• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Dedication
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 On the way
 Folkestone: Going on board
 Crossing the channel
 Boulogne: The buffet
 Boulogne: The hotel
 Boulogne: The quay
 Boulogne: The first morning in...
 Rouen: "Good-night"
 Rouen: Church of St. Ouen
 Rouen: Blind Pierre
 Rouen: Rue de l'Epicerie
 Rouen: The Creche
 Rouen: The schoolroom
 Rouen: School drill
 Caen: The arrival
 Caen: The hotel
 Caen: The hotel kitchen
 Caen: The washerwomen
 Caen: The knife-grinder
 Caen: Chocolate and milk
 Caen: The lacemakers
 En route: A railway crossing
 En route: A railway station
 Paris: The gardens of the Palais...
 Paris: On the boulevard
 Paris: The Tuileries Gardens
 Paris: Punch and Judy
 Paris: Musee de Cluny
 Paris: Staircase of Henry II
 Paris: The man in armour
 Paris: The "zoo"
 Paris: The pony tramway
 Paris: The swans
 Paris: A flower stall
 Paris: A day at Versailles
 Paris: La Fontaine des Innocen...
 Paris: The markets
 Paris: The Luxembourg Gardens
 Paris: The merry-go-round
 The night journey to Calais
 Calais: The water-gate
 Dover: Homeward bound
 "Bon retour"
 Back Cover






Title: Abroad
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00049821/00001
 Material Information
Title: Abroad
Physical Description: 56 p. : col. ill. ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Crane, Thomas Frederick, 1844-1927
Houghton, Ellen Elizabeth, 1853-1922 ( Illustrator )
Marcus Ward & Co
Publisher: Marcus Ward & Co.
Place of Publication: London ;
Belfast ;
New York
Publication Date: [1882]
 Subjects
Subject: Poetry of places -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Juvenile literature -- France   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1882   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1882   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1882
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
Northern Ireland -- Belfast
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Thos. Crane, Ellen E. Houghton.
General Note: Contains poetry and prose.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00049821
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002221881
notis - ALG2111
oclc - 14218104

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Half Title
        Page i
        Page ii
    Dedication
        Page iii
    Frontispiece
        Page iv
    Title Page
        Page v
        Page vi
    Table of Contents
        Page vii
    On the way
        Page 8
    Folkestone: Going on board
        Page 9
    Crossing the channel
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Boulogne: The buffet
        Page 12
    Boulogne: The hotel
        Page 13
    Boulogne: The quay
        Page 14
    Boulogne: The first morning in France
        Page 15
    Rouen: "Good-night"
        Page 16
    Rouen: Church of St. Ouen
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Rouen: Blind Pierre
        Page 19
    Rouen: Rue de l'Epicerie
        Page 20
    Rouen: The Creche
        Page 21
    Rouen: The schoolroom
        Page 22
    Rouen: School drill
        Page 23
    Caen: The arrival
        Page 24
    Caen: The hotel
        Page 25
    Caen: The hotel kitchen
        Page 26
    Caen: The washerwomen
        Page 27
    Caen: The knife-grinder
        Page 28
    Caen: Chocolate and milk
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Caen: The lacemakers
        Page 31
    En route: A railway crossing
        Page 32
    En route: A railway station
        Page 33
    Paris: The gardens of the Palais Royale
        Page 34
    Paris: On the boulevard
        Page 35
    Paris: The Tuileries Gardens
        Page 36
    Paris: Punch and Judy
        Page 37
    Paris: Musee de Cluny
        Page 38
    Paris: Staircase of Henry II
        Page 39
    Paris: The man in armour
        Page 40
    Paris: The "zoo"
        Page 41
    Paris: The pony tramway
        Page 42
    Paris: The swans
        Page 43
    Paris: A flower stall
        Page 44
    Paris: A day at Versailles
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Paris: La Fontaine des Innocents
        Page 47
        Page 48
    Paris: The markets
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Paris: The Luxembourg Gardens
        Page 51
    Paris: The merry-go-round
        Page 52
    The night journey to Calais
        Page 53
    Calais: The water-gate
        Page 54
    Dover: Homeward bound
        Page 55
    "Bon retour"
        Page 56
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
Full Text




















S "hos Crane

;llen-Houghton.a
'Thosran90
LONDONe.Xugto










































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The Baldwin Library

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!'Q. ABROAD






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BON VOYAGE


La, T \EAR DEAR FF.IEPJD, >., MET "AT HOr E,
AND NOW "ABROAD" WE MEAN TO ROAM:
WITH ALL WHO CHOOSE TO SPARE THE TIME
WE'LL WANDER TO A NEIGHBORING CLIME.
NOR NEED YOU LEAVE YOUR OWN FIRESIDE,
FOR WITH FAIR FANCY FOR OUR GUIDE,
SOUR WINGED THOUGHTS, IN SWALLOW-FLIGHT,
SHALL CROSS THE CHANNEL SMOOTH AND BRIGHT:
AND IN DESPITE OF WIND OR WEATHER,
WE'LL MAKE OUR LITTLE TOUR TOGETHER.

NOW ON OUR PICTURES YOU SHALL LOOK:-
TO YOU WE DEDICATE OUR BOOK. l











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BELFAST MARCUS *WARD & CO NEW-YORK
SLONDON








































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C C- N T E N TS
R 0 U EU F I C A E rl-

d ch Bon Voyage" ... ... 3 En Route-A Railway Crossing 32
LONDON: "Packing"-Frontispiece ,, A Railway Station 33
SThe Departure-Title-page PARIs: The Gardens of the
On the Way ... ... ... 8 Palais Royale ... 34
./ FOLKESTONE : Going on Board 9 ,, On the Boulevard ... 35
Crossing the Channel ... ... 10 ,, The Tuileries Gardens 36
S BOULOGNE: The Buffet ... 12 ,, Punch and Judy ... 37
The Hotel ... 13 ,, Muse de Cluny ... 38
The Quay .. 14 ,, Staircase of Henry II. 39
j ,, The First Morning ,, The Man in Armour 40
in France ... 5 ,, Th "Zoo" ... 41
ROUEN : "Good-night" ... 16 ,, The Pony Tramway... 42
Church of St. Ouen 17 The Swans ... ... 43
,, Blind Pierre ... 19 ,, A Flower Stall ... 44
S, Rue de l'Epicerie ... 20 ,, A Day at Versailles ... 45
The Creche ..... 21 La Fontaine des Inno-
isL L. ,n ,, The Schoolroom ... 22 cents ... ... 47 A L A LS
School Drill ... ... 23 The Markets ... ... 49
O O CAEN : The Arrival ... ... 24 ,, The Luxembourg Gar-
The Hotel ... ... 25 dens ... ... 51
The Hotel Kitchen ... 26 The Merry-go-round 52
The Washerwomen 27 The Night Journey to Calais 53
The Knife-grinder ... 28 CALAIS: The Water-Gate ... 54
Chocolate and Milk 29 Dn",,, H"mewar Pond "


THE \EI,-Lkb ARE BY V.RIh-L5 \\,.IIL,'


LO1NDON


51--























Y RE.ER, would, I on I kc to g to.?, '. or ii:t an hour or so,
\\ itth Itle Irjri.n. of .itl:r.nt .1ljc I.o)k at thin, in thfise pictured pag-es-
E-loth: Iri l l.- !.r ; la, ,rs , IJ r cin s. ee,-- i I. l IJ lIdrll ..1 Olic f.111111 '.
I hicr th ....r ,]j.',j hr c % in n-, 3n. d .o. I M iss E :rcI. their teacher kin ,.
hrt. c .r_ .Lco t. r N..Ii, r die,. and J cr c nr -ie h.s F.ath,:r trIed
FI his h d lr' iia ti,,- Spr n.. n ,-- ome tou,. or trc t, or pleaant thing.
I .mi, he. .i-. I. trr. "I pr,:. s,: c, f r Nd-Ie Diu nni. NIlabil, R'ose.
A trilp b,:,.ad- to :, t men to [' i.- s and thr,.u-h N,:rmn.ridy.
Sh n .Ill -I ':l imc,:d. -- C i lori .u, -- I ut -i.v not --kP.rtnI .-o I ith us -
".i R,[ r': ---"\\e c. n le te Ic u ,,m I t I on i .-.' ['h ].cr, tlther s.uJ Ile to, Shou[,]d conme.
Furn t.-, th! Fr,,nu-ptl ,.-n, -. th, -hildren packin._ bu-li,.
Ii. r.'.t p..i ,I._,, th-im in tI st.i r :t Cli.rin Cross ]hcir _reat cl.tion
I r tUi\ plairl. .-i n th.lir .,.c l .- eI rin._ -- "Tire', up,-Come, taike %our places


