A Book for every little Jack and Gill

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Material Information

Title:
A Book for every little Jack and Gill
Uncontrolled:
Book for every Jack and Gill
Physical Description:
46 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Dodd, Mead & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher:
Dodd, Mead & Co.
Place of Publication:
New York
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1879   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1879
Genre:
Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

General Note:
Cover title: A book for every Jack and Gill.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001593636
oclc - 10970170
notis - AHL7694
System ID:
UF00049589:00001


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A BOOK


FOR


EER Y LITTLE



JACK A ND GILL.





ILLUSTRA TED.





NEW YORK:
DODD, MEAD & COMPANY
PUBLISHERS.
















































Copyright r879, by DODD, MEAD & COMPANY.



















The east-ern sky is bright-
en-ing,
The night is al-most done,
And the mer-ry birds, a-wak-
ing,
Flut-ter to greet the sun.

But a-sleep lies lit-tle Gold-
locks,
Hard-ly a-live she seems;
Her sweet breath com-ing
gen-tly,
A-way in the land of
dreams.

In dream-land did I say? Not so. Up starts her
cur-ly pate:
Nurse, bring my things and dress my quick; I are
so wer-ry late."





8 f1HE TEA-PARTY.



THE TEA-PARTY.
Puss," said Rose, as she knelt in front of the fire one
bright morn-ing to give her pet a cup of milk for her
break-fast, "I have a plan. Would you like to know what
it is?"











Puss did not even look up, but went on lap-ping the
milk.
"Nev-er mind," said Rose, "if you don't want to hear
it you needn't. I'll go and tell Kate."
Kate was her sis-ter; and when Rose told her the plan,
she said that it was splen-did. Hand in hand they set
out to find mam-ma to ask her if they might car-ry it out.
And what was the plan? It was to ask four of their
lit-tie friends to take tea with them. Mam-ma said Yes
at once; so they ran up-stairs to put on their hats and
gloves, for it was quite a walk to where Tom and Lou
lived.





THE TEA-PARTY. 9

"Shall I take Le-on-o-ra?" said Rose, pick-ing up an
old doll.
"The ch;ld should be in bed," said Kate. Her
throat was ve-r} sore last night, and it will not be at all
safe for her to go out."
"Well," said Rose, lay-ing her down slow-ly, "I on-ly
thought that the fresh air might do her good; but no
doubt you are right."



11











The two lit -tle girls now set out. It was a bright June
day; the grass was green, and the breeze was rust-ling the
leaves on the trees. They stopped for some time at the
foot of a great oak. High up on one of the limbs they
could see a nest. As they stood still to look at it, the
moth-er bird came with a straw-ber-ry in her mouth.
j-1"I







The two lit-tle girls now set out. It was a bright June
day; the grass was green, and the breeze was rust-ling the
leaves on the trees. They stopped for some time at the
foot of a great oak. High up on one of the limbs they
could see a nest. As they stood still to look at it, the
moth-er bird came with a straw-ber-ry in her mouth,
She stood on the edge of the nest, and they could hear
the faint chirp of the ba-by birds as they ate it. Then





10 THE TEA-PARTY.

she flew a-way for more and they went on. Soon they
were at the house where
STom and Lou lived.
"The maid who o-pened
the door said that the
chil-dren were in the
nur- se ry. Up went
Kate and Rose to find
them and give the in-vi-
ta-tion to tea. As they
were com-ing down-stairs
a-gain they met Tom's
pa-pa, who smiled and
kissed them both.
"Now we must ask Bell and Bess," said Rose. And
they stopped at an-oth-er house ',
close by. As they climbed the .-
front steps they saw through
the win-dow the two lit-tle girls i
talk-ing ve-ry ear-nest-ly. In a :mI '''
mo-ment they saw their vis-it-
ors, and ran to meet them. 11
Their mam-ma said that they /
could go to the tea-par-ty; and ,
so our lit-tle friends set out for .
home.
As soon as they reached it
they went down to the kitch-en to watch Jane, the cook,
who was just a-bout to make some cakes for the par-ty.





THE TEA-PARTY. II
Rose and Kate de-cid-ed that the ic-ing on them must
be pink and white, and watched them with great in-ter-
est as they came all smok-ing out of the o-ven.


