May's dream

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Material Information

Title:
May's dream
Physical Description:
32, 16 p. : ill. ; 20 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Savill, Frances M ( Frances Maitland ) ( Author, Primary )
Irwin, M ( Madelaine ) ( Illustrator )
John F. Shaw and Co ( Publisher )
Publisher:
John F. Shaw and Co.
Place of Publication:
London
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Dreams -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Beauty, Personal -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Sick children -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1882   ( rbgenr )
Savill -- Authors' presentation inscription (Provenance) -- 1882   ( rbprov )
Baldwin -- 1882
Genre:
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
Authors' presentation inscription (Provenance)   ( rbprov )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Frances Maitland Savill ; with illustrations by Madelaine Irwin.
General Note:
Date of publication from author's inscription.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
General Note:
Baldwin Library copy inscribed by the author.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002237111
notis - ALH7592
oclc - 62393661
System ID:
UF00049832:00001


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MAY'S DREAM.


BY


FRANCES MAITLAND SAVILL,

AUTHOR OF THE FLYING POSTMAN," SH.AG AND JACK,"
ETC.




WITH ILL USTRA TIOVS B Y MADELAIINE IRWIN.









LONDON:
JOHN F. SHAW AND CO.,
48, PATERNOSTER ROW.


































































































































































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MAY'S DREAM.





HERE'S a cross sulky face for a little girl to
be seen with," said old nurse, leading an un-
i willing child to a looking-glass. Fie, Miss
May, that can't be my pretty little merry pet.
I don't know who it is. Oh, if little girls only
knew how ugly they look when they are naughty.'
* With this moral reflection, nurse left her young lady
alone in her bed-room to think upon her ways ;" instead
of which Miss May went to sleep. At first, certainly,








6 MA Y' S DREAM.

she stood where nurse had left her, gazing at the image
of herself, for she felt some curiosity about nurse's last
remark, which was intended to convey such deep
reproach.
May, aged eight, had always considered herself a very
pretty little girl, and small blame to her, for had she not
heard nurse say so a hundred times, not only to her
when she was good, but to the other servants. Her
large blue eyes, her golden curls, her rosy cheeks-she
had heard of them all in whispers, which had not con-
cealed the words from her sharp little ears; and even her
mamma's friends, while pretending to hide it, had shown
unmistakably that they shared nurse's opinion.
Does being naughty make people ugly ? little May
asked herself. She saw in the glass a pair of bright eyes
a pair of flushed cheeks, a pair of pouting crimson lips ;
and not being able to answer the question altogether
satisfactorily, she turned away, threw herself on nurse's
bed, and presently fell fast asleep.
And little May had a dream. She thought she waj
seated on a grassy bank watching a number of people
many of them were children of various ages-both boys







MA Y'S DREA AK. 7

and girls, and they were playing and working and
employing themselves, much as May's own companions











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did, yet something made her feel sure this was a strange,
new wori Fd she was looking at-it was certainly a very
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8 iMA Y'S DREAM

beautiful one; the trees and grass seemed greener and
the sky bluer than she had ever seen them; the ground
was carpeted with sweet-smelling flowers of every hue;
a river ran sparkling along near her feet, with waving
rushes and tall feathery grasses clothing its banks; gold
and silver fish leaped from the river and gleamed in the
sunshine, and birds of exquisite colour and plumage
flitted among the foliage ; pretty houses stood near with
gardens full of fruit and flowers, and soft, fragrant
breezes were wafted here and there, stirring the leaves
of the trees and the dancing ripples on the water's
surface.
But May's attention was chiefly directed to the in-
habitants of the spot before her, and she soon saw
something that puzzled her very much. What first
struck her was the extreme ugliness of many of the
faces, though some were pretty, and a few really
beautiful ; but there was something more-the faces
changed in the most curious way, so that a pretty face
which she had been admiring became an ugly one, and
plain people became beautiful. It was quite bewildering;
and May, who always wanted to know the reason of







MA Y'S DREAM. 9

everything, kept saying to herself, I wish I knew what
it means."
Just then a little boy ran by who had a bald head,
a huge nose, and small squinting eyes, very much like


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a mask May's brother had just bought; he seemed as
naughty as he was ugly, for he did nothing but tease
the other children, and seemed to delight in mischief.
With a small whip which he had in his hand he slily
lashed his companions, taking care to keep out of the
way of the older people, and only to hurt the little ones
who could not take their own part.







io MA Y'S DREAM.

