• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Horace, won't you sing?
 Baby Herbert
 Dressed for a ride
 Baby's ride on the donkey
 Herbert's kittens
 Supper
 Robbie's cow
 Daisy's trouble
 Somebody's baby
 Cousin Nellie
 Herbert and Annie
 Stephie and the sea
 The dog thief
 Annie's trouble
 Back Cover






Title: Little baby buds
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00049572/00001
 Material Information
Title: Little baby buds
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 22 cm.
Language: English
Creator: E.P. Dutton (Firm) ( Publisher )
J.J. Little & Co ( Printer )
Publisher: E.P. Dutton & Co.
Place of Publication: New York
Manufacturer: J. J. Little & Co
Publication Date: c1882
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1882   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1882   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1882
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Contains prose and verse.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00049572
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002233077
notis - ALH3479
oclc - 62331812

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Half Title
        Page i
    Frontispiece
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Horace, won't you sing?
        Page 1
    Baby Herbert
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Dressed for a ride
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Baby's ride on the donkey
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Herbert's kittens
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Supper
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Robbie's cow
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Daisy's trouble
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Somebody's baby
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Cousin Nellie
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Herbert and Annie
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Stephie and the sea
        Page 22
        Page 23
    The dog thief
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Annie's trouble
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
Full Text
























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LITTLE BABY BUDS.



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LITTLE BABY BUDS




















NEW YORK
E. P. DUTTON & COMPANY
89 WEST 28D STREET











































Copyright, 1882,
By E. P. DUTTON & CO.





































PRESS OF J. J. LITTLE & CO.,
os$. iS TO o0 ASTOR LACE, NEW YORK.













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"HORACE, won't you sing?"
Said May, "Or read something?"
So Horace read a story,
And sang a little song,
About a little maiden
Who played the whole day long.








BABY HERBERT.

ANNIE CLARK was visiting at her
Grandpa's. One day he asked
her if she would like to go to the city
and see her Mamma. She jumped
up and down in her delight, and was
soon ready. You can imagine her
happiness, on going into her Mam-
ma's room, to find a cunning baby
brother asleep in a crib.
After that she could not leave her
Mamma and the baby any more, and
soon Herbert grew to be a large baby,
who could sit up and play with his
pllaythings, just as you see him in the
picture.












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DRESSED FOR A RIDE. *

HERBERT has been dressed in his
new coat and hat, and is going
out in his pretty new carriage with
the lanterns on the side.
He is so happy to go, he can hardly
keep still enough to have his hat tied
on. At the sight of his carriage, he
jumps and kicks in his nurse's arms,
and his happy little face is a pretty
sight. Many people give him kind
and loving looks as he is taking
his morning ride. Some-times he
rides in a large carriage with his
Mamma, and then you should see
him.












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BABY'S RIDE ON THE
DONKEY.

WHERE is Baby? Let me see.
Way up there? Why, deary me,
How did Baby get so high?
Could he have had wings to fly?

What is this with coat so rough?
Such long ears! Why, sure enough,
It's a donkey; that is so.
Let us see how he can go.

Papa'll hold you, Baby dear,
So you need to have no fear.
Little donkey's good and kind,
If he trots you must not mind.


















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HERBERT'S KITTENS.

HERBERT has been playing with
his kittens and doll, until he is
so tired he has gone to bed with
them. He has fallen asleep, and his
Mamma has covered him up nice and
warm.
The kittens are not sleepy, but keep
still; one of them in his arms, and the
other looking as if she wondered what
it is all about.
I knew a little girl who had a kit-
ten that used to lie in her doll's bed,
and take its nap every day. The little
girl used to dressuher in a doll's night-
dress, and she looked very funny.











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SUPPER.

SUPPER'S ready! Supper's ready!
Where is little Roger's chair?
He must sit up to the table,
Supper's ready, waiting there.

Get his spoon, and get his apron,
Here's his porridge, smoking hot.
Come folks, come. Why will you
stay so?
You can come as well as not.