STi .1k,. ;ton': 1_ .prces -[, ul on like a dr,:tm.'n
A. ll- Itl,.rC. 1i 1L c.t\ i.. r lia:[ llmng up st-.w










T HE N at the Folkestone harbour, down they io Nellie, Miss Earle, and Bertie too appear,
SAcross the gangway to the boat below; Whilst Dennis, with the rugs, brings up the rear.
Mabel and Rose just crossing you can see, May looks behind her with an anxious air,
Each holding her new doll most carefully. Lest Father, at the last, should not be there.












































Watch with delight the busy scene around. Im glad the wind blows gently," whispers Rose.
The noisy steam-pipe blows and blows away,- And as the steamer swiftly leaves the quay,
"Now this is just the noise we like," they say. Mabel and Dennis almost d(lance with glee.
Ou cilrn nc o oadal af ;odsun. u wil tetumol od ndlodr ros
\Vatch: with deih the bu' scene arud mga idblw ety"wipr oe
The ~ : nosyseaPi lowsL and blw wy .. n ste stame swfl leaves teqa-

"G Now- A thi is juttenos e ike," theysay. Ma beL~ ~ l~ and In is alot(acewt le












CROSSING THE CHANNEL.



T HE sea is calm, and clear the sky--only a few clouds scudding by:
The Passengers look bright, and say, "Are we not lucky in the day:!"
The Mate stands in the wheelhouse there, and turns the wheel with watchful care
Steering to-day is work enough; what must it be when weather's rough ?
Look at him in his sheltered place-he hasn't got a merry face-
'Tis not such fun for him, you know, he goes so often to and fro.
Nellie and Father, looking back, glance at the vessel's lengthening track-
"How far," says Nellie, "we have come! good-bye, good-bye, dear English home!"
Dennis and Rose and Mabel, walking upon the deck, are gaily talking-
Says Mabel, "No one must forget to call my new doll 'Antoinette';
Travelling in France, wouldd be a shame for her to have an English name."
Says Dennis, Call her what you will, so you be English Mabel' still.
Says Rose, to Dennis drawing nigher, I think the wind is getting higher;"
" If a gale blows, do you suppose, we shall be wrecked ?" asks little Rose."






















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SHIE chatting with Dennis. Rose lost all her fear;
And the swift Aibert Victor came safe to the pier
At Boulogne, where they landed, and there was the train
InI waiting to take up tie travellers again.
But to travel so quickly was not their intent:
On a little refreshment our party was bent.
Here they are at the Buffet-for dinner they wait-
And the tall garcon, Andre, attends them in state.






BUFFET




























At a separate table sits Monsieur Legros,
And behind him his poodle, Fidele, you must know,
h\Vo c &n danc,. he', -, clever, and -land on his hea,4,
I u i b l I I r -,
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12









THEN to the Hotel on the quay they all went;
To remain till the morrow they all were content
After so much fatigue Father thought it was best,
For the children were weary and needed the rest.
Pictured here is the room in that very Ilotel,
Where so cosily rested Rose, Mabel, and Nell.






























Mabel dreamed of the morrow-of buying French toys:
Rose remembered the steam-pipe, and dreamed of its noise.
Nellie's dreams were of home, but she woke from her trance
Full of joy, just to think they were really in France.
Very early next morning, you see them all three
Looking out from their window that faces the sea.


13















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14
I-









THE FIRST MORNING IN FRANCE.



H ERE they see a pretty sight, After breakfast all went out
Sunny sky and landscape bright: To view the streets, and walk about
Fishing-boats move up and down, The ancient city-walls, so strong,
With their sails all red and brown. Where waved the English flag for long.

Some to land are drawing near, Toy shops too they went to see,
O'er the water still and clear, Spread with toys so temptingly:
Full of fish as they can be, Dolls of every kind were there,
Caught last night in open sea. With eyes that shut and real hair-

On the pavement down below, And, in a brightly-coloured row,
Fishwives hurry to and fro, Doll-fisherfolk like these below.
Calling out their fish to sell- Prices marked, as if to say,
" What a noisy lot," says Nell, "Come and buy us, quick, to-day :"

"What a clap-clap-clap-they make One for Mabel, one for Rose,
With their shoes each step they take. Two for Bertie I suppose,
Wooden shoes, I do declare, Father bought.-Then all once more
And oh! what funny caps they wear!" Set off travelling as before.


















'5












T 0 Rouen next they went, that very day, Dennis bought chocolate to make a feast-
And heard strange places called out by the way, They had three dinners in the train, at least.
Where bells kept tinkling while the train delayed : At Rouen here they are at last, though late-
At Amiens ten minutes quite they stayed. The bedroom clock there shows 'tis after eight !












































Mabel looks tired-she lies back in her chair Next morning, through the quaint old streets of Rouen
Beside the wood fire burning brightly there. They w ent to see the old church of Saint Ouen,
Rose says-" Good-night !"-to Bertie fast asleep, With eager feet, and chatting as they walked,
While her own eyes can scarcely open keep. About the ancient Town, together talked.



16




















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AID L)ennis, first,

lelor,,c d t.. ,s
In d ,, ,. ," .,
Sjiid Nellie, Here
1'rince iArhur i-,ett-



Here loan ,,I A.,-
\Wa., tried .ind JULrCd,
\ hlie,, tickle Il le
Ah.i.nst h,:r r, rned.
m.ud i.se, "' -h dear
In mi kes me ,,d
lu ln .; ,,JI.Jl r!.l ble
I'e.-ple r a..l
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N OW they have come into the entrance wide
Of great St. Ouen's Church ; see, side by side,
Dennis and Nellie going on before:
The others watch yon beggar at the door-
Poor blind Pierre; he always waits just so,
Listening for those who come and those who go.
He tells his beads, and hopes all day that some
May think of him, 'mongst those who chance to come.
Though he can't see, he is so quick to hear,
He knows a long, long time ere one draws near,
And shakes the coppers in his well-worn tin-
" Click, click," it goes-see, Bertie's gift drops in.
'Tis his one sou that Bertie gives away-
It might have bought him sweets this very day.
When through St. Ouen's Church they'd been at last,
Along its aisles and down its transept passed,
They went to the Cathedral, there to see
The tomb of Rolf, first Duke of Normandy.
But Mabel said, Why should we English care
About that Rolf they say was buried there?"
Then she ran on, not waiting for reply-
My little reader, can you tell her why ?







9 ...... .. .










ROUEN




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A n.l '11 ..ItI. In Il , d.
T h ,.-i h -tree,, % -.i, t .
,At le rl th rN. u t-e (

h o li.. m ..I ,i. .
N7, r kIqt ill d.,, lltrOLJ h,
AlIIu ,LJ t 141htl ,'Iia d T,_l1ed.
And all for one i, :i.













20
























































i I I ing, he can't find his spoon-some one will find it and coilo' r un ..



Sister F6licit6, sweetly sings she,
Up again, down again, BiKb, to me."



21




















T_ h nschool-room of the Carp-b is wide,
1 'le childrtr n sit thcr e, sid by s dcme,
A B11 Whille -Si.;ter" heari their lessons llirough ,
- E F G H And whenthsAnd, more thn m wrk ttht, cdo
jK IL Thy all get upu and he move h rn..






And aels th,. staildrhen stIj
MN P Now liand in hand, tranip, r.iml, they go,
Q R Q( T No%% N011 a line marchh tI.) and iro,
For wit]s the iastle in t er hand
i^ f Z H The *sl'tr^r" makukes them understand
Wi\\li 4 Cht k iljrcL it goes, click-clack, cli(ck-clack.
O:,n Sic'pian'i now turn vour eve-;,
,Whe's onl\ rue. but she's so Hjse-
'.!die knows ilir, alphabet all through,
And. more an than that, can teach it too.
ju\I nou% she nioves htr wand to )
Ands tells ther hildrvn Ahat to say




















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23











ARRIVAL AT CAEN.




HROUGH Rouen when our friends had been, "EXT up the staircase see them go,
And all its famous places seen, Withfemme de chambre the way to show.

They travelled on, old Caen to see, Father and Dennis, standing there,
Another town in Normandy. Are asking for the bill of fare.

Arrived at Caen, the travellers here Monsieur le Afaitre, who rubs his hands
Before the chief Hotel appear, And says, "What are Monsieur's commands?"
Miss Earle, Rose, Bertie you descry- With scrape and bow, again you see-
The rest are coming by-and-by. The most polite of men is he.

AMonsieur le Mlaitre, with scrape and bow,
Stands ready to receive them now,
Arnd Madane ,th her bl.ndejt air, --





























24










































i.~25










->MENU+
-- NOW that dinner is ordered, we 11 just take a peep
At the cooks in the kitchen-just see! what a heap
Of plates are provided, and copper pans too ;-
They'll soon make a dinner for me and for you.
SFrench cookery's famous for flavouring rare,
But of garlic 1 think thex 've enough and to spare.







































If we ask how their wonderful dishes are made,
I'm afraid the), won't tell us the tricks of the trade.
Do they make theni, I wonder, of frogs and of snails j
O(r are these after all. ouly travellers' tales?
The names are all doin on the Mlenu," no doubt,
But the worst of it is that we cant inmake them out.




26















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"[L 'HOMME qui passe," in France they call
The man who thrives 1THE
By grinding knives-
Who never stays at home at all, KNIFE-GRINDER

But always must be moving on.
He's glad to find OF CAEN.
Some knives to grind,
But when they're finished he'll be gone.

With dog behind to turn the wheel,
He grinds the knife
For farmer's wife,
And pauses now the edge to feel :

The dog behind him hears the sound
Of cheerful chat
On this and that,
And fears no knife is being ground.

The man makes jokes with careless smile,
"He doesn't mind
\ The dog behind,
But goes on talking all the while.










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TTLE Lili, whose age isn't three years quite, can get from her pretty white cow.
Went one day with Mamma for a long country walk, 1 EURE


















Keeping up, all the time, such a chatter and talkve chocolate, Lii averred.

Of the trehen Mamma said, Dear Lii, please don't be absurd
Soon she asked for some cake, and some chocolate too,have chocolate now




















You know we can't get it so far from the town.-
"But, Mamma,child," i li said, "if the Whisee-e cow gives milk,




















Then chocolate surely must come from the Bro cw."


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IN many a loa lv cttae in France
The bLoblins k,., thrca.dhn4 a in, d.n,:e
lih: lI'e da\ Ion-, Irom niorn,'c. i.) nrihr.
\\'ca'ng the lce so pretty and I.hlit.
How ;wi ltIv the nimti_ finger', tIk
he tdIreat on thl. lilk.w-not one j; nlss,..,I-
Eac:h I obbin would sicen t.-, r;- Irom ,;, [.i lC.'
To meet th.: lin:-rs thalit otrmll ille lac-.
How wonidrousl u,<.k the lj.,tr.rn slio.,
Fri.im th thrads, 3% unlcr *:',r e\.'- it e. row,
i'o% ,lU c=, ll o,:,w ri: I.:a ,.. -ln.I tt., r.
.A I1 under thie sil .f erh.-nter .,oier.
Lo..k 'it hi Nannett':-she c o, ,r .:x ely .:;.
\ct none i:an make Io\%cher laIi: th-li1 .:
And iher crandl-.: drhrr funic-pust c:..n %ir< ..L..
Is k arning alre di%1 tIe Lbobbins to h.,lJ.
withoutu t drat.ings t.,o oll.:,wi. or patterns tE trace,
Iflow c'n tIe-e p....'r cottger; t-',--r their lace
From the plant an,,I the I.,, cer an.I unf.,idin.: ern
And the fr't r.n the ipanrc their ..uttrns thl learu,---
.rom gossam,.r %eb bly th,:e piler ,....-
From Inatral t.laste and natural ove.
F4+,r ever form on f t[,:auty and ..ra(. .
"The1) ve hlernei, to fa1ld,.n tiher %,)nlirrrful LI.-.e.



































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32










SEN ROUTE

CLATTER clatter on they go,
Past stream and gentle valley,
Until the engine wheels turn slow,
And stop at length to dally

For dinner-time full half-an-hour Spread in the d ...... 1 I : I
SWithin a crowded station, And then, whl.n thiLat o- u j,
While hungry little mouths devour The children sally in a band, 4
The tempting cold collation With appetites diminished,

To look at all the folk they meet,- And all the other folk that make The engine puffs-away they fly,
The porters in blue blouses, A crowd in France amusing :- And soon leave all behind them;
The white-robed priests, the nuns so neat, Till hark! their places all must take, Now turn the page, and you and I
The farmers and their spouses, Without a minute losing. In Paris safe will find them.








































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PARIS, gay Paris so bright and so fair,
Your sun is all smiles, and there's mirth in your air.


The children, though tired with their travelling, found
That the first night in Paris one's sleep is not sound,
For the hum of the streets makes one dream all the night
Of the wonderful sights that will come with the light.
The morning was fine, and-breakfast despatched-
They soon made their way to the Gardens attached
To the old Royal Palace, and there met a throng
Of French children, and joined in their games before long.
One boy lent his hoop, and gave Bertie a bun,
And-talking quite fast-seemed to think it great fun
With nice English girls like our Nellie to play,
Though not understanding a word she might say.
On leaving the Gardens, the party were seated
Outside of a cafl, and there Papa treated
Them all to fine ices and chocolate too;
They could hardly tell which was the nicer-could you?


"ris. ,.k Par,,

'l tiur sun i, ;11 5 ile:
-" And there nmirth Ji, .oJ air '









J Y















35










IN THE TUILERIES GARDENS.


SN the Tuileries gardens, each afternoon,
A little old man comes walking along :

Now watch what happens! for just as soon
As they see him, the birds begin their song,
And flutter about his hands and head,
And perch on his shoulder luite at their ease,
For he fills his pockets with crumbs of bread
To feed his friends who live in the trees,
And well they know he loves them so
That into his pockets they sometimes go.


But hark to what's going on over there
'Tis surely a Punch-and-Judy man,

Making old Judy, I do declare,
Talk French as fast as ever she can!
And I think, from the looks of poor Mr. P.,
He's getting it hot from his scolding wife;
But just wait a minute, and then you'll see
He'll beat her within an inch of her life.
Walk in! take a seat and you'll see her beat,
nA il i pehr 1 1 il 1", -r tl i ,t

















36


























P IM 5A ll




PRXE
~-- ,"~ ~Ls~Oi~ nT~-~~'~- ~ es~nLP~PLACESI~





















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I HERE shall we go to next? they still would say,
And still they found new pleasures every day.
At times Miss Earle took Bertie for a ride,
With little Rose and Mabel side by side;
And then their father took the elder two
To see the picture galleries, and view
Historic buildings, where they sometimes rested,
And many a bit of history was suggested.
They saw a wedding at the Madeleine,
Then went to Notre Dame," close by the Seine,
And climbed the lofty tower, to see the view
Which cannot be surpassed.the whole world through.
One day their father took them all to see
A great museum, full as full could be
Of rare old furniture, of every kind
The artists of the "Middle Age" designed;-
And precious things in silver and in gold,
Made by the best artificers of old.
Now while another way the party's eyes
Are turned, "King Henry's Staircase Bertie spies,
And climbing up, with help from sister May,
He calls to Dennis, when he gets half-way,
"Come catrh me ,luicrk!"-and fthen runs rff, with peals
(.)Ol mer !iu htcr.-i )ennis at Ii he kl.












38















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SNOW-lg


39










ERTIE was first. "I've won the race." he cried:
B ult :))n tip.in 11,h liIj 1heK Irurr-ljl .l ,&,i,
,\nd l',rtie [.:L.k to ,.ar I, licnrinis rar -
"-'"h D enni., lo., 1 r-i ,;.r -1,,Z th -.t 1i- nl 1
H e I ..hok and ritrl -d m.). 'I I 1 l it 2 ,
\n, ;gate ne s li Ir- ht' Po,:, I D .-n1 s 4., J.
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-...)., ,_-- ,e, I L 1 .I ,-I ,, ,.r, I -iz I i .[ u n o w .








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S, l .I ', : imi bn, t. t ,,, ,.i w ,1,, t
JARDINdACCLIMATATION L. ,, ,. .,, .,,i ...,, .. ,,, ,
50 CENTIMES :.
I C1ESENTER CE RILLET A TOUTE f, T ..... -., A .I .r I
RtQUISITION --
n VALABLEpourleJodr meme < ''''i '" ..I .. p.rI.ii. '- I .. :':':




























"Is as happy an elephant as could be : me V TRAM WAY SLLOT Q
" I've a capital house, quite large and airy,"















So away to America CENTIMESumbo went,
4' PORE
"Oh, where isthe oo'that wu buitw e?"eETM









A STEADY steed is Mumbo, if just a trifle slow;
Upon her back you couldn't well a-steeple-chasing go:
But other opportunities there are to have a ride,
For there's a stud of ponies, and a camel to bestride-
A cart that's. drawn by oxen can accommodate a few,






























And if such queer conveyances don't please you at the Zoo',
There are little tramway cars too, with seats on either side,
Which will take you through the gardens, and through the Bois beside:-
Take the ticket on the other page, and with it you may go
From the lake within the garden to the gate that's called MAaillot.


42

























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A FLOWER STALL ON

THE BOULEVARDS

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A DAY AT VERSAILLES.

AT Versailles, as perhaps you have heard,
Countless pictures of fights
Form the chief of the sights:
Could so many great battles have ever occurred?




























No wonder our children the gardens preferred :-
For the fountains were really so pretty a sight,
That Bertie declared-and I think he was right-
It was better to play
Like the fountains all day,
Than such terrible battles to fight.


45














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LA
FOUNTAIN E
DES INNOCENTS


OUND this pretty fountain here
Sparrows gather all the year;
In its sparkling waters dip,
From its basin freely sip,
Round about their fountain play,
Safe and happy all the day:-
Little "innocents are they.
That is Antoine, bread in hand:
See him by his mother stand:
Saucy little birdies spy
Antoine's bread, and at it fly,
Trying each to get a share, A 0
Frightening little Antoine there.
Antoine does not orisz to share,
.Thinks the bread is all his right,
Sust to suit his appetite.
SMother says, '"Be kind, my son,
POThere is more when this is done; O I
Bread enough for thee at home:-
Let the pretty sparrows come;
Give them each a little crumb."

Here our little family
Near the fountain too, we see,
Walking through the open space
To the covered market-place.










47




























11






N%

48


















HERE from morning till night they are selling and buying,
And from morning till night their market wares crying:

All around you will find there is food of each kind;
There are flesh, fowl, and fish here for every dish.
The fish-market you see on the opposite page:
On this stall that is nearest, the shell-fish appear;
But were I to begin, it would take me an age
To tell you the names of the fish you find here.
See! there's puss looking out for what she can get,
And that little boy who is laughing is Paul,-
The girl with the lobster is sister Lisette,
And he's watching to see if it nips her at all.
Madame Blaise, there, tells Nellie her mussels are good,
But Nellie smiles sweetly and goes on her way,
And I venture to doubt if she quite understood
All the funny French things Madame Blaise had to say.
Other parts of the market contain butcher's meat,
And poultry, and fruit, and salads, and greens,
And here, if you want them, quite young, fresh and sweet,
Are the haricots verts which we know as "French beans."