.. .. "". Ilk














By three o'-clock their friends were all on hand. A
sharp show-er came up just as the last one got in-side the
door, so that they could not play on the lawn, and the
swing which they had in-tend-ed to use hung all wet and
twist-ed in the rain. But they had the great ta-ble in the
nur-se-ry cleared, and on it they put all their toys. Af-ter
they were tired of look-ing at the toys, they played games,
and they had such good times, and ran a-bout and
laughed so hard, that pa-pa, who was writ-ing in the
stu-dy and did not know that there was to be a par-ty,





12 THE LITTLE BROTHER.

sent up to know if a-ny thing was the mat-ter. By
and by, when they were tired and glad to sit still for a
while, nurse went down-stairs and soon came back and
said that tea was ready. So down they trooped. At
each plate stood a gin-ger-bread man, all white in front
with ic-ing. Tom called out:
"Oh! ho! I see a gin-ger-bread man;
I'll eat him up as fast as I can."
But nurse said No; that he must eat some bread and
but-ter first. Rose sat at the head of the ta-ble and
poured out the tea. By the time the meal was o-ver a
car-riage came for the lit-tle vis-it-ors, and soon af-ter that
Rose and Kate were fast a-sleep in bed.




THE LITTLE BROTHER.

LIT-TLE bro-ther in a cot,
Ba-by, ba-by!
Shall he have a pleas-ant lot ?
May-be! may-be!

Lit-tle bro-ther in a nap,
Ba-by, ba-by!
Bless his ti-ny lit-tle cap,
Noise far a-way be!





THE LITTLE BROTHER. 13













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14 THE LITTLE BROTHER.

With a rat-tie in his hand,
Ba-by, ba-by!
Dream-ing-who can un-der-stand
Dreams like this, what they be ?


When he wakes, kiss him twice;
Then talk and gay be.
Lit-tle cheeks, soft and nice,
Ba-by, ba-by !


Pret-ty lit-tle pout-ing boy,
Ba-by, ba-by !
Let his life, with sweet and toy,
Pleas-ure all and play be.


Sev-en white an-gels watch-ing here,
Ba-by, ba-by !
Pray be kind to ba-by dear,
Pray be, pray be!


Lit-tle bro-ther in a cot,
Ba-by, ba-by !
His shall be a pleas-ant lot,
Must not may-be !
[Author of Poems Written for a Child.l





THE LOST HAT. 15

THE LOST HAT.

WILL and May were at the sea-side. The wind was
high, and off went May's old straw hat in-to the waves.
" Here, take mine," said Tom, "and we will go in-to the
cave made by the rocks, where it is cool, and where the
sun does not beat so hot on the head." They had not

















been there more than throe min-utes when May cried out,
"Here, Tom, take your hat again; the waves are bring- j
ing mine back to land." She ran down to the wa-ter's
edge; and, sure e-nough, just then the hat was thrown up
on the sand. May grasped it and tied it fast on her
head, all drip-ping as it was.





16 A VISIT TO THE COUNTRY.

A VISIT TO THE COUNTRY.

DID you ev-er hear of a girl that had nev-er lived in
the coun-try ? Well, there was such a girl, and her name
was Grace. She had seen on-ly brick walls and the
patch-es of grass in the ci-ty squares, and did not know
a-bout the green fields and great woods. When she was
six years old she was very ill. She lay quite white and
thin in her bed, and the doc-tor said that she would not
be strong a-gain un-less she could have fresh coun-try air.
Her fa-ther wrote at once to her aunt to see if Grace
could go and stay with her. In a day or two the an-swer
came that she could. So one bright af-ter-noon, wrapped
up in a great rug, she was car-ried down-stairs, and then
to a steam-boat. Splash! splash! went the wheels, and
they were off. Grace watched the green shore, as they
went by, for a time; but soon she grew tired and fell
a-sleep. She slept so sound-ly that she did not know
a-ny thing more till the next morn-ing, when her eyes
o-pened to find the bright sun shin-ing on her bed. She
grew well so fast in the clear air that be-fore long she
could run a-bout in the fields with her cous-in Bell, and
gath-er the flow-ers that grew in the grass.
All coun-try sights were strange to her. She was
a-fraid to go near the cows for a long time, though Bell
would stroke them and feed them with clo-ver blos-soms,
and they would all come to her when she called. But
she was ve-ry glad to run in the house in the mid-dle of
",the morn-ing, and get a slice of bread and a glass of the






A VISIT TO THE COUNTRY.1




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18 A VISIT TO THE COUNTRY.

