• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 A story of the sea
 Left in charge
 King Alfred's early days
 Home studies
 Home examinations
 Watching
 Home for the holidays
 The bird's nest
 The boy that cared for sparrow...
 The fisherman's cottage
 Don't throw stones
 Gathering fir-cones
 Decision
 The page who loved his mother
 Red riding-hood, with a moral...
 The thorn in the foot
 How James Price lived and died
 Begin the new year well
 Harvest hymn
 Frost and snow
 The last letter
 Trusting father
 She couldn't trust him
 Back Cover






Group Title: A story of the sea and other incidents : for the young
Title: A story of the sea and other incidents
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00049573/00001
 Material Information
Title: A story of the sea and other incidents for the young
Physical Description: 95 p., 1 leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 13 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Wesleyan Conference Office ( Publisher )
Hayman Brothers and Lilly ( Printer )
Willatt & Grover ( Printer of plates )
Publisher: Wesleyan Conference Office
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Hayman Brothers and Lilly
Publication Date: [1882?]
 Subjects
Subject: Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1882   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1882
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
England -- Nottingham
 Notes
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
General Note: Frontispiece printed in colors by Willatt & Grover, Nottingham.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00049573
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002238018
notis - ALH8513
oclc - 62331802

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Frontispiece
        Plate
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
        Page iv
    A story of the sea
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Left in charge
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    King Alfred's early days
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Home studies
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Home examinations
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Watching
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Home for the holidays
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
    The bird's nest
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    The boy that cared for sparrows
        Page 42
        Page 43
    The fisherman's cottage
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Don't throw stones
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Gathering fir-cones
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    Decision
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
    The page who loved his mother
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
    Red riding-hood, with a moral lesson
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
    The thorn in the foot
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
    How James Price lived and died
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
    Begin the new year well
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
    Harvest hymn
        Page 80
        Page 81
    Frost and snow
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
    The last letter
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
    Trusting father
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
    She couldn't trust him
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
Full Text




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AND OTHER INCIDENTS.



FOR THE YOUNG.










ionboit:
WESLEYAN CONFERENCE OFFICE,
2, CASTLE-ST., CITY-ROAD;
AND 66, PATERNOSTER-ROW








































HAaTMA BROTnERS AND LILLYt
PRINTERS,
HATION HOSE, FARRINODON LOAD
LOXDON, B.C













CONTENTS.


--o;g1oo--

PAGE
A STORY OF THE SEA. 5
LEFT IN CHARGE 12
KING ALFRED'S EARLY DAYS 18
HOME STUDIES 22
HOME EXAMINATIONS. 24
WATCHING 27
HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS 30
THE BIRD'S NEST 36
THE BOY THAT CARED FOR SPARROWS. 42
THE FISHERMAN'S COTTAGE. 44
DON'T THROW STONES 47
GATHERING FIR-CONES. 50
DECISION 57
THE PAGE WHO LOVED HIS MOTHER 60
RED RIDING-HOOD, WITH A MORAL LESSON 63
THE THORN IN THE FOOT 67






iv CONTENTS.

PAGE
HOW JAMES PRICE LIVED AND DIED 70
BEGIN THE NEW YEAR WELL .77
HARVEST HYMN 80
FROST AND SNOW 82
THE LAST LETTER .85
TRUSTING FATHER 89
SHE COULDN'T TRUST HIM 92











A STORY OF THE SEA,
AND OTHER INCIDENTS.

-------~---

A STORY OF THE SEA.

W HEN the scorching sun of summer
makes the air in towns hot and sultry,
what can be so welcome as the reviving cool-
ness of the breeze from the ocean? what
more pleasant than the soothing sound of the
waves as they come gently rippling to the
shore ? Then there are the expeditions among
the rooks in search of sea-anemones, starfish,
and all the other curiosities and wonders of
numberless little pools and caverns ; with quiet
walks along the shore, when the young adven-
turers are wearied with the excitement of
their exploits in catching prawns or building
castles on the sands.






6 A STORY OF THE SEA,

Some of you, perhaps, have a little brother
or sister who is an invalid, and not able to
wander with you on the pebbly beach, or
gather shells, or look for beautiful specimens
of seaweed. But you will be glad, I am sure,
to lend your feet and hands and eyes to the
sufferer; who must sit, perhaps for hours to-
gether, in one place; or be wheeled along a
short distance at a time; and whose enjoy-
ment, therefore, is so much less than your own.
How delightful to be able to light up that wan
cheek with a passing smile, and, by affording
a momentary pleasure, to chase away the feel-
ing of pain from one whose lot is not so happy
as yours Your enjoyments will, thus be
doubled; and your kindness will be recalled
with gratitude, long after health has returned
to the feeble one whom you love, thanks, in
part, to your thoughtfulness and attention.
But it is not of pleasant rambles and joyous
holidays that I have now to tell you. My
story is a very different one. I will take you
to the seaside; but the sea is not running
quietly along the shore, making music as it






AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 7

flows. No; the gentle waves are lashed into
fury now, and dash against the rocks, leaping
up mountains high.'
At the time of which I am speaking, a great
crowd had assembled on the shore, for a storm
had raged all night, and tidings had come that
many vessels were in distress.
The good people quickly got out the life-
boat, and the brave sailors gladly risked their
lives in trying to save some of the perishing
ones. A terrible -daywas this! One of the
men, who had lived on the spot all his life, said
he had never seen the sea so angry, or a storm
so high. However, nothing could daunt the
brave men who manned the lifeboat; and soon
many, who be'fo:'e had qnite given up the hope
of life, were safely landed on the shore,-
some of them welcomed by the wives and little
ones, who, but a few minutes before, were
ready to mourn for them as lost.
But there was one ship which had struck on
a rock in such a dangerous place, that rno one
dared to venture near it. There were seven or
eight men and boys on the -vessel, all clinging






A STORY OF THE SEA,











QN








___ _






AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 9

to the mast, and it seemed as if they were
hopelessly doomed to perish. Had you been
there, you might at length have noticed one
little group of people eagerly engaged in fasten-
ing something to the end of a rope. It was a
rocket, like one of those beautiful fireworks
which so delight the hearts of boys on the
fifth of November. When all was ready, a
light was applied to it, and away it sped, bear-
ing with it the only hope of the stranded ship.
But it was not aimed right, and again and
again they tried, but in vain. At last-oh
what a shout there was from the people on the
shore!-the rope was flung right *over the
deck of the ship. Now, surely,' you will say,
' they will be saved.' Alas the men were so
benumbed with cold and the beating of the
storm, that they did not seem to notice the
help that was so wonderfully sent to them; or,
perhaps, they thought they would never be
able to hold on to the rope while they were
being pulled to shore; however that was, they
still clung to the mast. Only one boy seemed
inclined to do something. He was grasping





10 A STORY OF THE SEA,

the rope, when, sad to relate, a mighty wave
swept over the vessel, carrying with it all the
poor men, and the mast they had so vainly
trusted in. They found a mournful grave
beneath the moaning waters. Let us hope
that some of them will have a joyful waking
when the 'sea shall give up her dead.'
The poor boy who held the rope was, how-
ever, still alive. Waving his hand to the
eager watchers on the beach, he fastened it
round him, and, with a desperate effort, flung
himself overboard. In a little while he was
drawn safely to the shore, amidst the joyful
acclamations of the crowd ; and was carried to
a place of safety and rest.
Now, my dear young readers, why have I
.bold you this story ? Because it is pleasant to
hear of such a wonderful escape from danger ?
Yes; but also because I wish to remind you of
a danger you are exposed to every day of
your life. It is true you are not on the
mighty ocean, with the angry storm beating
around you; but your peril is as real as that
of the poor boy I have spoken of. Any moment





AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 11

you may be swept into eternity; and what are
you trusting in for the safety of your soul ? If
you imagine 'you are no worse than others,'
or that God is too merciful to doom you to
everlasting death,' you are no safer with this
hope than the men who clung to the mast,
instead of making use of the rope which was
thrown by the aid of the rocket for their
rescue.
Do not try to save yourselves. Many have
tried this, and have only found out the im-
possibility of doing so when it was too late.
A way of escape has been provided for us by
God; but you must accept of it, or it is of no
avail for you. The rope might have been close
to the boy ; but it could not have saved him,
if he had not laid firmly hold of it, and trusted
himself to it. So Christ has died to save you;
and yet you will be lost if you do not accept
of His salvation, and trust yourself entirely in
His hands.
Oh give your hearts to Jesus! When on
earth He loved to have the children round
Him, and praises sounded sweetly in His ear






13 A STORY OF 21TE SBA,

when sung by infant voices. He still loves the
little ones, and longs to gather them in His
fold. He carries the lambs in His bosom, and
in that resting-place they are safe for ever.



LEFT IN CHARGE.
ExoDUs ii. 1-9.
MANY of our readers know well what
'taking care of the baby means.' To
many little girls about nine years old this is
their principal home duty; and though it is, I
hope, generally a pleasure, sometimes, perhaps,
it may be tiresome if baby is unwell and fret-
ful, or if mother says, 'Just nurse the baby a
little, dear,' when you want to go out for a
little play, or for a walk with a friend, or to
learn your Sunday-school lessons. You feel
then that, though you love the baby dearly,
yet you wish it would go to sleep in its cradle
a little more.
Now, I wonder whether it has ever occurred
to you that there is an account of a little girl






AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 13



I .
I .'" ..- _



























77._
-- -t" .. J '/ -_ ._._ _





14 A STORY OF TIE SEA,

in the Bible who had to mind the baby; her
name was Miriam, and she lived in Egypt.
Some of you will remember that King Pharaoh
had cruelly ordered all the little Israelitish
boys to be put to death. Very soon after this,
Miriam's mother had a beautiful little boy.
Jochebed, that was the name of the mother,
tried to hide him, and she was able to do so
for three months; but as he got older, and his
voice became stronger, of course it was not so
easy, so she put him in a little basket by the
side of the river, and told Miriam, who was
then nine years old, to stay near and watch it.
Miriam was not like some little girls, who
leave the baby, as soon as mother's back is
turned, to go and have a game. She watched
until Pharaoh's daughter came and found the
baby, and told her maidens to take charge of
it. What was Miriam to do. th.un ? She knew
her mother would not like it to go quite away,
and never see it again; and just then a good
thought came into her head. She went to
Pharaoh's daughter, and asked her if she
should fetch a woman to nurse it; and when






AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 15

the princess said yes, she fetched her own
mother. Now this is a very interesting story,
and I want you to learn three lessons from it.
1st. To take care of baby.
A great many babies have been injured for
life because their little nurses were not careful.
Notice how your mother takes care of it, and
try to do the same; and remember what she
tells you about it, and always tell her if you
think anything is wrong. For instance, if you
let baby drop when she is out, be sure to tell
her, for fear you may have done the child some
harm without knowing it.
2nd. Never play at wrong times.
Whenever you have a duty to perform,
attend to it first of all; never leave off for
play until it is thoroughly done, whether you
have to clean the room, wash your clothes,
attend to the baby, go an errand, or learn your
lessons; whatever it may be, attend to your
duty first, and then play.
3rd. If you are in any difficulty, think.
Do not give up in despair because you do
not at once see what is best; many people, if





16 A STORY OF THE SEA,

they are asked why they did not do such or
such a thing, often either say they forgot it, or
did not think of it; or else they did not know
what to do, and so did nothing. God gave us
the power of thought and reason for us to use ;
therefore in any difficulty try to think what is
best, and then ask Him to help you to act up
to it.
Now, I can fancy some of my little readers
saying that they have often made these resolu-
tions before, but they find they cannot keep
them; they do mean to take care of baby, but
sometimes they cannot help losing patience,
and being cross with it: and though, when
they get up in the morning, they resolve to
finish all they have to do before they play, yet,
if a little friend comes in before they have
done, they forget all about their good resolves,
hurry over it, or only half finish it. And then
others, perhaps, will say that they cannot think
of things at the right time: capital thoughts
come into their heads afterwards, when it is
too late.
Now, shall I tell you how it was that Miriam





AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 17

was able to do her duty ? God helped her to
resist temptation, and guided her to a right
decision. Most probably, when she saw Pha-
raoh's daughter taking up her little brother,
she lifted up her heart in prayer to God for
help and guidance, and He sent the right
thought into her mind. We find that in
the song Moses and Miriam sang many years
afterwards, when they were both grown up
(Exodus xv. 1, 13, 20), they say, speaking to
God of His goodness to Israel, 'Thou hast
guided them in Thy strength unto Thy holy
habitation.'
This was the secret of Miriam's strength.
When she was tempted to do what was wrong,
she asked God to guide her with His strength ;
when she was in difficulty, and did not know
how she should act for the best, she still asked
God to guide her with His strength. If you
always do the same, He will guide you and
strengthen you through all the temptations and
difficulties of this life, and, for the sake of
Jesus Christ, will afterwards receive you 'into
His holy habitation.'
B






18 A STORY OF THE SEA,


IING ALFRED'S EARLY DAYS.

Y OU have heard, perhaps, of a good and
wise Saxon king who reigned in Eng-
land. He was the grandson of King Egbert,
the first Saxon king of all England. His
name was Alfred the Great.
When he was a very little boy, his mother
wished him to learn to read; and she used
to show him beautiful pictures in her prayer-
book, and to tell him what the pictures were
about. Little Alfred was always pleased when
the time came for seeing the book; and one
day, when his mother was talking to him, she
said that she would give him the book for his
own to keep, as soon as he could read it.
Then he began to take great pains, and very
soon learned to read the book, although it was
in Latin; and so his mother gave him the
beautiful book. When he grew bigger, he
loved to learn the old Saxon songs by heart,
and to sing them to his mother, who loved to
hear Alfred sing and play the harp.






AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 19

But when Alfred grew up, he was obliged
to leave off reading and singing to a great
extent. Some very strong and cruel men,
called Danes, came to England, and robbed
the people, and burnt the towns, and did a
great deal of mischief before Alfred came to
the throne. And at the beginning of his
reign they went on doing the same thing. He
had more than fifty battles to fight before he
could drive them away from his kingdom.
When he was first made king, he had not
one town where the people dared to obey him,
for fear of the Danes; and he was obliged to
disguise himself in poor clothes, and to live
with a farmer, who did not know him, as a
servant.
This farmer lived in a part of Somersetshiro
called the Isle of Athelney. While Alfred was
there, some of his best friends used to conie and
tell him howthae countrywaSgoing on, and
take messages to him from other friends j and
they all begged him to stay where he was till
they could cotect English olddiers enough to
fight the Danes in that neighbourhobd.
12






20 A STORY OF THE SEA,





I 1/
E' l






AND OTlHER INCIDENTS. 21

While he was staying at the farmer's house,
the farmer's wife scolded him one day very
heartily. I will tell you how it happened.
She had just made some very nice cakes for
supper, and laid them on the hearth to toast;
and seeing Alfred sitting in the house, doing
something to his bow and arrows, she desired
him to look after her cakes, and to turn them
when they were toasted enough on one side,
that they might not be burnt. But Alfred
had heard some news about the Danes that
day, which made him forget the cakes; for
he could think of nothing but how to save
England from the cruel Danes. When the
farmer's wife came into the house again, she
soon saw the cakes on the hearth, quite black
and burnt, and began scolding Alfred very
severely. Just then her husband came in,
with some of Alfred's friends, who told him
that they had beaten the Danes, and driven
them out of that part of the country, and the
people were asking for him, and it was time
to appear as their king. You may think how
surprised the farmer's wife was, and how she






22 A STORY OF THE SEA,

asked the king's pardon for scolding him. He
only smiled and said, if she forgave him for
burning her cakes, he would forgive her for
the scolding. Then he thanked her and the
farmer heartily for letting him live so quietly
with them, and went with his friends to find
the Danes, with whom he had a great deal of
trouble before he could drive them away.



