• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Who wants some curls?
 Out in the snow
 Meg's walk
 Down by the spring
 Ruth and Fred
 Floy's first flight
 The doves
 What John did
 A cool nook
 May and her bird
 Swans
 Dot's game
 Bess and her pets
 The quail's fright
 Back Cover






Title: The one syllable book
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00049535/00001
 Material Information
Title: The one syllable book
Physical Description: 32 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Brown, E. E ( Emma Elizabeth ), b. 1847
Edwards, Mary Ellen, 1839-ca. 1910 ( Illustrator )
Goodman, Walter ( Illustrator )
Lawson, Lizzie ( Illustrator )
D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
John Wilson and Son ( Printer )
J.H. Bufford's Sons ( Printer )
Photo-Electrotype Co ( Engraver )
Publisher: D. Lothrop & Co.
Place of Publication: Boston (30 & 32 Franklin Street)
Manufacturer: John Wilson & Son
Publication Date: c1879
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1879   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1879
Genre: Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
United States -- Massachusetts -- Cambridge
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Emma E. Brown.
General Note: Some illustrations marked "Photo--Electrotype Co."
General Note: Some illustrations signed M.E.E., Walter Goodman, or Lizzie Lawson.
General Note: "J.H. Bufford's Sons Lith., Boston"--cover.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00049535
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001593595
oclc - 23242730
notis - AHL7653

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Plate
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Who wants some curls?
        Page 1
    Out in the snow
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Meg's walk
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Down by the spring
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Ruth and Fred
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Floy's first flight
        Page 10
        Page 11
    The doves
        Page 12
        Page 13
    What John did
        Page 14
        Page 15
    A cool nook
        Page 16
        Page 17
    May and her bird
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Swans
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Dot's game
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Bess and her pets
        Page 24
        Page 25
    The quail's fright
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
Full Text




























; ......
I
















*...v. .








.r1
,,,., .., .. ., -- o. . ,.. ,-:.... ; ,_, ,: ; ='-



























'I













































The BaldAnm Lbria
m|Tl D ni.'.n
R mB FI''rj'd
..SEEN










CIO















j."Y II __
"AN
'~\I i'









7T'-. W-',
""1 cr" I],
,l,!i',,~' ,l' "' .-"..-'c



Hit





F( I -I- ,,i / ,d
S. .... ,,.,
'IN

-; ,:\ '! -~
f ArI '~r


I .. . i' ." .
'- .







THE



ONE SYLLABLE BOOK.




BY
EMMA E. BROWN.























BOSTON:
D. LOTHROP & CO., PUBLISHERS,
30 & 32 FRANKLIN STREET.











































COPYRIGHT,

I 7 9,
By D. LOTHROP & Co.






































UNIVERSITY PRESS: JOHN WILSON & SON,
CAMBRIDGE.








-- r -- =Ej-& *-i. _.. --- /T' rA

WHO WANTS SOME CURLS?
Out in the shop where Tom
works all day long, Madge and
Maud have come to get some curls.
When he planes the rough boards
of oak and pine, they pick up the
strips that fall on the floor, and
dress their hair with the long curls.
Madge takes the dark ones, and
Maud takes the light; and then
they ask Tom to make them some
wee curls that their dolls can wear.
Tom laughs, and says he has no
time to work for dolls, but he is
sure to give them what they want!





OUT IN THE SNOW.
Here are my three pets, Beth,
Ralph and Kate. And oh! such
fun as they have out in the soft,
new snow. Ralph has two balls,
but he don't mean to throw them
just yet. He will let Beth and Kate
throw theirs first, and then when
they stoop down to get some more
snow, the rogue will pelt them
both. But the balls are so soft they
will do no harm, and Beth and Kate
like the fun as well as Ralph.
What! both hands bare, Beth?
And, dear me! what have you and
Ralph done with your caps?
Thrown them off just for fun ?
Ah! but you must put them right
on, or Jack Frost will catch you.







:__- -- ...... 7-4352
.--_ __ =_ -_ ________ 7~I7 -





Eg.-- _- -_-







M ... -- -- -











i-_ ; _,;~= _- _--- --_----
-_-= .___
__-_.-__ = __

-- -- _ : _- ---_- ___ =.
-: -==--- =- -=:----- __ -- ---= = __---=-z __- -
~s -R; = -- -_=_-- _z-
__.-'._;
- =--- __= -- -
::- ! .. .
I _= _' _-_-


S.. .. .. __.= -





MEG'S WALK.
Oh! how it snows! And oh!
how it blows! But Meg is strong
and brave, and says it's just fun
to trudge through the drifts!
Since she came from school this
noon, she has been half a mile
down the road, to take a bowl of
broth to old Jane, who is poor and
sick. Once, when she was strong
and well, and Meg was just a wee
bit of a girl, Jane was her nurse.
That is why Meg loves her so much
and tries to do what she can for
her, now, It is not hard to guess
what makes Meg look so bright
and so glad. When we do a kind
act, it will shine right out in the
face, though we don't say a word!













.N' ,'t& I 41 9

,' ; C,
,, .. , 'I, .
.4 s




;. ; "I
( 'i ..,,%





".: ...lp "'

[. ,, 31
"I~









.I,,..t
.i .









...*'a --.. ...N .
N' N



V 9" N-




'x





DOWN BY THE SPRING.
It is a hot day, and Rose and Lou
have come down to the spring to
get a drink. How nice and cool it
is here in the shade!
All sorts of ferns and reeds grow
in the moist ground by the spring;
and up on the bank there is a wild
vine that climbs to the tops of the
trees.
Rose and Lou like to come here
and play. It is but a short walk
from their home, through the fields.
Rose has brought her pail to
fill at the spring; but they both
want to stay, and pick some ferns.
When they go home Lou says she
will take the pail all the way, for
Rose will have both hands full.













;i,



r;Ft
b`;, a
Li-
c,
VIs
'p



ii i
-,f:L:i 55

e
'.'C iJh




2=
n- =

-t
-i ii
.. ; I:z s;




'.s-"
v

L-- ct i;
r


31
:II \ ESgIS



"I
I



--:a

i-
11_1-


jt





RUTH AND FRED.
"O, Ruth!" said Fred, one bright
day in June; I know where there
is a bush just as full of pink and
white buds as it can be !"
0! how nice!" said Ruth; "do
let me go with you and get some."
"All right!" said Fred; "come
on, and I will show you the way."
But when they came to the woods,
they found the bush was a tall tree,
much too high for them to reach!
Ruth did not know what to do,
but Fred said:
"You stand here, Ruth, and I will
get a long stick with a crook at the
end. There---just look! Now I can
pull down a whole branch, and you
can pick off all the buds!"














..L ... f "; ,,-


S,..,:.
LdF



fill 4Kc
414







In-f
.I 3
i 1 \,, ,











l "
j ,




















__ ,, -, *





FLOY'S FIRST FLIGHT.
I speak of Floy as if she were a
bird, and her home a nest! But if
you knew Floy as well as I do, you
would not think it so strange; for
there is a deal in Floy's ways that
makes me think of a bird.
Dear me! how we shall miss
her. But Aunt Sue who lives in
New York, wants Floy to spend a
few weeks with her; and as she has
not seen Floy for more than two
years, I think we must let her go.
Floy likes to be prompt, and she
has all her things close at hand; so
that when the train comes she can
step right in the cars, and no one
will have to wait for her to hunt
up a bag.


















S-- .',t, x






lyVy



.7 ,



SO -.._
ii -






" < !---.---:-.----- ......