rich milk that they gave. Such hap-py days as these
were! She was bu-sy ev-e-ry min-ute of them. She
helped Bell take care of the chick-ens. Thir-ty lit-tle
chicks there were. Then they had a board placed
a-cross an old log, and on this they played see-saw.
Each had a small gar-den of her own, and in it they
raised some flow-ers.
When af-ter-noon came they hunt-ed for eggs. Up
and down the hay-mows in the barn they climbed, and
in-to all of the out-of-the-way plac-es.they looked, un-til
of-ten they had a large bas-ket full. When night came
on, they were both so tired that they some-times fell
a-sleep while they were get-ting read-y for bed.
One day there came a let-ter. It was from Grace's
mam-ma, and said: "We think our lit-tle girl had bet-ter
come home to us now." Grace danced up and down at
the hope of see-ing her own mam-ma a-gain, but was
near-ly read-y to cry when she thought of leav-ing all the
chick-ens and cows, and all the good times she had had,
and of go-ing back to the nar-row streets of the ci-ty.
But Bell was to go with her and make a vis-it, and that
cheered her ve-ry much. She was bu-sy e-nough in the
few days be-fore leav-ing. She gath-ered a great bag of
chest-nuts for her pa-pa, for it was now au-tumn, and
a great bunch of red ber-ries for her mam-ma. Then she
said good-by to her aunt, and was soon home a-gain.







A VISIT TO THE COUNTRY. 19






20 POLL Y.


POLLY.

I. II.

BROWN eyes, Torn books,
Straight nose, Spoilt toys,
Dirt pies, Arch looks,
Rum-pled clothes. Un-like a boy's.


III. IV.

Lit-tle ra-ges, Fall-ing down
Ob-vi-ous arts; Off chairs;
(Three her age is,) Break-ing crown
Cakes, tarts. Down-stairs.


V. VI.

Brib-ing you Wide a-wake,
With kiss-es As you hear,
For a few Mer-cy's sake,
Far-thing bliss-es. Quiet, dear!"


VII. VIII.

New shoes, Fold-ed hands,
New frock, Say-ing pray-ers,
Vague views Un-der-stands
Of what's o'-clock. Not, nor cares.






Pages
21 -22
missing
from
original





JACK'S RABBITS. 23

use in bring-ing me the book to hear your les-sons till you
have learned them. What have you been do-ing this last
hour? I am a-fraid that you have been think-ing a-bout
your rab-bits and not your les-sons;" and Gwen shook
her lit-tle head ve-ry so-ber-ly.
"Well, you know," said Jack "there were four ba-by
rab-bits born last night, and I was think-ing what to
name them. What do you think
of Frisk for one.
"I think you had bet-ter
stu-dy your books,." said Gwen,
" or you will be at the foot of
the class a-gain this week, and
then pa-pa will not like it at all."
Jack took the book a-gain,
and sat down in front of the fire r
on a stool. "Twice one are
two, twice two are four, twice
three are six," he said. Then
he thought of the ba-by rab-bits,
and put his head down on his
el-bows, and all i-dea of his les-sons was soon far a-way.
He had just a-bout made up his mind to name them
Frisk, Gill, Jet, and Bet when the tea-bell rang.
Oh dear !" he said, I don't know my les-son at all;
but I'll get up and stu-dy be-fore break-fast."
But the next morn-ing he slept late, and when he start-
ed for school he knew no more a-bout them than the
night be-fore.






24 JACK'S RABBITS.

"Jack," said his teach-er, "how ma-ny are three times
three ?"
Sev-en," said Jack, af-ter think-ing a long time.
"This is the third day you have missed that ques-tion,"

V







7 I-








said the teach-er, and now you must put on the dunce-
cap and stand on the bench."
Poor Jack! he felt very much a-shamed as he stood
there; and worst of all, his mam-ma passed by and saw
him through the o-pen win-dow. He made up his mind
then and there that les-sons should be the first things he
at-tend-ed to, ev-en if the rab-bits nev-er had a-ny names
at all. And he nev-er stood on the dunce-stool af-ter that
day.






A DOG, A CAT, AND A BOY. 25

A DOG, A CAT, AND A BOY.

