: R. M. Baranowski, R. A. Con-
over, J. W. Strobel, D. O. Wolfenbarger
Watermelon and Grape Investigations Laboratory, Leesburg: W.
C. Adlerz, J. M. Crall, N. C. Schenck


The use of trade names in this publication is solely for the purpose of
providing specific information. It is not a guarantee or warranty of the
products named and does not signify that they are approved to the exclu-
sion of others of suitable composition.


A Revision of Circular 193 B
This revision May 1963

COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS
(Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914)
Agricultural Extension Service, University of Florida,
Florida State University and United States Department of Agriculture, Cooperating
M. O. Watkins, Director
ii












CONTENTS
Page

SAFETY PRECAUTIONS ................................................................. .................... 2

FACTORS CONCERNING PESTICIDE APPLICATION .-.................. .................. 3

PESTICIDE RESIDUES AND TOLERANCES ...-...............-... ..... ............- 6

PEST CONTROL MEASURES .................... ..................... Insects Diseases
Beans ................. : .. ... ... ......... 11 26
Carrots ........-.-.. ................. ....... ........ 12 28
Celery ....................................................... 13 28
Corn, Sweet -------....... .. ---..-......--...-............. 13 31
Crucifers
Cabbage .......................--.--.. ------....... 15 32
Broccoli and Cauliflower ........--............................. 16 32
Brussel Sprouts and Chinese Cabbage ............... 32
Collards ..---- ---....... ...........-------.---........... 16 32
Mustard and Turnips ................... .................... 17 34
Rutabagas ........................................ ... .......... ...... 17 -
Radishes ................................ ............. ..................... 17 32
Cucurbits
Cantaloupe, Cucumber, Squash ................................ 17 34
Watermelons .... -----................ -......... .............. 17 36
Eggplant ................ ...... .............. ... ........... 18 37
Lettuce ......................................... .. ................................. 19 38
Endive (Escarole) .........-...--....----..-- ..-- ........... 19 38
Okra ...................................... ....... ............. 19 39
Onions .................... ....... ..... .................. 20 39
Peas ......................... .. .......----- -- --- ........ .. -............. 20 38
Peas, Southern (Cowpeas, Black-eye, Crowder) ........ 20 -
Peppers ...................................................... ..... 21 40
Potatoes ............. ........... .... .......................... 22 42
Potatoes, Sw eet ...... ................. ................................... 23 43
Spinach ....-- -...............-- ...........-- -.......-- .... ..... 24 -
Strawberries ................ ....- .............. ................. 24 44
Tom atoes ................ ........... ... ...................... ..... 25 45

POISON CONTROL CENTERS ............-...... .....-.................. Inside back cover








SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
Read and Heed the Precautions on the Label.-Relatively
few deaths have occurred among workers handling poisonous
agricultural products or economic poisons. Those that have
occurred can be traced to disregard of even the minimum safety
directions and precautions found on product labels. Some viola-
tions occur through ignorance or misunderstanding of the avail-
able information. Many more violations result from plain care-
lessness-or what is worse, recklessness on the part of workers
who have been adequately informed. The key to safe handling
is understanding coupled with the diligent practice of safe work-
ing habits. Accidents with pesticides can be prevented. Some
of the major causes are (1) leaving the material within reach of
irresponsible persons; (2) failure to read and follow the use
precautions on the label; (3) carelessness in the disposal of
empty containers.

ORGANIC PHOSPHATE INSECTICIDES
Parathion belongs to the phosphate group of insecticides
which also includes demeton (Systox), TEPP, phosdrin and
others. These materials are extremely poisonous-take special
precautions when you use them. When handling, mixing and ap-
plying such materials, use clean protective clothing, wear rubber
gloves and wear an approved respirator. Work so that dust or
spray does not blow back on you.
Early symptoms and signs of organic phosphate insecticide
poisoning include headache, giddiness, blurred vision, weakness,
chest discomfort, nervousness; a little later-nausea, cramps,
diarrhea, sweating, tears, salivation.

CHLORINATED HYDROCARBON INSECTICIDES
Chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides, which include DDT,
lindane, chlordane, aldrin, dieldrin and others, are generally less
hazardous to man than many of the phosphatic insecticides.
However, these also must be handled with proper precautions.
Symptoms and signs of poisoning by chlorinated hydrocarbon
insecticides include headache, nausea, vomiting, dizziness and
prostration. In more severe cases convulsions may occur with
or without warning symptoms. Coma may follow.
If a worker suspects excessive exposure to any insecticide,
he should see a doctor immediately.









A Note from the Authors


Control measures recommended here are the most effective
within limits of research results and observations with approved
pesticides. Information is given on pesticide tolerances and min-
imum days between last application and harvest. There will be
changes; therefore, the user is strongly urged to keep abreast
of developments through county agents, experiment stations,
industry, etc.


FACTORS CONCERNING PESTICIDE APPLICATION

Careful planning, close observation, coordination and super-
vision are essential in developing and maintaining an effective
vegetable pest control program. Constant consideration must
be given to sanitation, potential incidence of diseases or insects,
weather, economics, correct identification, proper timing, nozzle
placement, spray pressure and agitation, wind direction and ve-
locity, uniformity and layout of field, stage of plant development
in relation to other plantings, speed of equipment and thorough
coverage.
Sanitation.-Destroy crop residues following last harvest as
well as control volunteer crop plants and weed hosts of vegetable
pests in unused fields, along field edges and in the production
fields. It is a good practice to rotate vegetable crops with cover
crops or other crops that are not susceptible to the same pests.
Fallowing and clean cultivation reduce many pests in fields not
being used. So does flooding with water for 6 to 8 weeks once a
year. These measures might be considered where sod is not
needed to reduce plant bed erosion and sand burn.
Sanitation practices will aid in the control of many pests.
This is especially true of such hard-to-control pests as leaf
miners, aphids and certain diseases.
Weather.-Weather factors have tremendous effect on the
incidence of plant pests, the tolerance of plants to damage by
the pests, the effectiveness of pesticide treatments, and the like-
lihood of damage to the plants from pesticide treatments. Some
pesticides are ineffective at low temperatures; some are effective
for very short periods at high temperatures. Rains will often
wash pesticides from the plant, making an additional application
3







necessary. Wind will decrease the effectiveness of pesticide
sprays by blowing spray droplets or dust particles away before
they are deposited upon the plant.
Compatibility.-Most spray mixtures perform satisfactorily.
There can be many suitable mixtures of chemicals, but a given
application must meet several requirements, including: (1) each
component must be fully effective and (2) must not be harmful
to crop; and (3) the materials must mix readily and cause no
difficulty in operation and maintenance of equipment. In case
of questionable compatibility of a mixture of pesticides, do not
attempt the combination.
Formulations.-Pesticides may be applied as emulsions, wet-
table powder sprays, dusts, granules or baits. The effectiveness
of a pesticide and its potential for damage to crop plants is partly
determined by the quality of the emulsifiable concentrate, wet-
table powder, dust or granule used.
WP is the abbreviation used for wettable powder formula-
tions; 2E, 4E, 6E and 8E are designations for liquid concentrates
containing 2, 4, 6 and 8 pounds of active ingredient per gallon.
Dusts.-For control of plant diseases sprays are generally
more effective than dusts; however, there are certain times when
dusts are more practical. Under those conditions when it is de-
sirable to use dusts, the amount of active ingredient per acre
recommended is, in most cases, the same as with sprays. For
example, if 2 lbs. of a material containing 75% active ingredient
is to be applied per acre this would be 11/2 lbs. active ingredient
per acre. If a 5% dust were used, 30 lbs. of the dust would con-
tain the 11/2 lbs. active ingredient.
Amounts.-Spray materials are shown in amounts of the
listed formulation per 100 gallons of water unless otherwise in-
dicated. There may be several formulations of some pesticides.
For example, parathion is available as 15% and 25% wettable
powders and as liquid concentrates containing 2, 4 or 8 pounds
of active ingredient per gallon. To save space only one formula-
tion of a pesticide is listed for a particular pest under a crop.
Wettable powder formulations of pesticides are given in most
instances, but equivalent amounts of liquid concentrates can be
used. Suggested acre rates should be adjusted to insure com-
plete coverage; in general, 20 to 35 pounds of dust, 50 to 150
gallons of spray or 20 to 40 pounds of bait are accepted amounts
from which adjustments may be made.








The following table can be used as a guide in determining
equivalent amounts of other insecticide formulations that may
be used instead of those given in this publication:


Amount of Formulation (at left) needed to
obtain the following amounts of active in-
Insecticide gredient:
Formulation
14% b. 2 b. % lb. 1 lb.


1% dust ..............................
2% dust ..............................
5% dust ..............................
10% dust ............................
15% wettable powder ........
25% wettable powder ........
40% wettable powder ........

50% wettable powder ........
23-25% liquid concentrate
(2 lbs. active ingredient
per gallon) ........................
42-46% liquid concentrate
(4 lbs. active ingredient
per gallon) ........................
60-65% liquid concentrate
(6 lbs. active ingredient
per gallon) .........................
72-78% liquid concentrate
(8 lbs. active ingredient
per gallon) ............................


25 50 75 100
121/2 25 37V2 50
5 10 15 20


21/2
1% Ibs.
1 lb.


5
3% lbs.


7%
5 lbs.


10
6% lbs.


2 lbs. 3 lbs. 4 lbs.


% lb. 14 Ibs. 17s lbs. 2% lbs.


% lb.


1 pint


% pint


% pint


/4 pint


1% lbs. 2 lbs.


1 quart 3 pints 2 quarts


1 pint 1 pints 1 quart


% pint 1 pint 1 pints


pint % pint 1 pint


Certain pests of vegetables, for example aphids and serpen-
tine leaf miners, are more numerous and more difficult to con-
trol in some areas of the state and some seasons than in others.
These differences frequently make variations in the dosages nec-
essary to control the same pest. Where there is a range in
amounts in this publication, the higher dosages should be used
where pest control is most difficult. For instance, the higher
amounts will usually be needed to control aphids and serpentine
leaf miners in the southern part of the state, while the lower
dosages may be adequate in the northern part.







Spraying pressure should not be excessive. Excessive spray-
ing pressure causes pesticide spray droplets to be broken down
so small that they drift and are not deposited on the plant. In
addition, high spraying pressures cause undue wear on engines,
pumps, nozzles and other sprayer parts.
The speed of the sprayer should not exceed 5 mph when ap-
plying pesticides. Greater speed results in poor coverage.


PESTICIDE RESIDUES AND TOLERANCES

Most of the pesticide residue and tolerance information be-
low was taken from Leaflet No. 6, "Protecting Crops and Con-
sumers," Food and Drug Administration, U.S. Department of
Health, Education and Welfare.
Some of the chemicals used on vegetables may remain when
they are harvested and marketed. In excessive amounts, many
are injurious to humans. Any contamination of vegetables and
other agricultural foods is a matter of concern to growers, ship-
pers, the chemical industry, agricultural and public health au-
thorities, law enforcement officials and the consumer.

WHAT IS A TOLERANCE?
To avoid harmful amounts of residues of agricultural chem-
icals in or on our foods, regulations for their safe use are pro-
vided by law. One such regulation concerns "tolerance."
Tolerance is the amount of a pesticide that scientists have
determined may safely remain as a residue on the food crop
without injury to the consumer. Tolerances for specific pesti-
cides and crops are established by regulation. The Food and
Drug Administration (FDA) first considers evidence of safety
and the amount of residue that will remain if the product is
used according to directions on the label. FDA then sets a tol-
erance that is safe and can be met by growers if directions are
followed. If a tolerance is not necessary to protect the con-
sumer, FDA may exempt a particular product from requirements
for a tolerance.
A limited number of pesticide chemicals have been officially
declared safe and do not require either a tolerance or exemption.
Except for these products, no amount of residue of a particular
chemical on a specified crop is permitted if (1) there is no tol-
erance or exemption or (2) the tolerance is zero. However, the
absence of a published tolerance or exemption does not neces-







sarily imply that a pesticide chemical may not be used. Some
pesticide uses-for example, certain dormant sprays and soil
treatments-do not result in residues of the chemical on the
harvested crop. Uses that leave no residues do not require
tolerances or exemptions and do not have to be passed upon by
the Food and Drug Administration.