Hideous little wretch," said May to herself; "how
they must all hate him."
A little child, just able to walk, now came toddling


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down the broad, grassy road, near which May was
sitting. It was very beautiful. Indeed May had
already observed one thing in this new world-the








MA Y' S DREAM. I


babies and very little children and all the animals were,
without exception, beautiful. When the boy saw the
child approaching, he laughed, and putting out his foot
made it tumble down, and then ran away; but before he
disappeared May noticed that his face became uglier
than ever, his.complexion turning a sort of dark green'
which was inexpressibly hideous, and made May glad
when he had gone out of sight. As for the baby, who
could not pick itself up, but lay crying, it found a pro-
tector in a little girl, who was at first reading and
evidently interested in her book. She was a plain child,
and May had pnly noticed her because she knew well
what it was to be absorbed in a story-book, and this book
looked so very attractive from the glimpses she caught
of gay pictures inside.
On seeing what had happened, the little girl looked up,
then glancing back regretfully at her book, she shut it up,
and running to the baby she took it in her arms, kissed
and consoled it, and ended by telling it a story, which
made it laugh and clap its little hands.
Now all this May could understand, and she hoped,
though she didn't feel sure, that she should have done








12 MAY'S DREAM.


the same herself; but what she could not understand
was that as the little girl performed this kind act, her
face changed till it became as pretty as the baby's.




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"How could ,I think her plain ? thought May.
How odd it all is!"
She next found herself watching two pretty girls of
.about her own age, who were laughing and talking very







MA Y'S DREAM-. 13,


merrily, and showing each other their dolls. They
dressed and undressed them, exchanged them, put them
to bed, and seemed so happy that May, who had not


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mine." No, you gave it to me." I didn't." What
a story!" she heard in loud, an.ry voices ,and, as the-
a story !" she heard in loud, angry voices; and as the-







[4 MA Y'S DREAM.

quarrel went on, their faces became distorted and dark-
coloured, and lost all their beauty; their long silky hair
became rough and colourless, their bright eyes were
hidden under shaggy eyebrows, and all the roses were
gone from their cheeks. Two ugly repulsive little
creatures fighting for broken bits of dolls were all that
was left of the pretty group, and May no longer wanted
to go near them.
Meanwhile, a humpbacked man, with a hideous face,
passed by with a donkey and cart; he beat the donkey,
who was doing his best; and this did not surprise May,
for she had often seen the same thing done in her own
world, and it always made her unhappy; but she noticed
that at every stroke the cruel man gave the innocent
beast, his face became more frightful and his hump
bigger.
"It serves him right," said May, indignantly. "Oh
dear, how many of them are ugly; but here comes a
pretty one at last."
It was a boy of thirteen or fourteen, whose large dark
eyes, glossy curly hair, and bright complexion excited
May's admiration. He looked good and kind, too, and








MA YS DREAM 15


when May first saw him, he was helping a poor old
woman across a muddy bit of road, and carrying her






























bun.le for her. She thanked him very gratefully, and he
left her with a bright smile. A large dog was with him,
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16 M Y'S DREA,'








and it jumped up and licked his hand and showed that it
















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was fond of and trusted him all the animals he passed







iMA Y'S DREA7. 17

looked after him, and he had a kind word and smile tor
each, and a bit of bread in his pocket, too, for a hungry
donkey or dog. As for the children, they crowded round
him, and he was presently seen with two on his shoulders,
and others following him and showing him their treasures,
and all chattering so merrily.
How they all love him," said May to herself; and
again she longed to get up from her seat and go and join
the happy party gathered round the kind handsome boy,
who seemed to grow handsomer every moment. But
she felt somehow a curious difficulty in moving, so she
contented herself with sitting still and watching all these
strange sights; it was very interesting, but she wished
she could understand the meaning of it all, for she was
certain there was a meaning. The boy and his com-
panions had now disappeared, but May's attention had
been fixed by a little girl, who somehow reminded her of
herself. Her eyes are blue like mine, and her hair
the same colour," she thought; "but it's not much use
thinking of what she's like, for she's sure to change soon
as they nearly all do in this funny world; however,
I'll just watch all she does, and if she comes this way
I'll speak to her."
B







18 MA Y'S DREAM.

The child, however, took no notice of May, but kept
running round a beautiful garden full of fruit and
flowers and playing with a ball, her eyes sparkling,
and cheeks and lips rosy red, and her waving golden
hair flying behind her. Presently, however, she stopped
before a strawberry-bed, and gazed longingly at the
ripe fruit; then she glanced round, and seeing that
she was quite alone, she stooped and gathered several,
eating them hurriedly, and then walked away, playing
with the ball as before. Yet not as before. Could this
be the same little girl ?
"Ah," thought May, "she's growing ugly, like the
rest."
Watching with much interest to see what would
happen next, May observed a tall and kind-looking lady
approaching from a house which stood in the garden.
She called the little girl, who walked slowly towards her,
and after looking at her, she asked, Have you eaten
any fruit?" and May listening eagerly for the reply,
heard the child say, No, mamma."
"Naughty little thing," muttered May, "and oh, how
hideous she is growing-as bad as that boy. Like me,







MA Y'S DREAM 19

indeed! I hope I never look like that! I wonder her
mamma can bear to look at her."
The mamma did look very sad as she pointed to some
red stains on the child's pinafore and hands, and went
back to the house. Left alone, the little girl began to
cry bitterly.
Now she'll look uglier than ever," thought May,
unconsciously quoting nurse. But May was wrong.
The tears which streamed down the child's cheeks really
seemed, or so May fancied, to wash away the blackness
and ugliness of her face. And now a very beautiful
young lady came into the garden, and taking the little
girl's hand, she seemed to talk kindly and seriously to
her. The child's tears stopped, and as she looked up to
the elder girl her eyes became clear and bright again;
and when the lady appeared and the little daughter
ran into her arms, full of repentance, and was kissed
and forgiven, her face shone with peace and beauty.
Just then there appeared, looking in at the gate of the
garden, the face of the boy whose ugly appearance
had so distressed May before. It was the same, but
surely it was improved; the nose was smaller, and the



































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" There appeared looking in at th-e gate the face of the boy whose ugly appearance had so distressed May." 1 9.








MA Y'S DREAM. 21

bald head covered with short, dark hair. Under his
arm appeared a little kitten, which he showed to the
young lady and little girl, saying, "I found it in a
trap and could'nt leave it to die."
"You are a kind boy," said the young lady, taking the
kitten and giving it to the little girl; but surely you
are the same boy who was so naughty this morning."
The boy looked down ashamed, but apparently his
shame did him as much good as the little girl's tears had
done her, and as the beautiful young lady continued to
talk to him, all likeness to the mask gradually faded
away. As for the young lady, she became so lovely that
May could scarcely take her eyes off her.
And now a bell rang, and a large group of children
assembled under a tree where a lady stood by a table, on
which appeared a globe and some books. Lessons,"
thought May, and she felt this time no inclination to join
the party; she amused herself by watching the various
faces, and saying to herself, "That's a naughty one,
that's a good one," according to the amount of beauty
she observed. The lady herself, who was arranging the
children in order round her, was handsome, but she








2'2 MIA Y'S DREAM.

looked "strict," May decided, and again she congratulated
herself that she had not been seen and called up with the
rest. Presently, it was evident that questions were being
asked, and May's attention was fixed upon a pretty child
who stood near the bottom of the class, and who, at
every question, went down lower.
"You have been idle, Annie; you have not learned
your lesson," the governess said gravely. The girl looked
down, but said nothing. And now," thought May,
"she'll turn ugly-indeed, she ought to have done so
before." But no, the little face, though flushed and sad,
was fair and lovely as before.
The governess looked puzzled, May fancied, but she
said, "You know the consequence of neglecting your
work-you must lose your treat this afternoon."
And now the school seemed to be dismissed, and all
were gathered together for a pic-nic. Great baskets of
fruit and cake appeared ; the children wore pretty dresses,
and were jumping and singing. And now May would
have liked to join them, but she consoled herself for
not being able, by the consideration that had she been
seen and invited, some preliminary question on history or