For, from morning till night here they're selling and buying,
And from morning till night their market wares crying.











49























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5 i







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ROSE and Bertie have a ride; IN THE
Mabel, walking at their side,
Carries both the dolls, and so LUXEMBOURG GARDENS.
By the Luxembourg they go.

Over in that Palace soon- Hear that woman, Who will buy
For the clock is marking noon- Windmill, ball, or butterfly "-
The Senate will together come Josephine and Phillipe, see,
(Like our House of Lords at home). Eager as they both can be.

Charles before her, silent stands,
With no money in his hands,
No more sous-he spent them all
"On that big inflated ball.

S 1 Be content, my little friend,
Money spent you cannot spend;
SWith your good St. Bernard play,
- *,- Buy more toys another day.

















i












51










H ERE all the day long, Who will come for a ride ?
Are race-horses for hire, Horses, lions, all ready !
O That never go wrong. Bear or tiger astride,
And besides, never tire. You shall sit safe and steady.
Here all the day long, Who will come for a ride ?
Are race-horses for hire. Lions, horses, all ready!


















!


















Round and round the) canter slow-soon the) fast and faster go;
Look at Louis, all in white, Gaspard, almost out of sight,
Rose and Mabel side by side ;-Bertie watching while they ride. C
Dennis waits till they have done,--much too big to join the fun ;
Brother Paul, with serious air, minds his little sister Claire, LYSEI
Thinking if he had a sou, she should have some pleasure too.



52










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PORTE DE LA MER, CALAIS.
T HE last place where they stopped abroad was Calais, which, you know,
Belonged to England once-though that was many a year ago:
It has a beautiful old Tower, all weatherworn and brown,
And here's the Sea-Gate, opening from the i. ," that guard the town.
But now Farewell to Merry France the vessel ready waits
To take our party back again across the Dover Straits.











I i



























54









H O M E \V A R I )U (0 N D.
I L IKRAH I we're afloat, and away speeds the boat as fast as its paddles can go,
With the wind on its back, and a broad foaming track behind it, as white as the snow.
On board, every eye is strained to descry the while cliffs of our own native land,
And brightly they gleam, as onward we steam, till at length they are close at hand.
The sun shines with glee on the rippling sea, and the pennant strung high on the mast,
But at length it sinks down behind the grey town, and tells us the day is nigh past.
See, there is the port, and near it a fort, and the strong old Castle of Dover-
We 're close to the shore-just five minutes more, and the Channel Crossing is over.
Then all safe and sound upon English ground, we bid farewell to the sea-
Jump into the train, and start off again as fast as the engine can flee.
We run up to town, and thence travel down to the home in the country, at night;
Then. I'm sorry to say, dear Nellie and May. Rose, Dennis, and Bertie bright,
We must leave in their home till next holidays come, when. let al1 of us hope, it may chance
That our trip will, next 'Si.r;... be as pleasant a thing as our : .:' ii.' over to France.
















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SBON F -ETOU .

NOW THAT AT LAST WE'RE SAFELY BACK AGAIN.
AND AS UPON THE RAILWAY BRIDGE THE TRAIN
IS STAYED SOME MOMENTS, LET US SAY GOOD-BYE,
,' AND ASK IF YOU'VE ENJOYED THE TRIP, AND TRY
TO THINK THAT SOON AGAIN WE'RE SURE TO MEET,
"ON COUNTRY ROAD OR IN THE CROWDED STREET,
j IAND ERE WE PART, STILL LINGER FOR A WHILE,
"VIEWING THIS TRANQUIL SCENE WITH PENSIVE SMILE,--
;1 THE EVENING GLOW, THE RIVER'S FALLING TIDE,
SAINT PAUL'S FAMILIAR DOME AND LONDON'S PRIDE.














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