Rhymes and pictures

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Rhymes and pictures
Physical Description:
6 v. in 1 : ill. (some col.) ; 14 x 20 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Newman, William ( Illustrator )
Griffith and Farran ( Publisher )
Publisher:
Griffith & Farran
Place of Publication:
London
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Sugar -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Bread -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Cotton -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Tea -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Coal -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Sovereign (Coin) -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1862   ( lcsh )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1862   ( local )
Bldn -- 1862
Genre:
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London

Notes

General Note:
Spine title.
General Note:
In verse.
General Note:
Some illustrations are hand-colored and all pages printed on one side of leaf only.
General Note:
Has been attributed to William Newman, the illustrator.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002226932
notis - ALG7228
oclc - 62331785
System ID:
UF00049593:00001


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Full Text






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THE LAND OF THE SUGAR CANE.

In the West Indies, where the Sun The earliest step is shown below,
With Tropic iervour he-ts the ground, Frc men begin the land to plough;
The SUGAR CANE is chiefly grown They burn the stubble, here i... i Trash,"
(Though 'tis in other regions found) And spread upon the soil its ash.












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PLANTING THE SUGAR CANE.


Now negroes open up" the ground,
And plant the Cane in square-shaped holes;
Meanwhile the Planter walks around
W ith eagle i:.:, and all controls. -
1 he Hocing, Watering, must -
ensue,
I i ,e the Cane crop .
thrive an d grow.-


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CUTTING DOWN THE CANES.


T he C ane 1I 1.... .: i ''. '.' r..I. i.
T o cut ;r .. .. . . i I, I ,. ,'I
A ll hands Ie ,, :1. . rl -: ,
A cart t; .. I 1 .. I 1 . .'. ' -.
It now is '. rl i II ..'i
W ho's cli. I.1. i_ ,. '' i-i L
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THE SUGAR MILL.

The cr,)p has reached the Sugar : iil,
Whose iron limbs, with miglhtv strain,
Receive and press the stalk, until
The juice has left each i rr. ...i Cane
The sap, then free, runs off- apace
In troughs towards the h>;iling-place.







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THE BOILING-HOUSE.

SThis is the Ro iiil ir- ci f- iirf e-ill
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COOLING THE SUGAR. 7
The Coolers next perform their share;
For as the Sugar in them lies,
Exposed to currents of fresh air,
It soon begins to crystallize.
'Tis then removed, as we shall see,
Tlo what is called the Purgery.'




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THE PURGERY. 8



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..- .i i. *I' .ie oon arc e filled
~ !. I ." ~Downward flows,
1 l u i I ',- "i ', ',,uL t' classes juice,
-And leaves the Su .ir iit fr use.
And leaves the Sug~ar hit for use.







SHIPPING AND LANDING THE SUGAR. 9

Yes, fit for use. But far away
The Sugar has to travel now.
See, negroes draw it on a dray
"To port; and soon the vessel's prow
Dips with its weight. Fair winds betide,
And waft it to our own quay's side.








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OPENING THE HOGSHEADS OF MOIST SUGAR.
Safe on our shores ; the Sugar still
Is only Raw," or unrefined:
This is called Moist." The Baker's skill,
With fire and various aids combined,
Makes of it "Lump "-crisp, crystal whire,
Sweet to the taste, and fair to sight.










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REFINING THE SUGAR. I
How Sugar, when refined, is cool'd
In moulds of the familiar shape,
k L .... 1 ..... So having pass'd
I ... i ril, pinch, and scrape,
S K ,,. .. ed for sale
S and retail.













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THE GROCER'S SHOP. 12

The Grocer's shop's a human hive, "
Of honeyed goods from many a V C -'
land;
A part the grocer eats, to live;
The rest he shares with liberJl il .. 1
hand. '
The POUND or SUGAR tarries here,
And aitss your purchase, Reader, I
dear.
--'





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THE BARREN FIELD.


This is the Field full of stones and weeds,
That constant care and culture needs,
Ere it-becomes a fruitful field,
Enough of goodly corn to yield
1'o ii.ik t Qu.irt,:rn Loaf h._ k- -












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PLOUGHING THE LAND. 2


These are the Horses, the Men and the Plough,
Who are.just beginning, in earnest now,-
To till the field at early morn,
So that it may receive the corn
To make the Quartern Loaf with.

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SOWING. 3


This is the Sower, with outstretch'd hand,

Casting the seed upon the land,
Whence it will spring with its blade so green,
'-= ; -


SAnd then in golden guise be seen,

STo make the Quartern Loaf with.














- ..






4 THE FARMER.

This is the Farmer, come forth to see
What kind of a crop it bids fair to be;
And he smiles, and he nods, and he seems to say,
There'll be plenty of corn on a future day,
To make the Quartern Lnaf with.