MA Y'S DREAM. 23

geography might have been thought necessary; it was
as well on the whole to remain in obscurity at present.
But she felt sorry for that poor little girl, in whom she
felt a special interest; first, from the fact of her having
been at the bottom of the class (a position in which May
could personally sympathise), and secondly, because,
although evidently idle, she had not lost her beauty. She
had disappeared, however, but another child from the
class, whom May had noticed as being repulsively ugly,
with a nose that turned up till it nearly touched her
forehead, was present, laughing and playing with the
rest, yet now and then looking unhappy and restless.
" I should think so, with that nose! thought May.
They seemed to have their pic-nic where they were,
instead of going away in carriages; this May thought
uninteresting, though she acknowledged that they could
not have chosen a prettier spot. They played games,
and eat their cake and fruit, one enormously fat little boy,
with only one eye, not only eating twice as much as the
rest, but slily filling his pockets, Greedy, and of course
ugly," said May, parenthetically. But suddenly a hush
came upon the merry party, the laughing and singing








24 MA Y'S DRE _AM.

stopped, and all eyes were fixed upon the ugly child
who stood up. in .the middle, and said, I took Annie's
lesson book and hid it up, that she might not get above
me in the class; I am very sorry." Then she hid her
face in her hands, which May observed would have been
impossible had not her nose at once become smaller.
There was a murmur, a movement among the children,
a talk with the governess, and the next thing May
noticed was that Annie had appeared, and the two
children, now equally pretty, were kissing each other.
And now little May became conscious of a sensation
that was not altogether new to her, but which she had
not experienced since she came into this new world.
She began to feel for the first time discontented
at remaining so long unobserved, and her discontent
gradually increased to resentment. "At my own home,"
she said to herself, I am praised and petted, and I know
I am quite as good and as pretty as those children they
make such a fuss about. And yet no one takes the least
notice of me. I hate those children !" As May uttered
these last words, and felt a thrill of anger and envy
in her heart, a sudden horror turned her hot and cold,








MA Y'S DREAM. 25

and she tremblingly put her hand up to her face. Was
she changing like the others-becoming hideous ? Yes;
surely she felt a difference! oh, what would her mamma
say ? and nurse ? If only she could find a looking-glass
anywhere!
The children had all vanished now, and a cottage stood
where the pic-nic had been. There will be a looking-
glass in there, thought May; and still feeling her face
with mingled curiosity and terror, she drew near to the
little casement window, and, standing on tip-toe, peeped
in. The sight that met her eyes made her forget all
about her own trouble. A girl, not much older than
herself, lay upon a bed moaning in evident pain, and also
weeping piteously; tears kept rolling down a frightful
face, and did not, as May observed, improve its
ugliness. "She must be very naughty, but yet I pity
her," she thought, and she was thankful to see a kind,
beautiful lady enter the cottage, which May had not
dared to do herself. That's right," she muttered.
" She's got her basket and Bible, just like mamma when
she goes to see her poor people ; she'll do her good."
The lady sat by the bed and talked and read to the
















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MA Y'S DREAM. 27

sick girl for what seemed to May a long time, till at last
the poor thing's sobs ceased, and suddenly pulling from
under the pillow a coral necklace, she held it up, and
said :
Look here, I stole it from off the baby's neck. I
was a nurse-girl, and it was never found out. I pre-
tended I was ill and I came away, and now I am really
ill, and I have never worn it, and oh, I am a thief," and
again she began to cry, and to mutter, I am very sorry
I did it."
"You must restore it, and confess to your mistress,
my child, or your sorrow will do you no good," said the
lady gravely, but kindly. She will be so angry, she
will put me in prison," cried the girl.
"Child," said the lady, bending her calm lovely face
,over the distorted one on the pillow, "you would be far
happier in prison, having repented of your sin, than you
can be now. Let me fetch your mistress."
The girl seemed to consent, and presently there
appeared in the room another lady with a beautiful baby
in her arms; the confession was made, the necklace
restored, the little nurse-girl was forgiven, and when she








28 MA Y'S DREAM.

became a pretty girl once more, the baby seemed to
recognize her, and held out his little arms to go to her.
May only waited to see this result which she had been
expecting, and then turning away with a sigh of be-
wilderment, she said to herself:
I do wish I knew what it all meant; I see that the
bad people are ugly, and the good pretty; is beauty
given to them as a reward, I wonder ? "
No, my child," answered a sweet, gentle voice, close
to her; and a beautiful form appeared, clad in shining
raiment, and with long, white wings. May knew at
once that it was an angel, for she had often seen pictures
of angels in her story-books, only this one was more
lovely than any picture, and the voice and smile were
curiously like her mamma's
No, that would be a poor reward for goodness; but
have you never heard that goodness is beautiful and
sin ugly ?"
"Yes." May was sure she had heard her mamma
say that very thing.
Well, and now you see that it is so," continued the
kind voice.









fMA Y'S DREAi3t. 29


But" May ventured to remark, "it isn't so in onir

world."