What comes, Roger, after supper?
I know, kisses all around,
Then a little bcy is tucked up,
In his bed to sleep so sound.






















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ROBBIE'S COW.


"M/JOOLY, Mooly, how are you?
Can you eat, and can you moo?
Tell me, cow, what can you do?"

"I am only made of wood;
Still, they say, I'm very good,
Though I eat no kind of food."

"Mooly, what use are you, pray?
What do you do all the day,
If you can't eat grass or hay?"

"I'm not very smart, you see,
But there's one thing I can be:
Robbie's plaything; that suits me."



















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DAISY'S TROUBLE.


"HOW very sad, my dear, you look.
What is the matter, pray?"
"My doll," she cries, "for want of food
Has fainted quite away.

"I cannot think what I shall do:
She lies so stiff and cold!"
"Oh Daisy, this is very sad!
Have you the doctor told?"

"Indeed I have, and said I thought
For want of food she'd faint!
He truly cried, 'This apple take,
We'll hear no more complaint.'"




















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SOMEBODY'S BABY.

"WNHOSE little baby boy? Some-
body guess.
If you say "Mamma's," then I will say
Yes,"
If you say Papa's," why, Yes," it is
too:
Answer me either way, both ways are
true.
What is the baby's name ? What do
you think ?
Sometimes it's Darling," and some-
times it's Pink!"
Grandma says Baby," and Auntie
says Dove,"
But Mamma calls him her Precious
wee Love."
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COUSIN NELLIE.

HERBERT has been sick, and his
Cousin Nellie is bringing him a
basket of lovely flowers she has picked
from her own garden. What a dear,
sweet girl she is, and in her quaint
bonnet she looks just like a little pic-
ture stepping out of a frame.
I think Herbert will feel better when
he sees her sweet flowers, but sweeter
and brighter her face coming into the
room. I hope some of my little friends
will think some-times to give happi-
ness in the same way, for in giving
pleasure to others you grow happy
yourselves.













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HERBERT AND ANNIE.

IT was not very long now before
Herbert began to go to school,
and he had a very hard time learn-
ing to spell, and the teacher told
him he must print his words on his
slate every day at home, and study
from them.
Annie used to feel so sorry for
him that she was always very near
by to help him all she could.
Just now he is puzzling over the
word "G-o-a-t," and does not know
whether to spell it that way, or
"G-o-t-e."
Which way should you spell it?







































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STEPHIE AND THE SEA.

STEPHIE had been out in a big
boat, with the men who went
fishing, and when they got back the
water was up so high all around, that
some one had to carry him ashore.
"O Mamma," he said, "I want to
be a sailor!" "What would Mamma
do without her little boy?" said she.
"Well, I will stay," said Stephie, "but
I want to take off my stockings and
shoes, and let the waves chase me;
indeed I won't let them catch me."
His Mamma smiled, and Stephie
ran down to the beach and played
till he was tired out.




















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THE DOG THIEF.

yOU have heard so many stories
of good dogs, I will tell you one
of a bad dog, who would steal every
chance he could get. One day he
stole a sheep's-head from a butcher's
shop and ran away with it.
Herbert and his school-mates were
just out of school, and they joined
with the butcher's boy in chasing
the dog, crying "Stop, thief!" "Stop,
thief!" until the dog, well fright-en-ed,
dropped the sheep's-head on the side-
walk, and then ran on, the boys let-
ting him alone as they had the meat
all right.












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ANNIE'S TROUBLE.

HERB E RT and Annie went to their
Uncle John's to spend the sum-
mer, and one day the cousins took
Annie down to the garden. Herbert
did< not go for some time, and he
found them all sitting down without
any shoes on their feet.
What is the matter?" he cried. An-
nie said the gardener found footprints
among the flowers, and took off their
shoes and tried them in the marks,
and finding they fitted left them there.
Herbert brought their shoes and
put them on, and then went to tell
his Uncle about the bad gardener.































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