Little Buttercup's picture book

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Little Buttercup's picture book with ninety-six pages of illustrations
Physical Description:
96 p. : ill. ; 32 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
George Routledge and Sons ( Publisher )
James Burn & Company ( Binder )
Publisher:
George Routledge and Sons
Place of Publication:
London
New York
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Picture books for children   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1881   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1881   ( lcsh )
Alphabet rhymes -- 1881   ( rbgenr )
Caricatures -- 1881   ( rbgenr )
James Burn & Company -- Binders' tickets (Binding) -- 1881   ( rbbin )
Baldwin -- 1881
Genre:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Alphabet rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Caricatures   ( rbgenr )
Binders' tickets (Binding)   ( rbbin )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

General Note:
Bound by James Burn & Company.
General Note:
Illustrations engraved by W. Measom, E.H. Wehner, J. W. Archer, A. J. Mason, and W.C. Mason; also contains caricatures.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002223481
notis - ALG3730
oclc - 17797612
System ID:
UF00049532:00001


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LITTLE BUTTERCUP'S




PICTURE BOOK

























WITH NINETY-SIX PAGES OF ILLUSTRATIONS
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LONDON
GEORGE ROUTLEDGE AND SONS
BROADWAY, LUDGATE HILL
NEW YORK: 416 BROOME STREET
1881




























CONTENTS.


A BASKET OF MISCHIEF Frot.

PAGE PAGE
MASTER'S WHIP THE PET LAMB 52-57
LITTLE ANN AND HER MAMMA 6--I ANIMAL ANTICS 58, 59
THE BARON'S FAVOURITE HOUND. 12 COUNTRY SCENES 6
THE GUARDIANS OF THE CHATEAU 13 WILD SPORTS AND ADVENTURES 61
SCENES AND CHARACTERS 14,15 MORE SCENES AND CHARACTERS 62, 63
JACK AND THE BEANSTALK 16-21 THE BABES IN THE WOOD 64-69
COMICAL CREATURES 22, 23 OUT-OF-DOOR SKETCHES . 70, 71
SCENES AND CHARACTERS 24, 25 SOCIAL SKITS 72
MORE COMICAL CREATURES. 26, 27 SOCIAL HOURS 73
WHIMS AND ODDITIES 28, 29 QUEER CHARACTERS . .74-79
BABY 30-35 THE COMIC WILLIAM TELL 80
THE HIPPOPOTAMUS. 36 MERRY CONCEITS. .
CAT AND DOG 37 SCRAPS, COMIC AND OTHERWISE 82, 83
STREET SCENES AND CHARACTERS 38, 39 QUIPS AND CRANKS 84
TOM THUMB 40-45 THE COMIC ORPHEUS & OTHER JOKES 85
HISTORIC ECCENTRICITIES 46 THE FIELD AND THE FOREST 86
AMONG THE MILITARY. 47 OUR DOGS 87
HOLIDAY OUTINGS .48,49 ODDS AND ENDS . 88, 89
"A NICE PIE," AND COMICALITIES. 50 ROBINSON CRUSOE 90-95
OUR DOMESTICS 51 MERRY CHRISTMAS 96



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LITTLE BUTTERCUP'S PICTURE BOOK.






















MASTER'S WHIP.












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MASTER'S WHIP,






6 LITTLE ANN AND HER MAMMA.


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Little Ann and her Mother were walking one day
Through London's wide City so fair,
And business obliged them to go by the way
That led them through Cavendish Square.
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LITTLE ANN AND HER MAMMA. 7

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"Mma" said.the;child."see that carig so fair.
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...., sad te c i, "se tha cariag s.- fair.,',
All covre w -th- v ans and o"od'
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W hie w.. -- ., l in the cold,"
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Mamma," said the child, "see that carriage so fair,
All covered with varnish~ and gold;
Those ladies are riding so charmingly there,
While wLe have to walke in the cold."







8 LITTLE ANN AND HER MAMMA.




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Look thee little girl, said he mothe, and see









What stands at that very coach door;
Poor ragged beggar, and listen how she
A halfpenny tries to implore.
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poo rag',e beIr an lite ho,'
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LITTLE ANN AAND HER MAMMA.













































"'Dear ladies," she cries, and the tears trickle down,
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'Relieve a poor beggar, I pray;
I 've wandered all hungry about this wide town,
And not ate a morsel to-day.
3






1o LITTLE ANN AND HER MAMMA.








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Just then a tall footman came round,
And asking the ladies which way they would go,
The chariot turned off with a bound.
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An ai t le hh y e o g























The chariot turned off with a bound.






LITTLE AINN AND HER MAMMA.

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To la btyu11r foly andsin.,
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"How foolish those murmurs have been;

You have but to look on the contrary side,
To learn both your folly and sin."






I2 THE BARON'S F/AVOU RITE BOARHOUNVD.







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The Boarhound must be strong, fleet, and courageous, to be able to come
up with and attack so swift and powerful an animal as the Wild Boar, which
"inhabits the large forests of France and Germany, in which countries Boar-
hunting is a favourite sport.
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hunting is a favourite sport.






THE G ('lA RDI ANS OF TIHE CHATEAU. 13





















4






















A Watch-dog should be both gentle and brave. The Mastiff, which is the
largest and most powerful of watch-dogs, is a great favourite. The dogs in the
picture are Bull-Mastiffs; they are gentle enough with friends, but very fierce
when defending their master's property.






I4 SCENES AND CHARACTERS.




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"KEEP IT UP!" "FOR HE IS AN ENGLISHTMAN!" A LION TAMER.

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"ARE YOU-RALEIGH'" "BRING FORTH" THE TRAITOR!"
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THE STAGE-DOOR KEEPER. "ROBERT, TOI QUE J'AIME."

"SHE 'S ALL RIGHT WHEN SHE'S WOUND UP!"


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THE -' FIRST NIGHT ..- A BLACK DRAUGHT. IN : TH'OX
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THE FIS IH.ABAKDAGT NTEBXS







SCENES AND CHARACTERS. 15





UPSETTING THE WATCH. SHOOTING THE MOON. AN UGLY RUSH.















"SUPPORTING HIS
CHILD. I CLARINET SOLO.







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"LET ME PLAY THE
ONE OF SANGER'S. LION."
_LION"











MR. MANAGER. THE "HEAVY FATHER."


THE TRAVELLING CIRCUS. "JUST A-GOING TO BEGIN!"



C -t .HAI GE!. -


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WELLINGTON.
ON, AND OFF, THE STAGE. AT THE PANTOMIME. "HA! HA! HA!"






16 J CK AND THE BEANSTALK.



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and ran home, but his mother was very angry, and threw them into the garden.
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4 CK AND THE BEANS TALK. 1 7







































Next morning, Jack found that the beans had taken root, and had grown up
like a ladder which seemed to reach the sky. So he began to climb, and
when he reached the top, found himself in s trang"*Q land. Presently a pretty
fairy came up, and directed bhim to a large house where lived a giant who had
killed and robbed his father. The fairy told Jack that he must slay this giant.
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wife, who hi him in the oven. The giant declare e smelt fresh meat, but
his wife brought him his supper, after which he called for his hen. Every
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Jack crept out,,seized the hen.. andescaped ,,te beanstalk.
his vite bough hi lis s~per a~er hichhe alld fr hi he. 1v-
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A/G CK /AND THE BE _ASTALK. 19












































mined to kill the giant. So he disguised himself, and went again. The giant's

"board in which he might sleep. This time the giant called for his money-bags,
and when mothe h fallenow ale to buyback manyde off withce thingem as he hadck wasith the hen.r-
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whih'lae th sweetest mui whe yo sai ply, and again felasep
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Still Jack did not forget what the fairy had told him, but- once more climbed
the beanstalk, and coaxed the giant's wife, with much trouble, to let him in and
hide him inl the copper. The g-iant came home as usual, called for his harp,
which played the sweetest music when you said "play," and again fell asleep.
Jack once more ventured out of his hiding-place, seized the harp, and ran oKf







yA CK A D THE BEA NS TALK, 21

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"But the harp was a fairy, and cried Master, master!" till the giant awoke.
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and was kied. After this Jack became a good lad, and he and his mother
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But he arp as fai, ad cied Matermaser! til th giat aoke
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and as ille. Ater hisJackbecme agoo lad an he nd is mthe
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22 COMICAL CREA TURES.



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Si -- HOW D'YE DO,
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A. WIE MR. DOVE.
"A WISE O L.












"ENOUGH TO MAKE A "MOST VEWSICAL, MOST
CAT LAUG REY-NARD THE FOX AT HOME. MLANCHOLYER "












"LAWYER FOX AND MR. GOOSE A GREAT BOAR. KNOWING BIRDS "DOING A BILLP
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COMIACA L CRIEA TURES. 23



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A TRAP FOR FUNNYY DOGS." .
"WHAT HAVE YOU GOT IN
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GET IT?

















GOOSEY GANDER. THE WHITE CAT.
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A A WHY DON'T THEY OPEN
TETE-A-TETE.-
THE DOOR?"


"WILL YOU WALK INTO MY CASTLE ?














WHAT A HORSE TO BOLT A DAY ON THE WATER. THE CENTAUR OF ATTRACTION.






24 SCENES AND CHILA fRCTERS.












RICHARDSONS SHOW.-" WALK UP, POTTED! TED TALENTS.
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UNADORNED. RIGGED OUT.
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"PLEASE TO MEMBER THE JA LORD MAYORS DAY.
G OTTO! .
GROTTO !" "R\EAL, JASI! LORD M:\YOI;S DAY.







SCENES AND CHARACTERS. 25












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BILLY LACK-
NOBLE ROMANS-"ARMA VIRUMQUE CANO." A-DAY. TOUCHING UP TIHE PUPPETS.




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SEEING THE SHOW FOR NOTHING (?) "NOSEY." A DRESS REHEARSAL.
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AT THE PLAY.
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THE GAME OF FOX AND GOOSE. ATTACKED BY THE NATIVES. HOW WOULD THE JOCKEYS LIKE THIS? "PLEASE RFAI.MEMPJER THE SWEEPER !"


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_TH A--NIMALS' __.-_ ______________.___RGYEEUE ____APAS ____
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THE ANIMALS' BALL--LITTLE I7POGGY EXECUTES A PAS SEUL.







MORE COMICAL CREATURES. 27

















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SHY OUIRDS.























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A KANGAROO STEEPLE- --.----------
CHASE. PRICKLY PORCUPINE, R.A., PAINTS LORD LION'S PORTRAIT. STAGGERED











"PLEASE, SIR, DON'T FIRE-I'M SO TIMID." A WISE OWL. "HOW DO WE FIND OURSELVES THIS
"EVENING ?"
A KANGAROO STEEPLE







28 WHIMS AND ODDITIES.




















EARLY ENGLISH A BOY OF LOOSE
STYLE. HABITS.










"OH HOW PRETTY!" THE MAGIC FIDDLE-AN AWKWARD SCRAPE. MASTER CUPID.










WILL YOU HAVE A BITE? GETTING UP STEAM.









"NO BUTTONS AGAIN!" FAMILY JARS.


THE MAGIC FIDDLE-LEADING THEM A DANCE.











SCENES IN THE RING. GETTING A SCARE.

"AN ORDINARY AT ONE O'CLOCK."







WHIMS AND ODDITIES. 29












THE FIRST SET-OLD STYLE. "BLACK MONDAY."









SUBTRACTION. -" DAKER !"


















VERY ROSY! A TIGHT FIT.









"NOT IF I KNOW CANT AFFORD





CIVIL AND MILITARY.



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30 BABY'S MORNING BATH.


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About his feet and hands and chin,
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And every day he'd such a game;

Nurse brought a tub to wash him in i
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H~is cheeks were round, and dimples came
About his feet and hands and chin,
And every day he'd such a game;
Nurse brought a tub to wash him in.






BABY'S MORNING WALK. 31


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And thr am n h ol ak






32 BABY AT THE SEASIDE.









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"I see the ships, the cliffs, the sea,
To chink and jingle and let fall."






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Papa has asked some friends to dine,
They come to dine and stay to tea;
The ladies wear their jewels fine,
And Baby Boy comes down to see4
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They com to d ine an sa t ea;

The laie wear theirewels fine
Andi~ Bab Bo omsdontose






BA Y'S BED- TIME. 3 5




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Then hug ,~lma and fal asleep_, ,
S -.. ,i .. cai. hi to_
: I I



S.1.
1 I


{" ',, --- '"

-.-., ', -- -

'.. ,.,..'! , .
He .laughs and dances, plays.at_"peep.
1!: i9 "--- .... 1"
l .! : "" -: "
',"I .i " -

i
..,~ ~~i .,' ,'-












Thenhug Mamaand all aseep
So t i rie cri hie'd
'i "" -"' : --:'>'h
-- :-- .: --. --:- I--
\,...: "- a : .



He~~~~~ ~~~ laugh an acs lasa pe!
Whil all hs unny words' ar sid

So N- uri care i obd
















































































T1I-IP 141PPOPOT.AMUS.
-- --- 4 .. ..- 3 '--


-'-- -o-:-~ ~~ -=. --i








itil






















THE HIPPPOTAMUS






CAT AND DOG. 37

.- --..~ --













4r -r-4











PUSSY AND HER FAMILY.






























A FAITHFUL GUARDIAN.
+- -_ -- - -
:_--







.:






38 STREET SCENES AND CHARACTERS.







X,3




lo--
a.

.- -- "ONLY WAIT TII.L I CATCHt YOU" -
TIHE COW WITH THE IRON












"THE PLUG'S UP" POT AND KETTLE-" YOU 'RE
DRAV,'ING IT rI1.D. TAlIlTV."
















"GENTLEMEN OF COLOUR. MR. BUMBLE. WHERE ARE OU COMING TO?"
Ay i di,

















'i























"THE BREWER'S DRAYMAN. LITTLE TIMKINS TAKES HIS
COGEUNTERYEN OF COLOURSINS. EXTR. BUBBLE. W WIE ARE OUT. COMING TO?"
"\, ," "' .' ,

-. '- .., 1 .. ,,/

j-: "' L'
I } ,J _= __ .i
.14 -..- .. .-. ..
Y, i ', ,
', ,,.:'1 '' :

THE BRWRSDAMN ITL IKN AE I
CONTY OUINS EXRATOT'WIEU,







STREET SCENES AND CHARACTERS. 39










"WHO 'S YOUR HATTER T "

THE ORGAN GRINDER. ILL YOU GO AWAY?




/--





THE CABMAN'S A HEAVY KARE
SHELTER. ,'











tit -A -
__- .---,
















THE ORANGE GIRL.
BOND STREET. OXFORD STREET.



I .
I.- -E .a :_. i'- . I' )






'N --
.. :- .
'Ill i i=. .


it- I ,. ) ([ .-N






"I'VE CAUGHT YOU,
"HERE YOU ARE, Mum! "KEEP THE POT A-BOILING.'" HAVE I.?"







40 TOMi TH' UMA.

'erin t e agii' ;% '"'

-':'------'--- --t 4 -- .14 ','-. .-
-h: ,

t_ .... "' : .'"r ,: ',------.-.", --,: > -" "A (


treeI tohe-e they had. He f n h, t











,-- -


















thanhis f s. e -Q






TOM 7iHU- iMB. 41

I1 1












"10





4---















Now, Tom Thumb, as he was called, being so little, was always getting into
scrapes. One day he fell into a pudding and was tied up, but when the pot began
to boil, he began to kick and struggle, so his mother, thinking the pudding was
bewitched, gave it to a tinker. But Tom soon began to cry out, on which the
tinker was so frightened, that he threw the pudding over the hedge and ran away.
6






42 TOJI THUA JB.






































A raven carried Tom to the top of a giant's castle standing by the sea. Tom
was so frightened that he crept up the giant's sleeve, but as his movements made the
6 1*2
























giant feel uncomfortable, he shook him out into the sea. He was then swal-
lowed by a fish, which was soon after caught and sent to the King : when it was
--cut open, every one was delighted with Tom Thumb who was found alive inside.








was so frightened that he crept up the giant's sleeve, but as his movements made the
giant feel uncomfortable, he shook him out into the sea. -e was then swal-
lowed by a fish, which was soon after caught and sent to the Kings when it was

cut open, every one was delighted with Tom Thumb, who was found alive inside.






TOM TH UMB. 43

























Io.







Tom became a great favourite at King Arthur's Court. But one day, as the
cook was carrying a great bowl of furmenty, the King's favourite dish, poor Tom
fell plump into the middle of it, and splashed the hot furmenty into the cook's
eyes. Tom was sentenced to death for this, but just as the judge was concluding,
he jumped down the throat of a miller who was standing by with his mouth open!
/ "
Tom beam a ra aoriea igArhrsCut.Btoed y, s h
cook wa arigagetbw ffret, h igsfvuiedspo o
fell~ c plm it the ide ofiadslse h otfret noteco'
eyes. To a etne odahfrtibu uta h ug aocuig
hejupe dw te hrato amile howa sanig y it hsmothopn






44 TOM THU J(lB.












,I..,. I i- '
WI,




























"As Tom could not be found the Court broke up, and the miller went home.
But, as Tom began to roll and tumble about, he sent for a doctor. As Tom
began to dance and sing, the doctor sent for several others. While they were all
puzzling, the miller yawned, and Tom jumped out; on which the miller threw
him out of window into the river, where he was snapped up by a salmon.
,. x,._ _ .-C'] '....
0 ._ ._,_ ",'. I
i[? i','tf. ,--,.I II i ..
9[ J/ k _
't Iljl

As Tm culdnotbe fund th Cort bokeupandthe illr wnt ome
But, a Tom bgan t roll nd tu bleB aothe sent "%f or a doctor. As To
bea odneadsig h otrsn frsvr!ohr. hl hywr l




puzzling, ~~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ r th ilryweadTmjme u;o hc h ilrthe






TOM, THUMB. 45











r 7




V: -,,,






,--

















The salmon was caught, and Tom again escaped. But the Queen became
jealous of him, and set the King against him. So Tom mounted a butterfly,
and flew off. Soon after this, a spider, taking poor Tom for a big fly, made
a spring at him; Tom drew his sword and fought bravely; but the spider killed
him at last, on which the King and the whole Court went into mourning.








46 HISTORIC ECCEiVTRICITIES.









"TIIE BARD ON PEGASUS.





























HAROLD AT HASTINGS-" OH, MY
EYE! .
KING'S CROSS!
(AND SUCH A STATUE WAS ENOUGH
TO MAKE IIIM SO.)











"I'M MONARCH OF ALL I SURVEY!" THE REVERSE OF WELLINGTON. "TAKE AWAY THAT BAUBLE
- iGm




















ALFE I
BAI,\': CAPE t I' -" '


















ALFRED INDULGES IN A PATRIOTIC SONG,- AND LETS THE CAKES BURN.







AMONG TH E MILITARY. 47

















A STAFF-OFFICER. "THE HERO OF A HUNDRED FIGHTS." "FOR QUEEN AND
COUNTRY."





















"THE QUEEN'S SHILLING. ---
THE BIG DRUM. THE RAW MATERIAL. THE MANUFACTURED ARTICLE. OFFICER AND PRIVATE.











"TAKEN" IN THE REAR. F. "QUICK MARCH!




k 7,j_
,0 SOLI R TI D



0-




DOUBLE "THE SOLDIER TIRED." "DISCIPLINE -UST E MAINTAINED.







48 IHOLIDA Y O) UTIN GS.




.2 vi -.'.





CO-MING HOME IN STYLE. HALF HOLIDAY. P RE LA CHAISE.
























THE OL \)
COACHMAN. CUTTING A FIGURE.











GOOD SPORT. A DAY 'S FISHING.




A, 1IILY PART V.
*-. IPA,"




















ARRY SEES A SWEET
THING IN SERVES."
FESTIVE FELLOW-TRALLER. WHITEBAIT AT GREENWICE
----i~ --- i "
















'" ,- ,',' I I "











FESTIVE FELLOW\-TRAY 2LLER s. WHITEBAIT' AT GREENWICFI







HOLIDAY Y OUTINGS. 49
V
01* AT LAT..----
























,- -_ |" .







-FI














BY THE SERPENTINE.
4 Y












OFF TO THE RACE A DISCONTENT L AIT. AT THE RACES, 7
.. -_, ._- = ', --
__ __. <- __ :_ : =_ !-:. . := ....
-.1~~ .rs -. __ : 1,- .-. .- -











- I :.. . = .
ii 1, I :- -






So "A NICE PIE" AND OTHER COMICALITIES.




:- "'



"! ." 11 "." 1 j--:I ^ 1 .i
-. ,1 _^ ^ ---~ t -, ii




.A AN ICE PIE. G ,OOD TIMES. "HE.Y'S OF TTI'S17 "

-- ,













MR. SPOONER-"--WY EVERf
4 DEA NICE P. GOOD TIOES. 2. ''S OUT ITOF REACI.
11



-."'l.'
i I7i

.::,4 -- , U,'\i ... ---











-- ._' ,' , .._' .,-I----





4. "DEAD BEAT." 3. ".STOP' THLEIF!'" 5" OUT OF RI~iJCII.






OUR DOMESTICS. 5



















TI G' R". .-t' A TI
-r: '": !



































", MO{B UT ALLY POSTBOXR R
-iriA- IT -













'" 1- ._" -'_-, :" -'1 I_.
A REGULAR ISLAVEYAGOPLICK.AGOPLICO.DINAH.Y
,% II
i II ,
"I 'j .- 1- "





H""P! ,,,_ BELL.'






















_,',u :_ ... .. ; :#
A REGUAR SLAEY. A OOD PI N COK uKT-I-KTII






52 TNE PET LAMB.

.- -. 'i" '- - ," --i'
.'- J -' '
. ,- . --_. -." 1B.-' -
4.--.'-.
,- .._.

.. .- "-

J- -- "- -;;:}7-<- "<- .. .

r
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." -: v :_:v: c r"-



41 P. -, ..-.-






~P
~~ifill
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i ,hh 1 ,I


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II ." ,-i;
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I, ,", ,',- 7i"' -








.17








~;iJ1











The dewv was falling fast, the stars began to blink;
I heard a voice: it said, Drink, pretty creature, drink
And, looking- o'er the hedge, before me I espied
A w t ub h a M e it side
..% s c c R.-.


`! z. 1!


'A snow-white m a m ta_"
.r I -- -': r..


~~ei ',. '!I I
,}',,! '.,

l, ::, I I ;1 ,


.:- .. II -" .".,eI- "
~~i .._-_ .. .. ..
I _+ i, ).",- ... .,..V. f>-; ...
I~"-- ', ,,.



Andlookng 'e the~ hedge,88 beor meI spe
A snow-white mountain-lamb, ithaMie a t ie






THE PET LAMEt 53

.. "j -- /u .,- .... -.-. ,




-- 4-
, fe)


It,
rv~c
I .. .- . .
.". .
I''" ' ,- L-Y-:. .

'It ~ t-. %x \. /, ,]
-7- F









I--
-. ,'. ., ...









1:1
,. "' ,''0, ", -
,. .: ,,,,:- _...:; .;):...F -.t-r
,r ,....11 : . _,:-~ E ,, .. 1 ,']










,,B I/r" a child-' of be t
~ Vr ~ .~i.. 4f~ s'':





















I watched them with delight; they were a lovely pair.
Now with her empty can the Maiden turned away;
But ere ten yards were gone her footsteps did she stay.
b .. ,.-- '
"',1 ~ ~ ~ T I "'"" : ""
,' '. ' .
~ ;', -. .
~8!

..... , ;., '..,


'; '" : "'

r' ,
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....,- f;. : +. i
I .. ', . - ,.
: --- ' -' ";,-','1' ._____________ : ::_...

,." ," -" S. _!(... ., '"...,
'T aslitleBabaal Lethaie a hl fbat ae
I watched them with delight;l thywr lvl a
Now ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~' wihhremt a heMie ure wy
But~Fa ere te ad eegn fosesddsesa .i






54 7HE PET LAMB.


r'.' ?" i, ',- -"--;3 '- ... ."
t- L
4- -
-~~I . ._.. '.,



J




'HI
-NI,
,,- --- .... ,, ,.









U IA 7i .r dC~



iL



~7
-; . ,: -,-; : __" "__ 'J

































"If the sun be shining hot, do but stretch thy wvoollen chain,
.. -. _-- ,..
C -I... .


































For ainand mountain storms, the like thou need'st not fear,-
The ainand storm are things which scarcely can come here.
: ~~~~~ ~ ~ %' ...", ;L '-. "";"""
~l~ft ._. .... ,:
.... ; ''-... '"Bb .. """"
S- \. ... ,. ._.,



.I 4J


,.~
-- . o ,."

... .. . .__ ,, .


.:( .. . .I ._'7; -.i
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"i, '! ' >, .- "
S.'" ,J".' ' ',: :- '
':k -" I "

"I !.
r~:i if ,'rr
,:,; ? ,i,,
,. " :' t l "t ' l-
t , I ', ,
-_Lf7 .........
If he un b shnin hot dobutstrech hy oolln cain
Thisbeec isstaning y, ts cverttho cant gin
For ranadmuti somtelk ho eds o er,
The~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~i ranadsomae hnswihsaceycncm ee






THE PET LAMB. 55








S. -. ...._- .I .. ,,-,-- - -*:-


4.'
r '-








IIN
"" 1 ,- ""/ .' . I




% "I .--- '. -',, *





















"Rest, little young one, rest; thou hast forgot the day
When my father found thee first in places far away:
Many flocks were on the hills, but thou wert owned by none,
And thy mother from thy side for evermore was gone.
,,r r > -, .. .. . : ..z ' ,: ,;.t ", l ',- t ,!.






.. .~~~~~~~ .. ""i[:..















A t mte i-o th s- .u " mor .a .






56 THE PET LAiMAB.


XI

j' j r
r I'f





I-r
J.:
















kix
--f ''... ,
.... ; '



rq .. i--












1; D I Z A I
















"Thy limbs will shortly be twice as stout as they are now,
Then I '11 yoke thee to my cart like a pony in the plougrh;
My playmate thou shalt be; and when the wind is cold
Our hearth shall be thy bed, our house shall be thy fold.
S"" ':; :/ '':" ----_ :. ."

, I,, .


. .., -_


i 5. ; .,
, r- : : i . .. - . .
'; "' : i,'" .. ,':, : "-i
.. .. . .. "
--; ; -' ; '
. .5. -- -_-. .. . :


1_,. -.;"I ..r ,.
I- ._.- '. '
~j I --:_ .. '_
:,t ----- "--


", ,h li b il h rl b- ,w c -s -tu -- the "- n
.,,:,: , ,.,_.. ..... t y czr lk a p n i n h 1o~ h
:_.::.:", :...,at .', .-:l -e an .--n th :. s c
: ": he-::- s-:::' ". th --: ":;" ho s : b h o






THE PET LAMB. 57

,r -. ' :":l
411










jPI,'
.." ",- I-J ~










Jilll
ril, #1
; I ." -._ ic :.






'I










"dj" '
-. ,, I "d

IfI



lV / ,.- ..,.~



"Here thou need'st not dread the raven in the sky;













Night and day thou art safe,-our cottage is hard by.
Why bleat so after me ? Why pull so at thy chain ?
Sleep-and at break of day I will come to thee again!
SS
",41 , '/ o ;! '-
,/c ,, .,, ",. .:.
1;;' . .t
: ..
,,, , I i- ? ,
,I~ ~ r

': 'd l
r i;. r / L i
""' 'i' ,! "~ rl :.J. d~ I,
*~ t, /I

i i i' ',!I
,11 ,.i .. ,, .. -



i'": "' ,.r, ? ~ Z
,.' "Ii :, .i"'L "glgr ''. ,/:/ ll~BBP~t, li
I-,... ,.., ; ; ._ .. ;j


Why I~ blea softr:' me ?i Why pul so attychi
Slep-an atbeko dyIwl cm oteeaan
''I I'' I8












..r,. =,7- %:.t.. -- - ......- ...._

A BIRD OF PREY. MAKING IT GO DOWN. "HAREM-SCAREM." A LAWYER'S BILL.
~i~--~-~. .. . . . . . . . .~ '.



-. 7

S- t- -










S*S
_-~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~r ---- ;-_- ------ _-- -- - .. --=--
.... .... --_-- -- -- --- :--- ~- ---!---- -- -- -~ / - "-- ----
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~--i -_-_- __ _- -- - = -- __- -











C: -Y











A DAY'S SPORT-" POP GOES THE WEASEL!I
- - -_- - -- --- -: < - _ --::



==__~~- : .._ =- --_-< .. : i _- _= -




-: ~~tP .. --_f _- -,.:r _
----.--i :- -- -- ,_ -- ..


-- .--', .:
_- --- --- ....-PO 7=' TH !A







ANIMAL ANTICS. 59














COMING A CROPPER. : PITCH AND TOSS.

"JVEr II\UGII! IIEF H(AUGH!"




0 A,








A rEA MEETING. ISN'T HE A DONKEY ?









CATCHING A TARTAR. IPLE SjON,

`;1j I ISNTHE AIDONKEX ?






THE DOG AND HIS 7 OICES OF THE NIGHT.
SHADOW. _



I0







HORSE EXERCISE. ( KOIG 1HL DLsLRT.











THE MONKEY HOUSE. IN HOARSEPITAL. --
TH MONKY FEEDING THE BEAR.






60 COUNTRY SCENES.






~a












THE GOOSE GIRL. THE PET LAMB.
-. >




,'L ' -'r ','r "..
.:i U --:'" "."' .
,. %.--_--.-
'd ... - _.









-Pi












GOING TO MARKET. BILLY THE BOLSTER.


















FS
\' ll NL l -.
FE DG..... R S I
i c- i.':-i ': a


GOING TOS MARKE. ILYTIIE BOTLTRU.


t *: ,
: --'.: :5 a~a : ,
-.. ,, ::.*i.
q 4 L--7' "


: .... -: Z -__








FEEDNG TH IIET FOWLS, FRtt VIOLTETS.








WILD SPORTS AND ADVENTURES.









_




















D E S
I











A SOLITARY HUNTER. TIRED OUT.



































DANGEROUS SPORT. STOPPED BY A RIVLiR.







62 MORE SCENES AND CHARACTERS.








RIVAL RICHARDS.
"- ALL DICKEY.
THE NEW BALLET DISASTER. A COMICAL BALLET-MEPHISTO AND THE BAKER.


I - "















JOEY AND DR. SYNTAX. i \N ELEPH 'NT 7TWIn.












THE LOW COMEDIAN. JUVENILE TALENT.

A CRITICAL AUDIENCE.

-, D. K
Ilk9
i "-


E H E /AS "BAL T i- A" PT











REHEARSING A BALLET. STUDYING A PART, READY TO GO ON,






MORE SCENES AND CHA RACTERS. 63




-- r r-
S"






EGG DANCE EGGS-TRAORDINARY. MAKING UP. PRACTISING THE GOOSE STEP.











MIXED).









OUR POET. MASTER SHAKSPERE ARRIVES WITH A NEW PLAY. AUNT SALLY.








A SAILOR'S HORNPIPE. A FLIGHT OF FANCY. LEADING HER A DANCE.









WORKING THE PUPPETS. THE STAGE MANAGER. "TERRIFIC COMBAT





64 THE BABES IN THE WOOD.



































The Parents being like to di'e, I/c Fat/cr makes his wil4!
As plainly doth appea Two hundred pounds in gold,

















When h- e to perfect age should come, To be paid down on marriage-day,

















Three hundred pounds a year. Which tould not be controlled.
"As plainly "appear, w hu e p d "



-r: e ,d aich coud nti
























Three hundred pounds a year. Which could not be controlled.






THE AB4 ES IN THE WOOD. 6S

1' ,' ,,1 M'illi,
iii! I ['.~'II I 'I'!
II!AI I II i I
IM I
",. '"l.,'"''"I" '.
l..,

I I' *
I II I,,i liI',


\( ., 1 I I I



"' if

i' I l IL
l ,; ,

___ 11 loIi Ii i H~i ',
'' (' ,"JRi'








,I ,, i'!ii!
'"' i. ,













_____-.___ "' ._\
__._--_____-_____._.____-___. .. ...I__ _


"AId enrsls il dre lo eir Uncls care.













"Now, brother," said the dying- man, "God never prosper me nor mine,
"Look to my children dear; Nor aught else that I have,













Be good unto my boy and girl, If I do wrong your children dear,
ii
,, i i I "' 'Ii ,
I'~ ii'


-- ~ ~ ~~II I _a L

















No friends else have they here" When you are in the grave.








9
d\ I i .l :

'~, i, i iI I i z

Ilk :', ; ,J i 1' 'l, I !; ,ii / ,I il

''It '~t t t] e'' C] 'clre tor tjdr IIcl's '
"I Now broIthe, sadtedigmn,"o ee rsprm o ie
Lol t m cilde er oragtes ta ae
Be~ ~ ~ ~ goo unonybo n il, !/If do wro" yorchlrner
:Noii frind elseE haete ee"We yuae h rv.
I j I \j~I 9





66 THE BABES IN THE WOOD.




















41k














The Parents die; the Uncle takes the Babes home,
He had not kept these pretty babes He bargained with two ruffians bold,
A twelvemonth and a day, Who were of savage mood,
When, for their wealth, he did devise That theyshould take the children twain
To make them both away. And slay them in a wood.






THE BABES IN THE WOOD. 67























Thes
Ir
>774









,,. .,,___






A 4zd /ires Iwo z ufclzs to slay tiemn in a Wood.
They prate and prattle pleasantly, So that the pretty speech they had
While riding on the way, Made the ruffians' heart relent;
To those their wicked uncle hired And they that took the deed to do,
T these lovely babes to slay: Full sorely did repent.









i""
68 THE BABES IN THE WOOD.








I~ A
.. .. . .-. .











eris, in te Wood.


































Till death did end their grief Poor babes ast all relief.
tierish i i/ic Wood.


Thus wandered these two pretty dears In one another's arms they died,
Till death did end their grief; Poor babes, past all relief.






7 HE BABES IN TH1E WOOD. 69

A *





































Tke Robins bury the Babes witk leaves.-The Uncle dies in Prison.
The fellow that did take in hand And did confess the very truth,
These children for to kill, The which is here expressed;
Was for a robbery judged to die, Their uncle died while he for debt
As was God's blessed will: Did long in prison rest.







70 OUT-OF-DOOR SKETCHES.








ON THE PIER,

A REST ON TIIE WAY. ONE OF THE NATIVES.











ROOM FOR ONE
GRACE HARKAWAY. THE NEW NOVEL-VOLUME II.










AN ARTFUL DODGER. "HOORAY! WE'VE GOT A HOLIDAY THE SNOW MAN.









I
"THE TRAIN'S UST GONE, SIR!" ARRAYY PUT OUT. A FOREIGN INVASION.
L --,, ,, _.f. ..
'~~~ ~ ,'";i
,._ "'
,_ ,.'- '

._ =... ,
:_ .: :.
"THETRINS US GNE SR[ 'RR PT UT i FREGNINASON







OU7-OF-DOOR SKETCHES. 71









-PP,

GETTING OUT OF IIIS DEPTH. EVER WELCOME. COCKNEY SPORTSMEN.










'A TOUG_ JOB. A PENNY A PEEP.




































"; MRS. WIDE-AWAKE WEASEL AND FAMILY.
NO THOROUGHFARE. AN ICE MATCH.














A AM PROCESSION. WELL POSTED. SHOVEL HATS AND COALSCUTTLE BONNETS
~~~~~ -- _N.









































A FAMILY PROCESSION, WELL POSTED, SHOVEL HATS AND COALSCUTTLE BONNETS,







72 SOCIAL SKITS.










"WHEN THE CAT'S AWAY-" PENNY -A LINERS. CIVIC REVELS.



I I ,... .






I.





"THE PICTURE OF PAPA!" AIR OF LAC IDS.















A ft
SCORES COU CN YO SEE FRANK? PNING A





THE LAST CHAPTER. SLIPPERY CUSTOMERS. AN OBLIGING CHAIRMAN.














"LET ME DREAM AGAIN. A POLICE C.iSE, "A HORRIBLE TALE,"
." il.. .
**..* I I ,






SOCL4L HU11OURS. 73


Li I I C' 7 77





TILE LAST WORD. MANY HAPPY RETURNS OF THE DAY." NO QUARTER DAY.


.1 As













A LITTLE MISTAKE. AN EASY SHAVE. "HE'S GOT THE WRONG DRAUGHT!"
S....... ... .......















"zAIN'T A-GOING TO SPOIL
BRINGING HER TO. WAITING FOR THE T IMES .". MY FIGURE!











HAVE YOU HEARD PATTI THIS
THE UNFRIENDLY CRITIC. SEASON ? THE FRIENDLY CRITIC.
10
~~ ~ ~~ "11 -- -:i ii,(' '- -
S/ __ I 7 .l ..- : : -
_, a _, ,- \ - .,_ ], ,'








_






".. ..V TO ....D ,..T i T....-'I _.S
-H U- IENL .. R--.TIC, ,!,llOi" -.- ".. i, i.L { 7 ,- !
-.,' I.-- q- \" l "lt .,,,__ '. _" ....... : .,,, ..,, ... :-






74 QUEER CHARACTERS-DOC OR DONKEY.














































Than beast of education. Went further than his knowledge.
A







X, ,











II,











Doctor Donkey kept a school 'T is true he never much possessed
For all the brute creation; The learning taught at college;
But many thought him more a fool But then, the patience he possessed
Than beast of education. Went further than his knowledge.






QUEER CHARACTERS-THE ARTFUL FOX. 75








I, -- _









tl







jil




















Here's a sly old cunning Fox, Let us shut our eyes," quoth he,
Trying to appear devout; Say our grace before our meat."
Do you think those well-fed Cocks No," says the eldest Cock, not we;
Know what Reynard is about ? For it's us you want to eat !"






76 QUEER CIA RA CTERS- TABBY THE PIPER.

: I; ,I : i 1:;, ,, I, /'h I -....... .. I '''I--

I J ',I I I 'I I h , II
111.1 '' -,-- '"

le li
















I *, I' ,
I *- \I,' jjj






- __ _I-l" "'I, .'




-c







As Tabby lay basking one day in the sun,
A-longing for something to eat,
He thought to himself 'txould be capital fun
To play on a pipe for his meat.






Q UEER CHA RA CTERS-DOBBINV THE BLA CKSMITH. 77




I i I4 !

-A I












1-











The village forge old Dobbin kept,
And earned his bread from day to day;
For up he rose when others slept,
And, while they talked, he worked away
And, while they talked, he worked away!






78 QUEER CHARACTERS--THE TRIAL OF TOWSER.



_____________- II= L 'I

















The cunning counsel-- -Carlo tried
o-N -



























To plead a melancholy tale;
But Guilty," all the jury cried,
And so the thief was sent to jail.
r ~l.s 'i,,/ !,,I,
,,, ~ R I




1 tIi/ ;i




% -,--? ....






QUEER CHARACTERS-OLD JACKO THE MONKEY. 79


.-_. ......



,'x























But if they should wake him, he surely begin











To give them a taste of the birch!
:+_.- ---~- -~


'-- ," .i





To give them a taste of the birch!








8o THE COMIC WILLIAM TELL.














"BOW TO HIS HAT! NEVER!" "HI, YOU SIR, D'YE SEE THAT 'AT?"













MINION, OBEY THE MANDATE! "-" SIAN'T!" "TAKE THAT!"




i,







"A CRACK SHOT, IS IIE ?-THEN- LET HIM SHOOT AN APPLE OFF HIS SON'S HEAD.
IHA! HA'"












MASTER TELL IS "FETCHED." AGONY !-SUSPENSE!!












"A PALPABLE HIT!" TRIUMPH OF TELL.







MERRY CONCEITS. 81





l ow V:- _-,?
PERSISTENT BORS, NOT CAUGHT YET.
FILED IN CHANCERY.






...... . .. 9_ .
















-- 'THE HEIGHT OF







QUARRELSOME SPIRITS. ONE FOR HIS NOB.


MR. FIGARO FROG THE BARBER.
















"OH SNAKES "SKIPPER AHOY "I SAW HIM FIRST
t:' '!' OM ";'ITS :N F- .- H.. "

OH SNAKES : SKIPPERO AHOY TII B)" SW tM IRT








82 SCRAPS-COMIC AND OTHER WISE.

4











I' '.j-i- - '. i. I.
A SHOWER OF FROGS. SHATTERED IDOLS.





IN_
"_- 1> "




































"OH, HOW DELIGHTFUL I"

















BLOWING THEIR OWN-
TRUMPETS, "V WERE SHALL WE GO TI1IS YEAR?" THE MOUTH OF THE THAMES.








SCRAPS-COMIC AND OTHERWISE. 83





I !










TAKING HIM IN
CARRYING THE WAR INTO THE ENEMY'S LINES. HAND. WALL FRUIT.







1
























A GREAT TRAVELLER. I41 IN
r-I


iA IDT I i































ASKING FOR WORE, "BAKED POTATOES) ALL HOT! CUPBOARD LOVE.
i 0
\ '_I.













Tit 11if THE UE TO




























DARK DEALINGS. THE LAST STITCH. "AWAY WITH MELANCHOLY."
-- -- i "-" iI Li







84 QUIPS AND CRANKS.



i, 2 #. /. '






PEAR-TREE WALK. A BOTTLE STOPPER. ELEPHANT AND CASTLE.













THE DEMONS OF THE
DICE-BOX. WHIPPING THE WORLD.
.l -'---- Z ''----- "- ",









PEiRToE. f\~. i; B L,-I ,,11f ,Elt l









HOW THE JUG RUNS THE QUEEN OF HEARTS AND SIR CAPRICORNUS. APPY RETORTS.













BADLY PENNED. OLD KING COLE. UNDER THE THUMB





S41-
I i, -v- ,





LEAVING A, F T-j ..
BADLY PENNED. G OLD KIENG COLE. ODER TL E THUMB.
....( r-c~ ":b
S,.. --.:"' ' ., -,,,'". ,l, l,.-: _. .. .
.. : ._,. [.v- ,- .,~a -) .,
--~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ "- '- "et--- ,' ;',,1 -.







THE COMIC ORPHEUS, AND OTHER yOKES. 85






THE LAST 'BUS. RAISING HIS CHOLER. A QUARRELSOME FAMILY.







_, k i!I 1/

"I. CHARON INTRODUCES EUR YDICE TO PLUTO. IN FULL SWING. 2. ORPHEUS ARRIVES IN SEARCH OF
E UR YDICE.









3. ORPHEUS DEMANDS HIS WIFE. 5. OH, CEASE TILAT iADDF,\V & S7RAI\!"









PATTY THE PASTRYCOOK. -- -----
4. ORPHEUS TURNS ON HIS ORGAN. 6. "Al' HI, CERBER USI"










7. CERBERUS TURNS TAIL. PULLING HIM UP SHORT. 8. OY GO WITH 'E!"









A BULL IN A CHINA SHOP. ---- SERVICE."
A COLD IN THE HEAD.






86 7HE FIELD AND THE FOREST.










HARE. RABBIT, SQUIRREL. WEASEL.
















FALCON. WOODPECKER.















OWL. CORMORANT.












ROOK. MAGPIE.


THE STARTLED DEER,



-.












STAG. FALLOW-DEER, ROEBUCK.






OUR DOGS. 87










FLOSS PUNCH. COLLEY. GYP. SNUB.
.~~ ~ ..;. ..... .- ..


''., N
'"'%






"GIVE A DOG A A CAREFUL
"BAD NAME." LEADER.
FLOSS PUNCH. COLLYDOG." MISSIS'S PET."NU























A SAD DOG."SC O.



PINTO THE POINTER,








tAA



TWO FRIENDS. TRAY. ROVER, DASH,
.,...-'- , . --, .- c. ...,. I~. ." ,,, ...,.: .
S.. .. ,. .,. . . .. .... ...., ,
.. .( ....a .. ., ,<..>: .
,.. ",..,-

S ,' : :, : . , ,', ,,,% ,,,
.., , -.~ ,. ',. .. : .: .
" GIVE A DOG A """' ''" '":" ' A CAREFUL
BADn NAME."' [ :'' '' :'!;: i',' LEADER.

./!. ."i " '.-- "-.,






A 6'JOLLY DOG." [ ....;,.", ...- MIISSIS'S PET,"



.,.. ,.'. . ,, ,. ag \- r~ e~~r~~,,,
,. '


i 1 .,
S... .... : .!,,;


: ,, ..... !: ,: ,,
A "SAD 0OG." "~ "; ;-' :i
ki, " ...,...,,...., ,, .:...,r. .... "~ .. ..,i SU H A O .



PINTO THIE POINTER,

S" -

,,tS ,,
;, . ;-g ,!' .,
.,~~~~~~ r.-, '
TW RINS TA. OE. AH







88 ODDS AND ENDS.















THE "GENT" OF BYGONE FALLEN GRANDEUR-"HOW MUCH FOR "THE LAST ROSE OF SUMMER."
DAYS. THE LOT?"













SELLING A SECRET.
iPi'













THE ONE-HORSE SHAKY .
A CHIMNEY ORNAMENT AND FIRE-SCREEN, TURNING HIM INTO A BUTT.





THE DERBY DA GUY FAWKES DAY.











SNUFFED OUT AND PUT DOWN. UP-HILL WORK "HOUSEHOLD EFFECTS.
g4-
c_.. _----- =










__ ._







ODDS AND ENDS. 89

I \,- A "










FINISHING-STROKES. AN IMPATIENT PATIENT. THE HEIGZ17 OF ENJOYMENT.





TT 1
u .*,-s- '1 .1 .* :.,























"NO FOLLOWERS ALLOWED !" A STITCH IN TIME. STOPPING A TRAIN.








I- A
S- -- % ". 7 '"
^ 5'* ^ ^ '*/'"- ..










































FA QUIET DRIVE. A TREMENDOUS HEADER. OFF FOR THE HONEYMOON.
12
.{/ ,U E ,iIVE i _.-2.:.iS "_A ER .!F LR ,H - -, .
l, I ,......,'" r ,' -'






90 ROBINSON CRUSOE FINDS A KID.




































Robinson Crusoe was shipwrecked, and cast ashore on an uninhabited island.
After a time he began to get used to his lot. One day his dog caught a young
kid, and Crusoe, running up quickly, saved it alive from him. He then
made a collar of hemp, and led it home by a string. This little kid became so
tame that it followed its master about like a dog, and would never leave him.






ROBINSON CRUSOE MAKES AN UMBRELLA. 91








































Crusoe had saved a chest of tools and other useful things from the wreck; so
he built a house, and when his clothes wore out, he made himself a new suit of
>oat-skin, with a great fur cap to shoot off the rain. After this he spent a great
deal of time in making an umbrella. The hardest part was to get it to let down,
but at last he made one that answered pretty well.
~-q-


g






92 ROBINSON CRUSOE SEES THE PRINT OF A FOOT.



































Robinson Crusoe had another dwelling, with a plantation, and he would
often go from one place to the other. One day, while walking on the sands,
he was surprised to see the print of a man's naked foot! He listened, and
4 "--"































looked round, but could see nobody. He then ran back to a part of his dwel-
ling which he had made strong in case of an attack against savages.
ling which he had made strong in case of an attack against savages.






ROBINSON CRUSOE AND HIS MAN FRIDAY. 93












\X


























Soon after this, Crusoe saved the life of a poor young savage, whom a
number of others were going to kill. Crusoe took him home, and called
him Friday, because he had saved him on that day. He afterwards taught him
to speak English, and made him a suit of clothes. Crusoe had now a com-
panion to whom he could speak, and who became a faithful servant to him.







94 ROBINSON CRUSOE MAKES A BOAT.









































to help him to make a boat, in which they might put to sea. But when with
, . .






































water, as they had to move her almost inch by inch, with the help of great
rollers. But when she was launched she would have held twenty men.
v s yoho byinhwih.h help of gr


















r--ohhod
AsRoiso ruo wsedt lae h ilndi h oud h otFiday
to~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ help himT tomk aba, nwih hymih utt e. twhnwt
great~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~6 laou thyhddn hii oktemsm et gthrit h
watrasthy adtomoe eralos inh y nc, it te el o gea
rollers.. Bu hn h a luce sewud aehld teny n







ROBINSON CRUSOE, FRIDA Y, AND THE SA AGES. 95


1-i
i,:' '/' c -- -
IP
-




',At



'IS
.113 --7t









\ X\
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: "-.,:. :
,".'% . '. 'Ib- c; -






















Ar qA
Y .~ 1 .,,: ._ __r2i s .














,t ,_
". rt '

























The savages came again, and poor Friday was terribly frightened; but
when two or three of them had been killed, the others took to their boats, leav-
ing two of their captives, a Spaniard, and a poor old savage, who, to Friday's
great joy, turned out to be his father. Soon after this an English ship came
by, and Crusoe left the island for England, taking Friday with him.
<:.;


.k,.'\ :. ,
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; -- : 5";
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i' i f ~T

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i'~~~- J
~ ~ ~ ~ r "--2 .,.-.c j -
The svgscm agiadpoFrdywstrril rgtnd u
whn woortre o te ha bee killdthohesoktohirbala-
'ingtoo hi atvs pnad n orodsvgwo oFia
gret jy, urnd ut o b hi fahe. Son fte ths n Eglih sip am
by,4~~ an rself h sadfrEgadaigFia ithhm







96 MERRY CHRISTMAS.









S"HEY, DIDDLE, DIDDLE." "THE KING OF THE CASTLE." I














HICKORY DICKORY JACK AND JILL.






















". \ THE PUDDING.









MR. PUNCH. CAROL-SINGING IN THE OLDEN TIME. MRS. JUDY.

THE END.
"D C -- -, *- _" .,- ,-.,


It , -