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30 MA Y'S DREAM.

hidden from your eyes."
"Yes, that is what I mean," said little May,
emboldened by the angel's gentle words and manner.
"Now there's old Miss Meadows and Mrs. Briggs-
they are very good, but oh, so ugly! "
My little girl," said the angel, very gravely and
sweetly, "the beauty is there, and though you cannot
behold it, God can. In the world which you have come
to visit, there is simply this difference; the character and
disposition show themselves in the form and features,
which in your world often hide what is within. Cruelty,
selfishness, dishonesty, envy, untruthfulness, and bad
temper are ugly things; kindness, self-denial, humility,
and truth are beautiful. Here you see it is so, but in
your world it is really just the same; the sin may often
be concealed. beneath outward fairness of form, but
it is there, and God sees it in all its hideousness.
Child, nothing is fair in his sight but what is good.
Short-sighted mortals may see and admire a pretty
face or graceful figure when the heart is full of sin, but
He sees only ugliness; and where they see an ugly face,
He may look down upon the purest beauty. You have







MAA Y'S DREAM. 31

seen that in this world all animals and babies are beauti-
ful: it is because they are innocent, and no sin has
defiled or disfigured them. And you have seen how the
wicked and repulsive may become good and lovely, and
how the tears of repentance can soften and beautify the
erring ones. Remember," and the angel laid her hand
tenderly on May's head, real beauty without goodness
is impossible. Farewell." So saying, the shining figure
with snowy wings disappeared, and May, opening her
eyes, found herself on nurse's bed and nurse herself
bending over her.
Come, dearie, wake up," she said, you've had quite a
long sleep, Miss May, and I just smoothed your hair to
wake you, for tea is ready." May rubbed her eyes, and
then, as memory came back, she suddenly threw her
arms round nurse's neck and kissed her.
"There's my pet, with her own pretty bright smile
again," cried nurse, bustling away to pour out the tea;
and May quietly laughed to herself when she heard her
words.
When alone she jumped off the bed and going again to
the looking-glass, gazed thoughtfully into it. What a








32 MA Y'S DREAM.


very odd dream I have had!" she said to herself, still
feeling bewildered. I won't tell nurse about it, for I'm
sure she would not understand it; but mamma will, and
I must try and remember it all to tell her this very
evening," F. M. s.









MWj








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way so thoroughly excellent as this book."-LITERARY WORLD.

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13MtO anb attracted %toaricq

Edgar Nelthorpe; Hilda; or, Seeketh
Or, The Fair Maids of Taunton. By not her Own.
"Rev. ANDREW REED, Author of Ida By CATHAINE SHAW, Author of "In
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By YOTTY OSBORN, Author of "Jack,"
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Little Cousins;
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t ales of nglib ILife in tte @llen tifme.
By EMILY S. HOLT.





















Illustration reduced by Phot graphy.

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tories totft a purpose,

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-1 ...... .......
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-- :;J In the Sunlight
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A Year of my Life-story.
"" By By C. S., Author of Nellie
A S Arundel," &c.

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%torics bp L. C. L@eaSe.


David's Little Lad.
New Edition. Illustrated. 3s. 6d.



Suddenly the
strange miner sprang
to the front and called
out in a deep voice,
Sis 'I'm going on, tho'
'tis death. Shut the
"doors upon me, and
I'll cut the passage
"through.'
"' I'll go for another,
and I, and I,' said
many."-See David's
Little Lad," page 21 .


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Strand relief the con-
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Scamp and 1. Your Brother and Mine.
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sympathy with them all."-A thenceum. by the loving effort of a little child, after sad
Lettie's Last Home. experiences of the neglect and indifference

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Bel-Marjory.
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Water Gipsies.
A Tale.

Wi h Illustrations.
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Dot and her
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A Tale.
With Illustrations.
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A Knight of To-day.
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The description of Dorothy's life is excellent."--Sfectator.
The Children's Kingdom;
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'tories% for 'op#.

The House in the Glen.
And the Boys who Built it. New Edition. Illustrated. 8s. 6d.
Exactly what boys like."-The Guardian.


BY B Jack .,

SA Chapter in a Boy's Life.

By Y. OssORN,
Author of "Pickles," &c.

SCrown 8vo. With Illustrations
by PETHERICK. 5S.




"Prairie Days;

Or, Our Home in the Far West.

By M. B. SLEIGHT.

n With Illustrations.
Crown 8vo, cloth. 5s.
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si We can heartily recommend this story.
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we only realise them and make them our
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Or, Boy Life and Boy Work. Illus- Brave Geordie.
treated. 8s. 6d. Brave Geordie.
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and the whole teaching thoroughly whole- Illustrations. Crown 8vo. 8s. 6d.
some.,"-Watckman. "It is refreshing to meet with such a
spirited and thoroughly good story."- The
Christian.
Paul Thurston and his Little The Earl-Printer.
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seller, please juvenile readers."-Irislt Times.
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attvactitue (ift3ook%,r

Lady Betty's Governess;
Or, The Corbet Chronicles. By L. E. GUERNSEY. Crown 8vo. Cloth. 3s.
An unusually successful attempt to reproduce the manners of the seventeenth century.
The book, which is well and simply written, will give pleasure to its readers."-Saturday
Review.


The Chevalier's
f '4"Daughter.
An BPy L. E. GUERNSEY, Author of
"Lady Rosamond," &c.

""Crown 8vo. s.


Ai."aIN ,,t
A Lady Rosamond's
~ Book;

A, tOr, Dawnings of Light.

By L. E GUERNSEY.

Crown 8vo, cloth. s.

A well-told story, written in quaint
old-time style, the plot interesting and
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The Odd One;
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Elsie's Santa Claus.
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stories for the ILittle ODn
Pickles.
A Funny Litt'e Couple. By YOTTV OSBORN, Author of "Two Little Turks." With
Twenty-one Illustrations. Square. Cloth. 3s. 6d





























- --^.^ ^ ^ ^L ^ ^^ 1,L/)j/ Ky - -
I know!' cried Johnnie; 'you shall give the bread, and I'll keep watch for Richard.
I'll listen, and if we hear him we'll hide. I'll listen like the Indians do, like what we read
in the book.' "-See "Pickles," t. 52.
A sparkling volume for children, the exquisite outline engravings, illustrative of child
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Judy;
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Two Little Turks;
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Is perfect in its way for very little people."-Evangelical Magazine.
Records for very young children, who will thoroughly appreciate them, the adventures
and misadventures of a brother and sister."-Hand and Heart.
"Worth a Threepenny Bit;"
Or, General Weissel's Grandchildren. By YVONNE. Cloth, 2s. 6d.
Told with a freshness and reality not unworthy of Miss Edgeworth. We have not for a
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ZigIjteenpentn present 1Toofs.
IN ATTRACTIVE BINDINGS. GOOD TYPE. WELL ILLUSTRATED.
The Young Armour-Bearer;
Or, Chosen to be a Soldier. With Illustrations. Cloth. Is. 6d.


On the Door Steps;
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"Keeping Open House."
S By MARY W. McLAIN. Small
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Old David's Lassie;
Or, Lost and Found. Fcap. 8vo.


BY AUNT PENN.
SLittle Trouble the House.
S Illustrated.

Those Boys."
O - Op A Story for all Little Fellows.
"---" Books the little fellows' will
appreciate.'

STORIES BY M. L. C., AUTHOR OF STORIES BY F. F. G.
"LONELY LILY."
Left at Home; Polly and Winnie;
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Wandering May;
Or, Come unto Me. Little Nan ;
"Clarie's Little Charge. Or, A Living Remembrance.
New Edition. "Full of wide and useful teaching-
The Happy Land ; written with a purpose, and well written."-
Or, Willie the Orphan. Sunday School Teachers' Magazine.
Not only are thev suitable for presents,
but a blessing may be expected to rest upon
the truth, so lovingly expounded as it is in Harold;
these stories."-The Christian. Or, Following the Footprints.

