• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 When I was a little girl
 How I heard about bumblebees
 Some of Nannie's queer acquain...
 My cat Pickwick
 Nannie's visit at grandma...
 Ralph's garden
 All about grandpa Howard's...
 Uncle Jack's May-basket
 Uncle Jack's picnic
 Uncle Jack's story
 Aunt Chatty celebrates her...
 Back Cover






Title: When I was a little girl
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00049823/00001
 Material Information
Title: When I was a little girl
Physical Description: 144 p. : ill. ; 20 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Humphrey, Frances A
D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: D. Lothrop and Company
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: c1882
 Subjects
Subject: Animals -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Pets -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Human-animal relationships -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Parent and child -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Country life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Family stories -- 1882   ( local )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1882   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1882
Genre: Family stories.   ( local )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by F.A. Humphrey.
General Note: Publisher's advertisement on back cover.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00049823
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002231937
notis - ALH2325
oclc - 62393631

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
    Frontispiece
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Table of Contents
        Page v
    List of Illustrations
        Page vi
    When I was a little girl
        Chapter I: About Buttercup
            Page 7
            Page 8
            Page 9
            Page 10
            Page 11
        Chapter II: About Aunt Chatty
            Page 12
            Page 13
        Chapter III: About Jack
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
    How I heard about bumblebees
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Some of Nannie's queer acquaintances
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    My cat Pickwick
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Nannie's visit at grandma Richmond's
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
    Ralph's garden
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
    All about grandpa Howard's farm
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
    Uncle Jack's May-basket
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
    Uncle Jack's picnic
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
    Uncle Jack's story
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
    Aunt Chatty celebrates her birthday
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
Full Text


























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The Baldwin Library
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b.- Vo Lt t :
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ON THE WAY TO AUNT CHATTY'S.













WHEN I WAS A LITTLE GIRL




BY
MRS. F. A. HUMPHREY







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BOSTON
D. LOTHROP AND COMPANY
32 FRANKLIN STREET





































COPYRIGHT, 1882.

D. LOTHROP & COMPANY.




















CONTENTS.



PAGE.
I. WHEN I WAS A LITTLE GIRL ........ 7
II. How I HEARD ABOUT BUMBLEBEES... 17

III. SOME OF NANNIE'S QUEER ACQUAINT-
ANCES .......... ...... ........ 25
IV. My CAT PICKWICK ......... ........ 41

V. NANNIE'S VISIT AT GRANDMA RICH-
MOND'S.......... ....... ....... 52

VI. RALPH'S GARDEN ........... ........ 63

VII. ALL ABOUr GRANDPA HOWARD'S FARM 73

VIII. UNCLE JACK'S MAY-BASKET. ......... 90

IX. UNCLE JACK'S PICNIC............... 103

X. UNCLE JACK'S STORY............... 115

XI. AUNT CHATTY'S BIRTHDAY. ......... 130
V



















ILLUSTRATIONS,


On the Way to Aunt Chatty's. .............. Front.
Buttercup bites off Mary Jane's Head ........ 8
Nannie hears about the Bumblebees........... 19
Sue and I were sitting on the Grass.......... 27
Once I was carried off by an Eagle........... 31
The Scottish Mother's Guide ............... 35
Pickwick was the Rogue. ................... 45
How I used to help Father. ................ 49
The Robin that Marc Antony watched........ 55
Tito and his Monkey ...................... 59
The Swallow's Nest ....................... 74
Milking Time at Grandpa Howard's Farm.... 81
Ploughing in Spring Time .................. 85
The Seed was sown ....................... 87
Sally, Bess and I .......................... 97
Spot Pond............ .................. 104
Roy, Sam and Hero ....................... in
When I was Five Years Old............... 116
Ezekiel ploughs the Petel's Lot.............. 19
Red Grouse.............................. 129
K ing Philip .............................. 136
Tom and the Hat ........................ 138
Aunt Chatty's.............................. 142
VI

















WHEN I WAS A LITTLE GIRL.

CHAPTER I.--ABOUT BUTTERCUP.

When I was a little girl I lived in
Pinelands.
Pinelands is in Massachusetts.
My father owned a flock of sheep.
There were seventy-five sheep in
the flock.
He had a sheep barn.
It was a small barn.
It was not so large as the barn
where the cows and oxen were kept.
7








WHEN I WAS A LITTLE GIRL.
But I liked that sheep barn best.
-----------------~-----77




The ows were low. I could
.I f .








climb up on the hay.
-8
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' '-:::": i" :
i :': '' '
SIb





',' m :,! ', ,h .. ,_.










WHEN I WAS A LITTLE GIRL.

Sometimes I found a hen's nest
full of eggs in the hay.
Sometimes I threw the hay down
into the racks for the sheep to
eat.
The sheep were kept in this barn
in the winter.
In the spring they were driven
away to the pastures.
How pretty the little white lambs
looked as they played on the green
grass I
Sometimes there was a black
lamb.
Did you ever have a lamb for your
own ?
I had one once. She was a beauty.
I loved her dearly.
Her name was Buttercup.
9









WHEN I WAS A LITTLE GIRL.

She wore a blue ribbon around her
neck.
She followed me about every-
where.
She would follow me all over the
house if I would let her.
We played together a great deal.
Once she bit off Mary Jane's
head.
I did not like that. Mary Jane
was my doll.
By and by Buttercup grew into a
great sheep.
She used to come up behind me
slyly, and knock me over.
It was all in fun, you know.
But one day when I was watching
the little minnows in the brook, she
knocked me into the water.
I0










WHEN I WAS A LITTLE GIRL.

I scrambled out, but I was wet
through.
Mother said she could not allow
this sort of play.
So Buttercup was sent to the pas-
ture with the rest of the sheep.
I cried when she went.
The pasture was three miles away.
I used to go twice a week with
papa to see her.
I used to call Buttercup "
She knew my voice, and ran to
me.
I carried salt to her. She ate it
out of my hand.
Every year in June, the sheep were
washed.
They were driven down to Spot
pond.
II









WHEN I WAS A LITTLE GIRL.

They were caught one at a time, and
carried into the water.
The men rubbed and washed their
wool to make it clean.
I stood on the bridge and watched
them.
When the wool was dry the sheep
were sheared.
What a pile of it there was I And
how funny the sheep looked!
But they liked it. They were cool-
er without wool.

CHAPTER II.--ABOUT AUNT CHATTY.


Part of the wool was sold to the
traders.
Part of it was made into soft rolls.
These rolls were spun into yarn.
12










WHEN I WAS A LITTLE GIRL.

Did you ever see anybody spin
yarn on a spinning wheel ?
Now-a-days the yarn is spun by
machines in factories.
Aunt Chatty used to spin for the
people in Pinelands.
Her real name was Charity Mor-
rison.
All the boys and girls called her
aunt Chatty.
She always wore a high white cap.
Some mornings, when I woke, I
would hear a whiz-z-z in the attic.
Then I knew aunt Chatty had
come to spin. I hurried out of
bed. I carried my playthings into
the attic.
I carried up Mary Jane, and Patty
and Pea Blossom.
'3










WHEN I WAS A LITTLE GIRL.

There were two windows in the
attic.
I made my play-house in the south
window.
There I played and watched aunt
Chatty. She was a dear old lady.
Lady Beautiful staid up in the
attic when aunt Chatty came.
Lady Beautiful was our big tor-
toise-shell cat.
Aunt Chatty liked cats.
She had five of her own.
Aunt Chatty lived alone in a bit of
a house. She had many pets.

CHAPTER III.--ABOUT JACK.

Aunt Chatty once had a pet mon-
key.
14










WHEN I WAS A LITTLE GIRL.

His name was Jack. He was
full of mischief.
I went one day to take tea with
her.
To take tea with aunt Chatty was
charming!
Aunt Chatty said she would have
waffles and honey for tea.
She put her mixing bowl on the
table. She broke the eggs and beat
them.
She added the milk and flour.
I was watching her.
Jack was sitting on top of the eight-
day clock.
He was watching her too.
She went to get the waffle irons.
Down came Jack.
He caught up the bowl.
15










WHEN I WAS A LITTLE GIRL.

He turned it bottom up, and spilled
all the batter on the floor.
Naughty Jack!
Aunt Chatty scolded him and
turned him out of doors.
It began to rain. He cried and
wanted to come in.
But aunt Chatty would not let him.
There was a tin pan hanging on
a post.
He climbed up on the fence and
held the pan over his head with his
fore paws.
He nodded and chattered.
He seemed to say, "Just look at
my umbrella!"
Of course we laughed. Then aunt
Chatty let him in.
But we did not have waffles for tea.
16



















HOW I HEARD ABOUT BUM-
BLE-BEES.

It was one day, long ago, when I
was a little girl, only four years
old.
I remember how I ran into the
house to mamma crying as hard
as I could.
I had been out playing in the
garden.
My playhouse was under a great
white rosebush. The roses were in
bloom.
I7










HOW I HEARD ABOUT BUMBLE-BEES.

"What is the matter, Nannie?"
asked mamma.
I found a pretty bird -and
I-put it up-to my mouth-to
kiss it and it bit me!" said I
between my big sobs.
Mamma put the baby into the
cradle. She looked at my mouth.
One lip was swollen badly.
How did the bird look, Nannie
dear? asked mamma.
Here it is I caught it," I said.
I unrolled my apron. What do
you think dropped out?
A big bumble-bee!
That is not a bird," said mamma
smiling.
"I thought it was a little hum-
ming bird," I said.











HOW I HEARD ABOUT BUMBLE-BEES.

I do not wonder now that I
thought the bumble-bee was a pretty
bird.
It is very pretty.
It wears a dark coat.




-.*-





,*, ". *l ,




NANNIE HEARS ABOUT THE BUMBLE-BEES,

It has a bright yellow collar.
It has six legs.
Mamma sat down and told me
"19










HOW I HEARD ABOUT BUMBLE-BEES.

many pretty things about the bumble-
bee.
The bumble-bee sleeps all win-
ter.
It goes into a warm hole in a tree
or in a haystack, or in a wall.
In May the warm days come.
Then the June bumble-bee wakes up
and comes out of its hole.
It looks about to find a place for a
nest.
If you should go near it and
watch it, it would fly away.
It does not like to be watched.
By-and-by it finds a place that it
likes. It begins to dig.
It digs a little street into the
ground. The street is about a foot
deep.
20









HOW I HEARD ABOUT BUMBLE-BEES.

Then it hollows out a nest at the
end of the street.
Then it makes a few round cells
in this nest.
It lays its eggs in these cells.
The eggs hatch into little white
grubs.
The mother bumble-bee feeds
these grubs.
She feeds them with the pollen of
the flowers.
Pollen looks like yellow dust.
She has a little brush on her legs.
She brushes the pollen out of the
flowers.
Then she packs it into two little
baskets.
These little baskets are on her
hind legs.
21









HOW I HEARD ABOUT BUMBLE-BEES.

You cannot see them without a
magnifying glass.
When the grubs are fat they
begin to spin.
Each little grub spins a silken
web round and round its own body.
It looks then like a little ball.
This ball is called a cocoon.
There it stays till it is ready to
come out.
Then it bites a hole at one end
of the silken ball and comes out.
It comes out a real bumble-bee.
So you see it takes some time to
make a bumble-bee.
First it is an egg. Then it is a
little grub. Then it is a cocoon.
And then it is a bumble-bee.
The young bumble-bees help the
22









HOW I HEARD ABOUT BUMBLE-BEES.

mother to make her house bigger
to get ready for the bumble-bees
that are yet to be hatched.
Sometimes there are three hun-
dred bumble-bees in one family.
The bumble-bees gather honey. It
is very sweet. It is not good to eat.
There is another kind of bumble-
bee. It is called the moss bumble-
bee.
The moss bumble-bee does not
build its nest in the ground.
It builds its nest on the top of
the ground.
It digs a hollow place on top of
the ground.
Then it makes a roof over the
hollow place.
The roof is made of moss or grass.
23









HOW I HEARD ABOUT BUMBLE-BEES.

It lines the roof with wax.
The rain cannot get through the
roof.
I was not sorry the bumble-bee
stung me, when I had heard all this
beautiful story.










24- -I

4' u .
*'-*^ FJy^

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SOME OF NANNIE'S QUEER
ACQUAINTANCES.

Did you ever see an eagle?
I saw one once. It was flying.
Another time I saw some, eagles
in a cage in Central Park, New York.
It was a big cage; but it was not
big enough for eagles.
They sat quite still on the perches.
Once in a while a feather fell off
from one of them.
They looked very cross. I do not
wonder at it.
25










NANNIE'S QUEER ACQUAINTANCES.

They wanted to fly up in the air.
I was a very little girl when I saw
the flying eagle. I was only four
years old.
I was playing in the dooryard at
home.
My home was in Vineland.
My little sister Sue was with me.
She was not quite two years old.
She had just begun to walk.
It was Saturday, and mamma was
baking.
Sue and I were sitting on the
grass.
We were picking buttercups.
I was holding a buttercup under
her chin to see if she liked butter.
Just then it grew dark. I looked
up.
26











NANNIE'S QUEER ACQUAINTANCES.

A little way above our heads was
a very, very big bird.















His shadow fell on us. That was
/
I "' ~ -^









SUE AND I WERE SITTING ON THE GRASS.


"He was between us and the sun.
His shadow fell on us. That was
why it grew dark.
27









NANNIE'S QUEER ACQUAINTANCES.

I screamed and Sue screamed.
Mamma ran out, and she screamed.
Our big brother Ned was hoeing
in the garden.
He dropped his hoe and ran to
fetch his gun.
He fired and killed the eagle.
It measured nine feet from the tip
of one wing to the tip of the other.
Ask your papa to show you how
much nine feet is.
Then you will know how big the
eagle was.
Ned said it was big enough to
carry off Sue.
It was a bald eagle.
Many years ago in Scotland a great
golden eagle did carry off a baby.
The people were hay-making.
28










NANNIE'S QUEER ACQUAINTANCES.

The baby was lying on a heap of
hay, asleep.
Away off to the north were some
high and rocky hills.
The golden eagle had a nest in
those rocks.
He saw the baby.
Down he came, rushing through
the air straight to the spot where
the baby lay.
He seized her in his talons. He
flew away to the hills.
All the people ran after him.
They began to climb the hills.
There was a great company of
men and women.
The way was very steep and rough.
Soon they began to grow tired.
Then all went back but the mother.
29










NANNIE'S QUEER ACQUAINTANCES.

She kept on. She climbed up
the steep rocks.
She had to take hold of the bushes
to keep from falling.
Her feet and hands were soon
scratched and torn by the sharp stones
and briars.
By and by she reached the eagle's
nest.
It was made of sticks. Three
young eagles were in it.
Baby lay right among the eaglets.
She was fast asleep!
You may be sure the mother kissed
and hugged her.
Then she wrapped baby in her
plaid.
She tied the plaid fast around her
own shoulders.
30
































































ONCE I WAS CARRIED OF BY AN AGE.
ONCE I W'AS CARRIED OFF: BY AN iAGI, E. 31


















































i










NANNIE'S QUEER ACQUAINTANCES.

She could not carry baby in her
arms.
She must hold on to the bushes
with her hands.
Then she began to go down.
Once she almost slipped down a
steep place.
Then she lost her way.
She saw no path.
Just then a sheep came by with
her little lamb.
The sheep belonged to the flocks
down in the valley.
The mother said to herself, "The
sheep knows where to go with her
little lamb. I will follow her."
So she followed behind the sheep.
They got back to the hay-field in
the valley at sunset.
33










NANNIE'S QUEER ACQUAINTANCES.

This baby lived to be a pretty little
girl, and a very pretty grown-up lady.
I used to think a great deal of
another bird.
She was my neighbor. Her name
was Pretty Patty Perewinkle.
She talked a little.
She could speak her name.
She wore a beautiful dress. It
glittered in the sun like a silk gown
of many colors.
She spent a good deal of time
smoothing her dress.
When she was smoothing her
dress she often talked.
She said, Pretty Patty Pere-
winkle Pretty Patty Perewinkle !
I'm a beauty! I'm a beauty Just
splendid!"
34













.. i- *iT .








































THE SCOTTISH MOTHER'S GUIDE. 35












NANNIE'S QUEER ACQUAINTANCES.

It sounded very queer.
But Pretty Patty Perewinkle was a
parrot.
On sunny days her cage was al-
ways hung outside the door.
One day a strange cat came into
the yard. He spied Patty.
She was holding a piece of cracker
in her claw, and eating it.
Patty was very polite.
She bowed to the cat, and said
" Good-morning "
I wish you could have seen that
cat when Patty spoke to her.
She never had heard a bird talk
before.
She was frightened.
She ran off. Her tail was as big
as your arm !
37










NANNIE'S QUEER ACQUAINTANCES.

One day a man brought my father a
load of oak wood.
Our garden joined Patty's.
She was hanging out of doors.
The man backed his load to the
door of the wood-house.
He was just going to take off a
stick when somebody said "K "
(That is rather hard to spell. It is
the sound we make, you know, when
we want a horse to go.)
The horse began to walk.
Then somebody said Whoa!"
The horse stopped.
The man then backed him again
to the wood-house.
Then he began to unload.
Again somebody said "Kk I "
The horse started off.
38









NANNIES QUEER ACQUAINTANCES.

Then somebody cried, Whoa !"
This time the man was angry.
He looked around to see who it was.
But he could see nobody.
He thought a naughty boy must
be hiding somewhere teasing him.
Patty was standing on one leg
looking at him.
Once more he backed his horse
to the wood-house door.
He began to unload. A third
time somebody said Kik! "
But this time the man was watch-
ing. He knew it was Patty.
So he knocked at the door and
asked Patty's mistress to take her
in.
When Patty saw him coming she
bowed and said:
39










NANNIE'S QUEER ACQUAINTANCES.

Good-morning! Have a cracker?
I'm a beauty I'm a beauty Just
splendid! Pretty Patty Perewinkle
Pretty Patty Perewinkle I Klk "




















40


















MY CAT PICKWICK.

My father lived in Pinelands when
I was four years old.
I liked to go out and be with him
when he was at work in the fields.
That spring I dropped corn.
Do you know how to do that?
Father dug little holes in the
ploughed ground with his hoe.
These holes are called hills.
I used to think it was queer that
a hole should be called a hill!
"You must put five kernels of
41










MY CAT PICKWICK.

corn into each hill," said my father
Then he taught me a verse:

"One for the blackbird,
One for the crow,
One for the cut-worm,
Two to let grow."

That makes five kernels, you see.
When corn begins to grow, the
leaves are small and sweet.
The crows like it.
The blackbird likes it.
The little fat cut-worm likes it.
I had a pet cat.
He was big and white, and his
name was Pickwick.
One day father brought in an arm-
ful of corn from the garden for dinner.
42










MY CAT PICKWICK.

The husks were partly pulled off
some of the ears. The corn was
badly gnawed.
"I wonder what eats my corn?"
said father.
It must be mice," said mother.
I thought what fun it would be to
see the mice gnaw the corn.
So the next morning I carried my
chair out by the currant bushes.
Then I sat down to watch for the
mice. I sat there a long while.
I had a great many pets when I
lived in Pinelands. I had a pet toad.
My pet toad was sitting that
morning in a cool place under a
squash-vine.
I almost always had crumbs in
my pocket.
43









MY CAT PICKWICK.

I began to feed the toad with
crumbs.
I would toss a crumb, and the toad
would open his mouth and catch it.
Did you ever see a toad open his
mouth wide?
He has a very big mouth, but he
has no teeth.
Pretty soon I heard the corn-
stalks rustle.
Hush, toad !" I said. "There
are the mice! "
But it was not mice at all,
It was Pickwick! He was eating
the corn.
After that father pulled an ear of
corn every day for Pickwick.
He said he must not be allowed
to help himself.
44
















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PICKWICK WAS THE ROGUE. 45











































ii
I
II







i
I












i










MY CAT PICKWICK.

When I was five years old, I had
a picnic on my birthday.
My birthday is the seventeenth of
June.
Every year I am gladder and
gladder that my birthday is the
seventeenth of June.
That day is the anniversary of the
battle of Bunker Hill.
Where I live now, all the church-
bells are rung at sunrise, at noon,
and at sunset on the seventeenth of
June.
Everybody puts out the beautiful
Stars and Stripes.
I had my birthday picnic in the
orchard.
I invited my cousin Christine. I
also invited Polly and Peter.
47









MY CAT PICKWICK.

Polly and Peter were my biggest
dolls. Of course very little dolls did
not go to picnics.
Pickwick was invited.
So was Pud. Pud was the name
of my pet toad.
I wanted to invite a nest of ants
that lived in a corner of the garden.
But brother Jack said he thought
ants would not be nice guests at a
picnic.
They would be apt to get into the
cake and raspberry tarts.
So I carried a raspberry tart to
my ants' house before thepicnic began.
The ants immediately swarmed all
over it.
That is their way of saying a
thing is good. Jack was invited.
48



















































HOW I USED TO HELP FATHER. 49
II
.-_ .. : . --...






















HOW I USED TO HELP FATHER. 49













MY CAT PICKWICK.

I always invite Jack to all my
parties and picnics.
He was sixteen years old, and he
was splendid!
He is tall, and I often rode on his
shoulder.
That is the way I went to the
picnic. I rode down into the garden
on Jack's shoulder.
Pickwick followed.
But I carried Pud.











51
_. .

















NANNIE'S VISIT AT GRAND-
MA RICHMOND'S.

When I was a little girl, there was
no one I liked to visit so well as
grandma Richmond.
One summer I had the measles.
Mamma said I did not "get up"
well.
"We must send her to Rocky
Nook," said papa.
Rocky Nook was the place where
grandma Richmond lived.
The moment papa said that, I
began to feel better.
52









NANNIE'S VISIT AT GRANDMA'S.

We went in a big stage-coach with
four horses.
When I got out of the stage-
coach, Marc Antony came and rub-
bed against me.
Marc Antony was grandma's big
tiger cat. He had great double
paws.
He used to sit at the table and
eat with grandma and me.
He sat in a high chair and ate
from a pretty china plate.
Grandma always cut his beef-
steak into small bits for him.
Then he took his fork in his right
paw and ate very carefully and
slowly.
He was the only cat I ever saw
who knew how to eat with a fork.










NANNIE'S VISIT AT GRANDMA'S.

Grandma had an Alderney cow.
When Joe milked I always car-
ried my silver cup to the barn, and
he milked it full.
Sometimes the froth ran over the
edge of the cup.
I wanted to learn to milk, and
Joe said he would teach me.
But such work as I made of it!
I milked into Joe's face. I milked
all over my white aprons. I milked
on the ground. I could not hit the
pail.
Do you think grandma scolded
me because I soiled my aprons?
Grandma Richmond never scolded.
She said she did not care how
much I soiled my clothes if I only
grew well and strong.
54





















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T E I.O T

THIE ROBIN THAT MARC ANTONY WATCHED. 55













NANNIE'S VISIT AT GRANDMA'S.

And I did grow well and strong.
I grew ten pounds that very summer.
One day a queer thing happened.
Grandma lived in a stone house.
The front door opened on the
beautiful green lawn.
There was a side door which
opened into a yard.
At the side door was a porch.
Grandma was sitting in the porch
shelling peas.
I was playing on the grass with
Caesar.
Caesar was the dog.
Marc Antony was watching a
robin. The robin was eating cher-
ries.
All at once we heard music. I
ran and peeped through the hedge.
57










NANNIE'S VISIT AT GRANDMA'S.

A little boy was standing at the
corner of the house.
His clothes were very queer and
not very clean.
He had a monkey.
The boy was playing. The monkey
was dancing.
Marc Antony never saw a monkey
before.
He spit awfully.
He ran right up to the top of the
cherry tree, and frightened the robin
away.
Caesar began to bark.
Joe shut him up in the wood-
house.
Then grandma and I went out
on the lawn.
"My little fellow," said grandma,





















IJ






TO

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11 1 1 I il l" p
Pull














TITO AND HIS MONkEY. 59













NANNIE'S VISIT AT GRANDMA'S.

" who are you, and where did you
come from ? "
He said his name was Tito. He
came to America in a big ship.
Then his mother died and there
was nobody to take care of him.
Some people gave him the mon-
key, and told him he must take care
of himself.
They told him to play at the
doors of houses, and ask for money
and bread.
"It is a great pity that such a
little boy should wander about with-
out any home," said grandma.
She was talking to Janet.
Janet had lived at Rocky Nook
with grandma a great many years.
Grandma said she had been want-
61










NANNIE'S VISIT AT GRANDMA'S.

ing a little boy for a long time, to
go of errands and take care of the
chickens.
"And I think I will take this
one," said grandma.
So Tito came to live with grand-
ma Richmond. The monkey came
too.
Uncle Jack is an artist. He
paints pictures.
He made a picture of Tito and
his monkey just as they looked that
day.
Is it not a pretty picture?






62


















RALPH'S GARDEN.

In an earlier story I told you
about a visit to Grandma Richmond.
I want to tell you something more
about that summer.
Grandma's nearest neighbor was
Mr. Gray.
There was only a low fence
between grandma's garden and Mr.
Gray's garden.
Little Ralph Gray had a garden
that summer.
I had a garden too.
63










RALPH'SS GARDEN.

Ralph's garden was close by the
fence on one side.
My garden was close by the fence
on the other side.
My garden was a flower garden.
I had tall foxgloves and holly-
hocks.
Mr. Gray's gardener dug up the
ground for Ralph's garden.
He raked it smooth.
Then Ralph planted it.
He planted one hill of corn.
He planted four pieces of potato
in one hill.
The gardener fixed a tall pole
in the ground.
Ralph planted eight beans around
the pole.
He planted a row of sweet-peas.
64










RALPH'S GARDEN.

He planted one sunflower seed.
Then he scattered mignonette
seed all about his garden.






7."









NANNIE IN HER GARDEN.

The next day it rained a fine
and gentle rain.
Then the sun shone out, and
the seeds began to start.
65









RALPH'S GARDEN.

I could see the little blades of corn.
There were the eight beans all
sticking out of the ground!
Beans begin to grow in such a
queer way!
There was a great bunch of
leaves; those were the potatoes.
The sunflower seed sent up two
big, flat leaves.
The sweet-peas came up in a
bright green row.
The mignonette was so small
at first we could hardly see it.
Ralph worked in his garden
every morning.
I worked in my garden every
morning.
Ralph had a lovely set of garden
tools.
66









RALPH'S GARDEN.

He had a hoe, a rake, a spade, a
trowel, and a red wheelbarrow.
He pulled up every weed.
He kept the earth loose with his
trowel.
He stuck brush in the ground
for the sweet-peas to run on.
How the things did grow in that
garden!
The beans climbed to the top of
the bean-pole and then hung down.
The sunflower grew far, far
above my hollyhocks.
One morning there were two
blossoms on the sweet-peas.
Ralph picked them.
He picked a bit of mignonette.
He made a bouquet for his moth-
er.
67










RALPH S GARDEN.

Every morning after that he
picked a bouquet for his mother.
He put it beside her plate on
the breakfast-table.
Mr. Gray sometimes came to
see us when we were at work in
our gardens.
It is time your corn-fodder was
cut, Ralph," he said one night.
" Will you sell it to me for the
coWS "
I will give it to you," said Ralph.
Oh no!" said his papa; I will
buy it. I will give you a cent
apiece for the stalks."
So Ralph cut the corn-stalks
There were four of them.
We carried them to the cows
at the barn.
68











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MAIGGIE DI.IVIN(.; Tril': COV S llO1IE, 69












RALPH'S GARDEN.

Maggie had just driven them
home from the pasture. Maggie
always milked the cows.
Mr. Gray had two cows.
The black cow's name was Jetty.
The pretty red-and-white cow was
named Fancy Day.
They liked the green juicy corn-
stalks.
In September Ralph gathered
his harvest.
Before that time I had gone
home to Pinelands.
But grandma wrote me a letter
and told me all about it.
He had six big potatoes, and
eight small ones.
He gave the small potatoes to
Fancy Day and Jetty.
71










RALPH'S GARDEN.

Maggie boiled the big potatoes
for dinner one day.
lie had two gills of beans. He
put them away to plant the next year.
He had plenty of sweet-peas for
seed.

He carried off the sweet-pea
vines, the potato-tops, and the sun-
flower stalk, and put them on the
compost heap.
He put his garden in very
neat order.
He had a pint of sunflower seeds.
He gave those to his white leg-
horn hens.
tHe had a flock of beautiful white
leghorn hens.


72

















ALL ABOUT GRANDPA HOW-
ARD'S FARM.

Grandma Richmond was papa's
mother.
Mamma's mother was grandma
Howard.
It was only a very little way from
our house to grandma Howard's.
I used to stay there quite as much
during the clay as I did at home.
When I wanted a lunch I always
went over to grandma Howard's and
got it of Betty.
Betty had lived with grandma
73










GRANDPA HOWARD S FARM.



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THE SI.I.OW'S NEST.

Howard almost as long as Janet had
with grandma Richmond.
There were a great many very
74










GRANDPA HOWARD S FARM.

nice play-places at grandpa How-
ard's.
There was the piggery. It had
long troughs at the side where the
pigs ate.
"I used to count their noses while
they were eating.
Fifteen great noses all in the
trough !
But the little pigs were very
pretty.
I remember there were ten at one
time.
Each one of them was clear white.
They all had pink noses like rose-
buds, and the curliest of tails.
They would not stay in the pen,
They were always digging their way
out.
75










GARNDPA HOWARD'S FARM.

There are those pigs again!"
Betty would say; and we would
see them racing through the green
meadow.
But they soon grew big and fit,
and did not care to race.
Then there were the barns.
A great many swallows lived in
grandpa's barns.
The great windows were always
open in summer, so they could fly in
and out.
I used to watch them as they
brought the mud in their beaks
They build their nests of mud.
After a while the nests would be
full of -little birds.
Then what busy times there were
in the barns!
76










GRANDPA HOWARD S FARM.

The young birds seemed to have
as good appetites as small boys and
girls have.
They kept their parents very busy
feeding them.
Once, after a heavy rain-storm, we
found a swallow's nest oh the hay.
The rain had leaked through the
roof, and softened the mud. That
was the reason it had fallen.
There were four birds in the
nest. Ned carried it to the house
to grandma.
The swallows were in great dis-
dress. They flew about Ned and
cried. They followed him to the
house.
They thought he was carrying off
the birds and would keep them.
77










GRANDPA HOWARD'S FARM.

Grandma said they had better be
put on a high beam in the barn.
So Ned went up on a ladder and
put the poor little birdies in a corner
under the eaves.
He fixed a place so they could not
fall off.
There they lived till they got big
enough to fly.
At the end of summer all the
swallows flew away.
In the autumn the mows were piled
high with hay. Then I could climb
up and look into the swallows' nests.
But they were empty.
Did you ever hunt for hens' eggs
in the hay-mows ? It is great fun.
Hens like to lay their eggs in
secret places.
78









GRANDPA HOWARD'S FARM.

When I saw a deep hole in a
corner of a hay-mow, I was always
quite sure there was a hen's nest in it.
I would lie down on the hay and
thrust my arm into the hole up to
my shoulder. Perhaps I would put
my hand right into a nest full of
warm eggs.
Sometimes I would touch the
soft, warm feathers of a hen. Then
I was sure to get a sharp peck.
Sometimes, but not very often, I
would find a nest full of chicks.
I remember one day when I was
playing in one of the barns, I heard
a shrill "peep, peep, peep!"
I listened. I knew there were
chickens somewhere ; but where
were they?
79









GRANDPA HOWARD'S FARM.

I searched all about. I finally
found them in a shed-loft.
There they were, ten downy little
chicks, deep down at the bottom of
a barrel.
The mother-hen had hatched them
there, but she could not get them
out of the barrel. They could not fly.
So she had gone and left them to
get something to eat.
While I was there, she came back
bristling and clucking.
Ned very soon put them into a
comfortable coop in the yard.
I do not know how many cows
grandpa Howard had, but he had
a great many.
Four of the men used to milk the
COWS.
80




















41-I










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MILK-ING TIME AT GRANDPA HOWARD'S.




























































































































































































r










GRANDPA HOWARD'S FARM.

Sometimes the men were very
busy planting or haying.
Then Betty and Maggie would
help milk.
The milk was made into butter
and cheese.
I used to like it best when grandma
made cheese.
I will tell you why.
The cheeses were pressed in great
presses.
Everyday they were turned.
There is always a nice "rim" to
cut off from each cheese every day
while they are in press.
I was very fond of that rim to
eat.
Once Ned had such a funny
adventure with a calf.
83










GRANDPA HOWARD'S FARM.

He was trying to teach the calf
to drink out of a bucket.
The bucket was full of nice
gruel.
But the calf was obstinate, He
would not put his mouth down to
the bucket.
Ned thought if he got on astride
the calf's back, he could force his
head down to the bucket more
easily.
So he got upon his back; he
pushed his head down to the bucket,
when up went the calf's hind legs,
and Ned was pitched head first into
the gruel.
Ned felt pretty cross, but I
laughed; I could not help it.
Grandpa Howard had stable where
84

















































PLOUGHING IN SPRING-TIME.












