• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 The King's lesson
 A queer policeman
 Facts about elephants
 The surgeon bird
 The heron
 About leopards
 The cow-bird
 Something about bears
 About owls
 Flora and the mutton
 Back Cover






Title: The king's lesson
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00049825/00001
 Material Information
Title: The king's lesson
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 16 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Laurance, Kate
Weir, Harrison, 1824-1906 ( Illustrator )
D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: D. Lothrop and Company
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: c1882
 Subjects
Subject: Animals -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Animal welfare -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1882   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1882
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Kate Laurance and other stories by famous authors ; fourteen illustrations by Harrison Weir and others.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00049825
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002232815
notis - ALH3212
oclc - 62393638

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
    Frontispiece
        Plate
    Title Page
        Page ii
        Page iii
    The King's lesson
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    A queer policeman
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Facts about elephants
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    The surgeon bird
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    The heron
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    About leopards
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    The cow-bird
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Something about bears
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    About owls
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
    Flora and the mutton
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
Full Text





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THE KING'S LESSON




BY
KATE LAURANCE
And other stories by famous authors














FOURTEEN ILLUSTRATIONS

HARRISON W\EIR, AND OTHERS




BOSTON
D. LOTHROP AND COMPANY
32 FRANKLIN STREET





























COPYRIGHT, 1882.

D. LOTHROP & COMPANY.














THE KING'S LESSON.

Did you ever hear of Frederic,
the Great ?
He was King of Prussia.
Prussia is a country in Europe.
King Frederick was a great sol-
dier.
King Frederick may have been a
great man, but he was neither a
wise man, nor a good man.
There were some things that he
did not know as much about as
little American boys know.






THE KING'S LESSON.

King Frederick was very fond of
cherries.
He had a large orchard of cherry-
trees.
One day he saw some robins sit-
ting on one of his finest cherry-
trees.
He was afraid that the birds
would eat all his cherries.
He made a law that all small birds
should be killed.
He said that he would give six
pennies to any one who would
bring him the heads of two
birds.
The first year a great many birds'
heads were brought to Frederick.
He had to pay more than ten
thousand dollars for them.








































KILLED I.Y THE KING'S LAW.






THE KING'S LESSON.

The next year not half so many
birds' heads were brought.
He paid only five hundred dollars
for them.
The third year only three pairs
of birds' heads were brought.
All the birds had been killed.
Any little American boy could
have told i,ig Frederick what would
happen. There were no birds to eat
up the insects.
So the apple-borers came and killed
the apple-trees.
The locusts came and ate the
grain.
The beetles and bugs and worms
that eat leaves came and ate the
green leaves of the trees and
shrubs.






THE KING'S LESSON.

There was trouble throughout the
country about the swarms of in-
sects.
People said that there would be
no food for winter because the crops
were all destroyed.
Even the forest-trees were dy-
ing.
Frederick was sorry cAat he had
made so foolish a law.
He said that he would give six
pennies to anyone who would bring
two living birds into the coun-
try.
Back came the birds I
Swallows, sparrows, robins, larks
and thrushes were brought to eat
up the insects.
There was plenty of insect food






THE KING S LESSON.

for them, and they increased very
fast.
In a few years the woods were
filled with birds again.


-' *' "






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BACK CAMI THE BIRDS!


When the birds came back the
crops began to grow once more.
The fruit trees began to bear fruit.














































7:'I


















"WELCOME BACK AGAIN I'






THE KING'S LESSON.

The forest trees looked green and
fresh.
The people began to grow rich
and happy again.
After this lesson the Great Freder-
ick was willing to share his cherries
with the birds.

















A QUEER POLICEMAN.

ALL city boys and girls have seen
policemen.
The boy with bright eyes who
lives in Boston tells me they are big
men.
They wear navy-blue clothes, with
large brass buttons.
They also wear a leather belt.
A heavy stick hangs like a sword
from this belt.






A- QUEER POLICEMAN.