MAM-MA," said lit-tle Ted, I are hun.gry."
So mam-ma went to the shelf, and took down a loaf
of bread and cut off a good thick slice. Then she put
some but-ter on it, and Ted took it and trot-ted a-way.
But in a short-timfe he was back a-gain.
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,", he said, and I are hungry."
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"Why, Ted," she said "you can't have eat-en all that
great piece that I gave you "
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All gone," said Ted. More "


So ma--ma cut off an-oth-er slice; but this time she
"Why, Ted," she said, you can't have eat-en all that
great piece that I gave you !"
"All gone," said Ted. More"
So mam-ma cut off an-oth-er slice; but this time she





2() A DOG, A CAT, AND A BOY.

watched her boy, and what do you think she saw? Why,
there sat Trip, the dog, by him. Each time that Ted took
a bite he broke off a large piece for Trip, who wagged his
tail and seemed ve-ry much pleased. Mam-ma thought
that her good bread would not last long at that rate.
When it had all gone Trip and Ted had a romp, and
then Ted lay down and took a nap.
When he waked it was time for his din-ner. So he was
put up in a high chair, and a big bowl of bread and milk
was set in front of him. "Trip can't get to him there,"
said mam-ma, "so I will go out on to the porch and see
how my bird is."
All at once she heard Ted laugh, so she stood still to
listen. Then she heard him say, "No, no, puss; you
don't play fair: it's my turn. Stop, puss, I say! Trip
and I al-ways take turn and turn a-bout. Stop, I say !"
She ran back, and there was puss up on the stand
be-side him, drink-ing up the milk that was to have been
for her lit-tle boy's dinner.
"Shoo! shoo !" she cried; and puss, who knew that she
had no right to be drink-ing there, jumped down in great
haste and took to her heels out of the door. Trip, who
had watched it all with great wrath, flew af-ter her, bark-
ing with all his might, and kit-ty had to climb a tree to
get rid of him. Then he came back to the house a-gain.
Mam-ma had to throw out all the rest of the bread and
milk, and make a new bowl-ful; but Ted thought that it
was all great fun, and he laughed and chuck-led to
him-self a-bout it so much that it was quite a long time
be-fore he fin-ished' his din-ner.






A DOG, A CA T, AND A BOY. 27



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28 PENITENT ALFRED.

PENITENT ALFRED.

IT is Christ-mas eve, and a storm-y night,
The wind is loud and the snow lies white,
And lit-tle Al-fred has sulked to bed,
And these are the thoughts that pass through his head:


I, wish I were good, but I know I am bad-
O the wind, whis-tle, whew!
I make fa-ther an-gry, and moth-er sad-
Just then how it blew!


My heart was heav-y and hard to-night,
I crept to bed.
I could not say what was soft and right,
I wished I was dead.


But I see with my eyes shut be-neath the clothes-
It is dark and cold;
I see such sights as no-bod-y knows,
And no-bod-y's told.


I see our Ro-ver jump-ing the brook,
Swift and light.
I see a new moon, like a reap-ing hook,
Sharp and white.






PENITENT ALFRED. 29






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I see a red rob-in up in a tree,
Sing, sing!
And a ship-wrecked ba-by saved from the sea,
Cling, cling!





30 PENITENT ALFRED.

I see the church-yard; the snow lies deep;
For ghosts who cares?
"It I were to die to-night in my sleep!
I'll say my pray-ers.

Per-haps to-mor-row I may be good-
Christ-mas day;
But I am too small to be un-der-stood,
What-ev-er I say.


If moth-er would come up and kiss me once-
Was that the bed broke ?
No, I dropped a-sleep. But I won't be a dunce-
I thought some one spoke!


Mat-thew, Mark, Luke, and John,
Bless the bed that I lie on;
Four cur-tains to my bed,
Four angels-


Poor lit-tle Al-fred when morning comes,
And the bells say, "Cit-ron, and spice, and plums !
Pray he may find that the an-gels four
Have car-ried his hard heart out of the door,
And left un-der-neath his soft pink side
A heart that is soft-er, and free from pride.
[Author of Poems Written for a Child.]






TOB Y, THE COBBLER. 31

TOBY, THE COBBLER.

TO-BY was a cob-bler; and all day long he sat at his
bench, and stitched and stitched at the shoes that were
sent him to mend.





"( ^

















But when sup-per time came, he and his wife set the
ta-ble out in the gar-den, un-der the shade of an old ap-ple
tree, and ate their meal there. Jet, the black kit-ten,
went with them, and had her tea too.





32 FLEE T AND HIS MASTER.

FLEET AND HIS MASTER.