THE LAW AND CONSUMER PROTECTION
Under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, a food
containing a residue in excess of the tolerance is defined as
"adulterated" and must not be shipped across state lines. Most
states, including Florida, have laws to deal with crops produced
and consumed within their own boundaries.
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration checks on condi-
tions and practices during the growing season of each crop, and
on any spray-removal practice by shippers. If vegetables from
a particular area are suspected of having excessive residues,
samples are examined from outgoing shipments of the crop. If
residues in excess of tolerance are found, the shipment is re-
moved from the market by a state or federal court order. The
law also provides for action against persons and business firms
responsible for violations.

HOW GROWERS CAN AVOID EXCESSIVE RESIDUES
Generally, growers can avoid residues in excess of tolerances
on harvested crops by applying pesticides only on the crops speci-
fled, in the amounts specified and at the times specified in this
publication or on the pesticide label. It is not safe to reason
that "if a little is good, more will be better." The recommended
amount as well as the recommended time of application should
be observed. Growers should be especially careful in measuring
and applying the higher concentrate pesticides to be sure not
to exceed the recommended amounts. Examples of high con-
centrate materials are 8 pounds per gallon parathion, 8 pounds
per gallon toxaphene, 93% nabam and 20% toxaphene dust.
The labeling for all pesticides shipped interstate must be
registered with the U. S. Department of Agriculture under the
Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act. All appli-
cations for labeling submitted to the Department of Agricul-
ture are thoroughly examined to remove or modify any direc-
tions for use on particular crops that do not appear to fulfill the
requirements of that law. Among other considerations, USDA







determines if a pesticide is likely to leave excessive chemical
residues on the harvested raw agricultural commodities. If a
crop is not named on the label of a particular pesticide, this may
mean that no residue of that pesticide is permitted on that crop;
and hence the treated crop could not be shipped if it contained
a residue of that chemical.
Drift of pesticide onto adjacent crops should be prevented.
Consideration of the wind direction and velocity, adjoining crops,
and methods of application is extremely important when apply-
ing pesticides.
Growers are urged to consider carefully the locations of
various crops when planning their farming operations. Special
consideration should be given to planting in the same general
area those crops likely to receive the same approved pesticides.
Do not locate a crop adjacent to another if either is likely to be
treated with a pesticide not cleared on the other. Also, two
crops should not be planted next to each other if one will require
insecticide applications during the time of harvest of the other
crop.
Application of pesticides with ground equipment results in
less drift than application by aircraft under similar conditions.
Sprays, especially coarse sprays, drift less than dusts. Higher
spray pressures result in more drift than lower pressures.
Each grower should plan and follow a pest control program
that will assure him of vegetables without excessive pesticide
residues. Vegetables marketed with residues exceeding toler-
ances set by Food and Drug Administration are potentially in-
jurious to consumers, may result in serious financial loss to the
grower, and may reduce public acceptance of fresh Florida veg-
etables.
RULES FOR THE PACKER-SHIPPER
How can the packer-shipper who handles the produce of
many individual growers make sure that he does not ship a
product containing excessive residue? Here are two sugges-
tions:
1. He should pointedly ask each grower about his practices
and satisfy himself (during the growing season, if possible) that
all pesticides were used only in accordance with registered label
directions or other highly authoritative recommendations.
2. He should follow good commercial practice for the area,







the crop and the pesticide used, with respect to removal of ex-
cessive residues-by washing, brushing, trimming, etc.

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN EXCESSIVE RESIDUES OCCUR?

If FDA finds residues in excess of tolerances on shipments,
the first action is to protect the consumer by seizure of the
goods, if possible.
If a shipment is seized, the owner may choose one of three
courses of action:
1. He may admit the violation as charged and ask the court
for permission to take the goods under bond for removal of
excessive residues. This must be done under supervision of the
Food and Drug Administration. If reconditioning is success-
ful, the goods are released.
2. He may deny the violation as charged and have the case
tried on its merits in the federal court.
3. He may do nothing, in which case the goods will be de-
stroyed, or otherwise disposed of as determined by the court.
Because of the highly perishable nature of most produce, the
owner should act promptly (a return date of 10 days is usually
specified) if he wishes to act under 1 or 2 above.
Prosecution and court injunction are additional legal meas-
ures that may be taken against persons or business firms or both.

INSECT CONTROL

The amounts of insecticides recommended below as sprays
are for 100 gallons of water unless otherwise indicated. "Mini-
mum Days to Harvest" means the minimum number of days
that should be allowed between last foliar application and har-
vest. The intervals that follow are based on Florida Agricul-
tural Experiment Station research where available. The other
intervals are based on USDA information, and some of them may
appear to be longer than necessary. Examples are 15 days for
parathion on carrots and onions, 10 days for parathion on En-
glish peas, 14 days for Guthion and Diazinon on potatoes. If the
dosages recommended in this publication are exceeded, the mini-
mum days given may not be applicable and a longer interval
should be allowed.







GENERAL SOIL INHABITING INSECTS


Cutworms.-Apply toxaphene or chlordane at 2 pounds active
ingredient (5 pounds of 40% WP or 20 pounds of 10% dust)
per acre to the soil surface before planting if cutworms are
known to be present. Do not disturb soil for three to five days.
A 21/2% toxaphene or 2% chlordane bait can be used as above at
20 to 40 pounds per acre. If cutworm damage to young plants
is noted, baits should be used at once. Regular foliar applica-
tions with several insecticides, including DDT, endrin, parathion
and toxaphene, will prevent the establishment of cutworms.
Use only those recommended for the particular crop.
A home-made bait can be prepared by thoroughly mixing 5
pounds of 40% chlordane wettable powder or 6 pounds of 40%
toxaphene wettable powder with 100 pounds of wheat bran.
Moisten bait slightly with water and apply in late afternoon.
Use freshly mixed baits.
Mole-crickets.-Broadcast aldrin at 2 pounds or chlordane at
4 pounds active ingredient per acre as a spray, dust or granule,
or a 2% chlordane or aldrin wheat bran bait evenly over the soil
surface at 20 to 40 pounds per acre before seeding or transplant-
ing if insects are present. After plants are up use a bait.
Apply fresh bait in late afternoon when soil is moist and warm.
For seedbeds use a bait; or drench with an emulsion contain-
ing 1/4 pound actual chlordane in 100 gallons of water per 1,000
square feet of seedbed area. Treatments should be made a few
days before seeding.
Wireworms.-Apply aldrin (except for potatoes) at 3 to 5
pounds, or chlordane at 4 to 6 pounds active ingredient per acre
two to three weeks before planting. Distribute evenly over the
soil surface and disk into the soil to a depth of 6 inches. Use
the higher amounts on muck. Heptachlor, at the same rate as
aldrin, also can be used for controlling wireworms on certain
crops. These uses of heptachlor are indicated in the text under
the crop.
Wireworms in several areas of the state are not controlled
by aldrin, heptachlor or chlordane. Parathion at 2 pounds or
Diazinon at 1 to 2 pounds active ingredient per acre is recom-
mended for wireworms in areas with mineral soils where the
above materials are not giving satisfactory control. For organic
soils, parathion at 5 pounds active ingredient per acre is sug-
gested. Apply as for aldrin and chlordane.








BEANS


Bush, Lima, Pole


PEST
Aphids

Armyworms
Corn Earworm

Cowpea Curculio
Bean Leafhopper**
Bean Leafroller



Mexican Bean
Beetle


Leaf Miners
Cucumber Beetles
Thrips
Stinkbugs


Saltmarsh
Caterpillar
Lima Pod Borer
Cutworms

Wireworms
Lesser Cornstalk
Borer


SPRAY
Demeton (Systox) 2E, 1% pts.
Parathion 15% WP, 12-2 lbs.
DDT 50% WP, 2 lbs.
Sevin 50% WP, 2 lbs.
Toxaphene 40% WP, 2%1 lbs.
Toxaphene 40% WP, 2% lbs.
DDT 50% WP, 2 lbs.
Parathion 15% WP, 1/2-2 lbs.
Sevin 50% WP, 2 lbs.
Toxaphene 40% WP, 2% lbs.
Guthion 2E, 2 pts.
Malathion 25% WP, 5 lbs.
Parathion 15% WP, 3 lbs.
Rotenone 5% WP, 2% Ibs.
Sevin 50% WP, 1 lb.
Diazinon 25% WP, 1-2 lbs.
Guthion 2E, 2 pts.
Parathion 15% WP, 1-1 lbs.
Parathion 15% WP, 2 lbs.
Phosdrin 2E, 1 pt.
Sevin 50% WP, 2 lbs.
Phosdrin 2E, 1-2 pts.
Toxaphene 40% WP, 2% lbs.
Parathion 15% WP, 1%-2 lbs.


DUST

Parathion 1-2'
DDT 5%
Sevin 5%
Toxaphene 10
Toxaphene 10
DDT 5%
Parathion 1-2'
Sevin 5%
Toxaphene 10'

Malathion 5%
Parathion 2%
Rotenone 1%
Sevin 1Y2-2%
Diazinon 2%


Parathion 1-2%
Parathion 2%

Sevin 5%

Toxaphene 10%


MIN. DAYS
TO HARVEST
21
% 3
5
NTL*
% 5
% 5
5
% 5
NTL*
% 5 5
79
1
3
1
NTL*
7
7t


3
3
1
NTL*
1
5
3


See page 10. Endrin at 0.5 lb. active ingredient per acre
can also be used before seeding.
See page 10. Also heptachlor.
See under Sweet Corn page 15.


Toxaphene and Sevin may cause some injury to Pole Beans.

No time limitation when used as recommended.
** DITT will not control the bean leafhopper in the Everglades, Homestead and Lower
East Coast.
t Guthion cleared only on Snap Beans as of March 1, 1963.

1. Armyworms.-Apply insecticides when armyworms ap-
pear; continue at seven-day intervals until control is complete.
Sulfur may be used as all, or a part, of the diluent in dusts for
beans.

2. Cowpea Curculio.-Apply insecticides when cowpea cur-
culio appears, especially when pods begin to set, and repeat
weekly.








3. Leafhoppers.-Apply insecticides at first sign of leaf-
hoppers. Make one to three applications at 10-day intervals.
During severe infestations the time interval between applica-
tions may need to be reduced. In Everglades, Lower East Coast
and West Coast areas leafhoppers are most severe in spring
during warm dry periods, while in central and northern Florida
they are most prevalent in the fall.
4. Leafrollers.-Wait for fairly heavy populations of leaf-
rollers before applying insecticides. In some cases, dusting
borders of large fields by airplane is adequate. It is usually not
necessary to treat the whole field unless the acreage is small
or the infestation is severe.
5. Mexican Bean Beetle.-These pests are a problem in the
north and west Florida areas. Observations in the Gainesville
area indicate that lower dosages of parathion give satisfactory
control except when infestations are very heavy.
6. Leaf Miners.-Watch closely for leaf miners. Apply in-
secticide twice a week to small seedlings when there are heavy
migrations of adult leaf miners from nearby abandoned host
vegetable fields or on older plants when weekly applications are
not giving satisfactory control. Diazinon has not been effective
in the Homestead and Lower East Coast areas in recent years.
Parathion will usually give control in Central and North Florida.
7. Thrips.-These insects may be a problem on leaves and
pods. DDT or toxaphene used for other pests is also effective
against this insect.
8. Stinkbugs.-Apply insecticides when stinkbugs appear.
It is especially important to insure low population when pods
begin to set.
9. Lima Pod Borers.-Apply weekly when insects appear.

CARROTS
MIN. DAYS
PEST SPRAY DUST TO HARVEST
Aphids Parathion 15% WP, 1z/-2 lbs. 15
Phosdrin 2E, 1 pt. 1
Leaf Miners Diazinon 25% WP, 1-2 lbs. 10
Parathion 15% WP, 1-2 lbs. 15
Cutworms Toxaphene-See under Cutworms page 10.
Wireworms Parathion, diazinon-See under Wireworms page 10.








CELERY


PEST
Aphids




Foliage
Caterpillars

Leaf Miners


SPRAY
Dibrom 8E, 1 pt.
Parathion 4E, 12 pt.
Phosdrin 2E, 1 pt.
Demeton (Systox) 2E,
1% pts.
DDT 2E, 1 qt.
Phosdrin 2E, 1-2 pts.
Toxaphene 8E, 1-2 pts.
Diazinon 2E, 1-2 pts.
Dibrom 8E, 1 pt.


DUST


MIN. DAYS
TO HARVEST


Parathion 1-2%


Thrips DDT 2E, 1 qt. 14
Garden Fleahopper
Cutworms Toxaphene-See under Cutworms page 10.
Wireworms See page 10.
The 21 days is for 2 pints of toxaphene 8E. For 1 pint the minimum interval is 14 days.

1. Aphids.-Keep ditches and roadways free of weeds and
watch closely for aphids.
2. Leaf Miners.-Watch closely for leaf miners. Apply in-
secticides twice a week to small seedlings when there are heavy
migrations of adult leaf miners or to older plants when weekly
applications are not giving control. Parathion usually will give
control in Central and North Florida.


CORN, SWEET


PEST
Aphids
Spider Mites
Fall Armyworms
and
Corn Earworms
feeding in bud
Silk-Fly
Earworms



Corn Stem Weevil
Cutworms

Wireworms
Lesser Cornstalk
Borer


SPRAY
Parathion 4E, % pt.
Phosdrin 2E, 1 pt.
DDT 2E, 2 qts.
Parathion 4E, pt.
Toxaphene 8E, 1% pts.

Parathion 4E, 1 pt.
DDT 2E, 4 qts.*
Sevin 50% WP, 4 lbs.*


MIT O9' A .tsc


MIN. DAYS
DUST TO HARVEST
Parathion 1-2% 3
Phosdrin 1%% 1
**
**
**

3
DDT 10% NTLt
Sevin 10% NTLt
DDT 5%-Parathion 1% 3
Parathion 2% 3
**


See page 10. Also aldrin or endrin at 0.5 lb. active
ingredient per acre.
See page 10. Also heptachlor
See following discussion under No. 6


* These amounts should be mixed in 50 gallons of water and applied to one acre.
** These usages should not result in a residue problem on the edible ears.
t No time limitation when used as recommended.
13







1. Aphid and Spider Mite.-Infestations of these pests may
become heavy enough to require control measures in some areas
of the state.
2. Fall Armyworms and Corn Earworms Feeding in the
Corn Bud.-Make first application when feeding is observed.
Repeat at one to two week intervals, depending on severity of
infestation. Direct the spray from above and from each side
of the plant to the upper leaves to thoroughly wet and run down
into the bud-whorl. Spray pressure should not be excessively
high; 150 pounds per square inch or lower is preferable.
3. Silk-fly.-Check for adult silk-flies just prior to and dur-
ing silking.
4. Earworms.-For control, timing and good coverage are
essential. Treatments must be started when the silks first ap-
pear and continued until all the silks are dry or brown. Appli-
cations of one of the recommended insecticides will give control
when applied at 48 hour intervals to sweet corn silking during
October through March. During the rest of the year apply one
of the recommended insecticides every 24 hours. The amount
of DDT or Sevin recommended in the preceding table should
be mixed with 50 gallons of water and applied to one acre. The
dust must be applied at 25 to 30 pounds per acre. Dusts or
sprays should be directed to thoroughly cover the silks. Sevin
has been somewhat more effective than DDT in experiments
conducted during the spring.
5. Corn Stem Weevil.-Treatments must be started when
the first seedlings emerge from the soil and continued every
four days or two times a week for six applications or until the
corn stem is 1/2 inch or more in diameter. Sprays must be di-
rected to the lower stem and the adjoining soil. Use overhead
nozzles to apply 50 gallons per acre until the foliage begins
to form a canopy that prevents the spray from reaching the
ground and lower stem. Then, add a nozzle to each side of the
row and increase the rate to 100 gallons per acre. Cultivation
should be as infrequent as possible during this spray schedule
and should immediately precede a spray application. Two quarts
of DDT 2E plus 1 pint of toxaphene 8E seems about equal to
4 quarts of DDT 2E in effectiveness. Four quarts of DDT 2E
plus 1 pint of toxaphene 8E seems superior to 4 quarts of DDT
2E alone.
Eight pounds of 50% DDT WP plus 8 ounces of Triton X-100
seems to be about equal to 4 quarts of DDT 2E in effectiveness.








Pre-emergence chemical weed control (see Extension circu-
lar 196A) and delay of the first cultivation until after the final
corn stem weevil spray has resulted in better corn stem weevil
control. The corn stem weevil has been recognized as a pest
only in the Everglades.
6. Lesser Cornstalk Borer.-In the Everglades area apply
parathion, aldrin or heptachlor, using a wetting agent or deter-
gent in the spray water to help wet the soil and the webbing.
Make first application broadcast (covering rows and middles)
just before crop emerges, using 3 pounds 15% parathion WP
or 2 quarts of aldrin 2E or heptachlor 2E per acre. Make
second application as soon as crop emerges and before cultiva-
tion, using 3 pounds 15% parathion WP or 1 quart of aldrin 2E
or heptachlor 2E per acre. Higher gallonage (up to 300 per acre)
of more dilute coarse sprays at about 100 pounds pressure may
be more effective. In West Coast area 11/2 pounds actual DDT
or chlordane per acre as a spray or dust is recommended at the
time young plants break through the ground. A preplanting
application of Aldrin for wireworms has controlled this pest on
Everglades muck.
The lesser cornstalk borer is an erratic pest with outbreaks
during the dry periods. It is doubtful that routine control meas-
ures would be profitable.

CRUCIFERS
Adding a spreader-sticker in sprays applied to the foliage
of crucifers at the rate recommended by the manufacturer may
improve control.
Cabbage


PEST
Aphids


Leaf Miners

Cabbage Loopers
Other Foliage
Caterpillars

Cutworms


Mole-Cricket
Wireworms


MIN. DAYS
SPRAY DUST TO HARVEST
Dibrom 8E, 1 pt. 4
Parathion 4E, 1/2-1 t. Parathion 1-2% 10*
Phosdrin 2E, 1 pt. 1
Demeton (Systox) 2E, 1%z pts. 21
Diazinon 2E, 1-2 pts. Diazinon 2% 7
Guthion 2E, 2 pts. 21
Endrin 1.6E, 1 pt. 35
Parathion 4E, 1/-1 pt. Parathion 1-2% 10*
Phosdrin 2E, 1-2 pts. 1
Toxaphene 8E, 1-2 pts. Toxaphene 10% 14
Toxaphene-See page 10. Also Endrin at 0.5 lb. active in-
gredient per acre. After planting, regular foliage sprays
of toxaphene, endrin or parathion as for cabbage loopers
will prevent the establishment of cutworms.
See page 10.
See page 10.


* The 10-day interval is for 1 pint of Parathion 4E. For % pint the minimum interval is 7 days.
15








1. Cabbage Loopers.-These insects become increasingly
difficult to control with increase in size. Large mature loopers
have not been controlled with double dosages of combinations of
insecticides.

2. Leaf Miners.-Watch closely for leaf miners. Apply in-
secticides twice a week to small seedlings when there are heavy
migrations of adult leaf miners, or to older plants when weekly
applications are not giving control. Diazinon has not been ef-
fective in the Homestead and Lower East Coast areas in recent
years. Parathion will usually give control in Central and North
Florida.
Broccoli and Cauliflower

Recommendations are the same as for cabbage with the fol-
lowing exceptions. Do not apply endrin after edible parts start
to form. Do not apply toxaphene after edible parts start to
form or within 30 days of harvest. Do not apply phosdrin to
cauliflower within three days of harvest. Do not apply diazinon
to cauliflower or broccoli within five days of harvest. Do not
apply Guthion to broccoli within 15 days of harvest.

Collards
MIN. DAYS
PEST SPRAY DUST TO HARVEST
Aphids Dibrom 8E, 1 pt. 4
Parathion 4E, %-1 pt. Parathion 1-2% 15*
Phosdrin 2E, 1 pt. 3
Leaf Miners Diazinon 2E, 1-2 pts. Diazinon 2% 10
Parathion 4E, %-1 pt. Parathion 1-2% 15*
Cabbage Loopers Parathion 4E, %-1 pt. Parathion 1-2% 15*
Other Foliage Phosdrin 2E, 1-2 pts. 3
Caterpillars Toxaphene 8E, 1-2 pts. Toxaphene 10% 28**
Cutworms Toxaphene-See under Cutworms page 10.
Mole-Cricket See page 10.
Wireworms See page 10.

The 15-day interval is for 1 pint or parathion 4E. For 1/2 pint the minimum interval
is 10 days.
** This interval is for 2 pints of toxaphene 8E; the interval for 1 pint is 14 days; the
interval for dust is 21 days.








Mustard, Turnips, Rutabagas
MIN. DAYS
PEST SPRAY DUST TO HARVEST
Aphids Malathion 25% WP, 4 Ibs. Malathion 5% 7*
Foliage Parathion 15% WP, 12-2 lbs. Parathion 1-2% 15*
Caterpillars Phosdrin** 2E, 1-2 pts. 3
Cutworms Toxaphene or chlordane baits-See under Cutworms page 10.
Mole-Cricket See page 10.
Except 3 days for malathion on rutabagas & turnips and 7 days for parathion on
rutabagas.
** Phosdrin not cleared on rutabagas as of March 1, 1963.

Radishes
MIN. DAYS
PEST SPRAY DUST TO HARVEST
Aphids Malathion 25% WP, 4 lbs. Malathion 5% 7
Parathion 15% WP, 1/2-2 Ibs. Parathion 1-2% 7
Foliage DDT 50% WP, 2 lbs. DDT 5% NTL*
Caterpillars Toxaphene 40% WP, 2' lbs. Toxaphene 10% NTL*
Cutworms Toxaphene or chlordane baits-See under Cutworms page 10.
Mole-Crickets See page 10.
No time limitation when used as recommended.

CUCURBITS

Cantaloupe, Cucumber, Squash, Watermelon
MIN. DAYS
PEST SPRAY DUST TO HARVEST
Leaf Miners Dimethoate (Cygon) 4E, % pt. 7*
Guthion 2E, 2 pts.
Dibrom 8E, 1 pt. 7**
Aphids Dimethoate (Cygon) 4E, % pt. 7*
Demeton (Systox) 2E, 1% pts. 7t
Phosdrin 2E, 1 pt. 1
Parathion 15% WP, 1-2 Ibs. Parathion 1-2% 3
Thiodan 50% WP, 1 Ib. NTLt
Cucumber Lindane 25% WP, 1 Ib. Lindane 1%% 1
Beetles
Melonworm Parathion 15% WP, 1-2 lbs. Parathion 1-2% 3
Pickleworm Phosdrin 25% WP, 1 Ib. 1
Squashbug
Rindworm on Parathion 15% WP, 2 lbs. Parathion 2% 3
Watermelon Phosdrin 25% WP, 1-2 lbs. 1
Iimethoate cleared only on watermelons as of March 1, 1963.
Do not apply Guthion to watermelons and cantaloupes after edible parts start to
form. It is not registered on cucumbers and squash as of March 1, 1963.
** Except 4 days on cucumbers and summer squash.
t 7 days for watermelons and 21 days for cantaloupes. It is not registered on cucumbers
and squash as of March 1, 1963.
t No time limitation except 14 days for cantaloupes.

17








Leaf Miners-Watch closely for leaf miners. Apply insecti-
cides twice a week to small seedlings when there are heavy mi-
grations of adult leaf miners from nearby abandoned host vege-
table fields or on older plants when weekly applications are not
giving control. Weekly applications of dimethoate (Cygon) has
given good control. Parathion and diazinon will usually give
satisfactory control of leaf miners in Central and North Florida.
To reduce injury to bees, which are necessary for pollination,
spraying or dusting should be delayed until late afternoon or eve-
ning. It is suggested that parathion spray be applied early
enough to dry before dew falls, reducing possibilities of foliage
burn. Do not apply parathion when plants are wet or very young.


EGGPLANT


PEST
Aphids


Corn Earworm and
Other Caterpillars
Potato Beetles
Flea Beetles
Spider Mites
(red spiders)

Thrips

Leaf Miners


SPRAY
Endrin 1.6E, 1 pt.
Parathion 15% WP, 1/%-2 lbs.
Thiodan 50% WP, 1 lb.
DDT 50% WP, 2 lbs.
Endrin 1.6E, 1 pt.
Thiodan 50% WP, 1 lb.


MIN. DAYS
DUST TO HARVEST


Parathion 1-2%

DDT 5%


Kelthane 181/% WP, 12-2 lbs.* Kelthane 2%*
Malathion 25% WP, 4 lbs. Malathion 5%
Parathion 15% WP, 2 lbs. Parathion 2%
DDT 50% WP, 2 lbs. DDT 5%
Parathion 15% WP, 1-11/ lbs. Parathion 1-2%
Parathion 15% WP, 1-2 lbs. Parathion 1-2%
Guthion 2E, 2 pts.