HOME STUDIES.
EVER will the writer forget the remark
made by a beloved relative, when she
was a child of six years old: If you had been
a better girl, you should not have left me; but
now you must go to school.' Many a mother
and sister have had to send little boys and
girls to school at a very early age, because
they were not diligent and teachable at home.
This is a very pleasing picture; and it is easy
to see that the little people have their minds
on their studies, and that the mother or sister
who is teaching them will not have to send











O!i


_ __




~L1/





24 A STORY OF THE SEA,

them away from the comforts and joys of
home.
We say to that good boy, Go on to be dili-
gent in business, and obedient to rule, and you
will make a wise and good man. We do not
believe that old saying, 'A youth must sow his
wild oats.' Be sure that what a boy sows he
shall reap. You know how careful farmers
and gardeners are to get good seed to sow, that
they may have good crops; and the Bible
says, 'Whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he
also reap.' Boys who are obedient at home
will do well at school, when they are old
enough to bear a little hardship; and if they
do well at school they will do well in life.



HOME EXAMINATIONS.

T HIS picture is one from the French
school. It represents a mother examining
her two daughters on their return from school.
Examinations are often thought very dull by





AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 25

"I id
___ ji 'I'," .
IIi



I% 14i 1'






26 A STORY OF THE SEA,

young learners; but how pleasant is the feel-
ing when they are passed with credit, and they
return home to display the prizes they have
won! It is so very sad when parents spend so
much money to educate their dear children,
and they make no good use of their time.
Youth is the age to sow seeds in the mind and
memory, which will blossom and bear fruit
in riper years. A well educated woman is a
charm in society, and if she has no other riches,
she may rejoice in those more precious than
rubies and gold,-the riches of the mind. We
often hear that the French ladies neglect their
homes and children, but we know many make
excellent mothers. We do well, however, to
be thankful for our English homes, and our
dear Christian mothers, who give so much of
their time to home duties,:and make home the
happiest place on earth.






AND OTHEB INCIDENTS. 27



WATCHING.

N childhood's season fair,
On many a balmy, moonless summer
night,
While wheeled the lighthouse arms
Of dark and bright
SFar through the humid air,-

How patient have I been,
Sitting alone, a happy little maid,
"Waiting to see. cheery and unafraid,
My father's boat come in;-

Close tb the water's edge
Holding a tiny spark, that he might steer
(So dangerous the landing far and near)
Safe past the ragged ledge !

No fears had I, not one;
The wild,. wide waste of water leagues
around








ANNE-..
..... . ........ . ....... ----------
. . . . . .. . . . . . . . .
.............





r7
-7 :M.



L
Pm N

0 -, LZ






AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 29

Washed ceaselessly; there was no human
sound,
I was alone.

But nature was so kind!
Like a dear friend I loved the loneliness;
My heart rose glad, as at some sweet caress,
When passed the wandering wind.

Yet it was joy to hear,
From out the darkness, sounds grow clear at
last,
Of rattling rowlocks, and of creaking mast,
And voices drawing near.

Is't thou, dear father ? Say!'
What well-known shout resounded in reply,
As loomed the tall sail, smitten suddenly
With the great lighthouse ray !

I will be patient now,
My heavenly Father, waiting here for Thee !
I know the darkness holds Thee !
Shall I be
Afraid, when itis Thou ?






30 A STORY OF TBE SEA,

On Thy eternal shore,
In pauses, when life's tide is at its prime,
I hear the everlasting rote of time
Beating for evermore!
Shall I not, then, rejoice ?
Oh, never lost or sad should child of Thine
Sit weeping, fearing lest there come no sign,
No whisper of Thy voice!

HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS.
T HE word 'holiday' means, literally, a holy
or sacred day. It also means a day set
apart for commemorating some important event
in history; a festival; a day of joy and gaiety;
a day of freedom from labour; a day of amuse-
ment.' Such is the definition the dictionary
gives of what, I suspect, most of my readers
are practically very well acquainted with.
Even an occasional holiday is very delightful;
but when we add s to the word, what a dif.
ferent meaning it has for us! Whatwvisions
it then conjures up of the past and the future !
Days of 'joy and gaiety,' days 'of freedom





AND OTHER INCIDENTS, 31

from labour,' days of amusement.' I wonder
if any schoolboy is to be found who has not
felt as if he were almost entering into a new
world, when the time at last came, and he
could pack up his dog-eared Latin grammar,
bid adieu to lessons, anticipating nothing but
the pleasures of home for the next month
or six weeks. In such circumstances I have
known some boys express their unusual excite-
ment in some methods of which we could not
approve. But, notwithstanding a few boisterous
ebullitions, 'home for the holidays' is a very
happy time, both for parents and children, if
-I must put in that little word-it is found
that good, hard work has been done, and that
studies have been diligently attended to. How
delightful to be able to receive, with a clear
conscience, the heartfelt approbation of parents
and friends! It is only when thus merited
that the holidays can be truly enjoyed.
I cannot conceive of an idle lad having any
real pleasure in these weeks of recreation. A
conscious sense of duty rightly performed is
the best preparation for spending a pleasant






32 A STORY OF THE SEA

time at home, in the midst of a happy family
circle. Christian children scarcely need to be
told, that the word spoken by the wisest of
men, 'Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do,
do it with thy might,' applies to them, in
learning their lessons, as much as to good and
learned men who are busily working out great
schemes for the welfare of the world. I think,
if we tried to do all as unto the Lord,' and
remembered, 'Thou God seest me,' we should
not so often hear of parents' hearts being
pained and teachers discouraged by the short-
comings of their pupils.
Christmas has its own peculiar charms-in
the shape of skating, mincepies, roast turkey,
and plum-pudding; but I think my own holi-
days were spent most happily in the bright
summer days when, with a few companions,
many an old haunt and favourite nook, for
miles round, could bo visited. Sometimes we
climbed tall trees in the silent forest ; or we
slowly dragged ourselves to the summit of a
lugged hill for the sake of the prospect beyond;
or we explored slippery caverns on the seashore,





"AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 33






-- a -^ -















__ ~) '-






34 A STORY OF THE SEA,

looking for shells and fine specimens of weed
in places where a footing could be scarcely
obtained, and well pleased if, with only a
tumble or two into the water, we secured some
trophy of our daring to exhibit at home.
Then I have also pleasant memories of boat-
ing adventures, especially of fishing with hook
and line. When successful in drawing from
the deep some of the finny tribe, what shouting
and glee betokened the triumph of our skill!
Much excitement was once caused among us
by the announcement that on the hook of one
of our party could be seen, far down in the
blue sea, a large crab. Great was the anxiety
to secure this line fellow, and be. allowed him-
self to bp,,brought very nearly to the surface
of the water. .We could see his eyes looking
at us. But just as w& were about to seize
him carefully, avoiding his disengaged large
claw, he quietly gave us the slip by opening
the other, and so again sank to the bottom,-
there to go on in his own crooked way.
I remember, also, one holiday time, during
which I spent many hours on an ornamental






AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 35

piece of water, floating in and out among the
little islands, feeding the ducks and other water
fowl, and not seldom arousing the anger of
a graceful swan, that would now and then
rush at us, half-flying, half-beating the water
with its outstretched wings. Many pleasant
evenings were spent thus in navigating our
little skiff. The little people in our picture are
evidently enjoying themselves in a similar way.
We hope the youth, who seems quite a sailor,
will catch no 'crabs' in rowing, and be careful
not to upset his young lady friends, his sisters
or cousins, who are trusting to his skill.
We wish our readers-those of them who
are just now home from school-very happy
holidays. If they are wise, they will not be
sorry when they are over, but will cheerfully
go to work again; thus, like the busy bee,
laying up, while they have the opportunity,
rich stores of knowledge for future life:-
'Work for some good, be it ever so slowly;
Cherish some flower, be it ever so lowly ;
Labour-all labour is noble and holy.'

o2






36 A STORY OF THE SEA,




THE BIRD'S NEST.