DOGS are ve-ry clev-er fel-lows. The one whose pic-
ture you see here was named Fleet, and I will tell you
what he did. He was a great friend of puss, and they
of-ten lay down close to-geth-er in front of the fire, and he
nev-er chased her in-to a tree as some dogs do. Puss had
three lit-tle kit-tens, who were just old e-nough to climb,
and who were crawl-ing in and out of all sorts of
strange plac-es all the time.
One day Fleet, who was ly-ing by the kitch-en fire,
heard a loud mew from puss. He jumped to his feet
and ran out. There she stood on a bench by the door,
on which was a tub of wa-ter. The kit-ten had climbed
up the side of the tub and had tum-bled in, and puss did
not know how to get her out. Fleet knew in a mo-ment.
He stood up on his hind legs, and, reaching his head
o-ver, took the kit-ten in his mouth and put her all safe
on the ground. She was pret-ty wet, but her mam-ma
soon licked her dry, and in an hour she was crawl-ing
up a chair-back as bold-ly as if she had not just had a
mis-hap. And if the cook, who saw the whole thing,
had not put a-way the tub, I have no doubt that she
would have been in it a-gain be-fore night.
Fleet and puss be-came more firm friends than ev-er,
and you might have of-ten seen her rub-bing her head on
his legs and pur-ring with joy.
While all this had been go-ing on, Jack Gray, Fleet's
lit-tle mas-ter, had been up-stairs at his les-sons. Twelve






FLEET AND HIS M ASTIER. 33
















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34 FLEET AND HIS MASTER.
o'-clock struck, and he tossed a-side his books and ran
down-stairs, and rushed out of the front door on to the
lawn. "Oh! James," he cried to the man at work there,
"won't you please sad-die my po-ny just as quick-ly as
you can? and I'll have a ride be-fore din-ner. Where's
Fleet ?" and he whis-tled and called, Fleet! Fleet!
Fleet !"
The dog heard his voice, and came in long leaps
a-round the house, and they had a fine romp. Long
be-fore James came with the po-ny, the heap of dead
leaves which he had swept up with such care was scat-
tered far and wide. He was a good-na-tured man, though,
and on-ly laughed when he saw that his last half hour's
toil had been for noth-ing, and set to work to sweep them
up a-gain as soon as Jack had trot-ted off. It was a
bright au-tumn day, and the nag felt fresh and went on
at a good speed, while Fleet ran in front, chas-ing a-ny
squir-rel that dared to show his head out of the stone
fence.
When Jack got home it was time for din-ner. Af-ter
that was -o-ver, he found that James had made a great
pile of the leaves in a field a-way from the house, and was
go-ing to make a bon-fire of them. So he went with him
and watched the fierce flames as they roared and
crack-led, un-til there was noth-ing of all the great heap
left but a small pile of gray ash-es.






FLEET AND HiSe fASTER. 35


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36 MAY AND TOM.

MAY AND TOM.
























HERE are May and lit-tle Tom. They have been out
to hunt for wild straw-ber-ries, and a show-er has caught
them. They are more than a mile from home, too, so
that I fear, if the rain keeps on, they will get quite wet.
A tree, you know, is not a ve-ry good um-brel-la.





DA Y-DREAMS. 37


DAY-DREAMS.





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am sure. Hark! is she not call-ing? Yes, I hear her

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stopped roll-Ing her hoop, and is watch-Ing the birds that
fly a-bout her in the clear air. Her moth-er wants her, I
am sure. Hark! is she not call-ing? Yes; I hear her
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38 A NURSER Y SONG.

A NURSERY SONG.

One lit-tie bird-ie sat on
--- a tree,
--:. Sing-ing as loud as he
could for glee.
Th----ae adThe branch-es waved and
And---- tletthe sun-beams shone,
And the lit-tie bird said,
It is time to be gone.


Two lit-tle fish-es swam
in a brook,
Lit-tie they cared for the
net or the hook.
But the king-fish-er
stopped as he saw them
at play,
And the two lit-tie fish-es
swam quick-ly a-way.



Three lit-tle men went out for a sail
On the deep, wide sea, in the moon-light pale.
The mer-rv waves danced, and the wind fol-lowed free,
And the three lit-tle men sailed o-ver the sea.






A NURSERY SONG. 39

Four lit-tle mice sat eat-ing a cheese,
Nib-bling and run-ning a-bout at their ease;
Pus-sy came creep-ing a-long--in a trice
In-to their hole ran the four lit-tle mice.









.__- ___ -__ ___----



Five lit-tie wo-men sat in a row,
Stitch-ing as fast as their nee-dies could go;
The stars they were shin-ing, the cocks they were crow-ing,
When the four lit-tle wo-men had fin-ished their sew-ing.
[A utzor of Sleepy Forest.]





