The Nursery alphabet and nursery tales

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Material Information

Title:
The Nursery alphabet and nursery tales
Physical Description:
1 v. (various pagings) : col. ill. ; 19 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Frederick Warne and Co ( Publisher )
Publisher:
Frederick Warne and Co.
Place of Publication:
London
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1882   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1882   ( lcsh )
Alphabet rhymes -- 1882   ( rbgenr )
Nursery rhymes -- 1882   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1882
Genre:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Alphabet rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
with twenty-four page illustrations printed in colours.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002235036
notis - ALH5477
oclc - 62393696
System ID:
UF00049838:00001


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Full Text






URSERY
LHABET
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The Baldwin Library
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THE NURSERY

ALPHABET,



































































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THE NuRSERY ALPhBET. A B C J,








NURSERY ALPHABET,


AND NURSERY TALES.



WITH

TWENTY-FOUR PAGE ILLUSTRATIONS,

liiiutur in (D[olours.


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BEDFORD STREET, STRAND.
BEDFORD STREET, STRAND.














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NURSERY ALPHABET.

HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.

OLD MOTHER HUBBARD.

HOP O' MY THUMB.










THE NURSERY ALPHABET.

A for the Alphabet, A, B, C;

B for the Book that was given to me.


C for the Corn that stands in the stack;

D for the Donkey with cross on his back.


E for the Engine that's lighted with coke;

F for the Funnel that puffs out the smoke.

































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N sT G
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THE NURSERY ALPHABET.

G for the Goose that swims on the pond;

H for the Hen, of her chickens so fond.


I for the Icicle, frosty and cold;

J for the Jackdaw, perky and bold.


K for the Kitten that plays with its tail;

L for the Letter that comes by the mail,


M for the Monkey, a comical thing;

N for the Nut that he cracks with a grin.








































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TaE NumaSEY ALPHABET. I J K L M.























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THE NURSERY ALPHABET.


0 for the Owl that sees in the dark;

P for the Pony that plays in the park.



Sfor the Queen all seated in state;

R for the Regiment guarding the gate.



S for the Sun that sets in the west;

"I for the Tomtit building its nest.



U for the Umbrella that keeps off the rain,

V for the Van that follows the train.


















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THaE NURSERY AZLL'UABET. Ii S '1 U V.






THE NURSERY ALPHABET.


W for the Waggon that waits in the way,

X. is for none of the words I can say.



Y for the Yew growing by the church wall.

Z is for Zero, that's nothing at all.











































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THE NURSERY ALFUABET. W X Y Z.



















THE

HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.







































































'UE hOUSE T -HAT JACK BUILT.
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rliUs IoOUSe TtlAT JAICK BUILT,








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HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.



Tins is the House that Jack built.

This is the Malt
That lay in the House that Jack built.

This is the Rat,
That ate the Malt
That lay in the House that Jack built.

This is the Cat
That killed the Rat
That ate the Malt
That lay in the House that Jack built.

This is the Dog,
That worried the Cat
1That killed the Rat,
That ate the Malt
That lay in the House that Jack built.
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TE MALT CAT AND TE .AT
TilE MAL, THE CA, ADTL A






THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.

This is the Cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the Dog
That worried the Cat,
That killed the Rat
That ate the Malt
That lay in the House that Jack built


This is the Maiden all forlorn,
That milked the Cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the Dog
That worried the Cat
That killed the Rat,
That ate the Malt
That lay in the House that Jack built.

This is the Man all tattered and torn,
That kissed the Maiden all forlorn,
That milked the Cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the Dog
That worried the Cat,
That killed the Rat
That ate the Malt
That lay in the House that Jack built.
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THP D)OG, TILE COW, AN~D THE COCK.






THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.

This is the Priest all shaven and shorn,
That married the Man all tattered and torn,
That kissed the Maiden all forlorn,
That milked the Cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the Dog
That worried the Cat,
That killed the Rat
That ate the Malt
That lay in the House that Jack built.

This is the Cock that crowed in the morn,
That waked the Priest all shaven and shorn,
That married the Man all tattered and torn,
That kissed the Maiden all forlorn,
That milked the Cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the Dog
That worried the Cat,
That killed the Rat
That ate the Malt
That lay in the House that Jack built.
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THE MAIDEN, THE LMAN, AND THE COW.






THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT.

This is the Farmer sowing his corn,
That kept the Cook that crowed in the morn,
That waked the Priest all shaven and shorn,
That married the Man all tattered and torn,
That kissed the Maiden all forlorn,
That milked the Cow with the crumpled horn,
That tossed the Dog
That worried the Cat,
That killed the Rat
That ate the Malt
That lay in the House that Jack built.














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OLD MOTHER HUBBARD.











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OLD MJO[I'IEU II ,I3ARD ,ANDI) hEI- DOG.









OLD MOTHER HUBBARD.


OLD Mother Hubbard
Went to the cupboard,
To get her poor Dog a bone;
But when she came there.
The cupboard was bare,
And so the poor Dog had none.

She went to the baker's
To buy him some bread,
But when she came back,
The poor Dog looked dead.

She went to the joiner's,
To buy him a coffin,
But when she came back
The poor Dog was laughing.

She took a clean dish,
To get him some tripe,
But when she came back,
He was smoking a pipe.
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TILE I)uu; l~oOKIrNG DEA,.






OLD MOTHER HUBBARD.

She went to the ale-house,
To get him some beer,
But when she came back,
The Dog sat in a chair.

She went to the tavern,
For white wine and red,
But when she came back,
The Dog stood on his head.

She went to the hatter's,
To buy him a hat,
But when she came back,
He was feeding the cat.

She went to the barber's,
To buy him a wig,
But when she came back,
He was dancing a jig.
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THE D)OG PrxrLT'( o71 'I;ELUTI~-






OLD MOTHER HUBBARD.

She went to the fruiterer's,
To buy him some fruit,
But when she came back,
He was playing the flute.

She went to the tailor's,
To buy him a coat,
But when she came back,
He was riding a goat.

She went to the sempstress,
To buy him some linen,
But when she came back,
The Dog was a spinning.

She went to the hosier's,
To buy him some hose,
But when she came back,
He was dressed in his clothes.
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OLD MOTHER HUBBARD.

She went to the cobbler's,
To buy him some shoes,
But when she came back,
He was reading the news.

The Dame made a curtsey,
The Dog made a bow;
The Dame said, Your servant;"
The Dog said, Bow-wow!"

This wonderful Dog
Was Dame Hubbard's delight;
He could sing, he could dance,
He could read, he could write.

So she gave him rich dainties
Whenever he fed,
And erected a monument
When he was dead.


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TIt D)o, READING TIaE NEWS.















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HOP 0' MY Th1UMB S1'RLWINU PEBBLE5.










HOP O' MY THUMB.



ONCE upon a time, there was a woodman and his wife, who
had so many children that they did not know how to find
food for them. So one night, when they were all in bed, the
father told his wife that he thought they had better take
them into the forest and lose them there. The youngest
child, who was so very small that he was called Hop o' my
Thumb, overheard his father, and as he was a very clever
boy, he made -ap his mind to find his way home again. So
he went down to the brook very early the next morning, and
filled his pocket with large smooth pebbles as white as snow.
By-and-bye the woodman and his wife told the children that
they might go with them into the wood to have a good game
of play. They were all glad, except Hop o' my Thumb,
who knew what his father intended. So they set out; the
Woodman and his wife first, then the boys, and last Hop o'
my Thumb, who sprinkled pebbles all the way they went.
They spent a very merry day; but by-and-bye the parents
stole away, and left the children all by themselves. They
were very much frightened when they missed their father
and mother, and called loudly for them; but when Hop o'
my Tliiiil. told them what he:had heard, and how they could
find their way home by following the track of the pebbles,




























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TfIE GIANT'S SEVEN DAUGHTERS.







HOP O' MY THUMB.


which marked the way they had come, they set out, and
reached home safely, and their father and mother pretended
to be very glad to see them back.
But soon after they again resolved to lose their children,
if possible, in the forest. This time all the boys feared that
they should be left behind, and the eldest brother said he
would take some peas to sprinkle, to mark the pathway that
led home. By-and-bye the cruel parents stole away, and
left the little ones in the dark wood. At first they did not
care, for they thought they could easily find their way home;
but, alas when they looked for the line of peas which they
had sprinkled, they found they were all gone-the wood-
pigeons had eaten them up, and the children were lost in the
wood. Holding each others hands and crying sadly, they
walked on, to seek a place to sleep in. By-and-bye they
came to a giant's castle, where they were taken in, and told
that they might sleep in the nursery with the seven baby
daughters of the giant, who were lying all in a row in one
bed, with gold crowns on their heads. Hop o' my Thumb
thought it strange that the giant should be so kind, as he
had been told that ogres eat children. So in the night he
got up softly, and took off the little giantesses' crowns, and
put them on his brothers' heads and his own, and lay down
again. It was lucky for him that he did so, for in the night
the giant came up in the dark to kill the boys, that they might
be ready for the next day's breakfast. He felt the beds, and
finding the crowns on the boys' heads took them for his


















































---THE GIANT IN SEVEN-LEAGUE BOOS .









THE GIANT IN SEVEN-LEAGUE BOOTS.










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4O TB O O
HOP 0' MY THUMB TAKING OFF TfHE BOOTS.






fIOP O' MY THUMB.


own children, left them, and went to the other bed and cut off
the heads of his daughters instead. Then he went back
to bed. Directly he was gone, Hop o' my Thumb and iis
brothers got up, stole down stairs, opened the door and fled
away from the castle. But they did not go far. Hop o' my
Thumb knew that the giant would come after them in his
seven-league boots. So they got into a hole in the side of
a hill and hid. Very soon after, they saw the giant coming
at a great pace in his wonderful boots ; but he took such long
steps that he passed right over their heads. They were
afraid to move out till they had seen him go home again.
So they remained quietly where they were.
By-and-bye the giant who had been miles and miles in an
hour or two, came back very tired, and being also stupid
with grief (for he had loved his own children), he lay down
on the hill-side, and fell fast asleep. As he lay snoring,
Hop o' my Thumb stole out of the hole, drew the seven-
league boots off, and put them on his own feet. They fitted
him exactly, for being fairy boots they would grow large or
small just as one liked. The giant did not wake, so the
boys all came out of the hole, and hurried on as fast as they
could on their way home. Hop o' my Thumb saw a woman
sitting weeping by the way-side, and asked her why she
grieved. "Alas !" said she, "our good king is gone out to
fight, and I have just heard that his enemies are close to him,
though he does not know it, and I have no one to send and
*ell him his danger. I will go," said Hop o' my Thumb,
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HOP 0 MY THUMB REACHING THE CAMP





HOP O' MY THUMB.


in my fast boots." He started at once, and in two steps
he was in the camp. The. soldiers were quite frightened,
when they saw Hop o' my Thumb step in on his seven-league
boots.
The king was very much obliged to him for saving him
from this great danger, and kept him with him, that he
might send messages by such a swift servant.
When Hop o' my Thumb could be spared he went back to
his old home, when he found all his brothers; but his father
and mother were not there. Hop o' my Thumb hastened to
make inquiries for them, and found that they had been sus-
pected of murdering their children,-who had all disappeared
suddenly--that they had owned to leaving them in the wood,
and that they were to be put to death for the crime. We
must go and save them," he said. So he took his brothers
into the seven-league boots, and set out to the place where
Their parents were in prison. They arrived omlyjust in time,
for the guards were bringing out the woodman and his wife
to put them to death. Hop o' my Thumb took off the boots,
and all the children called out, We are alive! we are alive !
Do not.kill our mother and father."
Then there was great joy. The woodman and his wife
were set free, and embraced their children. They had re-
pented of their wickedness and were never unkind and
cruel any more; and Hop o' my Thumb kept them all in
comfort, by going on errands for the king in his seven-
league boots.
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1101' 0' MY TllMUMB SAVES 111S 'AIiLNTS.