May Lane; Astray and at Home;
Or, Love and Duty. By C. M. Or, Little Mollie and her Brother.
"An invaluable little book for the young."
-Daily Extiress. Tom Knight;
Tom Carter; Or, True Honour from God only.
Or, Ups and Downs in Life. Pop and Peggy;
Charlie and Lucy; or, How Tom was Rescued. 1s. Od.
Or, The Lonely Heart made Glad.
We strongly recom-mend it as a gift-book Too pretty a book to be left unnoticed."
for children."- The Christian. -Guardian.
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%toriefm tot (SBirl

Marion Scatterthwaite.
A Story of Work. By MAGGIE SYMINGTON. Crown 8vo. 6s.



""r' tro] tIhe Soldiers of the Cross.
A, o A Story of Flamborough Head
By the Author of "The Young
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2s. 6d.



Flower Stories for Little
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By ISALIND. Small 8vo. Illus-
trated. 2s. 6d.
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C e Willow Bank;
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True to the End. The Old House on Briar Hill.
A Story of a Sister's Love. By Rev. By I. G. MEREDITH. A real girl's
Dr. EDERSHEIM. New Edition. Illus- Book. Illustrated. 3s. Sd.
treated. 8s. 6d. "Full of bright, wise precepts, veiled
"An interesting story from the pen of an under a pleasant guise of story-telling. A
old favourite."-The Rock. charming work."-Christian World.

Christine ; Nellie's Secret;
Or, The Bible Girl. By S. PUNOT, Or, Brown's Alley and Sunnyside. By
Sd. it&c. 2s. 6d.
"W2s. kd. Will make an excellent Sunday-school
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most the skilful ease of the writer, or the Record.
genuine wisdom and beauty of the religious
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A Tale of North Harbour. By M. M,
Tim's Little Mother. POLLARD, Author of "Nellie's Secret."
By S. PUNOT. With Illustrations. Small 8vo. Illustrated. Cloth. 2s. 6d.
83s. 6d. "dA wholesome and interesting story, at
"An affecting, unaffected story of London once pleasant and profitable to read."-
life."--The Christian. Rock.

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%tories about animalI.

Rough the Terrier.
His Life and Adventures. By EMILY BRODIE. With Illustrations by T. PYM. Square,
cloth. 2s. 6d.















=/
0' r

















Told agreeably and simply, and the illustrations show a considerable experience of dog-
ways."-Standard.
A pleasant story that cannot fail to satisfy the little ones."- Watchman.

Little Folks in Feathers and Fur,
And Others in Neither. By OLIVE THORNE MILLER. With nearly 200 Illustrations.
Handsomely bound in cloth, gilt edges. Price 7s. 6d.
To begin with, dear unknown Reader, this book makes no pretensions to a scientific
work. Indeed, it is scrupulously otherwise. It is merely a collection of sketches, telling
what is interesting to know about a few of the millions of creatures that live on our globe.
It is written for little people, but will not be without interest to any one who is curious
about the ways of our little neighbours."-Extractfrom Preface.
A charming book, which, in attractiveness for little folks, will vie successfully with
many a collection of fairy tales."-English Independent.
Enough to make human little folks ardent naturalists to the end of their days."-
The Christian.

Queer Pets:
Their Sayings and Doings. By OLIVE THORNE MILLER, Author of Little Folks in
Feathers and Fur." Fully Illustrated. 4to, cloth extra. 7s. 6d.

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%tories for the Little ODne,
ATTRACTIVELY BOUND, WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY T. PYM.
SQUARE. 2s. 6d. EACH.

By ISMAY THORN.
PINAFORE DAYS.
E e lbbentures of fret anb IBollo bg Moot antb Mabe,
A book for every child's heart; it should be sold by thousands."-Christian World.
A capital story for children."-Daily Review.

ONLY FIVE;
OR, PUSSIE'S FROLICS IN FARM AND FIELD.
The story is exceedingly diverting, and the pictures are admirably drawn."
Court journal.

A SIX YEARS' DARLING.
OR, TRIX IN TOWN.
Square cloth.




















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t
-~ ~