The wise little girl who lives in
Boston tells me that policemen keep
the peace."
The boy with bright eyes says that
means keeping men from fighting, or
quarreling, or doing wrong in any
way.
My queer policeman does not look
at all like the Boston policemen.
My policeman is small,
My policeman usually wears a
pretty uniform of slate-colored fea-
thers, with white spots.
My policeman keeps the peace"
between timid chickens and wild
hen-hawks.
My policeman is a fowl.
His name is Guinea-fowl, or Pin-
tado.






A QUEER POLICEMAN.

He belongs to the turkey family.





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HE QUINEA-FOWL.
He is about as large as a common
hen.






A QUEER POLICEMAN.

His legs are short.
His tail is short; and droops al-
most to the ground
His head is naked, or only has a
few hair-like feathers.
He is bold and very noisy.
His voice sounds like the creaking
of a rusty hinge.
Some farmers always keep a few
Guinea-fowls with their flocks of hens.
They think their harsh cries frighten
waway hen-haks.
Guinea-fowls come from Africa.
They live in the woods, on the
banks of rivers in large flocks.
They stay together in flocks of
two or three hundred.
They eat grass and insects.















FACTS ABOUT ELEPHANTS

Dick is the boy who wants to
know things.
He has been to the Natural His-
tory Rooms in Boston.
In the large ball he saw the skele-
ton of a great animal.
Dick's big brother Tom said it was
the skeleton of a mastodon.
This animal lived thousands of
years ago. He lived before there
were any men on the earth.






FACTS ABOUT ELEPHANTS.

Then the animals, and the trees,
and the flowers even, were unlike
those now on the earth.
How do you know?" asked
Dick.
By digging," answered Ton.
Men often find parts of strange
trees and animals when they dig for
the coal we burn.
"This big skeleton of the mastodon
was dug out of the earth."
Are there no mastodons now ?"
asked Dick.
"No," answered Tom; the ele-
phant is nearest like the mastodon
of any animal now living."
"Tell me about the elephant,
then," said Dick.
Well," said Tom, elephants

















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THE ELEPHANT.





FACTS ABOUT ELEPHANTS.

live in the southern forests of Asia,
and in Africa.
"They go in troops just as chick-
ens go in flocks.
"They are usually as quiet and
harmless as cows.
"They are the largest and heaviest
animals on the earth.
"They have a thick, hairy skin;
and their color is like that of the
smallest of animals the mouse.
The African elephant is larger
than the elephant that lives in Asia.
He is also wilder.
The Asiatic elephant is from
seven to -ten feet high. He weighs
from three to four tons. A ton is
2240 pounds.






FACTS ABOUT ELEPHANTS.

"The African elephant is often
twelve feet high.
His ears are three times as large
as his cousin's in Asia. They are
often five feet long and four feet
wide.
"The people in Southern Africa
use these huge ears for sledges.
One of the strangest things about
an elephant is his tusks.
"These tusks are really the eye
teeth.
"They keep on growing as long
as the elephant lives.
"They are often from six to ten
feet long.
They sometimes weigh two hun-
dred pounds.
"These teeth are pure ivory.






FACTS ABOUT ELEPHANTS.

Paper folders, knife handles, and
many beautiful articles, are made
from this ivory.
Sometimes a single elephant's
tooth, or tusk, is worth one hundred
dollars.
And the elephant's nose is as
strange as his eye teeth. It is called
his trunk.
It is four or five feet long, and
tapers almost to a point.
The trunk takes the place of an
arm and hand.
It can be stretched out and drawn
in. It can be moved in every direc-
tion.
It is very strong; with it the
elephant can pull up small trees.
",At the end is a sort of thumb;





FACTS ABOUT ELEPHANTS.

tith this he can pick up a fine nee-
dle.
He also gathers leaves and grass
and puts them in his mouth with his
trunk.
So you see the elephant really
feeds himself with his nose!
The elephant can be easily trained
and taught.
In Asia and Africa the people
keep elephants as we keep horses.
"They ride on them. They plow
and work with them.
Elephants will travel fifty miles a
day.
",Wild elephants often go twenty
miles at night after a drink of water.
"Their food is vegetable. One
bnce kept in London ate two hun-






FACTS ABOUT ELEPHANTS.

dred pounds of vegetables a day, be-
sides quantities of hay; and he often
drank from sixty to eighty gallons of
water.
Elephants live to be one hundred
and fifty and perhaps two hundred
Years old."
O-oo!" said Dick, as Tom finished
the elephant talk, take me to see an
elephant! "
And Tom promised to do so.













THE SURGEON BIRD.

Did you know that birds could
act as physicians and surgeons ?
Physicians cure those who are sick.
Surgeons cure people who are hurt.
This story is about a little bird
who was a surgeon.
Two birds were building a nest
under a study window.
A gentleman sat in that study
every day.
He watched the birds.
They were building the nest of clay.





THE SURGEON BIRD.

They brought' round bits of wet
clay in their bills.
They stuck these bits upon the
wall.
After they had worked busily for
a while, they would perch on a tree
near by.
There they would sit and look
at the rest.
Sometimes they would fly down
and tear away all that they had built.
Sometimes a part of the nest
would fall down.
Then the birds would sit and
think how to build it better.
Right in the middle of their work
an accident happened.
One of the birds stepped on a piece
of broken glass.





THE SURGEON BIRD.

It cut her foot very badly.
But Mrs. Bird was a brave little
body.
She wished to keep on with her
work.
She did keep on until she was
faint and sick and could not fly up
from the ground.
Then she lay down. She closed
her eyes. She looked very sick.
The other bird looked at her anx-
iously.
Then he turned around and gave
three loud, strange cries.
Soon several birds came flying
about to see what was the matter.
A little surgeon bird came with
them.
He looked like the others, but he






THE SURGEON BIRD.

soon showed that he was a surgeon.




III


















HELPING MRS. BIRD.

He brought a bit of wet clay in
his bill.





THE SURGEON BIRD.

He ground it fine with his own
little beak.
Then he spread it on the bird's
sore stiff foot, just as a surgeon
spreads a plaster.
Next he took in his bill a long
green corn stalk which lay near.
He flew up on a tin water pipe
under the window.
One end of the corn stalk was
near the lame bird.
She understood what to do.
She took hold of it with her bill and
helped herself up onthe water pipe too.
Then the surgeon helped her into
the half-built nest.
Poor Mrs. Bird! It was very hard
to be sick, and to move into a half
built house.






THE SURGEON BIRD.

What do you suppose the little
surgeon bird did next?
He went to work and helped Mrs.
Bird finish the nest.
Then he flew off home.
Could the gentleman in the study
have been kinder or wiser than that
little bird?








j:













THE HERON.

The heron is a tall bird.
It has long legs.
It has a long neck.
It has long feathers.
It looks large, but its body is
small and lean.
It looks large because its feathers
and its wings are so long, and be-
cause it stands so high on its legs.
When their big wings are spread,
some full-grown herons measure
five feet across.





THE HERON.

The heron always has its house
near the water, because it is a fish-
ing bird.
It lives near fresh water ponds
and rivers.
But the heron is not a swim-
ming bird.
It is not like the goose, the duck,
and the swan.
Its feet are not webbed, like those
of the swimming birds.
It is a wading bird.
It has very long legs and claws, a
long neck, and a long bill.
When it is hungry it wades out
as far as it can into shallow water.
There it stands, half an hour at
a time, without stirring once, and
looks down into the water.




























































THE HERON.






THE HERON.

It looks like a fisherman who
is keeping very still while he
waits for a fish to bite.
The heron is waiting for a fish
to swim along.
When it comes, he will snap it
up with his long bill.
Sometimes herons build their
nests in the tops of large trees.
Sometimes they build on high
banks and cliffs.
The nest is made of coarse sticks,
and lined with wool.
The heron is a lazy bird.
If she can find a nest ready
made, which is big enough, she will
take it.
She does not care if it does be-
long to another bird.






THE HERON.

She often takes a nest for her
own which some owl or crow has
built.
She lays four large eggs.
The heron is a very cowardly
bird.
It will often run away from small
birds.
It will never fight if it can run
away.