40 THE THIEVING JACKDA I



THE THIEVING JACKDAW.

"WHY," said Jane, the maid, as she came through the
door and looked at the break-fast ta-ble, which stood with
the cloth spread and the dish-es on it, wait-ing for the fam-
i-ly to come down-stairs, "why, I am sure that I put a
spoon at mas-ter's plate, and now it is gone. I'll count
the oth-ers and see." Yes, sure e-nough, a spoon was miss-
ing.
It must be tramps," said Jane; and she ran to the
win-dow to look out. It was a ve-ry pret-ty scene that
she saw be-fore, her. An Eng-lish gar-den bright with
ma-ny flow-ers and a green lawn be-side it; but not a.
tramp was in sight. Jane ran out, and down one of the
paths, and gazed a-bout her. All at once she looked up,
and then she saw the thief. He was a shi-ny black jack-
daw, and there he stood on the roof, and in his mouth was
the miss-ing spoon. Jane shook her fin-ger at him. "Oh!
you wick-ed thief," she said, now I know what be-comes
of the things that are lost all the time."
She hur-ried back to the house and told her mas-ter
what she had found out. When break-fast was o-ver, he
had a long lad-der placed a-gainst the roof, and climbed
up. The jack-daw sat on a tree close by and chat-tered
with all his might; but it was of no use, his bad tricks had
been found out at last.
In a hole un-der the tiles they found the spoon that he






THE THIE VING A CKDA V. 41



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42 LA TE.
had sto-len that morn-ing and a great ma-ny oth-er things
be-sides. There was the sil-ver watch that was giv-en to
Tom-my by his grand-pa-pa on his last birth-day, and
which was lost the ve-ry next day. Tom was sure that
he had- left it on his dress-ing stand, but his pa-pa thought
that he must have lost it when he was play-ing ball. There
was a can-die-stick there, too, and all the fam-i-ly stood at
the foot of the lad-der and cried out with sur-prise as one
thing af-ter an-oth-er was ta-ken out of the hid-ing place.
That was the end of the jack-daw'sthefts, for now they
watched him so close-ly that he had no chance to steal.





LATE.

"YES, my fine lad, the door is shut, and you are at least
ten minutes be-hind time. I knew, when I saw you start
out to try and catch the rab-bit that ran a-cross the road
in front of you, that you would for-get all a-bout school."
Well, I al-most got him," said the boy who was late,
"and I would sure-ly have had him if I had not caught
my foot and fall-en in the dust."
Just at that mo-ment his teach-er heard his voice, and
called out, "John Jones, come in at once, and take your
place in the class." So John hur-ried in and soon for-got
all a-bout the rab-bit in try-ing to think how many were
nine times nine.













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44 THE PETREL.



THE PETREL.

JOE DA-VIS was the son of a fish-er-man, who lived close
by the beach. You could al-ways tell when his fa-ther
was at home, for then his boat was drawn up in front of
his house on the sand. Joe of-ten went out in it with
him, and ve-ry proud he felt at such times. When he
grew up he hoped to be a fish-er-man too, and have a
boat of his own. But as there must be a good ma-ny
years be-fore that would take place, he was hard at work
on a toy boat, which he meant to sail in a pool near at
hand. It was to be a two-mast-ed schoon-er, and he had
made up his mind to name her the Pe-trel.
Bob Jack-son, his great friend, who stood by and saw
him hard at work, thought that it was much bet-ter fun to
run down the beach and see the fish-ing boats go out
through the surf, and he tried to make Joe go with him,
but it was of no use to try.
At last, one fine day, the Pe-trel was done. She had
a full set of sails, which Joe's moth-er had made for him.
No soon-er had she touched the wa-ter than the wind fill-
ed her sails and a-way she went. The boys ran a-round
the pool to meet her at the oth-er side. Af-ter that ma-ny
was the hour that they spent sail-ing the lit-tle craft. Bob
Jack-son made one too, and then they of-ten had ra-ces.








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46 "THE FALL FROM THE APPLE-TREE.



THE FALL FROM THE APPLE-TREE.

HAL was up ifl the ap-ple-tree. There was one great
ro-sy fel-low that he was bent on hav-ing. "Take care,"
cried Will, "the limb will break if you go too far." Break
it did with a quick snap, and Hal fell to the ground and















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lay there for a time quite still. Will bent o-ver him, fear-
ing that he was dead, but all at once he rose up as well
as ever. I have the ap-ple, any way," he said, and he
took a big bite out of it.










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