Eggplant (Blotch) Endrin 1.6E, 1 pt.
Leaf Miners


Cutworms


See page 10.


Kelthane has caused some injury to eggplant; as a result, the manufacturer has with-
drawn label registration for its use on eggplant.
** Do no apply after edible parts start to form.

1. Spider Mites.-More than one kind of spider mite infest
eggplant. Parathion, malathion and sulfur are effective against
the common red spider, but do not control certain other species.
Kelthane controls all species that infest eggplant. Sulfur is the
suggested diluent for parathion and malathion dusts.

2. Eggplant (Blotch) Leaf Miner.-Apply endrin weekly for
control of this pest. This is not a maggot like the serpentine leaf








miner but is a caterpillar. It makes a blotch-shaped mine rather
than a serpentine mine.


LETTUCE


PEST

Aphids

Banded Cucumber
Beetle
Caterpillars
Lygus Bug

Cutworms
Mole-Cricket
Wireworms


SPRAY

Parathion 15% WP, 11/ lbs.
Phosdrin 2E, 1 pt.
DDT 50% WP, 2 lbs.
Parathion 15% WP, 11/2 lbs.
Phosdrin 2E, 1-2 pts.
Toxaphene 40% WP, 2% lbs.
Sevin 50% WP, 2 lbs.
See page 10.
See page 10.
See page 10. Also heptachlor.


MIN. DAYS
DUST TO HARVEST

15
2
14*
15
2
14*
14**


* Head lettuce only-outer leaves removed at harvest.
** Except 3 days on head lettuce.


ENDIVE (ESCAROLE)


PEST
Aphids

Caterpillars
Banded Cucumber
Beetle
Lygus Bug
Cutworms
Mole-Cricket
Wireworms




PEST
Aphids

Okra Caterpillar

Leaf Miners

Stinkbugs


SPRAY

Dibrom 8E, 1 pt.
Parathion 15% WP, 11 lbs.
DDT 50% WP, 2 Ibs.
Parathion 15% WP, 1% lbs.


See page 10.
See page 10.
See page 10.


OKRA


SPRAY
Phosdrin 2E, 1 pt.
Parathion 15% WP, 1/2-2 lbs.
DDT 50% WP, 2 lbs.
Sevin 50% WP, 2 lbs.
Parathion 15% WP, 1-2 lbs.

Parathion 15% WP, 2 Ibs.
Sevin 50% WP, 2 lbs.


MIN. DAYS
DUST TO HARVEST

4
14
14
14


MIN. DAYS
DUST TO HARVEST

1
Parathion 1-2% 3
DDT 5% 7
Sevin 5% NTL*
Parathion 1-2% 3
Parathion 1-2% 3
Sevin 5% NTL*


* No time limitation when used as recommended.

19








ONIONS

PEST SPRAY DUST T

Thrips Diazinon 25% WP, 1-2 lbs.
Malathion 25% WP, 3 lbs. Malathion 5%
Parathion 15% WP, 1-1%1 lbs. Parathion 1-2%
Phosdrin 2E, 1-2 pts.

Leaf Miners Diazinon 25% WP, 1-2 Ibs.
Parathion 15% WP, 11/-2 Ibs. Parathion 1-2%

Cutworms Baits-See under Cutworms page 10.


MIN. DAYS
0 HARVEST

10
3
15
1
10
15


1. Thrips.-Apply insecticide when thrips appear; repeat
when necessary. Direct nozzles over rows close to plants. Addi-
tion of spreader-sticker to spray is suggested. Spraying down
into sheaths is very important.


PEAS


SPRAY

Malathion 25% WP, 4 lbs.
Phosdrin 2E, 1 pt.
Parathion 15% WP, 1/2-2 lbs.
Diazinon 25% WP, 1-2 lbs.
Parathion 15% WP, 11-2 lbs.


DUST
Malathion 5%
Parathion 1-2

Parathion 1-2


MIN. DAYS
TO HARVEST
3
1
% 10
NTL
% 10


PEAS, SOUTHERN

Cowpeas, Black-eye, Crowder, etc.


PEST

Cowpea Curculio
Leaf Miners
Stinkbugs


Bean Leafhoppers
Bean Leafroller


Lesser Cornstalk


SPRAY
Toxaphene 40% WP, 2/2 lbs.
Parathion 15% WP, 11A-2 lbs.
Parathion 15% WP, 2 lbs.
Toxaphene 40% WP, 2/2 lbs.
Sevin 50% WP, 2 lbs.
DDT 50% WP, 2 lbs.
Parathion 15% WP, 1V2-2 lbs.
Toxaphene 40% WP, 2 lbs.
Sevin 50% WP, 2 lbs.
See under Sweet Corn page 15,


MIN. DAYS
DUST TO HARVEST
Toxaphene 10% 5
Parathion 1-2% 3
Parathion 2% 3
Toxaphene 10% 5
Sevin 5% NTL*
DDT 5% 5
Parathion 1-2% 3
Toxaphene 10% 5
Sevin 5% NTL*


PEST
Aphids


Leaf Miners


Borer

* No time limitation when used as recommended.








1. Cowpea Curculio.-Apply insecticides when cowpea cur-
culio appears, especially when pods begin to set, and repeat
weekly.
2. Stinkbugs.-It is important to maintain good control of
stinkbugs as soon as pods begin to set.
3. Bean Leafhoppers and Bean Leaf Rollers.-See comments
under Beans page 12.

PEPPERS
MIN. DAYS
PEST SPRAY DUST TO HARVEST
Leaf Miners Diazinon 25% WP, 1-2 lbs. Diazinon 2% 5
Dibrom 8E, 1 pt. 4
Guthion 2E, 2 pts. *
Aphids Endrin 1.6E, 1 pt. 14
Parathion 15% WP, 1-2 lbs. Parathion 1-2% 3
Thiodan 50% WP, 1 lb. 1
Demeton (Systox) 2E, 1% pts. 3
Armyworm (fall DDT 2E, 1 qt. DDT 5% 5
and southern) Endrin 1.6E, 1 pt. 14
Corn Earworm Thiodan 50% WP, 1 lb. 1
Pepper Weevil DDT 2E, 1 qt. DDT 5% 5
Thrips DDT 2E, 1 qt. DDT 5% 5
Parathion 15% WP, 1-11/ lbs. Parathion 1-2% 3
Cutworms See page 10.
Mole-Cricket See page 10.
Lesser Cornstalk See under Sweet Corn page 15.
Borer
NOTE: The use of dust or wettable powder formulations of DDT with-
out an aphicide is likely to result in a build-up of aphids.

Do not apply after edible parts begin to form.

1. Leaf Miners.-Watch closely for leaf miners. Apply in-
secticides twice a week to small seedlings when there are heavy
migrations of adult leaf miners, or to older plants when weekly
applications are not giving control. Diazinon has not been effec-
tive in the Homestead and Lower East Coast areas in recent
years. Parathion will usually give control in Central and North
Florida.
2. Pepper Weevil.-Apply DDT when infestation becomes
evident. Cut open fallen blossom buds and small fruits for evi-
dence of infestations.








POTATOES


SPRAY DUST T(

Dimethoate (Cygon) 4E, %-1 pt.
Endrin 1.6E, 1 pt. Endrin 2%
Thiodan 50% WP, 1 Ib.
(Also see Systemics, below)


MIN. DAYS


) HARVEST


7
3
NTL*


Armyworms
Loopers
Other Caterpillars


Banded
Cucumber
Beetle


Colorado Potato
Beetle
Leaf-Footed Plant
Bug
Green Stinkbug


Leaf Miners


Endrin 1.6E, 1 pt.
Parathion 15% WP, 2 lbs.
Phosdrin 2E, 1-2 pts.
Thiodan 50% WP, 1 lb.
Toxaphene 40% WP, 21/2 lbs.
Thiodan 50% WP, 1 lb.
Guthion 2E, 2 pts.

DDT 2E, 1 qt.
Thiodan 50% WP, 1 lb.
Endrin 1.6E, 1 pt.
Parathion 15% WP, 2 lbs.
Phosdrin 2E, 1 pt.
Thiodan 50% WP, 1 lb.


Endrin 2% 3
Parathion 2% 5
1
NTL*
Toxaphene 10% NTL*
NTL*
14


DDT 5%


Endrin 2%
Parathion 2%


Dimethoate (Cygon) 4E, 1/-1 pt.
Diazinon 25% WP, 1-2 lbs. Diazinon 2%
Dibrom 8E, 1 pt.
Guthion 2E, 2 pts.
(Also see Systemics, below)


NTL*
NTL*
3
5
1
NTL*
7
14
NTL*
14


Cutworms See page 10.
Wireworms See page 10.
NOTE: The use of dust or wettable powder formulations of DDT with-
out an aphicide is likely to result in build-up of aphids.

No time limitation when used as recommended.


1. Systemic Insecticides for Soil Application.-Phorate (Thi-
met) or Di-Syston will give control of leaf miners and aphids on
potatoes for about seven weeks after application. Thimet is
more effective against leaf miners and Di-Syston is more effec-
tive against aphids. Some control of banded cucumber beetle
is also obtained. Neither material will give control for the full
growing season.
Apply Thimet at the rate of 30 pounds of 10% granules or
Di-Syston at 30 pounds of 10% granules per acre at planting,
either in the fertilizer bands or in the seed piece furrow.

2. Leaf Miners.-Watch closely for leaf miners. Apply
insecticides twice a week to small plants when there are heavy
migrations of adult leaf miners from nearby abandoned host


PEST


Aphids







vegetable fields, or on older plants when weekly applications are
not giving control. Weekly applications of dimethoate (Cygon)
have given good control, but have caused discoloration of potato
foilage at 1 pint per 100 gallons in the Homestead area. Diazi-
non has not been effective in the Homestead and Lower East
Coast area in recent years. Parathion will usually give control
in Central and North Florida.

POTATOES, SWEET
MIN. DAYS
PEST SPRAY DUST TO HARVEST
Armyworms DDT 50% WP, 2 lbs. DDT 5% NTL*
Hornworms Toxaphene 40% WP, 2% lbs. Toxaphene 10% NTL*
Other Caterpillars
Gold Bug
No time limitation when used as recommended.

Begin applications when insects appear; one to two applica-
tions usually are sufficient. Thorough coverage is difficult where
vines are dense. It may be necessary to insert dust nozzles into
vines to get adequate coverage and satisfactory control.
Sweet Potato Weevil.-Practice sanitation and use certified
or weevil-free seed.
SEEDBED TREATMENT.-Dust with 2% dieldrin. Make the
first application when the first scattered plants appear. Make
the second application when all the plants are up. Make addi-
tional applications after each pulling. Apply the material so
as to cover all of the soil surface around the plants, using at
each application 1, pound of 2% dieldrin dust per 100 feet of
row; on beds use 1/4 pound per 80 square feet of surface.
FIELD TREATMENT.-When the vines begin to meet in the mid-
dle or the largest roots are 1/2 inch in diameter, use 75 pounds of
2% dieldrin dust per acre. Apply the insecticide to the soil
rather than the foliage in a 6- to 7-inch band on each row along
the plant crowns.
Harvest all sweet potatoes before December 1 and cull out
any infested ones.
When storing or banking sweet potatoes, dust them with
10% DDT at the rate of 1 ounce per bushel as you bank them.
Dust the ground and straw used.
CAUTION: Before eating or feeding to livestock, wash all
potatoes, which have been dusted with DDT.








Try to use potatoes by March 1, being certain to destroy all
infested potatoes. Do not allow volunteer plants around old
storage sites; these and plants left in the field are almost cer-
tain to carry weevils over from year to year.


SPINACH


PEST
Aphids
Caterpillars
Other
Chewing Insects



PEST
Pameras
Flower Thrips


SPRAY
Malathion 25% WP, 4 lbs.
Parathion 15% WP, 1%-2 lbs.
Phosdrin 25% WP, 1-2 lbs.


MIN. DAYS
DUST TO HARVEST


STRAWBERRIES


SPRAY
DDT 50% WP, 2 lbs.
Malathion 25% WP, 4 lbs.
Parathion 15% WP, 1%-2 lbs.


MIN. DAYS
DUST TO HARVEST
DDT 5% 5
Malathion 5% 3
Parathion 1-2% 3


Field Crickets
Flea Beetles
Leaf Rollers
Spider Mites


Cutworms
Mole-Cricket
Wireworms


DDT 50% WP, 2 lbs. DDT 5%
Parathion 15% WP, 1/2-2 lbs. Parathion 2%


Kelthane 18%% WP, 1%-2 lbs.
Malathion 25% WP, 4 lbs.
Parathion 15% WP, 2 lbs.
See page 10.
See page 10.
See page 10.


Kelthane 2%
Malathion 5%
Parathion 2%


Citrus Root Weevil Same as Wireworm.

1. Pameras.-Parathion gives better control of pameras than
malathion. Malathion is safer than parathion, but should be
handled with the proper precaution. See following caution on
use of parathion and malathion.

2. Spider Mites.-More than one kind of spider mite infest
strawberries. Parathion, malathion and sulfur are effective
against the common red spider, but do not control certain other
species. Kelthane has given control of all species in most areas.
Sulfur is the suggested diluent for parathion and malathion dusts.

CAUTIONS: Where recommended and needed, parathion
and malathion should be applied immediately after harvesting.
Wait at least three days before harvesting again.








TOMATOES


PEST
Aphids


Armyworms
Tomato
Fruitworms
Hornworms

Loopers


Leaf Miners



Stinkbugs
Other Plant Bugs


SPRAY

Dimethoate (Cygon) 4E, 1-1 pt.
Parathion 15% WP, lY2-2 lbs.
Phosdrin 2E, 1-2 pts.
Thiodan 50% WP, 1 lb.
DDT 50% WP, 2 lbs.
Phosdrin 2E, 1-2 pts.
Sevin 50% WP, 2 lbs.
TDE (DDD) 50 % WP, 2 lbs.
Thiodan 50% WP, 1 lb.
Parathion 15% WP, 2 lbs.
Phosdrin 2E, 2 pts.
Thiodan 50% WP, 1 lb.
Dimethoate (Cygon) 4E, /-1 pt.
Diazinon 25% WP, 1-2 lbs.
Dibrom 8E, 1 pt.
Guthion 2E, 2 pts.
Parathion 15% WP, 2 lbs.
Phosdrin 2E, 1 pt.
Sevin 50% WP, 2 lbs.
Thiodan 50% WP, 1 lb


MIN. DAYS
DUST TO HARVEST


Parathion 1-2%


DDT 5%
Sevin 5%
TDE (DDD) 5%

Parathion 2%



Diazinon 2%


Parathion 2%
Sevin 5%


3
1
NTL*
1
1


3
1
NTL*
1


Banded Cucumber Thiodan 50% WP, 1 Ib.
Beetle Guthion 2E, 2 pts.


Cutworms


Wireworms
Mole-Cricket
Field-Cricket


See page 10. Regular sprays of DDT, TDE or parathion
will prevent the establishment of cutworms after the crop
is planted.
See page 10. Also heptachlor.
See page 10.
Same as Mole-Cricket.


No time limitation when used as directed.


1. Leaf Miners.-Watch closely for leaf miners. Apply in-
secticides twice a week to small seedlings when there are heavy
migrations of adult leaf miners from nearby abandoned host
vegetable fields, or on older plants when weekly applications are
not giving control. Weekly applications of dimethoate (Cygon)
have given good control. Diazinon has not been effective in the
Homestead and Lower East Coast areas in recent years. Para-
thion will usually give control in Central and North Florida.







DISEASE CONTROL
The amounts of fungicide recommended as sprays are for
100 gallons of water. Materials recommended as dusts are to be
used at 20 to 35 pounds per acre. "Minimum Days to Harvest"
means the minimum number of days that should be allowed be-
tween last foliar application and harvest. If the dosages recom-
mended in this publication are exceeded, the minimum days
given may not be applicable and a longer interval should be
allowed.
BEANS

Bush and Lima
Bacterial Blight.-No fungicidal control.
Halo blight and common bacterial blight are carried in and
on the seed and soil. Seed treatment is not beneficial, and sprays
in the field usually are not effective. Secure blight-free seed
from western areas where proper production precautions have
been taken. Rotate crops.
Powdery Mildew.-Same as for rust control.
Root Rots.-All cover crops should be chopped down and al-
lowed to dry completely before being plowed under. Plow under
cover crops six to eight weeks in advance of planting and prepare
seedbed 5 to 10 days ahead of planting.
Spraying seed and soil in a six- to eight-inch band in the
opened furrow at planting time with a 50-50 mixture of captain
50% plus PCNB 75% at the rate of 8 pounds per acre has re-
sulted in improved stands. Protection cannot be expected for
more than a week or two after seed germinates. Be sure not to
exceed 8 pounds per acre, particularly during cool, rainy periods
of mid-winter.
Rust.-For severe rust condition, usually during spring
months when sulfur alone will not give control, the following
program is advised:
Spray with maneb (80%) at 1.5 pounds per 100 gallons of
water or use sulfur plus 3.5% maneb dust, beginning at emerg-
ence and continuing at seven-day intervals until a few days be-
fore harvest. Minimum days to harvest: 4.
When rust is less severe during fall and winter, sulfur spray
at 16 pounds per 100 gallons of water or sulfur dust should give
adequate control.







To be most effective, rust control should be started before the
leaves are infected. The control obtained before flowering has
more effect on yield than control late in the crop season.
Sclerotinia.-Flooding fields for five to six weeks during sum-
mer months will effectively reduce the number of sclerotia in
the soil.
On marl soils, apply 500 to 700 pounds of cyanamid per acre.
Broadcast and disk in prior to planting; no waiting period is
necessary on marl. Cyanamid is not necessary if land is flooded
three weeks or more during summer. On sand apply 1,000 pounds
of cyanamid and wait three months before planting.

Pole Beans
Bacterial Blight.-See under Bush Beans.
Powdery Mildew.-Same as for rust control.
Root Rots.-See under Bush Beans.
Rust.-Use rust-resistant varieties of pole beans where these
are adapted.
For the most severe rust conditions, which usually occur
during the spring months beginning with February, when sulfur
alone will not give adequate control, the following program is
advised:
1. Spray with maneb (80%), 1.5 pounds per 100 gallons of
water, beginning with emergence and continuing until poles are
set. Apply sprays often enough to cover new growth as it ap-
pears.
2. After staking, dust with sulfur plus 3.5% maneb twice
weekly until beans are setting, thereafter at five-day intervals
until about 10 days before harvest ceases. Use 30 to 50 pounds
per acre per application, depending upon plant size. Minimum
days to harvest: 4.
When rust is less severe, during fall and winter months, sul-
fur dust alone will give adequate control. Also, if sulfur plus
maneb dust is used during this period, the interval between ap-
plications may be lengthened to five to seven days. Minimum
days to harvest: 4.
To be most effective, rust control should be started before
the leaves are infected. The control obtained before flowering
has more effect on yield than control later in the crop season.
Sclerotinia.-See under Bush Beans.







CARROTS
MIN. DAYS
DISEASE SPRAY TO HARVEST
Alternaria Leaf Zineb 75%, 2 lbs. 7*
Blight- Copper, 4 lbs. 48-53% NTL**
(Alternaria metallic copper
dauci) Ziram 76%, 2 Ibs. 7*
7 days if tops used for food or feed.
** No time limitation when used as recommended.

In early plantings it may be satisfactory to begin applications
when plants are five to eight inches high and repeat at weekly
intervals. In later plantings, if the disease is established in the
area, it may be necessary to begin applications shortly after
emergence of the seedlings (three-inch stage).
Bacterial Blight (Xanthomonas carotae).-Seed treatment:
Treat seed 10 minutes in water at 1260F., (see Crucifers) or 10
minutes in 1:1000 mercuric chloride (1 ounce crystals in 71/2
gallons of water). Wash seed and dry.
CAUTION: Mercuric chloride is extremely poisonous and
corrosive and must be handled with extreme care. Use a wood
or earthenware container for treating seed with mercuric chlo-
ride. Take every precaution to keep away from children and
animals. Used material should be disposed of in a safe place.

CELERY
Transplant Bed
Fungi, Nematodes and Weeds.-Preplant treatment: Gases.-
Release methyl bromide under a gas-proof cover with a special
applicator or inject chloropicrin at a depth of six inches at one-
foot intervals (6 to 8 inch intervals on organic soil) and cover
the treated area with a gas-proof cover. In each case the covers
may be removed 24 to 48 hours after application. Allow three to
seven days after treatment for the gases to escape from the soil
before seeding. Two gallons of chloropicrin or 24 pounds of
methyl bromide per 1,200 square feet (2 pounds per 100 square
feet) of soil are recommended, but half these amounts have
been effective after August.
These gases are highly toxic and should not be inhaled.
Preplant Treatment. Drenches: The materials recommend-
ed are listed in the table on page 29. These may be substituted
for the gases under cover. They cost less and are more conveni-
ent to apply, but they are less effective, particularly during July








and August, when the soil temperature sometimes goes above
850F. A waiting period of two weeks between treatment and
seeding is necessary for most of the drenches, except treatment
10 in the table, which requires only a three- to seven-day waiting
period. With this method of fumigation, prepare the seedbeds
and keep them moist at least two weeks before application to in-
sure effective herbicidal activity. Apply the chemicals or mix-
tures of chemicals with a watering cart, garden hose propor-
tioner or sprinkling can. Agitate the solutions or emulsions
when applying to prevent settling out. Approximately 20 gallons
of water per 100 square feet or 240 gallons per 1,200 square feet
of seedbed is necessary to obtain adequate penetration. After
treatment, the seedbed should not be raked or cultivated beyond
a depth of 2 inches because of the danger of exposing viable weed
seeds. See first paragraph on page 30.)

RECOMMENDED CHEMICALS
Control of Soil Pests in Celery Seedbeds

Quantity per
Chemicals 1,200 Sq. Ft.
Seedbed

1. Methyl bromide .................................... 24.0 lbs.
2. Chloropierin ............................................... 2.0 gals.
3. Allyl alcohol ................................-- ---.. .......... ..... 1.1 gals.
EDB (ethylene dibromide 83% emulsible) ........................ 1.3 pts.
Formaldehyde 40% ...................................... ................. 2.8 gals.
4. Allyl alcohol .......................... ................................. 1.1 gals.
Dichloropropene and dichloropropane mixtures (D-D,
Telone, Vidden D ) ................................ ....... .............. 3.3 qts.
Formaldehyde 40% ...................................... ........ 2.8 gals.
5. SMDC (Vapam, VPM)* ................ ............................. 2.1 gals.
6. DM TT (M ylone 85W )* ............................................ .................. 8.3 lbs.
7. DMTT (Mylone 50W ) ...................... ... .................. 14.0 lbs.
8. Allyl alcohol ............................................ 1.1 gals.
Dichloropropene and dichloropropane mixtures (D-D,
Telone, Vidden D) ................................................... ...... 3.3 qts.
9. Allyl alcohol .................................... .. ... ................. g 1.1 gals.
EDB (83% emulsible) ................. ........ .... ........... 1.3 pts.
10. A llyl alcohol ..................................................... ..................... 1.1 gals.
1.2 dibromo-3-chloropropane 50% emulsible
(Nemagon, Fumazone) ......................................... 3.0 pts.

*A 25% to 50% reduction in dosage if treated area is covered with
plastic film. Full dosage under plastic film is equal to methyl bromide.

The chemicals for mixtures listed above may be purchased separately
and mixed, or some of them may be purchased already formulated, ready
for use.







The chemicals in the drenches are highly toxic and should
not be inhaled or allowed to come in contact with the skin. Wear
a gas mask containing a canister for protection against organic
vapors and wear rubber gloves, boots and apron when mixing
or applying the chemicals. This is particularly important when
a person is exposed to the chemicals over a period of several
days.
Fungi.-Post-emergence treatment.-On organic soils, fixed
copper at 4 pounds of 48-53 % metallic applied at weekly intervals
is sufficient for disease control until covers are removed. After
this, use control measures recommended for field diseases.

FIELD
Bacterial Blight (Pseudomonas apii).-On organic soils dur-
ing the late spring and early fall when bacterial blight is usually
present, apply fixed copper at 4 pounds of 48-53% metallic twice
each week or every four to five days, depending on rainfall. No
time limitation when used as recommended.
Do not apply foliar nitrogen during the seasons favorable
for bacterial blight, and avoid over-fertilization with soil-applied
nitrogen. To help prevent spread of the bacterium keep workers
and farm equipment from brushing against wet plants.

