• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Index
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Content
 Back Cover






Title: The little folk's ladder
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00049568/00001
 Material Information
Title: The little folk's ladder
Physical Description: 32 p. : col. ill. ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Plympton, A. G ( Almira George ), b. 1852
Dodd, Mead & Company ( Publisher )
Brett Lithographing Co ( Lithographer )
Publisher: Dodd, Mead & Company
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1882
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1882   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1882   ( lcsh )
Primers (Instructional books) -- 1882   ( rbgenr )
Alphabet rhymes -- 1882   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1882
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Primers (Instructional books)   ( rbgenr )
Alphabet rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by A.G. Plympton.
General Note: Contains prose and verse.
General Note: Colored illustrated boards by Brett Lith. Co.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00049568
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001751367
notis - AJG4302
oclc - 07747144

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Index
        Page i
    Front Matter
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
    Content
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
Full Text



















4pBi









i u n i





.. . . .
















tz





\ "-&.&-A7 --.-
, N t- --'--- --.- -..-' >,-, -. ,? ,- y1 .... .'.- z1 .' ''' V.'. v
.'" ,"t-',:', . t .*. .' "
S' -'; r ; -
-rI
"-z
i4^ ...',4t -4 .' -i ; ,.- ,
'"a- ,4;g 4 r *' ':. -: .- ..
m. .... r
""_I I -.- u 4 1* I-- "

,.. 4 ... P '."
A I

-, i t" ,
4- 1. -,-


















l d ..


;'' -' .": ... -' .-" : : ....
, / ..'... _ ,- -, :. ., ., ,,.-- ...; :
. --"" ," .., /,,: "', -" --.. .,' . .. .
-",V :_ .,' ' ":-. . ;,-.-.- :" -:-- ... :' ""

,[. : ; ..:'-, . .. ,,-_........ -,-.





-'.;:. .- *. -&.*- ,. r -,
.. .. r.- --
S,, -./.-:, ; ,. '-. ,'
" -- .. ~ .. .. i.

*, : I -. ,- -. - "- i '.y -. I .
.r, ..


11 . ..
,- 5
-_ G --. .: .I -*-. .. I. : .
r 1 .',. .*,. ,,*.



. ,,L .._.- .-. .I. .* ,-- --.1." ... -, .,,.' -- 4 -'-
S.... *a.']-bip a .-- a-s n, b,' ".14 .. | ; ...-;:,. -.--) .... ... .. ,


... . ...... 4.. .... .. ; ,

k -TL
......... ,-:'- -' / -.:..... .- --- .C -. If
~' '-. "t"' ,, ' ."-/'. -" ." 't i/ ,.-




"" y..i.-" ".. """ i "'-" r,.. ---' -

-.- *, .: ,. -. ...-- .-- -














,-,sho t -...-.'' _-
s.. .. .. -'.. .. .

I :N r -c't .,'.,-- .: -,. %. -: ,-, ., 1 1 5
-' =t 'd " .. ,, r*. .., ,w "%" " '- .*
,. ,. ,[r ,3 c;- ./ ,. ..,,~~ .. ... ...l ..,- ,r,!.,...
,~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~r :.,'', ':/ e "_-.. _-'i" .t.: -. ''':,' _" .- I-



















































1 /

.PI


/ ?'r





*/ ; ?. ^ ,* ^ / ^ ., _













hi
S,," (. ) c _ _

'1 *-* (3-Y
3 It) -- I^- S L*'*'-
.'N j ^ ^ ^ ^O -. l- *^ ,

? -U-


4 ,'I



1! 1 J is I~









I.,









re








THE

LITTLE

FOLK'S

Y LADDER.
A. G.

PLYMPTON.

NEW YORK:
DODD, MEAD & COMPANY,
PUBLISHERS.
KCopyright 188, by Dodd, Mead & Company.
Copyright 1888, by Dodd, Mead & Company.