T was a bright, fresh morning when two
very intimate young friends took a long
walk into the woods. The birds sang just as
happily as they are doing now in the great elm
before my window; the apple-trees were all in
blossom, and the air was full of their fragrance.
When the two boys came to a willow sapling,
they cut off a small branch with which to make
a couple of whistles. They had new knives;
and in about twenty minutes they were both
whistling away as loud as any two birds in
the whole wood.
When they had gone about a mile into the
woods, Philip happened to look up at the top
of an old tree which stood close beside the path.
There was a bird's nest in it, the very one that
a friend of theirs had told them he had seen
two weeks before. Philip pointed out the nest
to his companion; and it was soon decided






AAM OTHER INCIDENTS. 37

that they should both climb the tree, and bring
down all the eggs it might have in it.
Soon they were climbing toward the nest
with all their might. Before they reached it,
however, one of them remembered what his
father had told him about the sin of robbing
birds' nests.
'Wait, Philip,' said he; don't you know we
are both doing wrong in trying to get this
nest? My father told me it was a sin, and
that God sees every boy when he is engaged
in such mischief.'
Oh, you are a coward! What nonsense!
You are afraid this old tree will break down
with you. You are very foolish to talk as you
do. Nobody sees us. Follow me quickly; for
I see that your heart is failing you.'
That boy thought Philip was a very bold
boy, and, instead of obeying his conscience, he
climbed up after him. The branches of the
old tree were wide apart, and the boys found it
pretty hard work to get from one to the next
above it. But at last they got to the nest.
There were five eggs in it, and Philip took them






8 STORY OF THE.E.I,













L i 1.1 ,,1, .i~ .~ -i~~.-------------------------- ------ ,i.ik L






AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 89

out. When he had handed two to his com-
panion, he put the remaining three into his
own pocket. He then destroyed the nest;
broke it all to pieces, and it lay scattered on
the ground.
After the boys had finished their work, they
began to descend. But they had not gone far
down before the limb, on which they both had
stopped a moment to take another look at their
eggs, broke, and fell with them. They lay for
some time unconscious on the cold earth.
When they came to their senses again, it was
found that Philip had sprained his ankle, and
the other boy's arm was broken. By-and-by
they started for their homes in the village;
but every few minutes they were overcome by
pain, and had to sit down by the roadside to
rest. I can hardly understand how they ever
succeeded in getting into town; but they did
accomplish it at length, and without any assis-
tance either.
Just before they reached home, Philip said,
'When my father asks me what is the matter
with my foot, I will tell him that I only slipped,






40 A STORY OF THE SEA,

and hurt it a little. You must do the same
thing,-I mean that you must tell your father
that your arm is only sore a little.'
'Indeed I will not,' replied the other. 'It is
bad enough to rob a bird's nest, without telling
a falsehood about it. I ought to suffer for my
disobedience; but I won't lie for anybody.'
When Philip got home, he was asked by his
parents why he limped, so much. He answered
that he had slipped into a ditch while he was
out in the woods, and had hurt his foot a little.
'But,' he added, 'it does not pain me much
now, and by to-morrow I shall not feel it at all.'
But his foot grew worse. On the fifth day
it pained him so much that he had to tell the
whole truth, that he had fallen from a tree,
and had sprained his foot. Then the doctor
was sent for; and when he came in, and looked
at Philip's foot, he said; 'I am very sorry, very
sorry, I was not sent for before. I fear it is
too late to set this boy's foot right again.' He
was correct, too; for after he had cured the
pain, he found himself unable to get the ankle-
bone in its proper place again. So the sprained






AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 41

ankle remained at least four inches shorter than
the other one. Now he has to walk on a
crutch, and will be a cripple to the end of his
life.
When the other boy reached his home, he was
asked what was the matter. He answered: I
have disobeyed you, father. I went into the
wood this morning, and climbed up an old oak-
tree to rob a bird's nest. The branch gave
way; and then I fell, and broke my arm. I
hope you will forgive me. I have learned a
lesson by sad experience. Depend upon it, I
will obey you in the future.'
The doctor was sent for, and by his careful
attention he was perfectly restored in seven
weeks from the day of his accident.
Now I have two questions to ask.
The first is, What good did these boys get
by robbing the bird's nest ?
My second question is, After the nest was
robbed, and the boys had fallen, who did right,
and who came out best,-the boy who told a.
falsehood, or the one who confessed the truth ?






42 A STORY OF THE SEA,



THE BOY THAT CARED FOR SPARROWS.

T HE children of a free-school had a sum-
mer treat given to them, and they were
taken into the country to spend a happy day
among fields and birds and flowers.
There was one very kind little boy among
the merry party, who saw two other lads teas-
ing two sparrows by tying string to their legs,
and letting them fly a little way, and then
pulling them back. The little fellow was quite
grieved for the poor birds; and though he did
not scold the tormentors, he offered them a
halfpenny, all he had, to give him the fright-
ened sparrows. They agreed to do so; and at
once the kind-hearted fellow gave them leave
to fly away to their own homes in the trees;
and he was made very glad and happy.
The Bible teaches us that even the fowls of
the air are cared for by their Maker: 'Behold
the fowls of the air: for they sow not, neither
do they reap; yet your heavenly Father












'A
I I






44 A STORY OF THE SEA,

feedeth them.' Even a little sparrow does not
fall to the ground without His notice. Per-
haps the little boy thought of this.



THE FISHERMAN'S COTTAGE.

W E always love to see children ready to
help their parents; and what a lesson
the poor may teach the rich in this respect!
From earliest childhood one little body has to
help another, and to try to make the hard-
worked mother's toil lighter. It is sad to see
children overworked; but we do often see
bright and happy faces in the cottage kitchen,
while in the nursery and parlour we see fret-
ful, uneasy countenances. Try to do some-
thing to help and amuse each other, and you
will not have so many weary hours. The
fisherman's young daughter has not a very
nice work to do; but she is happy to help the
dear father who runs so many risks to get
them bread, by preparing bait, and hooking it
on the line to catch the fish. It is a very















10


r4 ,1






ii i I









iii ii I






46 A STORY OF THE SEA,

pretty sight to view the companies of fisher-
men's wives and elder daughters, in their red
petticoats and blue stockings, busy on the rocl;
collecting the mussels and periwinkles that
adhere to them. The little ones can get them
out of the shell, and so there need be no idle
hands at home. Those who live by the seaside
often have their hearts grieved to hear, after
a stormy night, of many a brave fisherman and
his sons having gone down in their little boats;
and they hasten to comfort and help the poor
widow and fatherless children. We know
some ministers who never forget to pray to
God for fishermen; and, dear children,, your
Father in heaven will not despise your prayers
if you ask Him to preserve the lives of those
so dear to you. God has often in. His word
remembered those who go forth on the mighty
deep, and has promised to hear them in their
distress, and to make the storm a calm.
You remember Jesus loved the fishermen,
and chose some of His disciples from their
boats and nets to follow Him, and preach His
Gospel.





AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 47



D ON' THROW STONES.
' 0 ndt throw stones my boy; you may
L' hurt .some one.'
'I do not throw them at anybody, sir.
What harm does it do for me to throw stones
at the fence ? '
You cannot tell, my youug- ft lend, who may
be behind the fence; and the stone you throw
for sport may cause a serious hurt.'
'I do not see any harm in throwing stones.'
'I am very sorry to see you persist in doing
"a mischievous thing, and add bad manners to
"a bad habit.'
Such was the conversation reported in The
Children's Missionary Record some years ago.
Lately in the streets of London we saw the
scene depicted, in our wood-cut. Some boys
were throwing, .tones: one hit a poor little
fellow in the eye, and injured it severely;
"another stone struck a cab-horse on the head,
which made it start back.
















a '- --* .f






AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 49

But more serious accidents sometimes occur
from this very foolish practice. Two are re-
lated in the Record above referred to. I have
just seen, says the writer, accounts of two sad
accidents from throwing stones, which ought
to be a warning to boys against this foolish
and dangerous habit. A young man was
riding on horseback, when a stone, thrown by
a little boy, hit the horse and frightened him,
so that he started and threw the young man
on the ground, and injured him very much.
The horse ran on through the street, and
struck a woman, knocking her senseless upon
the curb-stone. She was sadly injured in the
head, and so bruised that it is doubtful
whether she will recover. It seemed a very
small thing for the little boy to throw a stone;
but the result was dreadful. If the woman
should die, do you suppose that boy will ever
forgive himself for throwing the stone ?
But the other story is still more sad. A
youth was returning home from school. Just
as he was entering his father's gate he heard
a sound in the street, and, turning his head,
D






50 A STORY OF TIHE SEA,

was struck by a stone thrown by a little boy,
which hit him in the eye, and destroyed his
sight. Now that poor youth must go all his
days with a blind eye, just because the other
little fellow would amuse himself by throwing
stones. These two facts met my eye the same
day in the newspapers, which show that such
things occur very often. And probably, if, in
the last case, the stone had hit the boy on the
temple, it would have killed him. Again,
then, I say, DON'T THROW STONES.



GATHERING FIR-CONES.

B EFORE I talk a little about gathering
fir-cones, I should like, dear children, to
tell you something about fir-trees.
There are several kinds of them, each having
an interest of its own; but for the present we
shall speak only of two or. three.
We will begin with the larch. This is a very
graceful tree; and in the spring, when its






"AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 51

young leaves have just burst into life, it has a
peculiar, bright, yellowish-green tint, possessed
by no other tree of our forests. It produces
timber of great excellence and value, not only
for domestic, but for naval purposes. It is also
valuable for the tanner, and a kind of turpen-
tine is got from it. 'From the boiled inner
bark, mixed with rye-flour, and afterwards
buried for a few hours in the snow, the hardy
Siberian hunters prepare a sort of leaven, with
which to supply the place of common leaven
when the latter is destroyed, as it frequently
is, by the intense cold to which these men are
exposed in the pursuit of game.' You per.
ceive, therefore, that in the larch we have, not
only a beautiful object to look upon, but also
an exceedingly useful one.
Another very interesting tree is the Scot's fir
of Europe. Its timber, too, is very useful. It
is excellent for making masts of vessels. It
makes good charcoal for forges; but its most
important product is a resinous matter, con-
sisting of tar, pitch, and turpentine.
We have also the Norway spruce-fir, a native
D2






52 A STORY OF THE SEA,

of the mountainous parts of the north of
Europe. In Norway it constitutes the princi-
pal timber. It is found all over Siberia, and
is considered by the wandering tribes a certain
sign of the presence of springs of water.
When growing singly in rich soil, separate
from other trees, this forms one of the most
beautiful objects that can be imagined, with
its long drooping branches touching the very
ground, and its regular pyramidal figure.
We now come to another kind of fir, of
which, probably, most of our readers have often
read. If you open your Bibles, and turn to
1st Kings, in the 5th, 6th, and 7th chapters
you learn how largely Solomon employed the
cedars of Lebanon in building the beautiful
temple which he dedicated to God. 'Mount
Lebanon and the range of Taurus are the
native spots of this most stately and mag-
nificent tree, which compensates for its want
of height by its huge, wide-spreading arms,
each of which is almost a tree in itself.'
The seeds of all these trees are contained in
the cones which hang from the branches;. and






AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 53



t -




S: i i


.- 5. -2-
ifi






54 A STORY 0Q' TIE SEA,

beautiful things they are, some of them green,
some tinged with purple, and others a rich
brown. Some are large, smooth, and hand-
some; while others are short and jagged.
The little girl in the picture, with her apron
full of cones, reminds me of some of my own
youthful exploits. I once lived quite in the
country. Our house stood only a little way
from a thick forest of firs. We could see little
else but tall, dark trees in the distance. The
high road seemed lost in the woods, and, in-
deed, passed right through them.
We were early risers in those days; and
often, while the dew was yet lying on the
flowers, a band of us had been roaming for an
hour or.two among the trees, collecting mosses
and ferns, picking sprays of the yellow broom,
and gathering the fragrant blossoms of the
prickly furze, returning to deposit our trea-
sures at home, and enjoy the comfortable break-
fast for which our early walk had given us
a sharp appetite. When the sun had risen
higher, off we wVrt ag.dii, to pursue our
pleasant work.





AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 55

We never seemed to grow weary of these
rambles. There was always something new
in flower or grass or lichen to pluck. Sudden
gleams of sunshine, lighting up some tree or
nook, while the forest around lay in deep
shadow, delighted our young eyes. Then the
pleasure of sitting down to rest ourselves in
some more open spot, where we could watch
the clouds sailing over the tops of the solemn-
looking old fir-trees In our fancy they took
the shape of old ruins, castles with their battle-
ments filled with warriors, from which, while
we watched them, we weaved many a tale, still
unfinished, as they dissolved into some other
fairy scene-some hill or valley, or even one
of the Scripture scenes which we had pored
over in our Bibles. I have looked on many
a scene since then; but none lingers more re-
freshingly in my memory than those glimpses
of airy beauty and loveliness. How we used
to sit and 'listen to the silence!' nothing to
break it but the soft, melancholy coo,' coo'
of the wood-pigeon, or the distant cawing of the
rooks, or the soothing sound of some hidden






56 A STORY OF THE SEA,

brook; till we were awe-struck by the mys-
terious stillness, and glad to jump up and run
off to play, and regain our gaiety.
One of our favourite expeditions, at another
time of the year, was to hunt for these fir.
cones, about which we have been speaking.
We vied with each other who could find the
greatest number, and carry the most home.
We greatly enjoyed seeing the kitchen fire
heaped high with them, until they became one
mass of clear, red, glowing embers, sending
forth their pleasant smell and agreeable warmth;
while over all swung the 'girdle' (a large
round iron plate), on which were baked the
cakes which were to be consumed at tea-time.
Dear children, I can wish you no more de-
lightful holiday, in summer-time, than a day's
ramble in the woods, with some kind friend to
point out and explain the many objects of
interest you would meet with at every step,
and who will lead your thoughts up from these
beautiful works to the Maker of them all, and
will teach you to say from the heart, 'My
Father made all these.'





AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 67



DECISION.
MORE than half a century ago, a boy was
put apprentice to one of our ordinary
trades.
There was nothing very remarkable about
him, with, perhaps, one exception-he promised
to be a pious lad. But, alas in his case, as
in many others, this early goodness soon passed
away. He had to sleep with an ungodly
apprentice; and, on retiring to rest, shame
of being seen to pray so shook his firmness,
that, like his wicked companion, he hurried
to bed without bending the knee. Again and
again this was done. His regard for old
lessons got less and less; by-and-by he threw
them off altogether, and seemed like a boy
who had never known anything better.
In course of time, however, another ap-
prentice came to his master. He also slept in
the same room. Like a lad accustomed to pray,
the new apprentice quietly knelt to offer prayer










1; ,~111/.III

/' / J.
I .
~ ( 4DIA '






AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 69

to God on retiring to rest. This was seen with -
deep emotion by the other. Conscience at once
and severely condemned his want of firmness.
Shame to pray in the presence of his fellow
apprentice was the first step in his downward
course. The poor, unhappy, and fallen youth
was once more brought to reflection; and, with
a firmer purpose than ever, he consecrated him-
self to the service of God. In after-life he
became a useful and honoured minister; and,
after turning very many to righteousness, he
passed away to glory. This minister was the
beloved and revered John Angell James, of
Birmingham! How much harm may we get
from one act of indecision! and how much
good may be done by one act of decision Who
can tell what may result from the turning of
an apprentice boy to goodness ? Who cannot
be useful ? This example of juvenile decision
was the means of turning a poor apostate youth
to a course whose glorious issues eternity alone
can reveal.






60 A STORY OP TLE SEA,



THE PAGE WHO LOVED HIS MOTHER.

SREDERICK the Great, King of Prussia,
on one occasion rang in vain for his page,
and, upon going into the ante-room, found that
the boy had fallen asleep. On looking at him,
he observed a portion of a letter hanging out
of the page's pocket. From its contents he
found that it came from the boy's mother. In
it she thanked him for his thoughtfulness in
sending her a portion of his wages, and ex-
horted him to be good, temperate, and faithful
to the king, his master. Frederick replaced
the letter, and returned to his room. He then
got a number of gold coins, which he placed
in the boy's pocket, and, returning again, rang
the bell violently. The page awoke, and an-
swered the summons. The king accused him
of having been asleep. He was much con-
fused, and tried to make an apology. In the
midst of his agitation, his hand found its way
to his pocket. To his utter amazement, he






AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 61







'i- R





.4
62 A STORY OF THE SEA,

felt the gold. He was startled; on the instant
he went down before the king, and in agony
exclaimed, Some one has been plotting my
ruin; here are coins in my pocket: I know
nothing of the money.' The king soon re-
lieved him of all his fears% He told him to
send part of the money to his mother; and
comforted him by the assurance that he would
care for both his mother, and himself.1
That boy's love for and obledih:ti ce to his
mother brought him success in life. He was
a dutiful son, and an honest boy. And better
than an. earthly king's regard and reward was
God's:approval and favour,. Dear children,
happy in-having mothers who give you good
advice, and bring you up in the fear of God,
try to be and to do what you know -vill ple,-.a
theip, and you will secure, as you grow up,
the b'e; respect, and confidence of men;-per-
ala4 ,mle temporal good; certainly, a better
portion than one of silver and gold; the love
and care God will bestow on a dutiful, obedient
child.






AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 66



RED RIDING-HOOD, WITH A MORAL


W ELL, to be sure! What a funny pic-
ture.
Little Red Riding-Hood, with her scarlet
cloak and small basket, setting out on her dis-
astrous journey, but no wolf in sight. Of
course you all know the nursery tale, and that,
from beginning to end, it is what we call a
fiction. That means, that there is no truth
at all in it.
Little Red Riding-Hood never lived; there-
fore the basket, cloak, sick grandmother, and
alarming wolf were all invented by some witty
person who has thought, I will write a story
to make little folks afraid of wolves, and to
teach them, when they are sent on errands, not
to talk with strangers by the way for fear of
mischief.'
Now I have been asked to point a moral,
not to adorn the tale; and, on thinking it over,







64 A STORY OF THE SEA,









s /

I -



W l, -4













it came into my mind that in one sense my
young readers may be compared to 'Red
Riding Hood,' because they are sure to meet





AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 65

with a far worse wolf, in their journey through
life, than did the ill-fated little damsel in the
story. Your wolf is a tempting, fair-spoken
being, only too ready to live in your home, to
peep into all your concerns, to travel by your
side, persuade you to talk and loiter with him
when you should flee for your life. In your
smallest act of disobedience, and in your worst
ill-doings, he is always at your elbow, per-
suading you there is no harm meant. He
deceives, amuses, and pleases you; and with
the softest voice and most tempting ways con-
ceals from you his fierce eyes and large, hungry
teeth. You all know his evil, cruel nature,
and yet you do not shun him; nay, you have
become so friendly with him in your daily life,
that you are used to excuse his meanness and
treachery to yourselves, and yet most ready to
blame your neighbours for giving him house
and hearth. The world is much older since'
this evil-minded creature followed our first
parents' lamentable way out of the blooming
garden of Eden, and since then he has kept close
to every son and daughter of Adam and Eve.
E






66 A STORY OF THE SEA,

From the cradle to the grave he is your most
dreadful and unmerciful foe; one that it should
be your daily and hourly work to shut out
from your presence, to hate the very sight of,
and to be always on your guard lest he steal
in, to kill and to devour: for, alas! his ten-
derest mercies are cruel, and to those who
keep him as their constant companion he be-
comes in the end an evil beast, a beast of prey,
out of whose mouth they find no escape.
I cannot now do more than remind you of
the only King who can save you or me from
the cruel grasp of Satan, the terrible and too
familiar name of this ravenous beast. Think
of the great Shepherd who gave His life for
the sheep, because He beheld from afar off
the wolf 'who catcheth the sheep, and scat-
tereth them.'
Here I live, in sore distress,
Fearing, watching, hour by hour ;
For my foes around me press,
And I know their craft and power.
Lord, Thy lamb can never be
Safe one moment but with Thee.






AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 67

SO Lord Jesus, let me not
'Mid the ravening wolves e'er fall;
Help me as a Shepherd ought,
That I may escape them all:
Bear me homeward in Thy breast
To Thy fold of endless rest.'



THE THORN IN THE FOOT.

IN this pretty picture a poor boy has run
a thorn into his foot. No wonder, as he
has been rambling in the lanes and woods
without shoes or stockings. How sad it is
that so many poor children are thus destitute,
and have no kind parents to provide for them!
Happily he has found- two well-dressed little
friends, who have kind and loving hearts, as
any one may see from the sweet expression of
their countenances. Look how eagerly the
little girl is watching her clever brother trying
to take out the thorn; and mark the grateful
look, mingled with pain, in the young sufferer's
face. We feel qr'te sure that the pleasures
E2








- ^ "*' ,-> c*

00
4 2IV'j


-7i






AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 69

of that afternoon's country ramble would be
doubled to the kind children, and that, as they
returned home with their autumn harvest
of nuts and blackberries, they would feel the
blessedness which doing a true kindness always
brings to the heart. God is good to all, and
His tender mercies are over all His works.'
He has made this beautiful world to delight
the eyes of all His creatures. The poor, as
well as the rich, have eyes to delight in the
works of His hands and hearts to dance for
joy when all nature smiles and bids them
rejoice. Never spurn one of God's creatures,
however humble; but fill up your lives with
gentle words and kindly actions to those who
so much need them. You will 'in no wise
lose' your 'reward.' You will win the love
of many aching hearts, and God's blessing
will follow you through life, because you have
considered the poor.






70 A STORY OF THE SEA



HOW JAMES PRICE LIVED AND DIED.
T WO miles from Leominster is the pretty
little village of Luston. Surrounded by
beautiful orchards and fields, it is a pleasant
spot when the perfume of the new-mown hay
is wafted on the summer air, or the rich fruits
of autumn hang from the laden trees.
It was from this rural village that little
James, with his mother, one Friday, set out
for the market-town, full of life and spirits,
and little thinking that his active feet would
never again tread the threshold of his much.
loved home.
The purchases had been made, the bustle of
the market left behind, and James, attracted
by the flowers in the hedgerows, or the birds
that flitted among the bushes, lingered at some
little distance behind his mother, who reached
her cottage-door before he had ascended the
last short hill that led to the village.
Here, in the road, a horse had been loosed





AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 71

from the shafts of a cart, and lay rolling and
plunging violently. In passing, James, in
some way or other, received a kick, and fell,
wounded and bleeding. He was soon carried
unconscious to the home he had left so blithely
a few hours before. It was found that his
skull was badly fractured, and that it was
most likely, in a short time, death would
follow. But, though so young, he was not
unprepared for the hour of sudden suffering
and death, as the following notes of his brief
life will show.
James Price was born on the 6th of October,
1857; and so was not eight years of age
when he met with the accident which I have
described. From an early age lie manifested a
love towards the Saviour.' If his mother said,
'Now, Jemmy, we are quite alone,' he would
quickly answer, 'No; Jesus is here.' When
inclined to, give way to anger, he would often
try to overcome.the bad feeling, and say, 'Go
away, naughty spirit;' or, 'Get behind me,
Satan.' He would then look up with a smile,
and say, 'Naughty spirit gone away now.! '









~j'I -,
~~-i V

~F-' -.i


/"

1 I ~. -~j

F~ __ ____ ___ __ _






AND OTHEI INCIDENTS. 78

James was particularly fond of prayer.
When his mother asked him, in the course of
the day, Would you like to pray a little now ? '
he would say, Oh yes, mother; do let us pray
and sing two or three times.' If asked to do
anything after rising in the morning, he would
say, 'Please let us have our prayer-meeting
first.' He often used words like these.: O
Lord, help me, and bless me, and teach me to
do what is right. Take away this stony heart,
and give me a heart of flesh. If it be Thy
divine will, draw my father close to the
wounded side of Jesus, for His sake.'
He was also a lover of the Bible, and would
frequently say, 'Dear mother, do please read
me one more chapter.' He was particularly
fond of the histories of Joseph and David.
Seeing his mother in trouble one day, he
said to her, 'Mother, I told God what you
were crying about this morning as I went to
school.'
James was also devotedly attached to God's
house and the Sunday-school. He not only
seemed to think that attendance there was a






74 A STORY OF THE SEA,

duty he must not neglect, but he esteemed it
a pleasure and a privilege too great to be
slighted. He would watch at the window
when the minister was expected, and some-
times run to meet him. As a great favour
and enjoyment, he would beg to be allowed to
stay up, and go to chapel on the week even.
ing, when the minister came to the village.
His mother does not remember his proposing
any future plan without saying, 'If God spare
me.' He often repeated some solemn words
he had heard from a preacher's lips respecting
eternal death, and seemed greatly impressed
by them.
Such was little James in days of health and
life; but now we come to see him in days of
suffering and weakness.
His mother, resigning herself to the will of
God, prayed earnestly, on the morning after
the accident, that, if her darling child was
about to be taken from her, his speech and
understanding might be restored to him; and
that her heart might be comforted by some
utterances that might show his feelings and






AN.D OTHER INCIDENTS. 75

his views in prospect of death. Soon after-
wards he opened his lips, and repeated,-

'There is a happy land,
Far, far, away!'

and in the afternoon sang with a clear voice
the whole hymn. A lady called, and asked
him, 'Is Jemmy going to heaven? He
answered quickly, 'Yes, ma'am.' She said,
'How does Jemmy know he can go to heaven?'
He replied, 'Because Jesus died for me.'
Some time after he was conscious again, and
a friend said, 'What shall I sing, Jemmy '
He replied-

'My God, my Father, whilst I stray
Far from my home, in life's rough way,
O, teach me from my heart to say,
Thy will be done I" '

Afterwards, when his mother sang to him,-

0 sing to me of heaven,
When I'm about to die;
Sing songs of holy ecstasy,
To waft my soul on high :'






"76 A STORY OF THE SEA,

he took up the second verse, and sweetly sang
it himself.
The last day of his life was spent in a state
of unconsciousness. I saw him on the Tues-
day evening following the accident; but he
did not open his eyes or know me. I prayed by
his bedside, and sought to make the solemn
occasion profitable to his father and friends;
and on Wednesday morning he passed away,
to be 'for ever with the Lord.'
Dear children, this narrative shows us that
none are too young to die, and that death may
come to us suddenly and violently. It teaches
us, too, that a death-bed is a very unsuitable
place for repentance and seeking the Saviour.
It is very unlikely that little James could have
thought of and found God in those short and
uncertain hours of consciousness, if he had
not sought Him before. We learn, also, that,
though we may be called to die suddenly and
painfully, the love of God will prepare us for,
and support us in, that awful hour. 'Seek,'
then, 'the Lord while He may be found, call
ye upon Him while He is near.'






AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 77




BEGIN THE NEW YEAR WELL.

HAVE our young readers ever thought,
amid their new year's festivities, how
many poor, aged, and afflicted persons there
are who have no one to come in and wish them
a 'happy new year,' and remind them of the
days of their youth, when they too were glad ?
Now there is one way of making our own
happiness sure; and that is, by trying to make
others happy. Let our bright and active
young friends each think of some one to whom
they will try to bring joy and gladness. Let
them go forth with a pleasant greeting, a little
gift to some lone widow in her little cottage;
or let them read words of comfort from the
book of God to those who are unable to read
for themselves. We have heard of a poor
aged widow who could neither read the Bible,
nor live without hearing it read, so much
hope and joy did she derive from God's precious






-A ____ l. i 'i I I Il 1 ii
._r.mL''i






AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 79

promises. There was a cottage near hers,
where dwelt a shepherd, who had a little boy
who could read; but he had not learnt to try
to please others, and he chose rather to play
than to read. The old woman resolved to rise
an hour sooner in the morning, to spin one
halfpennyworth more than she earned; and
with this she hired the shepherd's boy to read
her a chapter every evening, which he very
gladly agreed to do. This made her so happy
as to say, 'The lines are fallen to me in plea-
sant places.'
We advise every one who has the oppor-
tunity to go and read the word of God to those
who desire it 'without money and without
price;' for thus freely is the Gospel offered
both to young and old. God will bless and
reward those who thus try to please others
better than themselves.





80 A STOBY OF THE SEA,




HAR VEST B YMN.
NOW Autumn strews on every plain
His mellow fruits and fertile grain;
And laughing Plenty, crowned with sheaves,
With purple grapes, and spreading leaves,
In rich profusion pours around
Her flowing treasures on the ground.
Oh! mark the great, the liberal Hand
That scatters blessings o'er the land;
And to the God of nature raise
The grateful song, the hymn of praise.

The infant corn in vernal hours
He nurtured with His gentle showers,
And bade the summer clouds diffuse
Their balmy store of geniafdews.
He marked the tender stem arise,
Till ripened by the glowing skies;
And now, matured His work, behold
The cheering harvest waves in gold.





AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 81











_
i ---= -

:2 .-~r
r" _
:.',--





82 A STORY OF T'HE SEA,

To nature's God with joy we raise
The grateful song, the hymn of praise.
The valleys echo to the strains
Of blooming maids and village swains:
To Him they tune the lay sincere,
Whose bounty crowns the smiling year;
The sounds from every woodland borne,
The sighing wind that bends the corn,
The yellow fields around proclaim
His mighty, everlasting name.
To nature's God united raise
The grateful song, the hymn of praise.




FROST AND SNOW,
AND THEIR TEMPTATIONS TO THE THOUGHTLESS.

WE wish all our little friends, this happy
new year's tide, to do as many kind and
pleasant things as they can think of. We
could tell them of many kindly acts by which
they might make many glad; but it is of un-





AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 83

pleasant, unkind things we want now to say
a few words. We feel sure that our little
readers would be quite shocked at the idea of
being told not to throw a poor man down, and
make him sprain his ankle or break his arm,
and so cause him to be laid up, not able to
work for his wife and little children, in the cold
winter. They would be still more shocked
if we bid them beware of making a cripple
of a little, merry, active child running spor-
tively along the street to keep warm on a cold
morning. And more than all, they would be
shocked if we told them not to cause the death
of a poor aged woman, going out, perhaps,
some clear, frosty morning, the first time for
many weeks, to fetch some kind lady's new
year's gift.
But all these things have been done, and
may be done again, by thoughtless boys who
slide along our streets, and make them as
bright and slippery as glass. Remember the
lines,-
'Evil is wrought by want of thought,
As well as want of heart.'
F2












.. ... .








II II

III






AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 85

Beware then, boys, of making slides in the
streets.
We would also say, If you do enjoy a merry
game of snowball, with a party of young
friends, all agreed to act in good part together,
do not unkindly toss one to startle a passer-by,
as we have seen many naughty boys do.
We think we hardly need say, Never put a
stone into a snowball. We hope it is only very
wicked children who do this. It is an easy
thing thus to put out an eye; and we have
read of a boy, full of malice to another boy,
who actually did this very thing.
Think, then, how you may keep from doing
unpleasant things out of doors as well as at
home.



THE LAST LEIR.

"TNOLE George's kind letters were always
welcome. They were usually delivered
by the last post at night. They were inclosed
in very thin envelopes, and bore a foreign






86 A STORY OF THE SEA,

stamp. Whoever, therefore, received the letter
from the postman knew at once where it had
come from, and all who happened to be awake
were told that 'a letter from Uncle George
had arrived.' They were generally short,
often too short; but they always had so much
love and goodness in them, that they were
read several times over, and then carefully
preserved. Frequently the children were
named separately, and a few kind words were
said, and sometimes a special question asked
about each.
For several months, however, there had
always been some question about' poor Nelly's
health.' The dear child referred to had long
given indications that she must leave those
who loved her so much. The answer to uncle's
questions had gradually shown that no hopes
were entertained of her recovery. 'Worse
and worse,' fading away,' almost gone,'
were the sorrowful words that told Uncle
George that 'poor Kelly' would soon be num.
bered with the dead.
One evening the little sufferer was sitting






AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 87

up in bed, full of pain, but 'joyful through
hope,' fearing the wearisomeness of the coming
night, yet confiding with unshaken trust in
her heavenly Father, when the postman's
knock was heard. It was the last post; the
letter bore a foreign stamp, and was inclosed
in a thin envelope. It was announced at once,
therefore, that there was, a letter from uncle.'
Nelly brightened up at the announcement, and
was greatly pleased when she was told that
there was a letter inclosed for her. There
was a painful silence as the family gathered
round the sick-bed to hear the letter read, for
all knew the sad significance there was in it.
It was as follows :-

'MY DEAR LITTLE HELEN,
'I am very sorry to hear that you are ill,
and that you suffer so much from your cough.
Your dear father tells me that you are, per-
haps, going to heaven soon; and that you
would like to be there with Jesus, who died
for you, and suffered here below, sLat IH
might prepare a place for you above. I hop,





88 A STORY OF THE SEA,

we shall all meet you there one day, and then
we will sing of Him, and to Him, who has
redeemed us. I should like to meet you again
on earth, but we cannot say whether this will
be or not; we will, however, all try to say, as
you used to sing, Thy will be done." Be-
lieve me, my dear little Helen, that I love you
very much, and pray for you, that when your
Father in heaven wills to take you, it may be
to His side.
'Your affectionate
'UNCLE GEORGE.'

All who sat round the sick child wept as
the letter was read, because they felt sure it
was the last she would receive. But the child
wept not. She took the letter in her hands,
and silently grasped the little -messenger of
love, casting on it a look of exquisite satis-
faction. Then she said, 'Tell dear Uncle
George that I love him very much, that I long
to see him, but that I must wait till he comes

The same company was gathered round the






AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 89

bed the next evening, and again all were weep-
ing; for another message for the little suf-
ferer had arrived, sent by the King of kings.
It said, 'It is enough; come up hither.' No
tear bedewed her languid eye, but a heavenly
joy spread over her face, when she found that
the time for her deliverance from sorrow and
pain had come.


TRUSTING FATHER.

' OHNNY, don't you think you have as
Much as you can carry ? said Frank to
his brother, who was standing with open arms,
receiving the bundles his father placed upon
them. 'You've more than you can carry
now !'
'Never mind,' said Johnny, in a sweet,
happy voice; 'my father knows how much I
can carry! '
How long it takes some of us to learn the
lesson little Johnny had by heart, 'Father
knows how much I can carry!' No grum-






90 A'STORY OF THE SEA,






SI II

















bling, no discontent, but a sweet trust in his
father's love and care that he should not be
overburdened. Our heavenly Father never






AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 91

lays a burden upon us that we cannot bear.
Do we trust Him as little Johnny did his
father ?
A gentleman once found his little boy punch-
ing holes in a piece of leather, and to teach
him not to meddle with the tool again, he
asked him to put out his tongue, that he
might use the punch on that. The little boy
hung back, when his little sister, three years
old, who had been eagerly watching him,
sprang forward and said, 'I will do it, papa,'
putting out her tongue as she spoke.
To put her to the test, the father laid on the
punch. She showed no fear, and so he pressed
it closer, but she stood looking up smilingly
into his face until, overcome, he withdrew the
instrument.
I cnew you wouldn't do it, papa !' said the
trusting little girl; I knew papa wouldn't
hurt his little Lizzie !'
Oh, when can we learn, like little Lizzie, to
trust a FAther's hand !





92 A- STORY OF THE SEA,



SHE COULDN'T T UST HIM.

ALL of you doubtless, have heard of Mr.
P. P. Bliss, who wrote so many of those
beautiful hymns and songs which Mr. Sankey
sang when he came over to this country from
America; and you will not be surprised when
I tell you that the author of I am so glad
that our Father in heaven,' &c., was very fond
of little children. He had two little boys of his
own, Paul and George, whom he loved dearly;
but though he loved them so much he loved
the Lord Jesus far more, and for His sake
he would often leave his dear children and
his happy home for months and months to-
gether, and travel from town to town, spread-
ing the glorious news of salvation and singing
of the Saviour's love.
But even when he was away from home,
Mr. Bliss never forgot little Paul and George.
Well, one year when he had not seen them
for a long while, he was preparing to return






AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 93

just about Christmas time, and was buying
beautiful Christmas presents for his little boys.
As he came near the toy-shop he noticed a
poor, shabbily dressed little girl looking wist-
fully at the tempting array of dolls displayed
in the window; poor child she had no one to
buy toys for her. I daresay she never had a
doll in her life. Mr. Bliss noticed the little_
girl, and felt quite sorry for her; then quick '
as a ray of sunlight, a kind thought entered
his mind, and going up to the child, he said
in his most winning tone : 'Now, just pick the
one that you want, and you shall have it. I
will g5 in and buy it for you.' Mr. Bliss knew
which of the waxen ladies he thought the
prettiest, and he waited quite eagerly to see
which she would choose. Oh, how nice for
the poor girl!' you think. 'Was she not
delighted and happy now?' No; she was
frightened and vexed, for she couldn't trust
him. She thought the tall, bearded stranger
must be teasing her; and so, though he re-
peatedly assured her that she could have a
doll if she liked, she threw her shawl over her





94 A STORY OF THE SEA,

head and ran off with a sad look of distrust
and fear in her face that went right to good
Mr. Bliss' heart. 'I was real grieved,' he
said, when he told the story, 'that the little
one would not let me do for her what I wanted,
and that she distrusted me, when I just
wished with all my heart to make her happy.
I think I understand a little better how the
Lord feels at our unbelief of His precious
promises. That is just the way sinners treat
Christ.'
Now, I should like all the little boys and
girls who feel so sorry that the poor girl did
not trust Mr. Bliss, and let him make her
happy by the gift of a beautiful doll, to ask
themselves whether they have never treated
the Lord Jesus in that way themselves. You
know He has far, far better gifts for you.
Have you not heard His voice calling you to
come to Him and learn-
'How sweet it is to praise and pray I

My blessing will no sorrow give,
I will their sunshine be.





AND OTHER INCIDENTS. 95

My grace shall teach them how to live,
Come, happy ones, to Me '

But perhaps you did not really believe it
would make you so much happier to serve
Jesus, and when your mother or your teacher
has talked to you about the joy and blessed-
ness of giving your hearts to God, it may be
you have felt vexed and a little frightened,
and wished they would not 'bother you about
religion.' Oh! if you had had any idea of all
the blessedness religion would bring you, you
would have thought it no-more a bother than
the little girl would have thought it to have
the beautiful doll if she had only trusted Mr.
Bliss. Will you, my dear readers, as the glad
Christmas time comes round, and you have so
many Christmas gifts from your kind friends,
let the Lord Jesus give you the great gift
of Himself, that He is waiting to bestow, and
give Him in return all He asks-your hearts ?



HAYMAN BROTHERS AND LILLY, HATTON HOUSE, E.C.



























/





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