MIN. DAYS
DISEASE SPRAY TO HARVEST
Early Blight Dyrene 50%, 2 lbs. NTL*
Late Blight Maneb 80%, 12 lbs. NTL*
Maneb 80%, Dyrene 50%, 50-50
mixture 2 lbs. NTL*
Wash and trim. No time limitation when used as recommended.

Early Blight (Cercospora apii).-Begin applications at week-
ly intervals and reduce to four or five days if conditions become
favorable for disease development. On organic soils after two
applications of any of the organic materials, follow with one
application of copper.
On organic soils begin applications immediately after plants
are set and repeat at 4- to 5-day intervals. Dyrene or maneb is
most effective. Dyrene at 1 pound mixed in the spray tank with
4 pounds of 48-53% metallic copper is equally effective against
early blight and in addition offers some control of bacterial
blight.







Late Blight (Septoria apii).-Use three year old seed. Early
blight control measures are effective for late blight control.
Pink Rot (Sclerotinia sclerotiorum).-Since the disease is
not serious every year, it is difficult to recommend a definite con-
trol program. Each of the following control measures has re-
duced Sclerotinia, but when conditions become favorable for the
development of the disease, it may be necessary to combine all
of them in order to obtain a satisfactory control.
(1) Rotate with a crop not susceptible to Sclerotinia, such
as sweet corn.
(2) Flood the soil either completely, partially, or intermittent-
ly for a period of 6 weeks during the summer.
(3) Treat the soil with cyanamid at the rate of 1,000 pounds
per acre on sand at least 3 months before transplanting.
Rhizoctonia Stalk Rot (Rhizoctonia solani).-This disease
usually occurs after blowing muck has injured the base of the
plants. Direct a spray nozzle on each side of the row toward
the base of the plants and apply 11/2 pounds thiram, 11/2 pounds
Dyrene or 4 pounds fixed copper, 48-53 % metallic, per 100 gallons
of water. Spray applications should be made in combination with
those for early blight control.

Mosaic.-The virus causing mosaic is transmitted by aphids.
At present the only effective control measure consists of eradicat-
ing the principal weed host, wandering jew, (Commelina spp.)
from the vicinity of the crop. It is particularly important to do
this in the seedbed area. This eradication must be complete
before the celery seedbeds are planted.

CORN, SWEET
MIN. DAYS
DISEASE SPRAY TO HARVEST
Helminthosporium Maneb 80%, 1% lbs. NTL*
Leaf Blights- Nabam 22%, 2 qts. (1 lb. 93%
(Helminthosporium WP) plus % lb. zinc sulfate
maydis and 36% NTL*
Helminthosporium Zineb 75%, 2 lbs. NTL*
turcicum)

Kernel and cob: no time limitation. Do not feed treated forage to dairy animals or
animals being finished for slaughter.

Maneb, nabam plus zinc sulfate, or zineb properly applied once
or twice weekly, depending on weather and disease conditions







and locations, will give economic control. For crops in the "whorl
stage" of growth, the sprayer should have two nozzles over the
row in addition to the side nozzles required for complete cover-
age of unfurled leaves. Application of fungicide should cease
10 days before harvest unless younger corn is growing nearby.
These same materials also control corn rust. Where practicable
use Helminthosporium resistant varieties.
In the Central Florida area, during "normal" seasons, four
applications of fungicide are usually sufficient.

CRUCIFERS

Broccoli, Brussel Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower,
Chinese Cabbage, Collards, Radishes
Spray materials do not stick easily to the waxy leaves of
most crucifers. Use a sticker-spreader as recommended by the
manufacturer on large plants in seedbeds and on plants in the
field.
Transplant Bed
Fungi, Nematodes and Weeds.-Preplant treatment: See cel-
ery transplant bed.

TRANSPLANT BED TREATMENTS
MIN. DAYS
DISEASE SPRAY TO HARVEST
Alternaria Leaf Spot Nabam 22%, 2 qts. (1 lb. 93% (See
(Alternaria brassicae) WP) plus % lb. zinc sulfate field
36%) treatments)
Downy Mildew Zineb 75%, 2 lbs.
(Peronospora parasitica) Maneb 80%, 1%/ lbs.
Chloranil 48%, 4 lbs.*
Do not use on cauliflower or Chinese Cabbage.

In the Hastings area, begin applications 7 to 10 days after
the seed is planted or before then, if mildew is present. Repeat
three times a week except when temperatures drop to 400F or
lower or heavy rains interrupt the schedule. Continue treatment
until plants are set in the field. Total number of applications
may vary from 6 to 15, depending upon season and weather.
Use 80 to 150 gallons of spray or 15 to 35 pounds of dust per
acre at each application, depending on size of plants.
Plow under abandoned seedbeds and harvested fields to pre-
vent diseases from spreading to new plantings.







FIELD TREATMENTS
MIN. DAYS
DISEASE SPRAY TO HARVEST
Alternaria Leaf Spot Nabam 22%, 2 qts. (1 lb. zinc
(Alternaria brassicae) sulfate 36%) 7
Downy Mildew Zineb 75%, 2 lbs. 7
(Peronospora parasitica) Maneb 80%, 1 lbs. 7*
No time limitation when used as recommended on cauliflower and brussell sprouts.
Remove residues on broccoli by washing or trimming if treated within 3 days of harvest.
Do not use on Chinese cabbage or collards.

Where seed is sown directly in the field, spray seedlings with
nabam plus zinc sulfate, zineb or chloranil as recommended for
downy mildew. Stop chloranil treatments when plants are
thinned. If alternaria leaf spot and downy mildew are a prob-
lem, continue treatment with nabam plus zinc sulfate, zineb or
maneb; use 100 to 150 gallons of spray or 25 to 30 pounds of
dust per acre every six to seven days.
Black Rot (Xanthomonas campestris).-Take every possible
precaution to secure disease-free plants. Do not locate seedbeds
or field plantings on land planted to any crucifer during the pre-
ceding 12 months.
Cabbage seed grown in the Puget Sound area are reported
to be free of black rot, but the hot water treatment is recom-
mended regardless of source. Hot water treatment is carried
out as follows:
Treat seed at 122 F. Cabbage and brussel sprouts should be
treated 25 minutes; broccoli, cauliflower, collards, Chinese cab-
bage, kale, kohlrabi, rutabaga and turnips should be treated 18
minutes.
Fill muslin bags about 2/3 full of seed. Tie the tops and
immerse in a container of water at the temperature indicated.
Keep the water temperature within one degree of that specified.
Keep the seed under water, and stir to maintain uniform tempera-
ture. At the end of the period, remove seed from the hot water
and plunge into cold water, then spread out and dry. Treatment
is a delicate operation and is best performed by a trained opera-
tor using special equipment. It may be more satisfactory to
have seed treated at the nearest central seed treating plant. A
University of Florida publication, Extension Agricultural Engi-
neering Mimeo Report No. 61-1, gives instructions for construc-
tion and operation of a central hot water seed treating unit.
Test seed for germination before treating with hot water.
Weak seed may be killed, while good seed will stand treatment
and germinate well if planted within two months.








Yellows (Fusarium oxysporum f. conglutinans).-The only
control after soil is infested is use of resistant varieties. Grow-
ers should take every possible precaution to secure disease-free
transplants.
TURNIPS AND MUSTARD
MIN. DAYS
DISEASE SPRAY TO HARVEST
Downy Mildew- Nabam 22%, 2 qts. (1 lb. 93%
(Peronospora parasitica) WP) plus zinc sulfate 36%,
3/ lb. 7*
Zineb 75%, 2 lbs. 7*
Turnip roots; no time limitation.

When weather favors development of the disease, begin ap-
plications as soon as seedlings emerge and repeat at three- to
four-day intervals. Addition of a spreader-sticker may be ad-
visable.
In the Hastings area, downy mildew is seldom observed and
is of no consequence. The cabbage mildew fungus does not at-
tack turnip and mustard.
Leaf Spots.-Exact controls of the various leaf spot conditions
reported on these crops have not been fully determined. Nabam
plus zinc sulfate may control Alternaria but is not effective
against Cercosporella. A regular schedule of alternate sprays
or dusts of maneb and zineb is suggested.

CUCURBITS

Cantaloupe, Cucumber and Squash
Anthracnose (Colletotrichum lagenarium).-Same as for
downy mildew.
Angular Leaf Spot (Pseudomonas lachrymans).-Use only
disease-free seed, or treat seed for six minutes in mercuric chlo-
ride (1 ounce crystals in 71/2 gallons of water), followed by rins-
ing in clear water and drying.
CAUTION: Mercuric chloride is extremely poisonous and cor-
rosive and must be handled with extreme care. Use a wooden or
earthenware container for treating seed with mercuric chloride.
Take every precaution to keep away from children and animals.
Used material should be disposed of in a safe place.
Weekly applications of copper sprays (4 pounds of 48-53%
metallic copper per 100 gallons) help to control spread of the







disease in the field. Copper will not give satisfactory control of
powdery mildew and thus is not a substitute for the other ma-
terials. Repeated copper applications may cause yellowing of
leaf margins and possibly reduction of yields. No time limitation
when used as recommended.
Blossom Blight (Choanephora cucurbitarum).-No control
recommended.
MIN. DAYS
DISEASE SPRAY TO HARVEST
Downy Mildew Zineb 75%, 2 lbs. NTL*
(Pseudoperonospora Maneb 80%, 11/2 lbs. NTL*
cubensis) Nabam 22%, 2 qts. (1 lb. 93%
WP) plus 3/ Ib. zinc sulfate
36% NTL*
No time limitation when used as recommended.

Maneb may be injurious to cantaloupe and cucumbers. Zineb
alternated with maneb, is preferred because it is less injurious.
SDowny mildew is serious in all parts of the state during
warm, damp weather. Spraying every three to four days, be-
ginning before runners start, if necessary. In seasons of light
infection, applications may be delayed until runners form and
intervals may be longer.
There are several varieties of cucumbers and cantaloupe that
are resistant to downy mildew but fungicides should be used to
prevent other diseases.
Powdery Mildew (Erysiphe cichoracearum).-The fungicides
used for downy mildew give some control of powdery mildew,
but will not give sufficient control. Karathane at the rate of 8
to 16 ounces in 100 gallons of water may be added to the carba-
mates to control powdery mildew when it appears. If powdery
mildew is a persistent problem, use Karathane on a preventative
basis, i.e., on a regular schedule (every five to seven days) be-
fore the disease appears. Minimum days to harvest: 7.
During cold weather, sulfur may be used on squash (2 to 4
pounds) and on cucumber (no more than 2 pounds) two or three
times to control powdery mildew. Sulfur should never be used
on cantaloupe.
Viruses (Mosaics).-Most mosaic symptoms in these crops
are caused by aphid-transmitted viruses that occur naturally in
wild hosts. Elimination of weeds around the field before plant-
ing will help greatly in reducing losses from virus diseases.
Rodents.-See under Watermelons.







WATERMELONS
MIN. DAYS
DISEASE SPRAY TO HARVEST
Anthracnose Zineb 75%, 1 lb., plus maneb
(Colletotrichum 80%, % lb. NTL*
lagenarium) Maneb 80%, 1% lbs. alternate NTL*
Downy Mildew with Zineb 75%, 2 lbs. NTL*
(Pseudoperonospora
cubensis)
Gummy Stem Blight
(Mycosphaerella
citrulline)
No time limitation when used as recommended.

Copper (3 pounds of 48-53%o metallic copper per 100 gallons)
may be used alternately with zineb or maneb where downy mil-
dew is the only disease of importance. Copper will not control
anthracnose, and, in some cases, causes leaf burning on water-
melons. Copper may be used on watermelons with no time limi-
tation.
The major diseases of watermelons can be controlled with
fungicides. The severity of these diseases varies from year to
year, depending on weather and other factors. Usually one or
more of them cause damage in Florida. In dry seasons, the
value of fungicides may not be apparent, especially in northern
Florida. Higher yields of higher quality melons usually result
from a systematic disease control program.
Inadequate coverage of foliage is probably the most common
cause of poor disease control. Complete coverage of both foliage
and fruit is essential for adequate disease control. It is necessary
to cover the underside of the leaves as well as the topside. Spray-
ing is preferable to dusting because better coverage is possible.
Make the first application soon after plants begin to grow
and before runners start. Weather conditions will govern the
number and timing of subsequent applications. In general three
to five sprays are sufficient in northern and central Florida,
while seven or more may be needed in southern Florida.
Seed-Borne Diseases.-Unless a rodent control seed treatment
that contains thiram as an ingredient is used, a seed treatment
for control of seed-borne diseases is recommended.