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REAPING. 5



These are the Reapers, so nimble and blithe,
Cutting the corn with the hook or scythe,
Which falls as thick as the autumn leaves,
SAnd then is gathered and bound in sheaves,
To make the Quartern Loaf with.

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THRESHING. 6



This i; the B.irn where the Thr.sher; .pp-.-r,

Be.,Etirn th .- traw for the 2 rner'd eir,

\ iddin th ir fl %iI th a heartnv 2 ,d..,xl,

To get gr.in crn.u ih t- ,cnd t, the i ,i"11,
Andi nranke the Qiarterrn L.- if wirl,.



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7 THE CORN GOING TO THE MILL.

- - - - -
This is the Wagon that bears the load
"Of corn upon the turnpike road;
Straight from the barn to the mill it goes,








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THE WIND-MILL. 8


This is the Mill, with its ceaseless song
Of click-e-ty, clack-e-ty, all day long;
Andt] I, [ifl ,d tirrs i i i l ,n'i} l pa I \\'-t!-
.,Ill11 the ci :.rll er ch:n', ged t.. t .. ur,
if, ,,/
T., mik he (oQu rt,:i ii Lt .








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THE RAILWAY TRAIN. 9


This is the flying Railway Train
Hasting away with might and main;
For the flour has been sold to a London man,
Who wants it for baking as soon as he can,
To make the Quartern Loaf with. - -






10 MAKING THE BREAD.


This is the Baker, who's kneading the dough,
A thing that is wanting we very well know,
For by it the weight and the size are increased
So he mixes the flour, the water, and yeast,
T- in Ike the )Qu rtcirn IT i Ith.













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THE BAKER'S SHOP. II



II
dii- This is the Baker's Shop in town,
W.'ith stacks of bread, both white and
brown
The Quartern Loafat length is made,
And firms an article of trade.

S Long may our fields the grain pro-
duce,
I m And science e'er improve their use.
Nlav Farmer, Miller, Baker still
Rewarded be fir toil and skill
By harvests plentiful, not scant,
And ineer the ingredients want
.o make the Quartern Loaf
. ...... .. .. w ith.



























Qc;-FF TH.I RRAN CtSA INT rAU L'S Ca.YDus






THE COTTON PLANT.






In many lands the COTTON
grows
With tropic heat and
fav'ring soil;
But where the Mississippi
flows, &0
It best repays the Planter's
-. ----_J _- _
Soil.
Here let us wander for a
space,
The Cotton growth to watch
and trace.







PLANTING THE COTTON. 3

The teeming land, first by the plough
Is furrow'd out in ridges wide,
Then Negro hands with nimble hoe
Dig holes, with seed to be supplied.
Cotton Planting, thus begun,
Soon prospers neathh the genial sun.





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HOEING THE COTTON.



Within a week the seedlings show
Their sprouting heads above the ground,
Then carefully the tillers go,

SWith nicely balanced hoe around,
S iAnd thin the rising plants. The best






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PICKING THE COTTON. 5


The Cotton Harvest-day has come,
The plants have grown, the yield is good,
Now haste all hands to get it home,
Ere accident from worm or flond.
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F,-.r uhich ., iri-ii a*,rki \ait. '-- .. .. ". '





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CARTING THE COTTON.

The Cotton Fibre, placed in sacks,
Is carted off the field with speed,
Dressing and Ginning still it lacks,
From seeds and trash it must be freed.
So to the Gin-house haste along,
The darkey Hands with dance and song.







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THE GIN-HOUSE. 7

See, here the Gin-house ; where the hum
Of tongues and wheels, incessant wakes
The Village echoes. Hither come
The carts, piled high with Cotton Sacks.
Now hasten, lads," and work with glee,
"The Cotton's wanted over sea.







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WHIPPING THE COTTON.








But, cre the "Gin" is used,
they take
The Cotton to the Whipping Ar
Press, M. P
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Through which 'ti roughly 110g,
turned to make
The labour of the Gin-Room
less.

Now pass we on to where
the Gin" i
Is used to work the Fibre -
clean.







GINNING THE COTTON. 9





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And what's a Cotton Gin," i i,
som e folks II:,.'', "_

May justly ask. Well, here -_ ._ ,1' -''i, ',
we seez -- I
It is a thing of wheels and
spokes, l ..1
And spikes, revolving trans-
versely.
Which tear the Cotton i
A
through and through,
Leaving it clean and fair
to view.

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PACKING THE COTTON.

The Cotton staple fit for use,
Is here by skilful Negroes packed
In hempen Bags. What once was loose
And light, becomes as stone compact.
Then weighed and labelled r :-t we see,
It takes its place on the Le\ jc."











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THE LEVEE.


The Levee is a wharf or bank,
Thrown up along the river's side,
Here Cotton Bales in many a rank,
Await the ebbing of the tide.
On "Foreign Orders" ere they float
Sea-ward upon ihe Georgia" boat.