GRANDPA HOWARD'S FARM.

the horses were
kept.
There was an
old white horse
named Pomp.
He was very
old.
He did not do
any work.
Grandpa used -
to let me ride
on him when I THE SEED WAS S.
liked.
Pomp always did just as he
wanted to.
If he wanted to stop and eat
grass, I could not make him go.
Grandpa said I must never strike
him.
87










GRANDPA HOWARD'S FARM.

But I used to ride him all about
the farm.
I used to ride out into the fields
and watch the ploughing.
I think it is a pleasant sight to
see the big, strong oxen plough up
the hard ground.
Sometimes the whole flock of
hens would come out and follow the
plough.
They ate the worms and grubs
turned up by the plough.
Grandpa had a great many oxen.
They used to stand in the stalls
all down one side of the floor in one
of the big barns.
One pair of the oxen was a pretty
cream color.
They had beautiful eyes.
88










GRANDPA HOWARD S FARM.

All oxen have large, soft, beautiful
eyes.
Oxen are very gentle. I was
never afraid of them.
After some of the fields were
ploughed, they were harrowed.
When the earth was fine and
smooth, the seed was sown.









Y r





89

















UNCLE JACK'S MAY-BASKET.

I was two years old when uncle
Jack went to Europe.
He staid in Europe three years.
I remember the day he came
home.
I had been in the woods to pick
May-flowers. I brought home a
great bunch of lovely pink-and-
white blossoms.
Mamma was putting the May-
flowers in a vase.
The door opened; papa came in
with a gentleman.
90










UNCLE JACK'S MAY-BASKET.

The gentleman was very brown;
he had a long beard.
He wore a hat with a wide brim.
He was tall.
Mamma said, "0 Jack!" and
dropped the vase on the floor.
It broke into ever so many pieces.
But mamma did not mind.
She kissed the strange gentle-
man.
Then she put her head on his
shoulder and cried.
I thought it was very queer mam-
ma should cry because uncle Jack
had come home.
But papa said people often cried
when they were very, very glad.
I thought then I should never
want to be very glad.
91










UNCLE JACK'S MAY-BASKET.

"And this is Queen Mab ? said
uncle Jack, and he lifted me right
off the floor.
What pleasant brown eyes he
had!
Before he went to Europe he
used to call me Queen Mab be-
cause I was such a little thing.
Queen Mab is a fairy, and fairies
are always small.
"I am Nannie Howard Rich-
mond," I said.
Then uncle Jack laughed.
You are my dear little niece,"
he said, and kissed me.
It was April when uncle Jack
came home.
We always hung May-baskets in
Pinelands.
92









UNCLE JACK'S MAY-BASKET.

So when May came I told mam-
ma I wanted to hang uncle Jack a
May-basket.
Mamma said I might.
Mamma always helped me to
have good times.
I had a silver five-cent piece. It
was new and bright.
I went to the store myself to
buy the things for my May-basket.
I bought a sheet of pink paper
and a sheet of blue paper.
They cost two cents.
Then I bought one cent's worth
of peppermints.
Mr. Day kept his peppermints
in a square box.
One side of the box was glass,
to show the peppermints.
93









UNCLE JACK'S MAY-BASKET.

Almost all the peppermints were
white; but there were a few red
ones.
When we children bought a cent's
worth of peppermints, we always
hoped we should get one red one.
That day when Mr. Day took
out my peppermints there were two
red ones.
Then I bought a stick of cinna
mon candy. I had one cent left.
I looked around to see what I
could buy with it.
I saw a row of cunning sugar
pigs. They were pink, with yellow
stripes.
Oh, what dear little pigs I how
much are they?" I said.
"A cent apiece," said Mr. Day,
94









UNCLE JACK'S MAY-BASKET.

smiling. Hie picked out the very
prettiest one for me.
When I got home mamma said
I had spent my money very
well.
She helped me make my May.
basket.
I wonder how many of you little
folks ever made a May-basket.
Mamma cut the sheets of pink
and blue paper into strips.
She wove these strips in and
out till she made such a pretty
basket.
It was in blue and pink checks.
Then she turned down one side
of it.
The edges were plain.
She cut the lower edges into nar-
95









UNCLE JACK'S MAY-BASKET.

row strips, and then crimped them.
She did not crimp the two upper
edges.
Now, mamma," I said, I will
tell you what I wish you would
do.
I wish you would paint a pink
rose and a blue violet on one of
these plain edges."
Mamma could paint beautifully.
She painted the pink rose and
the blue violet.
Now on this other side, mamma,.
will you please write this verse:

"'The rose is pink,
The violet blue,
Sugar is sweet,
And so are you.'"
96













"6A.,--

































SALLY, BESS, AND 1. 97








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