Ounces per Teaspoons per
100 Lbs. Seed Pound of Seed
Chloranil 48% ...... ......... ....... .............. 6 %/
or
Thiram 50% ....................................... ................ 4 /2







Wilt (Fusarium oxysporum f. niveum).-Fusarium wilt is
soil-borne and cannot be controlled with fungicides. The use of
resistant varieties, along with rotations and new land, is the best
control measure. When it is necessary to use land which has
been previously planted to watermelons, delaying thinning is
recommended with Charleston Gray. For wilt resistant varie-
ties a minimum of 3 years and for wilt-susceptible varieties a
minimum of eight years between crops is desirable.
There is always a possibility that wilt may occur on new land
as a result of infestations through drainage water, tools or cat-
tle which come in contact with infested fields.
Rodents.-Seed treatment.-Place 5 pounds of seed in a five-
gallon container with a dust-proof lid. Weigh and measure out
the materials before you start the treatment.
Make a 10% latex water emulsion by putting 0.8 fluid ounce
(5 teaspoons) of Dow Latex 512-R (48% solids) or 0.8 fluid
ounce (5 teaspoons) poly vinyl acetate or 1/4 pint Rhoplex AC-33
(46% solids) in a 1/2 pint container and filling with water. Pour
this solution over seed. Place lid on container and tumble seed
until uniformly moistened with adhesive.
Next, measure out 0.8 ounce endrin 50W and 5.0 ounces thi-
ram 75 and blend together; add mixture to seed and tumble
until seed are evenly coated.
Then, measure out 0.8 ounce of aluminum powder (extra
fine) and add to seed and tumble until seed are evenly coated.
NOTE: This entire seed treatment must be completed within
three to five minutes, before the adhesive sets.
Finally, spread the treated seed out to dry for 24 hours be-
fore planting. Treat only 5 pounds of seed in five-gallon con-
tainer. You may treat larger quantities with larger equipment.
CAUTION: Endrin is extremely toxic and should not be
breathed or allowed to get on clothing or skin. If accidentally
spilled on skin or clothing, change clothes and wash immediately
with soap and water. Read and follow precautions on labels on
packages explicitly. Commercially prepared packets of all in-
gredients with measuring bottle are available in 5-, 10- and 20-
pound packets through pesticide distributors in Florida.

EGGPLANT
Phompsis Blight (Phomopsis vexans).-Florida Market is
resistant to the tip over stage of Phomopsis blight. However,








the fruit rot and leaf and stem lesion stages are serious problems.
Only disease-free plants should be transplanted from seedbed
to field.
TRANSPLANT BED SPRAY
3 lbs. 76% ferbam
or
2 lbs. 75% zineb
To make 6 gallons of spray, use 3 ounces (22 level tablespoons full)
ferbam, or 2 ounces (8 level tablespoons full) of zineb.
Make two applications 10 days apart, with the first at the
initial signs of any damping-off in the seedbed.
There are no field control recommendations. Set healthy
plants in the field.

LETTUCE AND ENDIVE
Alternaria Leaf Spot (Alternaria sonchi).-For lettuce only,
use ziram 76%, 2 pounds in 100 gallons of water, and begin ap-
plications when disease appears; repeat at four- to five-day
intervals.
MIN. DAYS
DISEASE SPRAY TO HARVEST
Downy Mildew Nabam 22%, 2 qts. (1 lb. 93%
(Bremia lactucae) WP) plus % lb. zinc sulfate
36% 7*
Zineb 75%, 2 lbs. 7*
Maneb 80%, 1% lbs. 7*
5 days on head lettuce.

Begin applications when disease appears; repeat at four- to
five-day intervals.
Spray twice weekly during cool, wet weather. Where rows
are spaced 18 inches apart, apply 150 to 200 gallons spray per
acre. Nabam plus zinc sulfate may cause injury.
Drop (Sclerotinia sclerotiorum).-Since the disease is not
serious every year, it is difficult to recommend a definite control
program. Each of the following control measures has reduced
drop, but when conditions become favorable for the development
of the disease, it may be necessary to combine all of them in
order to obtain a satisfactory control.
(1) Rotate with a crop not susceptible to this disease, such
as sweet corn.
(2) Flood the soil either completely, partially or intermit-
tently for a period of six weeks during the summer.
(3) Treat the soil with cyanamid at the rate of 1,000 pounds
per acre on sand at least three months before transplanting. On







marl soils, apply 500 to 700 pounds of cyanamid per acre and disk
in 7 to 10 days before setting plants.
(4) Spray base of plants at weekly intervals with a mixture
of 2 pounds each of hydrated lime and ferbam. Stop treatment
three weeks before harvest.
Mosaic.-Most severe on head lettuce. The recommended
control is to use only seed which has been indexed as mosaic-
free. Field spread may be reduced by aphid control.


OKRA
Powdery mildew (Erysiphi cichoracearum).-Apply weekly
sprays of sulphur at 16 lbs. sulphur per 100 gallons of water,
or dust with 325 mesh dusting sulphur.


ONIONS


DISEASE SPRAY
Downy Mildew Nabam 22%, 2 qts. (1 lb. 93
(Peronospora WP) plus % lb. zinc sulf
destructor) 36%, plus spreader sticke
Blast Zineb 75%, 2 lbs., plus stick
(Botrytis sp.)
Purple Blotch Maneb 80%, 1%/ lbs., plus
(Alternaria porri) sticker
No time limit on dry onions; 7 days on green onions.


MI
DUST TO H
%
ate
r
er Zineb 6%%


When weather conditions favor the development of disease,
begin applications when seedlings emerge; repeat at intervals
of three to four days. In certain seasons, it may be impossible
to begin applications on a weekly schedule, shifting to twice-
weekly applications if necessary.
It is extremely difficult to obtain adequate foliage coverage
because of the waxy nature of the onion plant. Successful con-
trol has been reported by timing dust applications to coincide
with formation of fine films of moisture on the leaf surface at
certain periods of the day.


PEAS
Powdery Mildew (Erysiphe polygoni).-Spray with 10 pounds
of wettable sulfur in 100 gallons of water or dust with 325 mesh
dusting sulfur.


N. DAYS
ARVEST


NTL








Begin applications when' signs of disease appear. Repeat at
10- to 14-day intervals, or often enough to keep the disease under
control. Do not apply when plants are wet or during periods of
high temperatures (above 900F).
Powdery mildew sometimes become serious during winter
months. It is usually necessary to adhere to a strict spray pro-
gram to keep it under control.

PEPPERS
Fungi, Nematodes and Weeds.-Pre-plant treatment in trans-
plant bed: See celery transplant bed.
MIN. DAYS
DISEASE SPRAY TO HARVEST
Bacterial Spot Copper, 4 lbs. of 48-53%
(Xanthomonas metallic copper, plus 400 ppm
vesicatoria) streptomycin sulfate NTL*
Copper: no time limitation. Streptomycin: do not apply after fruit begins to form.

In plant beds, begin spraying when plants emerge and repeat
at seven-day intervals. Copper may offer a measure of control
during periods of light infection. However, it will not give
control during rainy, windy periods, which are particularly favor-
able for spread of the disease.
A suggested seedbed program is as follows: during rainy
periods, spray once weekly with copper (4 pounds of 48-53%
metallic copper); add streptomycin up to 400 ppm.
For field control, 4 pounds of 48-53% metallic copper will
reduce disease during rainy season. Add streptomycin up to
400 ppm in areas where bacteria are susceptible to streptomycin.
Streptomycin is generally ineffective in South Florida because
of resistant strains of the spot bacterium. Do NOT use strep-
tomycin after fruit start to form.
Damping-off (Pythium spp., Rhizoctonia spp., etc.).-Avoid
planting on low or poorly drained areas. Do not follow peppers
with peppers. A chemical soil treatment with SMDC (Vapam,
VPM) on direct-seeded peppers may be tried where damping-off
and other soil-borne troubles, such as nematodes and weeds,
are a problem. Inject five to six inches deep on the prepared
bed at the rate of 1 pint per 100 lineal feet of row or in two bands
at the same rate for two row beds. Good moisture for seeding
and compaction ofthe bed following application is essential for
success. A waiting period of at least three weeks before seed-







ing is necessary for chemicals to escape. The PCNB plus captain
row treatment is the same as for beans.
MIN. DAYS
DISEASE SPRAY TO HARVEST
Frogeye Spot Zineb 75%, 2 Ibs. NTL*
Cercospora Copper, 4 lbs. of 48-53%
capsici metallic copper NTL*
Maneb 80%, 1Y2 lbs. NTL*
No time limitation when used as recommended.

In plant beds, begin spraying when plants are two to three
inches high and repeat at seven-day intervals. In fields after
plants have become established, repeat at 7- to 10-day intervals
as needed.
Frogeye spot is not usually a serious disease, and when weath-
er conditions are not favorable for its development, the spray
schedule may be modified.
Viruses.-Use tobacco mosaic-resistant varieties where pos-
sible.
Workers handling pepper plants should wash hands with
strong soap and water or 70% alcohol before handling plants.
This is most important for workers who use tobacco.
To reduce insect transmission of viruses from wild host plants
(nightshade, ground cherry and others) several practices are
suggested:
(1) Eradicate wild plants in fencerows and on ditch banks
during season when crops are not growing.
(2) Plant barrier crops around pepper fields. A 50-foot strip
of a non-susceptible crop (corn, beans, etc.) tends to trap insects
flying in until they become non-infective.
(3) Spray barrier crop with suitable insecticide at least
weekly to reduce population of insect vectors. See insect control
recommendations.
(4) Destroy old infected crops before planting following crops
alongside them.
POTATOES
Numerous virus, bacterial and fungus diseases are controlled
by always planting certified seed.
Corky Ringspot.-This disease is caused by a tuber and soil-
borne virus. Pungo is highly resistant to corky ringspot and is
recommended for planting in infested soil.








MIN. DAYS
DISEASE SPRAY TO HARVEST
Early Blight Maneb 80%, 11/2 lbs. NTL*
(Alternaria solani) Zineb 75%, 2 lbs. NTL*
Late Blight Nabam 22%, 2 qts. (1 lb. 93%
(Phytophthora WP) plus % lb. zinc sulfate
infestans) 36% NTL*
No time limitation when used as recommended.

In south Florida, begin spraying for late blight when plants
have emerged and continue at four- to five-day intervals.
In the Hastings area, begin spraying when the plants are
six to eight inches high, if late blight does not show earlier, and
continue at five- to seven-day intervals; or use a more economical
method of control by spraying the plants following eight con-
secutive days when the seven-day average daily temperatures
range from 500 to 77F. and the ten-day total rainfall is 1.01
inches or greater. When the latter method is used, intervals be-
tween spraying may vary from 5 to 14 days or more depending
upon the severity of late blight and the duration of periods when
temperatures and rainfall favor its development.

Scab (Streptomyces scabies).-In areas where soil reaction
is usually pH 6.0 or higher and scab has caused excessive losses,
treat seed with hot or cold formaldehyde solution or acidulated
mercuric chloride solution. Certified seed, crop rotation and
holding the pH below 6.0 will assist in controlling scab. Do not
treat seed when potatoes are to be grown in areas where scab
has caused little trouble.

(1) COLD FORMALDEHYDE: 1 pint 40% in 30 gallons of water. Soak
uncut tubers 1 hours, then remove and air thoroughly. This treat-
ment is more effective when sacked tubers are first soaked in water
for two minutes before soaking them in formaldehyde or mercury
solutions. This softens the scab lesions.
(2) HOT FORMALDEHYDE: 3.3 quarts 40% per 100 gallons of water.
Dip uncut sacked tubers for three to four minutes in the solution
held at 122 to 124F. Stack sacks on end to dry. Potatoes may be
cut for planting any time after the sacks have dried. Temperature
of the hot solution must be kept within the range indicated to give
control of the disease without injuring the tubers.
(3) ACIDULATED MERCURIC CHLORIDE: 6 ounces mercuric chloride
plus 1 quart commercial hydrochloric acid in 25 gallons of water.
Soak sacked uncut tubers for five minutes, allow to drip and plant
immediately, or dry out. This treatment is safe on muck and peat
soils. This material is poisonous and corrosive; treated seed should
not be eaten or fed to livestock.
42







CAUTION: Mercuric chloride is extremely poisonous and
corrosive and must be handled with extreme care. Use a wood
or earthenware container for treating seed with mercuric chlo-
ride. Take every precaution to keep away from children and
animals. Used material should be disposed of in a safe place.
Sclerotinia (Sclerotinia sclerotiorum).-Flooding fields for
five to six weeks during summer months will reduce the num-
ber of sclerotia in the soil.
On marl soils, where sclerotinia has attacked the previous
crop, apply 400 to 600 pounds of cyanamid per acre before plant-
ing. Distribute evenly and thoroughly mix with the surface soil.
Cyanamid is not necessary if soil has been flooded three or more
weeks during the summer.

POTATOES, SWEET
Black Rot (Ceratocystis fimbriata), Scurf (Monilochaetes in-
fuscans), and Wilt (Fusarium oxysporum f. batatas).-These
diseases will be kept under control with the following practices:
Seed Selection: Many diseases may be reduced by growing
enough seed from vine cuttings to produce next year's seed sup-
ply. Select hills at digging time that are free of disease, have
desirable varietal characteristics, and have at least four or five
Number 1 size potatoes per hill. Take special care in digging
and storing the seed potatoes, handling as little as possible to
prevent bruising.
Plant Bed Site: Locate the bed where sweet potatoes and to-
bacco have not been grown within three years. If permanent
beds are to be used, remove soil to a depth of 12 inches, drench
the bed and frame with a solution of 1 pint of formaldehyde per
15 gallons of water, then replace with new soil.
CAUTION: Seed Treatment: (Pay strict attention to precau-
tionary label statements.)
Semesan Bel: 1 pound to 71/2 to 8 gallons of water for 1 min-
ute; bed or dry in the shade.
Plant Treatment: Cuttings from the seedbed will give effec-
tive control of black rot and scurf. Cut 1 inch above soil line
rather than pulling with roots on.
Internal Cork.-Seed stock should be free of internal cork,
a disease for which there is no other known control. Cork-free
seed potatoes are available.







STRAWBERRIES


Anthracnose (Colletotrichum, fragariae).-Occurs most of-
ten in nursery beds, causes spotting and girdling of runners and
leaf stems. Most severe with high temperature and moisture.
Spray with three to four pounds of 48-53 percent metallic cop-
per from basic copper plus spreader sticker or dust with 6 per-
cent copper dust at 20 to 35 pounds per acre and use on a pre-
ventive schedule once a week or more often. No time limit be-
tween last application and harvest.
Rhizoctonia Bud Rot (Rhizoctonia solani).-Most prevalent
during cool, humid weather. Favored by fog and heavy dew.
Avoid areas where this disease has been prevalent on previous
crops particularly where heavy legume cover crops have been
grown. Cut and allow cover crops to thoroughly dry before
turning under.

Leaf Spots (common, scorch, blight).-In the nursery spray
with three to four pounds of 48-53 percent metallic copper from
basic copper in 100 gallons of water at 75 to 150 gallons per acre
or dust with 6 percent copper dust at 20 to 35 pounds per acre
at seven to ten-day intervals. Use lower rates on small plants.
In fruiting fields, use two pounds of 75 percent zineb in 100
gallons of water, or 20 to 35 pounds of 61/2 percent zineb dust
per acre at seven-day intervals until full bloom, then switch to
three to five pounds of 50 percent captain in 100 gallons of water
or 20 to 35 pounds of 6 percent captain dust per acre at seven-
day intervals, throughout fruiting season. The captain treat-
ment may be used throughout the season. Use the three-pound
rate before bloom and the five-pound rate following bloom.

Black Root.-This condition occurs on older plants in the
nursery. These plants will produce new lateral roots and vig-
orous plants when transplanted. Good soil aeration two to three
weeks prior to digging aids in new root initiation.

Sclerotium Rot (Southern blight) (Sclerotium rolfsii).-De-
velops during hot, wet weather and is most severe in the nursery
during the summer. This fungus attacks plants at the soil line
and invades both the crown and roots, causing sudden death of
plants. Avoid areas where this disease has been prevalent on
previous crops, particularly where heavy legume cover crops
have been grown. Cut and allow cover crops to thoroughly dry
before turning under.







Fruit Rots.-Use 50 percent captain, as recommended for leaf
spots, at seven-day intervals. No time limitation between last
application before harvest.

TOMATOES

Transplant Bed
Fungi, Nematodes and Weeds.-Pre-plant treatment: Use
methyl bromide and SMDC (Vapam, VPM) transplant bed treat-
ments as recommended for celery.
Bacterial Spot (Xanthomonas vesicatoria).-C o p p e r (4
pounds of 48-53% metallic copper) will give some control; addi-
tion of streptomycin (up to 400 ppm) will control the disease
in areas where the causal bacteria are susceptible. Streptomycin
is generally ineffective in South Florida because of resistant
strains of the spot bacterium. Begin applications at emergence
of seedlings and continue on a four- to five-day schedule. Com-
plete coverage is essential. Control in plant bed helps reduce
subsequent losses in field, if plants are set at end of rainy season.
Gray Leaf Spot (Stemphylium solani).-Treat as for late
blight, except that applications every five to seven days should
be sufficient. Use resistant varieties where these are adaptable.
Late Blight (Phytophthora infestans).-Same as field con-
trol.
Field
For general control of fungus diseases of foliage, the combina-
tion of 1 pound of maneb and 1 pound of Dyrene* is recommended.
No time limitation when used as recommended. If gray leaf spot
or Botrytis becomes troublesome, increase Dyrene* to 2 pounds.
If late blight becomes troublesome, increase maneb to 11/2 pounds.
Bacterial Spot (Xanthomonas vesicatoria).-C o p p e r (4
pounds of 48-53% metallic copper) sprays may be useful under
light to moderate conditions, but are inadequate under severe
conditions. No time limitation when used as recommended.
Early Blight (Alternaria solani).-Control as for late blight
except that dichlone is not effective.
Fusarium Wilt (Fusarium oxysporum f. lycopersici).-No
chemical control. Use resistant varieties or new land.

See footnote on page 46.








Verticillium Wilt (Verticillium albo-atrum).-No chemical
control. Use new land or rotate with non-susceptible crops.
Gray Leaf Spot (Stemphylium solani).-Control as for late
blight except that Dyrene*, 2 pounds per 100 gallons, is also rec-
ommended.
Use resistant varieties where they are adapted.
Dyrene* although superior to maneb and zineb for gray leaf
spot control, is inferior for control of late blight. Therefore,
use Dyrene* when gray leaf spot is the principal disease and when
late blight is not a threat. Combinations of Dyrene* and maneb
or zineb as listed previously may be used when both gray leaf
spot and late blight are threats.
Gray Mold (Botrytis sp.).-Plants on soils limed to pH 6.5,
or calcareous in nature, should not need protection. Spray with
Dyrene* (2 pounds of 50%) on gray leaf spot susceptible plants.
Dichlone (0.5 pound of 50%), ferbam (3.0 pounds of 76%) or
Dyrene may be used on gray leaf spot resistant varieties. Di-
chlone is preferred in cool weather on gray leaf spot resistant
plants, if late blight is a threat. Ferbam or Dyrene is pre-
ferred when temperatures exceed 80F. These materials may
be added to maneb or zineb to control all the important fungus
diseases of tomatoes. It is important to begin spraying with
effective materials before the minimum daily temperatures fall
below 650F, or before the vines of ground tomatoes begin to
fall over.
Gray Wall (Physiologic).-Use resistant varieties.
Late Blight (Phytophthora infestans).-Spray with maneb
80%, 11/2 pounds per 100 gallons of water, zineb 75%, 2 pounds
per 100 gallons, or dichlone 50%, 3/ pounds per 100 gallons.
Dichlone should be used with caution if temperature is above
850F.
In southern parts of the state, begin applications immedi-
ately after transplanting or emergence and continue at four- to
five-day intervals. In areas or seasons when the disease is less
severe, the time between applications may be five to seven days.

Phoma (Phoma destructiva).-See Late Blight.

CAUTION: Dyrene, if used as a spray combination with copper, should
not be applied in a larger quantity than 1 pound of 50% Dyrene with 4
pounds of 48-53% metallic copper per 100 gallons of water when day tem-
peratures are in excess of 85F.








Sclerotinia (Sclerotinia sclerotiorum).-Flooding fields for
five to six weeks during summer months will reduce the number
of sclerotia in the soil.
On marl soils apply cyanamid at the rate of 500 to 700 pounds
per acre, 7 to 10 days before setting plants in the field; distribute
evenly and disk thoroughly after application. Cyanamid is not
needed on soils flooded three or more weeks during summer.
On sand apply 900 pounds and wait three months before plant-
ing.
Potato Virus Y and Tobacco Etch Virus.-Eradicate wild host
plants (nightshade, ground cherry, volunteer tomato plants)
BEFORE the crop is planted. Avoid planting subsequent crops
next to diseased early plantings until after the early plantings
have been destroyed. Avoid tomatoes in close proximity to po-
tatoes.
Pseudo-Curly Top Virus.-Destroy nightshade and ragweed
growing in and around the field before planting the crop. If the
disease appears in the field, spray the margin of the field with
parathion to kill the tree hoppers that transmit the virus.
Tobacco Mosaic Virus.-Direct seed if possible; use high clear-
ance spray and cultivation equipment; have workers handling
plants wash hands with soap and water after smoking.

Spray Notes








Spray Notes





POISON CONTROL CENTERS


City & Phone

Bradenton
4-0391

Daytona Beach
CL 2-5561

Ft. Lauderdale
JA 4-0541

Ft. Myers
ED 2-1141

Gainesville
FR 2-4321

Gainesville
FR 6-3211

Jacksonville
EV 9-7751

Lakeland
686-7786

Miami
371-9611

Miami Beach


Naples
MI 2-2151


Hospital

Manatee Vet. Memorial Hospital
206 Second Street, E.
Bradenton, Florida
Halifax District Hospital
Lakeshore Drive
Daytona Beach, Florida
Broward General Hospital
1600 South Andrew Avenue
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
Lee Memorial County Hospital
2776 Cleveland Avenue
Ft. Myers, Florida
Alachua General Hospital
912 S.W. 4th Avenue
Gainesville, Florida
J. Hillis Miller Health Center
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida
St. Vincent's Hospital
Barrs Street & St. Johns Avenue
Jacksonville 4, Florida
Lakeland General
Lakeland Hills Blvd.
Lakeland, Florida
Jackson Memorial Hospital
1700 N.W. 10th Avenue
Miami 36, Florida
Mt. Sinai Hospital
4300 Alton Road
Miami Beach 40, Florida
Naples Community Hospital
350 Seventh Street, North
Naples, Florida


City & Phone


Ocala
622-4211

Orlando
GA 3-5511


Panama City
PO 3-6056

Pensacola
HE 2-1241

Plant City
752-2121

St. Petersburg
5-1181

Sarasota
924-4343

Tallahassee
223-1264

Tampa
224-3722

West Palm Beach
JU 2-2185


Hospital


Munroe Memorial Hospital
1410 South Orange Street
Ocala, Florida
Orange Memorial Hospital
1416 South Orange Avenue
Orlando, Florida
Bay County Memorial Hospital
600 North MacArthur Avenue
Panama City, Florida
Baptist Hospital
1000 West Moreno Street
Pensacola, Florida
South Fl6rida Baptist
P. O. Box 231
Plant City, Florida
Mound Park Hospital
701 6th Street
St. Petersburg 1, Florida
Sarasota Memorial Hospital
1901 Arlington Avenue
Sarasota, Florida
Tallahassee Memorial Hospital
N. Magnolia Dr. & Miccosukee Rd.
Tallahassee, Florida
Tampa General Hospital
Davis Islands
Tampa 6, Florida
Good Samaritan Hospital
1300 North Dixie Highway
West Palm Beach, Florida


--- '










Four Keys to
--icide Safety


I


*1.


READ THE LABEL ON EACH PESTICIDE CO
ER BEFORE EACH USE. Heed all
cautions and warnings. / / Z


2. STORE PESTICIDES IN THEIR ORIGINAL,
LABELED CONTAINERS. Keep them out
of the reach of children and irresponsible
people.


3. APPLY PESTICIDES ONLY AS DIRECTED.


4. DISPOSE OF EMPTY CONTAINERS
SAFELY.


US AN
PEST ICIDE



STOP
READ TE PECUaT~IOiNS


I


E


Icr~LC~6~
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-br:




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