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THE MISSISSIPPI BOAT. 12


" Hey, for the Seas and foreign skies,
The boat is here, the Bales aboard;
Now fav'ring breezes waft the prize,
Where it may work and food afford
To willing labourers of our Isle, -I
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"___Ti_ LONDON. GRIFFITH & FARRAN.
SUCCEISSOIS TO NEWBERY AND IIARRIS, CORINE (OF ST. I'AUL'S CIIUICIIlYARI).







THE TEA PLANTATION.





A TA i PI.llnt.rti.'i i. here seen,
*- pLt.h s. .I l.p hill-side clim b,
In -tr.gl' ing tuitlrt of evergreen.

._-cc, pli
,"' -_-L. '' -. ~" . \ .t i.1 you will plainly


Dc' plcs t [It r.igin of Tea.



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CULTURE OF THE TEA.


The Culture now demands great care,
"Or else the plant will ne'er succeed;
Manuring, watering, sun, and air,
And rooting out each rankling weed.
Then perchance two plants out of three
Will reach maturity as Tea.


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GATHERING THE TEA. 3



See here the gathering of the Tea,
When gloved hands only touch the stalk;
The Gatherers clear, ili I.I iiOth1. .iit-e frL tI I-
From soil-nor mti, th111C. n.111 ,r t.ilk. -.
For nought so dainty can there '
bhe
As is the fragile plant of Tea.





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DRYING THE TEA.


"Next comes the drying, this is
S. .done,

fire,



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And sometimes in the noon-day sun,
As time and quality require.
This may seem strange to you and me, i ii .
But 'tis performed in making Tea.






ROASTING AND ROLLING THE TEA.


Roasting and rolling now appear, -
Some o'er their hands the hl. r 1,. t. I r, --i -- .


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R-1 rih- m iu'tl thiv carp and mr.



'Tea.
=- -Tea.






SORTING THE TEA. 6


The sorting then by practised hands
Is next proceeded with-and mark
Great care this picking craft commands,
Rough leaves from smooth, and light from
dark.










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BUYING THE TEA. 7

The great Tea Merchant now behold,
Who comes to purchase what is made;
And with his store of notes and gold,
Determines he will drive a trade.
And few men richer are than
She,
Who largely traffics thus in
Tea.


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MIXING THE TEA.

Now to the Merchant's house is brought,
The Tea which they proceed to mix
With baser kinds-for trade is fraught,
Alas! with such dishonest tricks.
From these disguises nought is free,
What can we then expect of Tea.




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CARRYING THE TEA. 9


The Ilriiou ctkhlF they clselv pick,




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CHINESE BOAT WITH TEA. 10


Now, by the water's edge, each Chest
Is ready to start o'er the main,
And soon will find a place of rest,
In England, Ireland, France or Spain.
For 'tis a rover wild and free,
This universal plant called Tea.





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A FAMILY CUP OF TEA. I

Hurrah! at length we see it here,
Upon our own Tea Table placed;
And soon our spirits it will cheer,
From out the Urn that it has graced.
1-- i Y '

-- Let each and all then
-- " grateful be
And hail a welcome
"guest in Tea.



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GBRIFFITH AND FARRAN, Successors to Newbery and HIirris, Corner of St. Paul's Churchyard.







NEWCASTLE.


This is Newcastle, a town in the North,
From whose dusky confines our fuel comes forth:
Other places there are, which they Coal Districts" call,
| But Canny Newcastle is chief of them all.



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THE PIT'S MOUTH.


This in Newcastle, is called the
Pit's Mouth,
S'' \Vitll it. L' i1.:- .1ni shingless,
'i n...li, .i t, w\, [ iiJ south,
i -- '- ." h thl t th:- M iners

--d- / C...l-b i.L-ct ceaselessly
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PITMEN AT REST. 3


-- These are some Miners in broad open day,
: Iii i liu..h ih.. 'ie allowed but a short time to stay;
.I r .....n tl.- 'II be hid from the sun and the light,
S ,. 1- .ul *r i, Jdarkness from morning till night.







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THE PITMAN AT WORK. 4


1 al Pin.mn who with his staunch pick,
- .- I-I n-, ,t thb, black Coal, be it ever so thick;
.- .\,,Ad.\;l .vhen at this work he has long

enoughh plied,
1? I'ls the big basket that stands by
Shis side.
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THE PIT'S SHAFT. 5


This is the Pit's Shaft, aiid '"ii hcre \..li d, ;cr ,
A basket of Coals being Itl ,..- I1i.J h- ;
On the tramway beneath othcr I .it ,r -
seen,
Awaiting their turn to be hl;, i-i",
I ween.



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LOADING THE COLLIER. 6

Now the Coal is brought forth from the Mine, here to be
ii
Conveyed on small waggons right down to the sea,
A ,lr..p ", r l,- I -..l *i ]1,. i.lI l >,i.:t l p 1,
T !,, C .., ir.m .h -- n t th1 0 .

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THE SHIP ON ITS WAY. 7




Here is the ship laden full, on its way,
Dancing along, mid the waves and the spray,
., And the very Coals seem as tho' shouting
with l]eIe,
"--. .' h .. I'r ...ii ..,r dungeon we
I I. ji. .. rc -et free."




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THE COAL-WHIPPERS. 8





.' P ,In London the vessel at length has
/ 'arrived,
SAnd into her hold the Coalwhippers
I- I have dived;
A- -They 'll soon make a clearance of
all they can find
And leave the ship empty, a sport to
-- the wind.


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UNLOADING THE BARGE.

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A I id 4t L.- ,:r Il,,' Vi htli tl-n: l,,.,d o.n th,:ir b.Lck ,. r *' !



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THE COAL-WAGGON. IT


And now in the Waggon we see the sacks ride,
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I' ' Behind two stout horses, their rich owners' pride;
.1 Slow and sure is their maxim, as onward they go
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THE COAL-CELLAR. I
I I
1i At length they arrive at their long des-

I, [I'', : I t. i r I' :;,.
Si tined spot,
i | .. And without loss of time in the Cellar are
shot;
SSee John with the Coal Scuttle near dare
Si' not go
..* -?, While the man gives a pitch and then
bellows "Below!"
''., !i Soon, soon, in the grate will that Coal
i ', i .make a blaze,
"'' i" The comfort and joy of the bitter cold
S days;
I' And when round the fire you in winter
.3 time sit,
Let your thoughts travel back to the New-
i,..'~'I castle Pit.

i -. i, ,',FINIS.











T iiAE H, I TO 'Y OF A--


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GOLD FINDING. 2

Amid Australia's fertile hills,
Or on the Californian shore,
The Miner bold, his pocket fills
SWith morsels of the precious ore,
V, which washed from soil resplendent shine
"N, ;:gets-or lumps-or gold dust fine.








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THE MONSTER NUGGET.












The Gold obtained, the miners no .
-,,\ -: i s..:;.



Must overland and sea convey , ,
The costly load. Our pictures shew '' ,' T. _
A "monster" nugget, and the way .
Its lucky finders send it down L ~
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To its next stage a sea-port town. "-;-- -1 -
r- 7 --
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THE GOLD AT THE BANK.

See at the Bank the Gold arrives
Where 'tis deposited; the whole
To test and weigh; then each receives
Its worth in coin, a shining pile.
Now leave obtained, we take our way
To th' office known as the Assay.









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ASSAY MELTING.










Ere the Gold-finder has his meed il

In coins, the assayer first must fuse 'iI'i*

The ore in pots. Thus it is freed

From dross; then into moulds called .
,----- ,' .T 2--j J i- i















Erhey cast the Gold-fild, then careful weigh I

Each bar, its proper worth to pay.us 'I. II

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WEIGHING THE GOLD.

See, where in well adjusted scale,
By glass secured from passing breeze,
The assayers sit the weight to tell,
And worth of each deposit. These
Well ascertained, the value paid,
The Gold may into coins be made.



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GRANULATING THE GOLD.








-14
. .- _-

More melting and refining still
The Gold must have ere it is pure,
A tank with water then they fill, i
And into this the metal pour ,"1'
While it is in a molten state, i' 1i l'
And thus the Gold they granulate. .''' '
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PURE OR STANDARD GOLD. 8

One more refining work. The grain
Which now exactly looks like snuff,
Is placed in jars of porcelain,
And mixed with acid just enough
To part or separate the ore
From dross, and leave it standard pure.

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GOLD 'Ciii,'_-,.. :-.." 9

The grained Gold is pressed in cakes, A cheese or two from out his hoard,
Called cheeses," and in vaults is stored; Again remelts and casts in mould
Then, as he needs, the coiner takes As ingots which must next be rolled.


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THE ROLLING MILL o0









Here is the new made rolling mill, I

By skilful hands designed to press,

The golden ingots with a will, ,l,

And nicely balanced force and stress, "-

Between its cylinders of strength

To strips of proper breadth and length. l, ,. ,11


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CUTTING THE GOLD. i


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Here workmen sit and cut the Gold, 1 Il J I i'
In pieces of the proper size, !

For various coins as they are told; A i Ii

No waste 's allowed as you'll surmise, .

And watchmen stand on guard all day, ;
Lest pilferers steal the bits away. -






COINING THE GOLDEN SOVEREIGN.

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Here is the coining-press, and see _

The coiners sit and work with glee,

As well they may and pleasure take

Since Golden Sovereigns they make.

May WE have ever some to spend, Y1

And some to Srve or help a friend. -- I





FINIS.


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