C a

C a t

ii~ ,cat

Sa cat.

See the

See the cat.

n I

I can

I can see

I can see the cat.







a
Ann and a cat.

b at
m at

s r at


Th e
The rat sat on
m e
the mat. e
b e

The dog.
0
See me.
I am on
the dog.








L e i b


it let i-
is met Ai1k
in get
bed -q\

ba by.

I see the baby. It is in bed.
Let me get in the bed


bed
h
a hat Combine the Sounds already learned,
Sto form other sounds.

h it as
b it h as
s it not
h ot








. w. y. boy
my fish boys
boy will S im.
this well yo
,you
now .. .,;.. ,
"how "


little .. ,,
Little boys, can you see the fish?
Can you swim as well as the fish?
Now see how well the fish can swim!

Wh run U -
What sun up
fun ny
Oh my, what
a funny hat! -
It is a sun hat. ii .
The sun is hot
up in the sky.
____________ J J ^____






8

P. K.

Papa eat girl

mamma meat boy

are meal here

milk


Here are Ben and Nan, a boy and

a girl. See them eat milk and meal.


-_ < S-.

? Milk for the

S'-- \ baby boy and

V ^- girl, and meat

S_ fo r p a p a a n d

-T-T -










away she
soon lost : ,
poor tries .
cool world
too dark
seems but
wide little
ride hard
like


Poor little girl.
She has run away
and is lost. She
tries hard not to
cry, but the world
seems so big and
so wide. The sun
has set too, and it will soon be dark.
On the side of the hill is a man. It is
her papa. Will she not like to see him
and ride home to her mamma?






10

r^r_7 --- .



II A .




J!,






(Combine the sounds already learned to form other sounds.)

m ay k ate up

d ay P1 ate c up

g- ay

tr ay See Kate with a

.away tray. What is on

P1 ay the tray. I see a
cup on the tray.








S oak
S' / coat
/ boat
I hope
I alone
"story
don't
-- Hear
___ wants
"put
-, with
_takes
up stairs

Hear the baby cry. Poor little boy,
he wants to put on his hat and coat
and go with Ben in the boat; but no,
little Jane takes him up stairs to bed.
I hope she will tell him a story and
not make him stay alone. I think he
will like a story; don't you?
The stairs are of oak.
Do you see the chair?





12

our
'Iout
S about
stout

rain
again
afraid

face noise drops
umbrella
nice spoil walk

"Is it not great fun to be out in the
rain? Who is afraid to get a little
wet ?" said Willy. The rain drops
on my face, but I don't care for that.
I can keep it off with my umbrella."
So he held his umbrella over his face.
It is not a good way to walk. See
how he ran into poor little Mary.






13



rain ing
blow ing
/Th say ing
wind
side
Sl close
under
Just
6/_ what

Oh! How the wind blows.
See how Nan has to hold on to
her umbrella.
The rain cannot spoil our fun,"
said little Jo to little Jane, who was
walking home close by his side. ."I am
glad it is raining and blowing, so you
can go home under my umbrella."
That is what little Jo is saying to little
Jane.






14











C all sure June
"small pure truly
6 tall dance flowers
Q-

Dear me, what is all this
about? Why do these little
boys dance? The sun is out
S the air is so pure and the
.j- flowers are so pretty, that
S: is why they dance. Do look
/ at that big girl running so
fast and this small one with
Smo re flo w ers th a n sh e ca n
"- _hold.
--4;,






11415









e leads her mother out of
<' Zv..,
\^ -^ i .,-<,


v. z. '- *-'5i


"Never Buzzn h t b







and the bees buzz. She loves the
birds and bees. She never saw a bee
before.







16
X
box new happy
SMax blew king
fox flew kite
One day a big
box came for Ned
and Max. In it was
a kite for Ned and a
nice book for little
Max. It was the
story of a fox. "Oh
mamma," said the
boys, "let us go out
and fly the kite.
S^' So they went out
,: C o on the hill.
SNed's new kite
flew up in the sky,
the wind blew it
up, and little Max
S( stood by Ned's side
\ as happy as a king.
i ___ i^ _____________









her sir fur
stir curls
girl
look along
thick once
took beach
their caps- -
know sail
ship any
send

Once two little boys lived on a hill
by the sea. It was very cold but they
wore thick coats and fur caps that hid
their curls.
"Come," said Tom, one fine day,
"we will go down to the beach and
look at the ships at see."
"There is a ship coming this way,"
said Ben.
"No Sir," cried Tom, "that ship don't
stir, there is no wind to fill her sail
and send her along. You don't know
any more about ships than a girl."







18
Qu quick, queer, queen.
Here is Mr. John, who is calling this
queer girl a queen. He asks her to go
to ride with him. The horses are at
the door.
He says let us be quick.



77 .

",-' ,

'lC








A little boy
lived on one
1 side of a fence
Sand a little girl
"on the other.
The little boy's
S name was
Johnnny.
Johnny said
he did not like a house with a fence
around it. If it were not for the fence
around his house he would not tear
his clothes so often. There were trees
and many flowers in Johnny's garden
and it was very pleasant, but he said
he was tired of it. He liked little
girls better than trees or flowers.






20

Maria and little Jane are having

their pictures taken. Turn out your

toes Maria and smile a little more.

There that is just right. But little

Jane looks frightened. She does not

know what is
:. going to be
-\4 ~ done. It is a
good picture.

S,- T -i\I am sure,
said Maria, I
'i .tried to look

,-fY- just as pretty
as I could.






21

THE STORY.

Our boy 3 -
is fond of __,_
stories,but
there is
one story
better than
all the
others. It
is about the fish that swim in the sea,
the birds that fly in the air, and all
sorts of strange beasts that live on the
earth. It is a true story.
When our boy is a little older, he
will learn to read.
Would it not be strange if he should
learn to read out of this very book ?






22





-,, -%~~ '"
11 ,> ,,


7-,r





4 o






These "
are the
girls who
"live on
our street.
Then there are some big girls, but they
run away from us when we try to play
with them. There are also some boys






23

on our street, but they are off by them-
selves playing base ball.
My mother says she is glad I am
not a boy, for then I would keep my
hands in my pocket, and perhaps I
might even ring door-bells and run
away,
The babies stay in the house most
all the time and can't do anything but
sit around on the floor and suck their
thumbs.
Which of these girls do you ,
think I am ? My mother
says I am the ,
very prettiest one
in the 4j -
street.
-^ ^^ *j/^-Z"__






24


















It is time for the children to go in-
,C1 Pt~~r r)~L. I I~'.- \





















Lucy stay out longer, but baby is
he can take his whi and little Fido
Do lo at iies t mk
i 1 i -.1. J ) '


L'u.ys \,, ot' lg btay i s



< <, t '"




It is time for the children to go in-


Do look at Tom, he tries to make
Lucy stay out longer, but baby is

sleepy and even Fred is ready to go if

he can take his whip and little Fido.






25


A velvet coat,
A lovely hat, ,
And both are new /1
Just think of that. 4

When my old nurse I A
"Was dressing me, \
She said I was
A sight to see.

My mother came
And looked so pleased,
They kissed me, oh,
And how they squeezed.

I'm going out,
But first I'll see
If these new things
Look well on me.






26



Johnny
likes to J'

play horse

with his '.
sister Kate. /f


He calls her long braids his reins,

and by pulling them he can make her
go as fast as he likes.

Kate does not like to play horse

as much as Johnny does.

"But girls are so queer," says

Johnny, "they do not know how to
have a good time."






27


Jenny has -.
been playing
allthe morning r
in the park. / ". -
I do not ,-
wonder she is :
very tired and
gets up on to
a chair the mo-
ment she is in
the house. Oh
she is so tired.
She tells her mother she never
was so tired in her life, so very, very
tired. "Then," says her mother, "you
had better come up stairs and take a
nap.
But Jennie is not tired any more;
she says she has rested, and she
hops off the chair looking as fresh as
a daisy.









A used to stand for Ann,
O Now it stands for Annie;
This girl's name is Ann,
I But isn't she a grannie?





B stands for a boy, dear,
It also stands for bad;
When these two words together come,
It makes us very sad.

C is for a nice little cart,
Just big enough for two.
D for a dog, a dear old dog,
The best I ever knew.


"" "
,. -..





29
E stands for the eyes of Miss Maud,
She turns to her papa's face-think .4
She but says please, and never need
tease,
For he takes out his purse in a wink.


F for the beautiful fan
She moves with many
Sa wile,
G for the gown
t b with flounces
"all round,
made in the very ,
/I i best style.
H stands for Maria's new Y" '
hat,
Quite in the fashion, my
dear,
I for the imp of a boy who
cries,
Oh (; how exceedingly *
S4
Sis for our little John,
Ah ha, my young rascal, what's
this?
Here's little Dorothy Ann,
SK stands for a very big kiss.
x- t4






30
L is for a lot of babies
All on a summer's day,
M the moon, the pretty moon,
Come down to us they say.



- .' ,-1 ^"' ^ '-! ",',


N is a little nun,

": for the other one, ,f .
That all about her stares. '

v I i
Ni is awt littleher nun,l' -'-










Sforstands for pastry,other one,
P stands for pies;
'1^ |< i j_ Make a lot, make a lot,
l u h Emeline, he cries.








~ I-
,is a quarrel,
Oh what a sight.
R for a rascal
Who enjoys a fight.



S stand for little Susy Smith,
A little saint they say;
She's very fat, I'm glad of that,
And will not pine away.









T is for Tabitha,
Asking for a penny,
I U stands for uncle
SWho wont give her any.







32


V for a little visitor,
Who came to make a call,
\ V \ '-j A very bashful visitor
Who would not talk at all.








W this world of ours,
Round as a ball, my dear. -
X stands for little Xenophon,
Who thinks it's very queer.






A youth who was a Swede.
S __Z for a zither which he loved
Oh very much indeed.







-I. y i c r '" '
-i.- -- i




,, .--., /, ,'^^ -- ..,-- ', ^/ \ ^ ^ ^
"-, 'p / \' ....
*~r.

,-'"'- ^ .---. .;. /'.



' -.-. .r-. r' :_,-
,, ,,_,.
'a7 -^7 Li



, .TJ-k ., -- .C,.;*_.'- '- *y ,
,'r f = 'i ,
. -- "- --
"".. "I ......... "

I /~ K4!~5~
Is; .: f: T &e .. -- .
-, I -
,'I , -.. . ". ,- a ,, ,."_ .



r r
i/.:1; IP .'f . .. .6_ --
,/ ;" -: '' - .






9i~s ct--t-~i~

'. -X t71A zr~&#
... ,$.&' -- "- -; "4
41 ..... 4 ,/ -
"'. ,, ...-I ' -

--
"" "' ;"' / ,, .









A ., /&L z. ', i-.
-. .. _,,


oii ,r ,,'
..,4
--.2 ,






'a .,1
,, ,,.. -.~ -, ,-" ? --"..", >'---.
,;.- : 11ir L .'
'"-. .- :-.. "... .,/ t_: -,
,.I .7--- ,,.-'- .-

"6 """ . 1 ac -: -' ... '")'
i"' =..,, e -
r' " -, : r -

"' "- -'r .."" ..









N..


t;tar
*fl


:rry


N~ ;1-? :~-r- lP~


- -. F '- ~-~ ~_*- / 'ti: .* ;

P, -A 0



4.Ir I ,- (


11E
r~



















.-~j- /





Iw
All: 'd '







Am

-~ I,-





University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs