Under the window

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Under the window pictures & rhymes for children
Spine title:
Under the window after Kate Greenaway
Physical Description:
64 p. : col. ill. ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Greenaway, Kate, 1846-1901 ( Illustrator )
McLoughlin Bros., inc
Publisher:
McLoughlin Bros.
Place of Publication:
New York
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1881   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1881
Genre:
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

General Note:
Baldwin Library copy contains inscription dated 1881.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
after Kate Greenaway.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002223604
notis - ALG3855
oclc - 16123835
System ID:
UF00049534:00001

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Half Title
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Table of Contents
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Under the window
        Page 15
    Little maiden
        Page 16
    The tea party
        Page 17
    Socks and shoes
        Page 18
    The tabbies
        Page 19
    Fanny and Willie
        Page 20
    What Bessie was reading
        Page 21
    Margery Brown
        Page 22
    In the green meadow
        Page 23
    The man in the moon
        Page 24
    Coming from school
        Page 25
    Polly and Susy
        Page 26
    The village walk
        Page 27
    Five little sisters
        Page 28
    The go-cart
        Page 29
    Cackling geese
        Page 30
    Going to tea
        Page 31
    Poor Dickey
        Page 32
    The shuttlecocks
        Page 33
    Over the wall
        Page 34
    Broomstick ride
        Page 35
    Tommy Toddyhigh
        Page 36
    Higgledy, piggledy
        Page 37
    Somewhere town
        Page 38
    On the shore
        Page 39
    Pipe thee high
        Page 40
    Three funny bonnets
        Page 41
    Rolling hoops
        Page 42
    Three little boys
        Page 43
    Going-a-maying
        Page 44
        Page 45
    The little fat goblin
        Page 46
    We saw a ship
        Page 47
    Little Tommy
        Page 48
    The proud girl
        Page 49
    Pretty Patty
        Page 50
    The garden wall
        Page 51
    Three little sailors
        Page 52
    A pretty story
        Page 53
    Tommy and Jimmy
        Page 54
    The two boys
        Page 55
    The miss pellicoes
        Page 56
    Little baby
        Page 57
    Fishing on the bridge
        Page 58
    Prince Finikin
        Page 59
    At the gate
        Page 60
    My house is red
        Page 61
    Three little girls
        Page 62
    Crazy Dan
        Page 63
    Ring the bell, ring!
        Page 64
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
Full Text











































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The Baldwin Library
Sm Univqr3ity

















UNDER THE WINDOW












AFTER

KATE GREENAWAY



















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PICTURES & I(H Y)E
Jfo Children





SN NE Wl yC RK:OS
S IIcLOUG HL I BROS.



















New York
Engraved & Printed
by
McLough/in Bros.























PAGE
My garden,
Is under the window .......................... 15









Airy, fairy little Maiden,
Will you be my little wife?................... 16









You see merry Phillis,
That dear little maid.......................... 17









As I stepped out,
To hear the news............................ 18









Three old ladies,
Lean and fat................................. 19



7












CONTENTS.





Litle Fainny ji ear a h-at,
,ikc hl r i:mar-iit ** .rarnn ie."............ ... :o








Beneath the Lil;es,-
ratll e garden Li.Ies ..................... 21








Margery Brown!
Margery Brown!............................ 22








II'* In the green meadow,
The bro.:k npplles clear....................... 23








'Tis true,
Johnny Eutcher, 'tL true...................... 24









Oh! -h t fun............................ 25



8











CONTENTS.





Little Polly, will you go,
"A-walking out to-day?....................... 20








"As I walked through,
The village street ........................... 27








Five tle sisters,
WalkLr.g in a rw .. .. .. 2S








In go-cart ,: tiny,
My SLter I drew........... ........ 29








Some GC eee nt ot aur aall,,ng.
T, brlAt h.L tI.. J- t. d .... 30








You're g'.ing out
0To t-3 to-day ..










CONTENTS.








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I CONTENTS.




r ,'lf
The Sa .: :m,








"" e M.:. \ :.r. .r E "F.. ........ ... .
F'r. ie.d hhl








And I'olly y.u :e... i














.\\'hr "re a ..,; g,.r,

















i rtr, the tl:'t .. 4 5
...II_





11
n4












CONTENTS.




PAGE
This little fat Goblin,
A terrible sinner............................ 46






We saw a ship,
That sailed the sea ............... ........ 47






Yes, that's the girl,
That struts about............................ 48






Here's Tommy,
Out upon the green.......................... 49






Now the raiu,
Has passed away ............................ 50






Little Miss Patty,
And Master Paul............................. 51







-\' it ; i ,:f the --
$h.:,:~l.,, I: .. .. .



12 .__-












CONTENTS.






...- I
J N .. 'l! .:.f .u..











SWhat is Tommy,
Running for, running for...................... 54









A Butcher's boy,
And a Baker's Boy .................. ........ 55








. .
.' .. ,,r: ,: .:...I I i .:;e .. ...... ........ 56










L f r 1I ...... ..., n ,. .............. 57
















13













CONTENTS.






Prir...e Firikin.










Pa F'al:., and ilann,
Ila'e g.:nre I. t1.e t.:, nn. .. ':,-








t,' h .M-,.ue , red.
hlX httI,. .,u:,. ... !







f
Thr ee little g'rli.
"Sat rn a ral








---- (_'Oh' ulr an ugl,.
S mar .. .
['. h, Ih I I. n ,. r.










IIurral. I ,m the |.r ('4



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14




























UNDER TiE %V IND ['r


guard, n ki uinid-:r the %ind










Th, n I chirrup. and tall t,: m,." l. ,. .R
\'ho'd anc SISr,- c a uid tlr'Ci a,


T I
.. e ':



ThenI cirru, ad tak t myRob












LITTLE MAIDEN.


S AlR\ fairy, little MAaidn.
Will you be my little v. ie?
If you X\cd me dii: inty darling,
'You shall hat.yL bLe for life !


V-.u shall haS e a bo.nnet pretty,
\\ith a feather lonjr and w-hite
tie o" gayc and l\'cl\y dreR.A,,
Slhoc.,, and lnd cand ribaind' bright.


And a tiny house, to live in,
And a beehive, rull of bees;
Anrd a living little husband.
S\\'h \\ill pet )ou, i.hen \.:cu phase.



And a \woolly coat, and mitten
And a brindle cow, and call':
\'itlh a tabby cat, and :kittens,
That \xill play, and nmkl you laugh.


E\'ry other day, for dinner.
You shall have a cherry pie;
And upon the softest cushions,,
Like a little lady lie.


T ll m ', precious little maiden.
T.lI mc now, and tell me true;
\\ll \'oi lo1 e me dear former,
l.ut as much, as I lo-e you?




16









































TI.E TEA PARTY.

Vo-i see merry Phillis, that dear little maid,
Has invited Belinda to tea;
S^fi Her nice little garden, is shaded by trees,
W\'hat pleasanter place could there be

There's a cake full of plums, some strawberries too,
And the table, is set on the green ;
SThe carpet is brilliant, \\ith daisies and grass,
Could a prettier picture be seen ?

A black-bird is singing, high up on the tree.
His music falls sweet on the air;
And softly it blends, with the prattle so sweet,
Of the two little maidens so fair!


17
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TV I











SOCKS AND SHOES.

As I stepped ouLt to hear the news,
I met two maids, in socks and shoes.
One. in a coat of blue \was seen,
And one was dressed in bottle green.

And so they toddled up the street.
Two pretty maids, as you would meet.
With hats so round, and fair to %iew,
And feather white, and riband blue.

T\,o glen ear-rings Fanny wore,
While Bertha held a muff before :
An- ,o they smiled, and softly talked,
As up the street, thc-y slowly walked.




18




































THE TABBIES.

THREE old ladies, lean and fat,
Met to have a pleasant chat;
Down upon three chairs they sat,
Tell me what you think of that ?

Each one brought, a tabby" there,
Soft and silken, plump and fair;
Pretty, purring, pussies, rare,
Guarding each her mistress' chair!

Chairs, and cats, and gossips three,
Waiting for their cups of tea;
Tell me darling, tell to me-
How many tabbies" here you see?



19


















































FANNY AND WILLIE.

LITTLE Fanny wears a hat, Fair, and like a lady, she-
Like her ancient Grannie." Neither proud, nor silly;
Willie's hoop was given him, Likes to take her morning walk,
By his sister Fanny. Out, with brother Willie.



20

























































WHAT BESSIE \WAS READING.

* BENEATH the Lilies-tall, white garden Lilies- Ere long, a Prince came riding in the sunshine
The Princess slept, a charmed sleep always : A ind just s\waed the Lilies to and fro
For, ever were the fairy Bluebells ringing, It woke the Princess, tho' the Bluebell music,
^Forever thro' the Night, and thro' the Day. Kept ringing, ringing, sleepily and low.

21
































MARGERY BROWN.

"MARGERY BROWN! Margery Brown!
Why are you standing, atop of the hill ?"
"Oh! I am looking at London town,
To see if the chimneys, are smoking still!"

" Margery Brown Margery Brown !
Why are you listening, listening there?"
"Oh! I list to the bells of London town,
And the voices of men, and of maidens fair."

"Margery Brown Margery Brown !
Why are you crying, crying so sore ?"
" Oh! I had a lover in London town,
An now I shall see him, no more, no more !"








22






























IN THE GREEN MEADOW.

IN the green meadow, Three little maidens,
The br.-.:,k ripples clear; Like birds on the wing;
S.:.fi. in the sunshine. Fair as the morning dew,
The daisies appear. Merrily sing.

See, hc.\w the buttercups, Blow little breeze
Brighly. unl':ld; On the hill-top and plain;
Hid in the shining grass, Play in the sunshine,
\'ell:.'. as g,'l.. And blow off the rain.




















23












THE MAN IN THE MOON.


" 'Tis true, Johnny Butcher, 'tis true, "And sometimes, they say, he comes down,
Don't think I am playing you tricks; With a bagful of candies and toys;
There's a man, and a dog in the Moon, And then, Johnny Butcher look out,
And he's cross, as a bundle of sticks I" For he takes away all the bad boys I"













































24






















--- = -





























COMING FROM SCHOOL.

SCHOOL is over I Thro' the meadow,
Oh what fun I Up the hill;
Lessons finished, Backward, forward,
Play begun. Running still.
Who'll laugh loudest? Laughing, playing,
Let us try; Round about;
Who'll run fastest, Come, and hear us,
You or I ? Sing and shout!


25






































P-'i.L\ AND SU.LY.
LilTLE Pcll' 11" \..u go, a- a.lkn.; our to-day?
Liu'.il SuI'. y'e I ill. i1 M ..rh.r sa. s I may.
Ltrl.: P-lly, M.:ith r .l:ar. ha said that .,au mnay p. .
\\'Wi a darling M. other mild, v.ho ne.er an,,irs--n .j

(C... e then Little S.us. let us p[la up..n iI grass.i
.\n.Il ,haii ve tle I .ll.:,. buiti-rflies, iho:' fluu.:r a" e ,pass :
We II .j an.e -h..ut th.: niad.:.v. vher.e m.ndcst daisle: -pring,
And aii;.ier t.. tIhe nimrry birds, that in the bu-hic; s'ng.

S:o rai,- \"ur rre-tt p r.:as:.l. to shad.: u Ir rom the Sun.
aAnd hold it i o'.-r Doll\s carr, as Fup and d ..n we run:
.\ nd there v.'.'ll at(her bl:'sso-.:ni A.-t. to ak,: a da:a chain,
And frolic till the shad,as come, to call us bhl.ni again.







26


















THE VILLAGE WALK.

As I walked through,
The village street;
The steeple bells,
Were ringing;

And baby nestled,
In my arms;
And clear, the birds
Were singing.

And sweet in every
Garden bed;
The lovely flowers,
Were springing.

But not so sweet,
As baby's arms;
Which round my neck,
Were clinging;-

Nor half so bright,
As baby's eyes;
With love, and joy,
So brimming !













27
































FIVE LITTLE SISTERS,

FIVE little sisters, walking in a row,
Isn't that a pretty way, for little girls to go ?
Each has a round hat, and each a furry muff;
And each has a little coat, of green and silken stuff.

Five little marigolds, standing in a row,
Isn't that a pretty way, for marigolds to grow ?
Each with a green stalk, nodding ev'ry one;
And a yellow flow'r bright, shining in the Sun.














28













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THE GO-CART.

In Go-cart so tins. So on this fine morning,
My Sister I drew. We're out once again;
I've promised t.o dra, her, To gather sweet flowers,
The wide %\%:,rld through. That grow in the lane.


We ha\rin't vet strt.d. And sister, and brother,
I o.in it v.ith s:rr:.. ; And I, as you see;
Because our trip alT'. Are joyous and happy,
Is leit till to-torr.. As children should be I












29















CACKLING GEESE.

SOME Geese went out a-walking,
To breakfast, and to dine;
They hissed, and cackled noisily,
And numbered, four from nine.

A dame went out a-walking,
A cross, and crabbed crone;
She said, "I wish that all you geese,
Were starved to skin and bone !"

But still they kept a-cackling,
With harsh, and hissing tone;
And so I left these noisy geese,
"And still more noisy crone
























30

































GOING TO TEA.


0,i..'Ilr going out to tea to-day,
Be careful what you do;
Let all accounts that I shall hear,
Be pleasant ones, of you.

Don't spill your tea. or gnaw your bread,
And don't tease one another;
And Fanny mustn't talk too much,
Or quarrel with her brother.

Say If you please." and Thank you,"
Come home at eight o'clock ;
And Ethel, pray be careful, dear,
And do not tear your frock.

Now mind your manners, children five,
Attend to \hat I say ;
And then perhaps. I'll let. you go,
Again, another day.




81
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r,~ iil!c~rmii-~ cide ie








































POOR DICKEY!

POOR Dickey's dead The bell we toll,
And lay him in the deep, dark hole.
The sun may shine, the clouds may rain,
But Dick will never pipe again!
ITi-_ quilt \will be as sw\cit as oLrs.--
B-right buttercups, and cutckoo fI11:'L'.





















THE SHUTTLECOCKS.


UP you go, Shuttlecocks, ever so high!
When you get up, in the sunny blue sky;
Why do you fall again, Shuttlecocks, why?
Up you go, Shuttlecocks, flying so far!
Rising and falling, how pretty you are:
Light as the thistle-down, bright as the stars.




























iS- 1












S- .


















OVER THE WALL.

OVER the wall, we are looking, and why ?
The King, and his courtiers, will soon pass by;
The Queen and her ladies, will ride this way,
And that's why we look from the wall to-day.

All mounted on horseback, so gallant, and free,
The King, and the Queen, and the Court you will see
In silver and gold, will the courtiers appear,
And that's why we're waiting so patiently here.

With waving of banners, and beating of drums,
And sounding of trumpets, so gaily they come;
So fathers, and mothers, and maidens and all,
We're laughing, and looking, from over the wall.










34









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TOMMY TODDYHIGH.

SILLY Tommy Toddyhigh,
Once took his Sister Prue;
And went to play upon the bridge,
To show what he could do.

Then, to frighten Sister Prue,
He said, "now see me fly;"
He tried, and nearly broke his neck
Did Tommy Toddyhigh.

Jacky raised him by the leg,
While Tom did sadly cry;
He wished he hadn't left the bridge,
Did Tommy Toddyhigh.

36













I ~~"--- ---- --- ~~-----------------------------



-4


































HIGGL-ED', PIGGLEDY.

.-. HICGGLED'V, riggledy se how thl run!
Hopperty, Popperty, what is the fun
Has the Sun. or the Mloon, tumbled into the Sea ?
What it the matter, now till unto me.

HigglcJy, r'iggleady, hi':\ can I tell ?
Hopperty, I'opp:-rty, hark to the bell!
Big ones, and little ones, scamper away,
For nobody knows, \hat wiill happen to-day !



37





































SOMEWHERE TOWN.

How shall I travel to Somewhere town?
Oh! up in the morning early;
Over the tiles, and the chimney-pots,
That is the way, quite clearly.

And which is the door, to Somewhere town ?
Oh! up in the morning early;
The round red Sun, is the door I'm sure,
That is the way quite clearly.

And what shall I see, in Somewhere town ?
Oh! up in the morning early;
I'll see the place, where the Moon goes down,
And the Stars, are born, quite clearly!




































ON THE SHORE.

THE Sea is calm, The wind may fall,
The Moon is up; The wind may rise;
The pretty boats, And you may go,
Are on the wing. Or you may stay.

Come let us join But you will come,
Our hands about; If you are wise;
And on the sand, And dance with us,
We'll dance and sing. The hours away.












39













































PIPE THEE HIGH.

Pirr thee high. and pipe thee low,
Let the little feet go faster:
Blow your penny trumpet-blow;
Well done, little master!

Pipe thee high, and pipe thee low,
How she dances, light and airy;
Take her hand, as white as snow,
Dainty, little fairy !




40

























---------C -










THREE FUNNY BONNETS.

POPPERTY, Peggy, Dressed in their bonnets,
And Polly you see; They thought it such fun;
Out with their playthings, To run thro' the showers,
A picture of glee. Or play in the sun.

Three funny bonnets, But naughty boys often,
On three little girls ; Would cry out in play;
Pinafores tidy, Oh! here's the three Grannies,
But never a curl. Out walking to-day !













41

























ROLLING Hl-lOPS.

OH! roll away. Oh roll away!
XAs far and last, as you can run;
W'r however can the fastest go,
Will surely be the v inning one.

Now, helter-skelter-off you roll!
But Fanny stubs her little toe;
And sadly falls upon the ground,
While swiftly on the others go.

But soon, she'll get upon her feet,
And with the others race away;
And if she doesn't beat them now,
Perhaps she will another day I




































THREE LITTLE BOYS.

"WHERE are you going, you three little boys,
And where are you going to-day?"
"We're going to look for a sweet apple tree,
And in the green meadow to play."

"For what are you longing, you three little boys,
And what would you like to eat ?"
"We would like some apples, and gingerbread,
And a fine big drum to beat."

"What will you give me, you three little boys,
In exchange for these good things ?"
"A long-tailed kite, a top, and a ball,
And a little brown bird, that sings."

"But that will not do; you little rogues three,
I'll have something better than that;
Some pretty green snails, you must seek till you find,
And bring them to me, in your hats."



43



































GOING-A-MAYING.

OH! ring the bells, Oh ring the bells!
We bid you all, Good morning;"
Give thanks we pray, our flowers are gay,
And fair for your adorning.

Oh ring the bells, Oh! ring the bells !
Good friends, accept our greeting;
Where we have been, the woods are green,
And fast the Spring is fleeting.

Oh ring the bells, Oh ring the bells!
For this fair time of Maying ;
We blossoms bring, and while we sing,
Oh hark to what we're saying.







. :. : :::* '* `: ".' 44::., ; : : .... .
44





















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GOING-A-MAYING.

Oh! ring the bells, Oh ring the bells !
And while they're sweetly chiming;
Our flowers so gay, well give away,
With words of merry rhyming.

Oh ring the bells, Oh ring the bells !
We must not long be staying;
For May has come, and May will go,
While we are here delaying.

Then ring the bells, Oh! ring the bells!
We'll sing a song with any;
May every year, bring you good cheer,
And each of us a penny.







46





































THE LITTLE FAT GOBLIN.

THIS little fat Goblin, Then laughed little Goblin
A terrible sinner ; A merry, ha! ha!
Stole cabbages daily, "Before me he catches,
For breakfast, and dinner. He'll run very far."

The farmer looked angry, And little fat Goblin,
And scolded in vain ; Ran off from the farm;
" That rogue has been stealing, Taking a cabbage-head,
My cabbage again." Under each arm!











4V.














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WE SAW A SHIP.

WE saw a ship, that sailed the sea.
It left us as the Sun went down.
The white birds flew, and followed it,
To town-to London town

Right sad were we, to stand alone,
And see it sail, so far away;
And yet we knew, some ship would come,
Some other ship, some other day.

It seemed to sink, beneath the wave,
Until it vanished from our eyes;
And with the Sun went down at last,
Just as the yellow Moon did rise!






47











TiiI



























THE PROUD GIRL.

YE-, that's the ,girl that struts about,
So very proud-so very proud !
Her do; is quite as proud as she;
And both are very wrong to be
So proud-so very proud!

And Jane, and Willy laugh at her,
Because she is so 'very proud.
Says Ine, lMy stars! just see her walk.
Says Will, now. can the doggie talk ?
He looks so \cry proud !"







48





































.: .. .. ....V



LITTLE TOMMY.

HERE'S Tommy, out upon the green,-
The sweet and pleasant Spring has come
He sees the birds about him flit,
And hears the bees, with merry hum.

He's looking at the speckled hen,
And says the little chicks are fun ;"
Hle loves to see them scratch for seeds,
And round about their mother run.

He hears the soaring, merry lark,
Sin. s wcetly in the distant sky;
.\nd thinks,-a bird he'd like to be,
.\nd uith the pretty songster fly.














I~i--~-~=---]















PRETTY PATTY.

Now, the rain has passed away,
Fast the storm is flying;
Pretty Patty, patient waits,
While the grass is drying.

"Shall I sing ?" says Robin red,
"Shall I bloom ?" says flower;
"Shall I come ?" says shining Sun,
"Shall I rain?" says shower.

"Sing your song, my pretty bird,
Bloom, my lovely flower;
Come again, my pretty Sun,
And dry the naughty shower !"




60

































THE GARDEN WALL.

LITTLE Miss Patty, and Master Paul,
Have found two snails, on the garden wall.
" These snails," says Paul, "how slow they walk
A great d,.al slower, than we can talk.
lakec haste, Mr. Snail, go faster I pray;
In a ract: with our tongues, you'd be beaten to-day."
Thliin .a.ys Miss Patty, in accents mild
For Patty, though small, is a thought ful child-
" If .saa.'j' and /., I would w\i:h t1) go,-
\VWy sl'wi' and :surc, is the pace y..u know."














61











































.-.- .












THIF.:ITT I STLE .II.OLRO .


"Yt ;r .:I them-
E l,:.. :! 2. t- l .: !
r ba. .:.I [l,.m-
Lad. .t all cl r,:';!


\Varnin; s th.: '\e -i i.-- 'et, thle :r'".' r-' .". -b ur,
Sill I repeat tlicii. Tl ..i.l I v, :;
Ci l .i,: i iatcr r.:..- T h..iu, h Iilh,.r nl -,l old.
Fihcis ,ill c.tt tlicllm 1 li.l m.:.Il r may cry."



4''





































AAnPn F'T T I.-ket RIE'uT






Or hit-- I icarnnr..t vri ;
But up the: r,.,J, he I,-1. .. :nt.
WVhile I4;-.s mei-ed at pla,!.


Antd Made. and T,:mrn, camei ,:,r behind.
\\W irh ...11. and v i. ._ .a :
The I(l,- \",s .-rc.n, tle cit .; black,
And tr.-lt, the I,.:,.e!v J \ .


But ,hern the\' r..ached the Gard.n Gate,
Nov,;. \.hat I ,Y' ik true :-
The sr:r 's gn e I'r,:l rni ,:,r head,
And g.oo- bye to :u !





i58















TOMMY AND JIMMY.

WHAT is Tommy running for ?
Running for,
Running for;
What is Tommy running for?
On this fine day!


Jimmy after Tommy runs,
Tommy runs,
Tommy runs;
Jimmy after Tommy runs,
On this fine day!



Now, perhaps you'll ask me why,
Ask me why,
Ask me why;
Now, perhaps you'll ask me why-
Why so fast they go ?


Sure am I, you'll never tell,
Never tell,
Never tell
Sure am I, you ll never tell,
For you'll never know!









64
















THE TWO BOYS.

A BUTCHER'S boy, and a Baker's boy,
Met on a Summer day;
Said the Butcher's boy, to the Baker's boy,
"Now please to walk my way."

























Said the Butchers boy, to the Baker's boy,
My trade's the best in ton ;"
" If yot say that." says the Baker's boy,
"Ill have to knock you down."

Says the Butcher's boy, to the Baker's boy,
"That's a thing you cannot do;
And I think before you knock /.', down,
I'd better trip up j'.i /"



66
































The twelve Miss Pellicoes,
Were twelve sweet little girls;
They wore their hair, in many ways,
But none of them had curls.

The twelve Miss Pellicoes,
5 Had dinner every day;
T A not uncommon thing, at all,


The twelve Miss Pellicoes,
Went sometimes for a walk;
SIt also is a well-known fact,
"That most of them could talk I
THE MISS PELLICOES.
Soves e ee ise, Th e twelve Miss Pellicoes,
THE twelve Miss Pellicoes, Were always most polite;
Of course to school were sent; Said, if you please," and "thank you,"
Their parents wished them to excel, "Good morning," and "Good night."
In each accomplishment.
The twelve Miss Pellicoes, The twelve Miss Pellicoes,
Played music-fa-la-la You plainly see were taught;
Which consequently made them all, To do the things, they didn't like,
The pride of their Papa. Which means, the things they ought.
The twelve Miss Pellicoes, About these twelve Miss Pellicoes
Learned dancing, and the globes; I ve nothing more to say;
Which proves that they were wise, and had So fare you well, Miss Pellicoes
The patience, which was Job's. I wish you a good dayl
66













LIITILL BAB.\.

LITTLE. baby, if I threw,
This fair bl,:ssom d.\ n to you;-
\Vould you catch it, as \ou stand ?
HIldiing upI each tiny hani;-
Lookini ouit _of th,-_,e cray eyes,
\\'hcre such deep, deep wonder lies







































67

















































FISHING ON THE BRIDGE.

THE finest, biggest fish you see, We'll take him home, and have a dish,
Will be the trout, that's caught by me; Of crispy, juicy, buttered fish
But if the beauty will not bite, So whether small, or large' he be,
Then we may hook, a little mite. We'll have at least, a fish for tea.



!Ip










































"PRINCE FINIKIN.

PRINCE FINIKIN and his Mamma,
Sat sipping their bohea;
"Good gracious," said his highness,
What girl is this I see ?"

S"M..sr cr-riiinly, she cannot be, Then Finikin's Mamma replied,
A n.iire :. our town." "Dear Prince, it seems to me;
And then he looked at his Mamma, She looks, as if she'd like to drink,
And set his tea-cup down. A cup of my Bohea !"

But Dolly, simply looked at them, So Finikin poured out the tea,
And did not speak a word; And gave her currant pie;
She has no voice," said Finikin, Then said unto his dear Mamma,
"It's really absurd." "How kind a Prince am Ii"



69


































AT THE GATE.

"* P\pe. and mla mmi Lin.: gonen t,, t-- t,:'oan,
And tih said if a ery .n ....J g;rl. I *.iculd be;
That ithv \ ..ul.1 bte h:nme henl tLhe Siun '.ent oI[ wn,
And bri n b:..k some i rerrr\. neIL' i,;s for ne.

Aud dear M.Ainimn Raid, ..ith a kiss and a mnide.
-- I'll lo.:.k 1..r a dJoll : -,..il. s., ay
W i\\'th pretty prik d clippers, arid I...ng 'el. .'- curls.
To cone here and aii ., .',h nmi La.iLv s...nme day."


I'e tried t,:. I' .:.., ajn. m \r !e-s..n I kno: .
And out ;it tl, -'- I am a.i in: ti :.:-
Oh I tlere t h a\ are n... at the FoC it -.f. tih hill.
Aud s.,:.n I slill know, what th i 're bringin'- t:- me'












bu

























MY HOUSE IS RED.

" MY house is red, my little house,-
A happy child am I;
And whether I'm at work or play,
The time goes swiftly by.

I have a tree, a bright green tree,
To shade me from the Sun;
And under it, I often sit,
When all my work is done.

My little basket, then I fill,
With Hazel-nuts so brown;
With flowers bright, I cover them,
And trip away to town.

I take them to the ladies there,
Who give me half a crown;
And then I buy some currant-cake,
.And back I come from town."
















J.




N I, -


il J ill


SII I |






THREE LITTLE GIRLS.

THREE little girls, sat on a rail,
Sat on a rail,
Sat on a rail;
Three little girls, sat on a r.il.
One fine hot day in September.

What did they say, on that ine day ?
On that fine day,
On that fine day;
What did they say, on that ine, d\y ?
That fine hot day in September.

They talked about the crows and c.:rn,
The crows, and corn,
The crows, and corn:
They talked about, the crows and corn,
That fine hot day in September !







62










































CRAZY DAN.

O \what an ugly, queer old man!
The neighbors call him crazy Dan.
He sometimes breaks the children's toys,
And loves to scare the girls and boys.

He's caught poor Billy, as you see,
Who seems in sad distress to be;
And cries as loud, as cry he can,
And kicks the shins of crazy Dan!

Old Dan, enjoys his loud alarms,
And holds him, in his skinny arms;
But soon he'll set poor Billy free,
And let him scamper home to tea.


68

















44V

















RING the bell, ring!
Hurrah for the King!
The dunce fell into the pool, Oh!
The groom and the cook,
Fished him out with a hook;
For he was going to school, Oh!

Then he piped his eye,
And shook himself dry;
And looked like a terrible fool, Oh!
So now let us dance,
And give him a chance;
To sit on the dunce's stool, Oh!








64











YN.








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Pe
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