-N














ABOUT LEOPARDS.

The leopard belongs to the cat
family.
Look at the leopard lying down,
in the picture.
Does he not look like a cat?
See his whiskers! His tail has
rings on it just like my kitty's
tail.
His fur is very soft. Should
you like to stroke him?
See his great paws!
The leopard is pale yellow. He













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A FAMILY OF LEOPARDS.






ABOUT LEOPARDS.

has beautiful black spots all over
his coat.
He is very handsome. He walks
softly like a cat. He climbs trees
like a cat. He can leap from one
tree to another.
Leopards live in Africa and in
India.
They stay in the jungle.
The jungle is a very, very thick
woods.
I once saw a tame leopard.
He was in a menagerie.
His master opened the door of
his cage.
The leopard leaped out.
'The leopard and his master played
together just as you play with your
kitty.





ABOUT LEOPARDS.

They rolled over and over on
the grass.
I will tell you a pretty story of
a tame leopard.
His name was Sai. That was
his name after he was caught.
When he was running about in
the jungle he did not have any
name.
He was very small when he was
caught.
At first he was tied up with a
cord.
But he soon grew tame and
gentle.
He lived in a big house.
The house was called a castle.
The castle stood on a high hill.
Out of one of the windows you






ABOUT LEOPARDS.

could look down upon the town.
Sai liked to look out of that
window.
He would put his fore paws on
the window-sill.
Then he would rest his chin on
his fore paws.
There he would stand a long
while and watch the people.
There were children who lived in
the castle.
The children liked to look out of
that window too.
One day they found Sai at the
window.
He would not come away. So
they all took hold of his tail and
pulled him down.
Sai dearly loved his master.






ABOUT LEOPARDS.

One day he missed him.
Sai ran all about the castle,
looking for him.
By and by he found him. He
was sitting at his writing-table.
Sai jumped upon his neck. He put
his head close to his master's head.
He rubbed his cheek on his
master's shoulder.
He wagged his tail. He was full
of joy.
He was as gentle as a pet cat.
Once Sai went to England with
his mistress.
They went in a big ship.
They put Sai into a cage.
When they were carrying the
cage to the ship, the men dropped
it in the water.





ABOUT LEOPARDS.

Oh dear! everybody thought poor
Sai would be drowned.
But the sailors pulled the cage
out of the water.
Sai was dreadfully wet and
curled himself up in the corner of
the cage to dry.
He would not look at anybody
but his mistress.
When he saw her he jumped
up, and rolled over and over for joy.
He put his nose and paws through
the bars of the cage for her to pat
him.
At last he got safely to England.
I never heard that he hurt
anybody.













THE COW-BIRD.

Cow-birds are not pretty birds;
and they are very lazy.
They never build nests. They lay
their eggs in other birds' nests.
The other bird sits on the cow-
bird's egg with her own and hatches it.
The baby cow-bird is very greedy.
He eats all the food. Often the
other little birds die with hunger.
The pretty little yellow bird will-
not hatch the cow-bird's egg.
When a cow-bird lays an egg in






THE COW-BIRD.

the yellow bird's nest, the mother-
bird calls the father-bird, and they
talk over it.
The father-bird then goes and gets
some mud.
"With this, they stick the cow-
bird's egg down. Then they make
a new floor to their nest.
They lift their own eggs up to the
new floor, and make it all soft and
nice.
The cow-bird's egg never gets
warm enough to hatch.
A man once found a yellow bird's
nest with three floors in it.
There was a nice soft floor where
the little yellow birds were hatched.
There were two other floors, and
a cow-bird's egg on each.













SOMETHING ABOUT BEARS.

There are many kinds of bears.
The Polar bear is white. His nose
and claws are black.
He lives in the Arctic regions.
There is no green grass in the
Arctic regions. The ground is cov-
ered with snow and ice all the time.
The people who live there, call the
Polar bear Nennook.
Nennook's fur is thick and long.
It hangs down over his feet.
The bottoms of his feet are thickly






SOMETHING ABOUT BEARS.

covered with hair, so he can walk
on the ice without slipping down.
Sometimes he sails out on the
ocean.
And what do you think he has for
a boat?
Sometimes he has an iceberg.
Sometimes he sails on a great flat
piece of ice. It is so big it is called
an ice-field.
He eats seals.
He catches seals in a queer
way.
He sees the seal lying on the ice
asleep.
He walks towards it very softly.
But the seal hears him and
wakes up.
Then Nennook stops and paws






SOMETHING ABOUT BEARS.

the ice with one foot. That makes
a noise.
The seal likes the noise. He lis-
tens. Then he rolls over, just as a
cat does when she is pleased.
Then he goes to sleep again.
Nennook stops pawing the ice.
He crawls a little nearer the seal.
Perhaps the seal wakes up again.
Then Nennook paws the ice
again.
By and by he gets near enough to
catch the seal.
In the autumn Mrs. Nennook eats
all the seals she can find.
She grows very fat.
Then she digs out a hollow place
-in the snow.
She lies down in it. The snows





SOMETHING ABOUT BEARS.

fall and cover her up very deep.
There she stays all winter with
her babies.
Bear babies are called cubs.
Her house in the snow is very
snug and warm.
There is a little hole through
the snow up to the open air.
So they have plenty of fresh air
to breathe.
In the spring she comes out.
The first thing she does is to hunt
up a seal for her family to eat.
The seal lives in a snow house
just as Mrs. Nennkoo does.
Mrs. Nennkoo smells all about
over the snow, just as a dog smells
for a woodchuck.
By and by she comes to a little






SOMETHING ABOUT BEARS.

hole in the snow. Then she knows
that she has found a seal's house.
She jumps right on to the house.
She is very big. She breaks through
the snow roof.
And there is a fat baby seal!
All bears are very fond of their
cubs.
I read -a very pretty story in an
old book the other day. Some sail-
ors chased a bear on a field of ice.
She had two little cubs with her.
They could not run very fast.
She tried many ways to coax
them to run faster.
She would run on ahead and call
them.
But they could not keep up with
her.







SOMETHING ABOUT BEARS.

Then she took one up in her
paw and tossed it ahead. Then she
tossed the other.
So she ran, tossing first one little
cub and then the other, till she got
away from the sailors.
The great grizzly bear lives in.the
Rocky Mountains and in Califor-
nia.
He is very savage. He eats ber-
ries and roots.
He eats a pig, or a calf, when he
can get one.
He is very fond of honey.
All bears like honey.
The wild bears keep their honey
in the hollows of trees.
Bears can climb trees.
The grizzly bear knows when he











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SOMETHING ABOUT BEARS.

comes to a tree that has honey
in it.
I suppose he smells it.
Up he goes, and sticks his great
nose into the home of the bees.
If most of the bees are out, he has
no trouble.
But if they are at home, he gets
stung.
The claws of the grizzly bear are
long and sharp.
The Indians wear necklaces made
out of his claws.
The black bear is smaller than the
grizzly bear.
His coat is very shiny and hand-
some.
I saw a company of soldiers the
other day.






SOMETHING ABOUT BEARS.

They were marching down Wash-
ington street in Boston.
They wore very tall hats made
out of the skins of black bears.
Did you ever see a black bear in
a menagerie ?
When you go to see one, carry
him a bun.
Bears are fond of buns.
The brown bear lives in Europe.
He is about as big as the black bear.
In Lapland the people eat him.
The meat and fat are very good.
They make beds and coverlets out
of his fur.
They make bonnets and mittens
out of his fur.
They make leather out of his skin.
So you see he is very useful.





SOMETHING ABOUT BEARS.

All bears sleep the greater part of
the winter.
I have told you how the polar bear
sleeps.
The grizzly bear and black bear
and brown bear sleep in hollows
of trees and in caves.
The brown bear eats acorns and
ants and honey.
I think it very funny that such
big creatures as bears should like
berries and honey; don't you ?
But, then, I suppose if you were
six feet tall you would still like
candy!
Bears make very interesting pets.
They are full of mischief. They
can learn to dance. You would not
like to be hugged by one.












ABOUT OWLS.

There are one hundred and fifty
kinds of owls.
Owls fly in the night. They can
see in the dark.
They cannot see in the daytime.
The sunlight dazzles them.
So they perch all day.
When night comes they go in
search of food.
Their feathers are soft and downy.
They make no sound when they
fly.





ABOUT OWLS.

The big owls eat rabbits and
birds and hens.
The naughty chicken that does
not like to go into the coop, tucks
her head under her wings and gdes
to sleep on the branch of an apple-
tree.
In the night the great owl pounces
upon her and carries her off.
She makes a nice dinner for the
mother owl and the owlets.
The small owls are called owlets.
They eat mice and moles snd
beetles.
When the little sparrow-owl
catches a bird, he picks off all the
feathers before he eats it.
This is the way an owl eats a
*mouse :





ABOUT OWLS.

He tosses it up in the air. He
catches it as it falls head foremost,
and swallows it.
He swallows all but the tail.
He sits a long time with the tail
hanging out of his mouth.
What do you suppose he is think-
ing of?
Then he swallows the tail.
By and by he spits out the fur
and bones of the mouse. They are
rolled up into a little ball.
The owl is the only bird that has
an external ear.
You have an external ear.
If you look at any other bird
you will see only a passage which
leads into the head.
The owl has a lid to his ear





ABOUT OWLS.























A CARVED OWL.

which he can open and shut.
The great brown and white
horned owl lives in America.





ABOUT OWLS.

He has feathers on his head that
look like horns.
The great horned owl makes a
very nice pet.
When he is pleased he raises his
horns. When be is cross, he flattens
them.
All owls hiss when they are
angry.
The cry of the great horned owl
can be heard a long way at night.
He says Waugh, hoo, hoo, hoo "
Another owl says, Whah-whah-
whah P "
There is a small American owl
called the saw-whet owl.
His cry sounds like a saw.
Sometimes a traveller gets lost in
the woods.






ABOUT OWLS.

He hears the cry of the saw-whet
owl.
He thinks he must be near a saw-
mill.
So he follows the sound. Some-
times he goes for a long way. But
he does not find any saw-mill.
Owls live in hollow trees, in caves,
in barns, in towers.
They line their nests with grass
and leaves and moss.
There is an owl called the burrow-
ing owl.
He does not trouble himself to
make a nest.
He lives in a prairie-dog town.
The prairie-dog town is under
ground.
It has streets and houses, all






ABOUT OWLS.

dug out by the little prairie-dogs.
The burrowing owl takes one of
these houses for his own.
When I was a little girl I went to
a show in a tent.
There were parrots and monkeys
and big snakes. There was one
very cunning monkey that rode on a
pony.
But I thought the prettiest thing
was a great white owl.
The great snowy owl lives in
Greenland.
He is a beauty.















FLORA AND THE MUTTON.

Flora is a spaniel.
Tib is a grey cat.
They were great pets, and good
friends with each other.
They were allowed to come into
the dining-room.
Many nice bits were given them
at meal-times.
One day their master was dining
alone.
Some one called to see him in
haste.






FLORA AND THE MUTTON.

He left his dinner, and went out
into the hall.
When he came back, Flora was
lying on the dinner-table.
There was a leg of roast mutton
on the big platter.
She was lying beside that platter.
But Flora had not touched the
roast mutton.
She did not move when her mas-
ter came in.
She did not seem ashamed, or
afraid.
Her master thought, "This is a
very strange thing for Flora to do.
I have always been proud of her
good manners.
"I never knew her to get on the ta-
ble before.
A






FLORA AND THE MUTTON.

But the mutton has not been
touched. I do not understand it."
He looked around the room.
Then he saw Tib hiding in a cor-
ner.
Tib looked very much ashamed.
She looked as if she had been in
mischief.
"Ah! I see," said her master.
Miss Tib tried to help herself to
roast mutton while I was out.
Flora drove her away.
Flora is on the table to take care
of my dinner for me."
You may believe that Flora had a
very nice dinner that day.
She very kindly allowed naughty
Tib to share with her.






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