/ ~ ~ Ti -- , ---_- --






THE DOVES.
O! what a whirr of wings as the
doves sweep down from the roof
to the street! A bag of grain was
spilt just here, and the doves will
have a rich feast. There are some
doves with brown wings, and some
with grey; and then I can see two
that are pure white. Just see how
tame they are! The horse and cart
are close by, but they do not seem
to fear the hoofs or the wheels.
And why should they? If they
came a bit too near, the doves well
know they can spread their broad,
swift wings, and soon be out of
harm's way!
But who could have the heart
to hurt a dove?

















-
r I`




rILtk7 ;-:: 7SILI, -1


.
-i.





..1
`-



I i] 1 r --1
-
.. ..
!!

SiF
PPJ






r.




B c ''



-'1 c* ;sr

rf: ; ;, r
-P





-L P"..i' ;
...r-
..
'
A


71' : IsllelplPcrr hl


I PBBU-I"


t vi-
f4_
rl. i
'






.,
;:.'
... dri.


-r.
:jBCfi .



.*
r

:.L..





i; n.
r. r.
t f7.L`


r'- TP.;l IEBIrL;r:
.:l-;iklc- ----Gi?.-


rT- b;lL ti:j-Sq:
1-ri




h;_ s- LliF
..-*e



.j
-_liir;LI(T

-c.t .-$
i,
.-rC rc- X
=. ..-
-;
'C ; ;:I
-i ---V*^
_t .lic.-
:z -
"
o fT;





WHAT JOHN DID.
Last night there came a fall of
snow; and what do you think
John found when he went out to
the barn?
Why! the first thing he saw
when he threw back the door in
the hen's coop, was the bright eyes
of a big, red fox! To be sure, the
fox had not yet come in the yard;
but the hens and the geese had
seen him, and "Clack! Clack!"
Quack Quack !" they ran from
side to side in such a fright that
John knew there was no time to
be lost. So he caught up an old
gun that stood in the barn, and
quick as a flash he shot the fox
as it stood at the gate.












------ -------- -------=-
-- ---- ------------
--- ----- -
-=-- ---
---- -- -------- ----------- -
-----5_ c_L--- -----
---- i_==__-=__=Z-_==T=-i --
----------- I _i oi _
--i_ --:--- --------
'-_-;-----I-
ii---- ----;,
'=
--- ----

-- --


------;-




--21-----Iai--



-=1 1;1


10





























;-5-------=
-------------



%"""I""LOBRLi
I: =-----

..
---.---- ----__
------------------------






A COOL NOOK.
Deep down in the pond---that is
where the fish live, and how cool
it must be there, these hot days!
In and out, up and down, they glide
through the tall, green reeds; and
now and then, you can see them
jump up and snap at a fly! The
trout have bright spots on their
backs, but all the perch have coats
of plain grey, and then I can see
one fish with broad, flat sides, that
is not a trout, and not a perch---
can you tell me what we call it ?
Just count that school of small fish
near the bank! When they start
off like that, and swim so close,
it is not very hard to catch them
in a net!










~ i'I'
'I
'/' /i/j
___ 'I ;~~Z~_~3T7:~r _











:r _
ia1~





MAY AND HER BIRD.
Poor sick May! She has to lie
in bed all day long, and most of
the time she is in great pain.
But oh! she does have such good
times with her pet bird.
His name is Fritz, and when she
calls him, he will come and perch
on her hand; then he does look so
odd, when she tells him to make a
bow! First, he gives a snap with
his beak, and then he puts one
claw up to his head ---just as if he
had a cap to take off!
May says that when she gets
well, she means to make him a
little cap out of some red silk,
and teach him how to put it on,
and take it off!










1W














11 '''II'"',





:9..,L ." I '
A' 1
h. L I t';I~





f -Alq












... .... ...





SWANS.
What a long neck the swan has!
Black swans are more rare than
white ones; and there is one kind
of swan that they call the Song
swan, for when it flies, it cries
"Hoop Hoop! like the shrill,
high note of a flute. But we do
not see the Song swan here; it lives
in the far, far North.
On the banks of the Thames, a
swan built her nest in the same
spot for twelve years. One day, the
men at work near the stream, saw
her raise the nest with straw and
sticks. That same night a great
storm came, but the swan's eggs
were safe, for her nest was just too
high for the flood to reach!









'" "" ---'-- -:-----" f"T' -- _"_' -:,""-. -,r-


III __
-, .,,. (-._ .... _l,,I.,!J - :,.I


''I ',
1w.











IlkI
- "I







hi";,,i" /'
"- 'I
,_,,,_ '_-"1"J' [:,' jkif
'"--- "' ,rW ; ,Ib."l '"""... I"" I'6
,li "i~ 'lly'I
Y,: i4 r,, -.. ,"'
": --:-'-':..'? -.' -C"" :; ~ ~ ', i / 1.,,.,,,,r',. .

., ., __.___ ---::: II. .


i ,,..
~""
.. _.., 1t 1 ,,:'
_-_- ___-' __ _,_ _"i _' -_ '' _
-~ ~ _.. -_ _- = --=-





DOT'S GAME.
Dot went out in the yard to play
with her bat and ball; but once
when she gave the ball a very
hard strike, it flew so far she had
to climb over the stone wall to
get it.
There it lay on the grass, but as
it fell it must have hit a stone, for
on one side there was a long slit,
and all the "bounce" had gone
out. But Dot was not sad long,
for she soon thought of a new
game.
"I can call my bat a net," she
said, and all this long grass will
do for the sea; then I can sweep
my net up and down, and catch
a lot of leaves for fish !"













~" -
-..- :4_ __ _
_. -. __---




-, v..-_--



ii..

', -- L















~l








F.- .- ,.
._. .. ...



-~1 *t .-.,
:.>...':'_ ; ..




r.:~~~~~ F',Gii-- ,

..-" .... .
''-_CZ. i'





BESS AND HER PETS.
Which does Bess love best of all
these four pets? Well, that would
be hard to tell, but I think Boz,"
the wee dog in her lap, gets the
most hugs and pats through the
day! Still, she thinks the world
of them all; and they are so fond
of her, they would like to keep
close to her feet all day long!
The big, black dog, that has such
a grave, wise look, she calls "Prof."
Then there is Prance" close by,
who tries to jum p p and kiss her
hand; and that is dear old Max"
who creeps close to her side, and
tries by dint of rubs and barks, to
tell Bess how much he loves her !
Would you not like such pets?













!I
1ill i'J I i :r
'!I









it


j(( ii!l;ii

,r













a













E/

I: .Y-JC\t
i(YI





THE QUAIL'S FRIGHT.
Oh! such a warm, snug nest as
the quails had there down in the
wheat. It was built of dry leaves
and twigs just as brown as the
earth; and no one could tell when
they heard the quail's pipe, where
in the world they were hid. But
when the wheat had grown, there
came a sad, sad day, for the quails.
The old bird was the first to
hear the sound of the scythes,
and with a loud cry of "Bob
White! Bob White!"' she left the
nest. Then, one by one. the young
quails spread their wings; and
when the men came to cut the
wheat, not a quail was to be seen,
far or near!











/ //;L -

"-C .- 3 --- p'" .
-. I

., U '-! .
.^ ... "- . .,' ,' "--' j,/_.. "


v r _" 'I "

:-^Z''-4 4 --. '>-. ,, ",,,. t '- ,*'.
_^.' ^ . *- ' -,", '-. -^ ---

'. L'- -_- *; ,; ,!, III ;;, '- ,; --::. ^,
"-I- \ -. ,,





:; ': _& _ 7
------i :-. _:-- ,, ,

;-- ,-- ..,-_,



























I.












f E&YiT4AP Y EA,-
kVW;AT LOCUST



*


'. ;




tk







hi











jsi





"IT :- " SiZ ; S "'
&p"' 1IP '





University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs