• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Plate 1
 Plate 2
 Plate 3
 Plate 4
 "By the softly-flowing river"
 Evelyn's Pets: A story of...
 Three home rulers
 Evelina
 Ethel
 Affection
 Plate 5
 Plate 6
 Plate 7
 Plate 8
 Plate 9
 Plate 10
 My little birds
 John Wilson's picture gallery
 The new Villa
 Going Skating
 Spring-time
 Dreaming
 Plate 11
 Plate 12
 Plate 13
 Plate 14
 Plate 15
 Plate 16
 Babes in a basket
 Jesus and the woman of Samaria
 Jesus Blessing little children
 At bishop's head
 Falling leaves
 Plate 17
 Plate 18
 Plate 19
 Plate 20
 Plate 21
 Plate 22
 Painting the poker red-hot
 The careless nurse
 "Many happy returns of the...
 Helping mamma
 The little emigrant
 The pets dinner
 Plate 23
 Plate 24
 Plate 25
 Plate 26
 Plate 27
 Plate 28
 In memoriam
 Apple blossoms
 The winter of age
 The moorish maiden
 "How is that, grandmamma?"
 The first bouquet of spring
 Plate 29
 Plate 30
 Plate 31
 Plate 32
 Plate 33
 Plate 34
 Jesus with the doctors
 The trial of Abraham's faith
 Good-night, mother!
 Cinderella
 On the Connecticut
 Doe and fawn
 Plate 35
 Plate 36
 Plate 37
 Plate 38
 Plate 39
 Plate 40
 A group of beauties
 Golden locks
 Summer morning
 Working her first sampler
 Supper at last
 Autumn
 Plate 41
 Plate 42
 Plate 43
 Plate 44
 Plate 45
 Plate 46
 The tapir and his foe
 Shooting water-fowl in Africa
 The sick lambkin
 The little nurse
 The peacock's complaint to...
 The pass of splugen
 Plate 47
 Plate 48
 Plate 49
 Plate 50
 Plate 51
 Plate 52
 Tender cares
 Mamma's birthday
 "Morning"
 An eastern beauty and her feathered...
 Mother's Darling
 Time to get up
 Time to go to bed
 "Piping times of peace"
 Plate 53
 Plate 54
 Plate 55
 Plate 56
 Plate 57
 Plate 58
 Plate 59
 Plate 60
 Plate 61
 Back Cover






Title: The royal chatterbox
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00049531/00001
 Material Information
Title: The royal chatterbox
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 32 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Pannemaker, Adolphe François, b. 1822 ( Engraver )
Laplante, Charles ( Engraver )
Davis, John Parker, 1832-1910 ( Engraver )
Cole, Thomas, 1801-1848 ( Illustrator )
Davis, Luc ( Illustrator )
Greenaway, Kate, 1846-1901 ( Illustrator )
R. Worthington ( Publisher )
Dalziel Brothers ( Engraver )
Publisher: R. Worthington
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1881
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1881   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1881   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1881
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Contains prose and verse.
General Note: Illustrated title page; other illustrations engraved by Pannemaker, Laplante, Davis, and Dalziel after Luc Davis, Kate Greenaway, and T. Cole.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00049531
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223576
notis - ALG3826
oclc - 14234207

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
    Title Page
        Page ii
    Plate 1
        Page 1
    Plate 2
        Page 2
    Plate 3
        Page 3
    Plate 4
        Page 4
    "By the softly-flowing river"
        Page 5
    Evelyn's Pets: A story of Stonely
        Page 5
    Three home rulers
        Page 6
    Evelina
        Page 6
    Ethel
        Page 6
    Affection
        Page 6
    Plate 5
        Page 7
    Plate 6
        Page 8
    Plate 7
        Page 9
    Plate 8
        Page 10
    Plate 9
        Page 11
    Plate 10
        12
    My little birds
        Page 13
    John Wilson's picture gallery
        Page 13
    The new Villa
        Page 13
    Going Skating
        Page 13
    Spring-time
        Page 13
    Dreaming
        Page 14
    Plate 11
        Page 15
    Plate 12
        Page 16
    Plate 13
        Page 17
    Plate 14
        Page 18
    Plate 15
        Page 19
    Plate 16
        Page 20
    Babes in a basket
        Page 21
    Jesus and the woman of Samaria
        Page 21
    Jesus Blessing little children
        Page 21
    At bishop's head
        Page 22
    Falling leaves
        Page 22
    Plate 17
        Page 23
    Plate 18
        Page 24
    Plate 19
        Page 25
    Plate 20
        Page 26
    Plate 21
        Page 27
    Plate 22
        Page 28
    Painting the poker red-hot
        Page 29
    The careless nurse
        Page 29
    "Many happy returns of the day"
        Page 29
    Helping mamma
        Page 30
    The little emigrant
        Page 30
    The pets dinner
        Page 30
    Plate 23
        Page 31
    Plate 24
        Page 32
    Plate 25
        Page 33
    Plate 26
        Page 34
    Plate 27
        Page 35
    Plate 28
        Page 36
    In memoriam
        Page 37
    Apple blossoms
        Page 37
    The winter of age
        Page 37
    The moorish maiden
        Page 38
    "How is that, grandmamma?"
        Page 38
    The first bouquet of spring
        Page 38
    Plate 29
        Page 39
    Plate 30
        Page 40
    Plate 31
        Page 41
    Plate 32
        Page 42
    Plate 33
        Page 43
    Plate 34
        Page 44
    Jesus with the doctors
        Page 45
    The trial of Abraham's faith
        Page 45
    Good-night, mother!
        Page 45
    Cinderella
        Page 45
    On the Connecticut
        Page 46
    Doe and fawn
        Page 46
    Plate 35
        Page 47
    Plate 36
        Page 48
    Plate 37
        Page 49
    Plate 38
        Page 50
    Plate 39
        Page 51
    Plate 40
        Page 52
    A group of beauties
        Page 53
    Golden locks
        Page 53
    Summer morning
        Page 53
    Working her first sampler
        Page 54
    Supper at last
        Page 54
    Autumn
        Page 54
    Plate 41
        Page 55
    Plate 42
        Page 56
    Plate 43
        Page 57
    Plate 44
        Page 58
    Plate 45
        Page 59
    Plate 46
        Page 60
    The tapir and his foe
        Page 61
    Shooting water-fowl in Africa
        Page 61
    The sick lambkin
        Page 61
    The little nurse
        Page 61
    The peacock's complaint to Juno
        Page 62
    The pass of splugen
        Page 62
    Plate 47
        Page 63
    Plate 48
        Page 64
    Plate 49
        Page 65
    Plate 50
        Page 66
    Plate 51
        Page 67
    Plate 52
        Page 68
    Tender cares
        Page 69
    Mamma's birthday
        Page 69
    "Morning"
        Page 69
    An eastern beauty and her feathered prisoner
        Page 69
    Mother's Darling
        Page 70
    Time to get up
        Page 70
    Time to go to bed
        Page 70
    "Piping times of peace"
        Page 70
    Plate 53
        Page 71
    Plate 54
        Page 72
    Plate 55
        Page 73
    Plate 56
        Page 74
    Plate 57
        Page 75
    Plate 58
        Page 76
    Plate 59
        Page 77
    Plate 60
        Page 78
    Plate 61
        Page 79
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
Full Text
























































































P.

































III.




















A.
































































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Copyright 1881. by

R. WORTHINGTON, 770 BROADWAY, NEW YORK.





















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EVELYN'S PETS.

"D TN ot Frighten Pussei So! "










-_______ _= _-
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THREE HOME RULERS.








































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"'Twas beauty's bondage o'er me cast,
The charm that speaks in silent eyes."






































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"All"















ETHEL.
"Light of our dwelling lace"
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","gh ofo' w ll~in -lal,,'ii''e 4. I








THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

"By the goftly- lowig iivei." And upon the shining surface
Drop their foliage leaf by leaf,

So upon a good man's pathway
HY doth the river run so swiftly ? Fall, like leaves from autumn trees,
Tell me truly, mother, dear. Prayers and blessings and good wishes
SI see it hurrying, rushing onwards, From the 'very least of these.'
Through all the seasons of the year.
Thus he moves on to the ocean
"I mark it as it floats on past us,Thus he oe on to the oea
Of that wide Eternal Shore,
Eddies there, and shallows here; f that wide E nal Shor,
But I cannot tell its errand- Where a calm and holy splendor
ut cannot its Waits the soul for evermore."
Whether far or whether near."

The river runneth to the ocean ,
In a calm and steady stream,
Giving food and health and plenty,
Working always, whilst men dream. vely' et : tofy of toqely.

"Where the golden grain stands thickest,
And the tree luxuriant grows, lRIM, you must not bark like that,
Where the fragrant grass is greenest, You will frighten my poor cat
There the blessed river flows." Quiet, sir, and do not tease,

" Tell me, mother, whither comes it, I'll take kitty, if you please."
All this mighty flood we see,
All this mighty flood we see, Prim put up his fine old head,-
Flowing always, never lacking,
Flowing always, never lacking, He well knew what Evelyn said,-
Always calm and bright and free? Gazed at her with trustful look,
Gazed at her with trustful look,
" Do you tell me in the mountain, As pussie in her arm she took.
'Neath a stone there bursts a spring,
Where the harebells and the heather rm dd not want to harm theat-
Join the ferns in fairy ring ? He was taught too well for that;
SHe but wished to play, but she
" That is but 'a thread of silver,' Was frightened, as she well might be.
The rill-a poor and puny thing,
Where we've sat in summer weather So Evelyn told the dog to go-
Listening to the mavis sing !" "Do not frighten Pussie so;
I won't have her worried now."
" Yes, my child, that tiny streamlet, Prim understood, and said, "Bow-wow."
Broadened onward in its flow,
Gathering force and waxing stronger Come along," said Evelyn ; come."
Is the river that we know. Off they set together home,-
Puss and Prim and Evelyn too-
"As a good man's life this streamlet, When Prim looked up Puss said, "Mee-oo."
Though but small when first begun,
Flows on calmly, bringing blessings As they went along the track,
To all around, both old and young.
To all around, both old and young. The girl put puss on Prim's broad back
" As the smooth unruffled surface There the kitten held so tight,
Of a river grand and still With paws and claws and all her might.
Takes a tinge of Heaven's brightness,
Silent working Heaven's will, Very often since that day
I've seen the cat and dog at play ;
"So the good man's life unfoldeth Puss is not afraid of Prim,
All the peace that lies within, For he loves her, and she loves him.
Reflects abroad the sun of Heaven,
Dispelling darkening doubts of sin. So, young friends, be good and kind,
And, if angry, call to mind
" As the murmuring trees doth whisper Good old Prim, and Pussie, too
Where the river runs beneath, Who live in love, as you should do.








THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

"By the goftly- lowig iivei." And upon the shining surface
Drop their foliage leaf by leaf,

So upon a good man's pathway
HY doth the river run so swiftly ? Fall, like leaves from autumn trees,
Tell me truly, mother, dear. Prayers and blessings and good wishes
SI see it hurrying, rushing onwards, From the 'very least of these.'
Through all the seasons of the year.
Thus he moves on to the ocean
"I mark it as it floats on past us,Thus he oe on to the oea
Of that wide Eternal Shore,
Eddies there, and shallows here; f that wide E nal Shor,
But I cannot tell its errand- Where a calm and holy splendor
ut cannot its Waits the soul for evermore."
Whether far or whether near."

The river runneth to the ocean ,
In a calm and steady stream,
Giving food and health and plenty,
Working always, whilst men dream. vely' et : tofy of toqely.

"Where the golden grain stands thickest,
And the tree luxuriant grows, lRIM, you must not bark like that,
Where the fragrant grass is greenest, You will frighten my poor cat
There the blessed river flows." Quiet, sir, and do not tease,

" Tell me, mother, whither comes it, I'll take kitty, if you please."
All this mighty flood we see,
All this mighty flood we see, Prim put up his fine old head,-
Flowing always, never lacking,
Flowing always, never lacking, He well knew what Evelyn said,-
Always calm and bright and free? Gazed at her with trustful look,
Gazed at her with trustful look,
" Do you tell me in the mountain, As pussie in her arm she took.
'Neath a stone there bursts a spring,
Where the harebells and the heather rm dd not want to harm theat-
Join the ferns in fairy ring ? He was taught too well for that;
SHe but wished to play, but she
" That is but 'a thread of silver,' Was frightened, as she well might be.
The rill-a poor and puny thing,
Where we've sat in summer weather So Evelyn told the dog to go-
Listening to the mavis sing !" "Do not frighten Pussie so;
I won't have her worried now."
" Yes, my child, that tiny streamlet, Prim understood, and said, "Bow-wow."
Broadened onward in its flow,
Gathering force and waxing stronger Come along," said Evelyn ; come."
Is the river that we know. Off they set together home,-
Puss and Prim and Evelyn too-
"As a good man's life this streamlet, When Prim looked up Puss said, "Mee-oo."
Though but small when first begun,
Flows on calmly, bringing blessings As they went along the track,
To all around, both old and young.
To all around, both old and young. The girl put puss on Prim's broad back
" As the smooth unruffled surface There the kitten held so tight,
Of a river grand and still With paws and claws and all her might.
Takes a tinge of Heaven's brightness,
Silent working Heaven's will, Very often since that day
I've seen the cat and dog at play ;
"So the good man's life unfoldeth Puss is not afraid of Prim,
All the peace that lies within, For he loves her, and she loves him.
Reflects abroad the sun of Heaven,
Dispelling darkening doubts of sin. So, young friends, be good and kind,
And, if angry, call to mind
" As the murmuring trees doth whisper Good old Prim, and Pussie, too
Where the river runs beneath, Who live in love, as you should do.








THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX

Tlifee lorqe Ruleft velihr.
t, HEN first my fancy ceased to roam
N ulsters clad, of Irish frieze, 'Twas thou that fix'd it, wild before;
With rough gray stockings to their knees, Thine artless smiles allured it home,
Great woollen comforters around And bade the truant stray no more.
Their sturdy necks securely wound, 'Twas beauty's bondage o'er me cast
Deep in each pocket plunged a hand- The charm that speaks in silent eyes,
Our troublesome Home Rulers stand. Outshining all the misty past
With hues of present paradise.
Eyes of dear Erin's deepest blue, The wavelet, dazzled by a star,
With little devils laughing through; Lies lonely 'mid the restless sea;
Noses turned up to those blue skies But I, a wavelet happier far,
Whose color cannot match the eyes; The star itself came down to me.
And Irish mouths, that forward press! blest was I above my thought-
Oh blest was I above my thought-
With such a wealth of wickedness n
With such a wealth of wickedness! Beyond expression's warmest bound;
'Twas earthly beauty that I sought,
Oh Patsy, Hugh, and Brian, still 'Twas heavenly goodness that I found.
You rule our household at your will !
No mother's word your hands can stay,
Big sisters helplessly give way, Itl1el.
You push your father from his throne, stay! vision of youth and grace
v TAY i stay i vision of youth and grace !
You stop all talk, except your own, t st radia a h
v nStay! stay! radiant and happy face !
You storm and wheedle, tease and fight,
Ad e k u u a ig Stay stay light of our dwelling-place!
And sometimes keep us up all night Sad in thine absence we'll be.
Sad in thine absence we'll be.
Thy smile was like sunshine, it glittered so cheerily,
If we would speak of Eastern things, Thy voice was like music, it rang out so clearly;
The fall of cities-stocks-or kings, We knew not till now that we loved thee so dearly:
The price of meat, Miss Jones's flirtings, Our home will be dark without thee.
The liveliness that marks gray shirtings,
How preference debentures waver, Stay stay! loving and kindly heart!
Or ministers loose fame and favor- Stay! stay joy is where'er thou art!
Your chatter, chatter, comes to break Stay stay wherefore so soon depart,
The wisest statements one can make. Leaving us here in our pain
" I want to this "-" I want to that" Yet if, like the spring, to new lands thou art going,
Ever and ever spoils our chat. To scatter thy smiles like sweet primroses growing,
And when your father's making out We'll hope that with beauty, and grace overflowing,
Where stood some Ottoman redoubt, Like spring, thou wilt come back again.
You interrupt him with your shout -
"It's snowing, pa! may Igo out?" Nffeetiol.

Oh, children, children, be more sage WEET Home !" Oh blissful, holy place,
You cannot know the cares of age. When perfect love and peace are found
If we can't let you skate to-day, Within it, shedding joy and grace
Or go this evening to the play, To make the threshold "hallowed ground."
Deep and sincere as is your sorrow When heart to heart, and hand to hand,
'Twill be forgotten by to-morrow. Are closely linked by silken chains;
The woes with which your father strives Where each one shares the fears, the cares,
May last for years, and sadden lives. The hopes, the pleasures, and the pains;

Be less conceited, little boys Where open deeds and guileless speech
Though he can't match you at a noise, Dissolve all clouds of mean deceit;
Papa knows better far than you Where honest eyes without disguise
What it is wisest you should do. Look straight into the eyes they meet;
Do not abuse the power you have, Where manhood, infancy, and age,
Nor overdrive a willing slave. With simple faith and earnest trust,
If thus you struggle for Home Rule In lowly reverence hear the page
Tremble! He'll pack you off to school! In which 'tis written "Be ye just."








THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX

Tlifee lorqe Ruleft velihr.
t, HEN first my fancy ceased to roam
N ulsters clad, of Irish frieze, 'Twas thou that fix'd it, wild before;
With rough gray stockings to their knees, Thine artless smiles allured it home,
Great woollen comforters around And bade the truant stray no more.
Their sturdy necks securely wound, 'Twas beauty's bondage o'er me cast
Deep in each pocket plunged a hand- The charm that speaks in silent eyes,
Our troublesome Home Rulers stand. Outshining all the misty past
With hues of present paradise.
Eyes of dear Erin's deepest blue, The wavelet, dazzled by a star,
With little devils laughing through; Lies lonely 'mid the restless sea;
Noses turned up to those blue skies But I, a wavelet happier far,
Whose color cannot match the eyes; The star itself came down to me.
And Irish mouths, that forward press! blest was I above my thought-
Oh blest was I above my thought-
With such a wealth of wickedness n
With such a wealth of wickedness! Beyond expression's warmest bound;
'Twas earthly beauty that I sought,
Oh Patsy, Hugh, and Brian, still 'Twas heavenly goodness that I found.
You rule our household at your will !
No mother's word your hands can stay,
Big sisters helplessly give way, Itl1el.
You push your father from his throne, stay! vision of youth and grace
v TAY i stay i vision of youth and grace !
You stop all talk, except your own, t st radia a h
v nStay! stay! radiant and happy face !
You storm and wheedle, tease and fight,
Ad e k u u a ig Stay stay light of our dwelling-place!
And sometimes keep us up all night Sad in thine absence we'll be.
Sad in thine absence we'll be.
Thy smile was like sunshine, it glittered so cheerily,
If we would speak of Eastern things, Thy voice was like music, it rang out so clearly;
The fall of cities-stocks-or kings, We knew not till now that we loved thee so dearly:
The price of meat, Miss Jones's flirtings, Our home will be dark without thee.
The liveliness that marks gray shirtings,
How preference debentures waver, Stay stay! loving and kindly heart!
Or ministers loose fame and favor- Stay! stay joy is where'er thou art!
Your chatter, chatter, comes to break Stay stay wherefore so soon depart,
The wisest statements one can make. Leaving us here in our pain
" I want to this "-" I want to that" Yet if, like the spring, to new lands thou art going,
Ever and ever spoils our chat. To scatter thy smiles like sweet primroses growing,
And when your father's making out We'll hope that with beauty, and grace overflowing,
Where stood some Ottoman redoubt, Like spring, thou wilt come back again.
You interrupt him with your shout -
"It's snowing, pa! may Igo out?" Nffeetiol.

Oh, children, children, be more sage WEET Home !" Oh blissful, holy place,
You cannot know the cares of age. When perfect love and peace are found
If we can't let you skate to-day, Within it, shedding joy and grace
Or go this evening to the play, To make the threshold "hallowed ground."
Deep and sincere as is your sorrow When heart to heart, and hand to hand,
'Twill be forgotten by to-morrow. Are closely linked by silken chains;
The woes with which your father strives Where each one shares the fears, the cares,
May last for years, and sadden lives. The hopes, the pleasures, and the pains;

Be less conceited, little boys Where open deeds and guileless speech
Though he can't match you at a noise, Dissolve all clouds of mean deceit;
Papa knows better far than you Where honest eyes without disguise
What it is wisest you should do. Look straight into the eyes they meet;
Do not abuse the power you have, Where manhood, infancy, and age,
Nor overdrive a willing slave. With simple faith and earnest trust,
If thus you struggle for Home Rule In lowly reverence hear the page
Tremble! He'll pack you off to school! In which 'tis written "Be ye just."








THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX

Tlifee lorqe Ruleft velihr.
t, HEN first my fancy ceased to roam
N ulsters clad, of Irish frieze, 'Twas thou that fix'd it, wild before;
With rough gray stockings to their knees, Thine artless smiles allured it home,
Great woollen comforters around And bade the truant stray no more.
Their sturdy necks securely wound, 'Twas beauty's bondage o'er me cast
Deep in each pocket plunged a hand- The charm that speaks in silent eyes,
Our troublesome Home Rulers stand. Outshining all the misty past
With hues of present paradise.
Eyes of dear Erin's deepest blue, The wavelet, dazzled by a star,
With little devils laughing through; Lies lonely 'mid the restless sea;
Noses turned up to those blue skies But I, a wavelet happier far,
Whose color cannot match the eyes; The star itself came down to me.
And Irish mouths, that forward press! blest was I above my thought-
Oh blest was I above my thought-
With such a wealth of wickedness n
With such a wealth of wickedness! Beyond expression's warmest bound;
'Twas earthly beauty that I sought,
Oh Patsy, Hugh, and Brian, still 'Twas heavenly goodness that I found.
You rule our household at your will !
No mother's word your hands can stay,
Big sisters helplessly give way, Itl1el.
You push your father from his throne, stay! vision of youth and grace
v TAY i stay i vision of youth and grace !
You stop all talk, except your own, t st radia a h
v nStay! stay! radiant and happy face !
You storm and wheedle, tease and fight,
Ad e k u u a ig Stay stay light of our dwelling-place!
And sometimes keep us up all night Sad in thine absence we'll be.
Sad in thine absence we'll be.
Thy smile was like sunshine, it glittered so cheerily,
If we would speak of Eastern things, Thy voice was like music, it rang out so clearly;
The fall of cities-stocks-or kings, We knew not till now that we loved thee so dearly:
The price of meat, Miss Jones's flirtings, Our home will be dark without thee.
The liveliness that marks gray shirtings,
How preference debentures waver, Stay stay! loving and kindly heart!
Or ministers loose fame and favor- Stay! stay joy is where'er thou art!
Your chatter, chatter, comes to break Stay stay wherefore so soon depart,
The wisest statements one can make. Leaving us here in our pain
" I want to this "-" I want to that" Yet if, like the spring, to new lands thou art going,
Ever and ever spoils our chat. To scatter thy smiles like sweet primroses growing,
And when your father's making out We'll hope that with beauty, and grace overflowing,
Where stood some Ottoman redoubt, Like spring, thou wilt come back again.
You interrupt him with your shout -
"It's snowing, pa! may Igo out?" Nffeetiol.

Oh, children, children, be more sage WEET Home !" Oh blissful, holy place,
You cannot know the cares of age. When perfect love and peace are found
If we can't let you skate to-day, Within it, shedding joy and grace
Or go this evening to the play, To make the threshold "hallowed ground."
Deep and sincere as is your sorrow When heart to heart, and hand to hand,
'Twill be forgotten by to-morrow. Are closely linked by silken chains;
The woes with which your father strives Where each one shares the fears, the cares,
May last for years, and sadden lives. The hopes, the pleasures, and the pains;

Be less conceited, little boys Where open deeds and guileless speech
Though he can't match you at a noise, Dissolve all clouds of mean deceit;
Papa knows better far than you Where honest eyes without disguise
What it is wisest you should do. Look straight into the eyes they meet;
Do not abuse the power you have, Where manhood, infancy, and age,
Nor overdrive a willing slave. With simple faith and earnest trust,
If thus you struggle for Home Rule In lowly reverence hear the page
Tremble! He'll pack you off to school! In which 'tis written "Be ye just."








THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX

Tlifee lorqe Ruleft velihr.
t, HEN first my fancy ceased to roam
N ulsters clad, of Irish frieze, 'Twas thou that fix'd it, wild before;
With rough gray stockings to their knees, Thine artless smiles allured it home,
Great woollen comforters around And bade the truant stray no more.
Their sturdy necks securely wound, 'Twas beauty's bondage o'er me cast
Deep in each pocket plunged a hand- The charm that speaks in silent eyes,
Our troublesome Home Rulers stand. Outshining all the misty past
With hues of present paradise.
Eyes of dear Erin's deepest blue, The wavelet, dazzled by a star,
With little devils laughing through; Lies lonely 'mid the restless sea;
Noses turned up to those blue skies But I, a wavelet happier far,
Whose color cannot match the eyes; The star itself came down to me.
And Irish mouths, that forward press! blest was I above my thought-
Oh blest was I above my thought-
With such a wealth of wickedness n
With such a wealth of wickedness! Beyond expression's warmest bound;
'Twas earthly beauty that I sought,
Oh Patsy, Hugh, and Brian, still 'Twas heavenly goodness that I found.
You rule our household at your will !
No mother's word your hands can stay,
Big sisters helplessly give way, Itl1el.
You push your father from his throne, stay! vision of youth and grace
v TAY i stay i vision of youth and grace !
You stop all talk, except your own, t st radia a h
v nStay! stay! radiant and happy face !
You storm and wheedle, tease and fight,
Ad e k u u a ig Stay stay light of our dwelling-place!
And sometimes keep us up all night Sad in thine absence we'll be.
Sad in thine absence we'll be.
Thy smile was like sunshine, it glittered so cheerily,
If we would speak of Eastern things, Thy voice was like music, it rang out so clearly;
The fall of cities-stocks-or kings, We knew not till now that we loved thee so dearly:
The price of meat, Miss Jones's flirtings, Our home will be dark without thee.
The liveliness that marks gray shirtings,
How preference debentures waver, Stay stay! loving and kindly heart!
Or ministers loose fame and favor- Stay! stay joy is where'er thou art!
Your chatter, chatter, comes to break Stay stay wherefore so soon depart,
The wisest statements one can make. Leaving us here in our pain
" I want to this "-" I want to that" Yet if, like the spring, to new lands thou art going,
Ever and ever spoils our chat. To scatter thy smiles like sweet primroses growing,
And when your father's making out We'll hope that with beauty, and grace overflowing,
Where stood some Ottoman redoubt, Like spring, thou wilt come back again.
You interrupt him with your shout -
"It's snowing, pa! may Igo out?" Nffeetiol.

Oh, children, children, be more sage WEET Home !" Oh blissful, holy place,
You cannot know the cares of age. When perfect love and peace are found
If we can't let you skate to-day, Within it, shedding joy and grace
Or go this evening to the play, To make the threshold "hallowed ground."
Deep and sincere as is your sorrow When heart to heart, and hand to hand,
'Twill be forgotten by to-morrow. Are closely linked by silken chains;
The woes with which your father strives Where each one shares the fears, the cares,
May last for years, and sadden lives. The hopes, the pleasures, and the pains;

Be less conceited, little boys Where open deeds and guileless speech
Though he can't match you at a noise, Dissolve all clouds of mean deceit;
Papa knows better far than you Where honest eyes without disguise
What it is wisest you should do. Look straight into the eyes they meet;
Do not abuse the power you have, Where manhood, infancy, and age,
Nor overdrive a willing slave. With simple faith and earnest trust,
If thus you struggle for Home Rule In lowly reverence hear the page
Tremble! He'll pack you off to school! In which 'tis written "Be ye just."






















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AFFEOTION.
































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MY LITTLE BIRDS.







M;h~U;S( -c,~ ,.L: ., .._. -..,- ;- ,..2~~~?~ 4. \.. .,% .-.~- :
'ix. -i '...' ,, ... .
Mrs.. ton's Advice





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JO0H N WILSON'S BIG PICTURE GALLERY.















































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THE NEW VILLA.





















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GOING SKATING.
Put it in his mouth, Nina."




















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VII














S PRIN NGTIME E.-TTHE PET LAMB.








THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

"J]Vly ITittle 3i'.< then, when his wife and family were around, he took as great
pleasure in seeing it placed on the wall correctly, as if it had
ARLY every morning I go to the kitchen to feed my cost thousands of dollars.
feathered friends. No sooner do I appear with my
large basin of water, and scatter the crumbs about, than my
friends come flocking in through the open window-birds
of all kinds, large and small, for they are all friends lle JNew Villk.
of mine.
R. BROWN takes great delight on winter evenings
Many of them are pigeons, and so very tame that they I.
in making all sort of mechanical toys and ornaments
will come when I call them and eat out of my hand. They
out of wood and paper with his knife. Why, he could
belong to the "fan-tail" variety of pigeons, and are very out of wood and paper with his knife. Why, he could
beautiful birds. They are quite white, and are something make almost anything with his knife,. from a toothpick to
beautiful birds. They are quite white, and are something
an eight-day clock.
like a swan in their manner of walking. Sometimes my an eight-day clock.
He once made a train of cars, with engine attached,
pigeons will put their heads back among their tail feathers.e once made a train of cars, with engine attached,
out of wood, and a windmill for little Robert, who is now
Some people call fan-tail pigeons "shakers," because they out of wood, and a windmill for little Robert, who is now
constantly move the head up and down. looking intently at the completion of the villa, wondering
constantly move the head up and down.
There are numerous varieties of pigeons in England; and if the different parts will stick together after his father with-
There are numerous varieties of pigeons in England; and
draws his hands from the card villa. But no doubt it will
in America there is a bird very like our English friends,
prove highly satisfactory, and become an ornament to the
which is known as the "passenger pigeon." These birds fly prove highly satisfactory, and become an ornament to the
in immense flocks from various parts of the United States, sitting-room.
and are killed in numbers by men and beasts who lie in wait *
for them. The mass of pigeons extends for one hundred or
two hundred miles in length, in close-following detachments; o g tig
and it is a very curious sight to watch them, for every de- i pretty scene, which Mr. Davis has placed before
tachment moves through the air as the first one did,-just in ne which will win the sympathies of all
the same curves and circles.
he same curves and circlesbeholders. The merry group of ladies and children are

wending their way through the woods toward some quiet
~-3-
lake, to indulge in the graceful pastime of skating, and the
two youngest children are inducing old "Nep" to carry
Jolij Wilol'1 Vidftuie Qmlleiy. their skates for them, which he seems perfectly willing to do,
-..T-- .- to judge from the patient manner in which he stands to have
;' John Wilson had been a rich man, he would have the skate straps affixed to his collar.
-, had a grand gallery of fine oil paintings, by both
ancient and modern painters, in handsome gilt frames,
costing lots of money; but John Wilson happened to be pfii e-tilne.
a poor man with a rich taste for art. He was neverthe- .,
less a happy man, even though he could not get the fine N all ages poets have sung in praise of spring,
paintings in gilt frames, for could he not always get one or and artists have shown us how gay nature makes
more of those large engravings similar to what appeared in the fields and hedgerows, when, as Chaucer tells us,
"Chatterbox Quartette," and paste it up on the wall ? and all go forth








THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

"J]Vly ITittle 3i'.< then, when his wife and family were around, he took as great
pleasure in seeing it placed on the wall correctly, as if it had
ARLY every morning I go to the kitchen to feed my cost thousands of dollars.
feathered friends. No sooner do I appear with my
large basin of water, and scatter the crumbs about, than my
friends come flocking in through the open window-birds
of all kinds, large and small, for they are all friends lle JNew Villk.
of mine.
R. BROWN takes great delight on winter evenings
Many of them are pigeons, and so very tame that they I.
in making all sort of mechanical toys and ornaments
will come when I call them and eat out of my hand. They
out of wood and paper with his knife. Why, he could
belong to the "fan-tail" variety of pigeons, and are very out of wood and paper with his knife. Why, he could
beautiful birds. They are quite white, and are something make almost anything with his knife,. from a toothpick to
beautiful birds. They are quite white, and are something
an eight-day clock.
like a swan in their manner of walking. Sometimes my an eight-day clock.
He once made a train of cars, with engine attached,
pigeons will put their heads back among their tail feathers.e once made a train of cars, with engine attached,
out of wood, and a windmill for little Robert, who is now
Some people call fan-tail pigeons "shakers," because they out of wood, and a windmill for little Robert, who is now
constantly move the head up and down. looking intently at the completion of the villa, wondering
constantly move the head up and down.
There are numerous varieties of pigeons in England; and if the different parts will stick together after his father with-
There are numerous varieties of pigeons in England; and
draws his hands from the card villa. But no doubt it will
in America there is a bird very like our English friends,
prove highly satisfactory, and become an ornament to the
which is known as the "passenger pigeon." These birds fly prove highly satisfactory, and become an ornament to the
in immense flocks from various parts of the United States, sitting-room.
and are killed in numbers by men and beasts who lie in wait *
for them. The mass of pigeons extends for one hundred or
two hundred miles in length, in close-following detachments; o g tig
and it is a very curious sight to watch them, for every de- i pretty scene, which Mr. Davis has placed before
tachment moves through the air as the first one did,-just in ne which will win the sympathies of all
the same curves and circles.
he same curves and circlesbeholders. The merry group of ladies and children are

wending their way through the woods toward some quiet
~-3-
lake, to indulge in the graceful pastime of skating, and the
two youngest children are inducing old "Nep" to carry
Jolij Wilol'1 Vidftuie Qmlleiy. their skates for them, which he seems perfectly willing to do,
-..T-- .- to judge from the patient manner in which he stands to have
;' John Wilson had been a rich man, he would have the skate straps affixed to his collar.
-, had a grand gallery of fine oil paintings, by both
ancient and modern painters, in handsome gilt frames,
costing lots of money; but John Wilson happened to be pfii e-tilne.
a poor man with a rich taste for art. He was neverthe- .,
less a happy man, even though he could not get the fine N all ages poets have sung in praise of spring,
paintings in gilt frames, for could he not always get one or and artists have shown us how gay nature makes
more of those large engravings similar to what appeared in the fields and hedgerows, when, as Chaucer tells us,
"Chatterbox Quartette," and paste it up on the wall ? and all go forth








THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

"J]Vly ITittle 3i'.< then, when his wife and family were around, he took as great
pleasure in seeing it placed on the wall correctly, as if it had
ARLY every morning I go to the kitchen to feed my cost thousands of dollars.
feathered friends. No sooner do I appear with my
large basin of water, and scatter the crumbs about, than my
friends come flocking in through the open window-birds
of all kinds, large and small, for they are all friends lle JNew Villk.
of mine.
R. BROWN takes great delight on winter evenings
Many of them are pigeons, and so very tame that they I.
in making all sort of mechanical toys and ornaments
will come when I call them and eat out of my hand. They
out of wood and paper with his knife. Why, he could
belong to the "fan-tail" variety of pigeons, and are very out of wood and paper with his knife. Why, he could
beautiful birds. They are quite white, and are something make almost anything with his knife,. from a toothpick to
beautiful birds. They are quite white, and are something
an eight-day clock.
like a swan in their manner of walking. Sometimes my an eight-day clock.
He once made a train of cars, with engine attached,
pigeons will put their heads back among their tail feathers.e once made a train of cars, with engine attached,
out of wood, and a windmill for little Robert, who is now
Some people call fan-tail pigeons "shakers," because they out of wood, and a windmill for little Robert, who is now
constantly move the head up and down. looking intently at the completion of the villa, wondering
constantly move the head up and down.
There are numerous varieties of pigeons in England; and if the different parts will stick together after his father with-
There are numerous varieties of pigeons in England; and
draws his hands from the card villa. But no doubt it will
in America there is a bird very like our English friends,
prove highly satisfactory, and become an ornament to the
which is known as the "passenger pigeon." These birds fly prove highly satisfactory, and become an ornament to the
in immense flocks from various parts of the United States, sitting-room.
and are killed in numbers by men and beasts who lie in wait *
for them. The mass of pigeons extends for one hundred or
two hundred miles in length, in close-following detachments; o g tig
and it is a very curious sight to watch them, for every de- i pretty scene, which Mr. Davis has placed before
tachment moves through the air as the first one did,-just in ne which will win the sympathies of all
the same curves and circles.
he same curves and circlesbeholders. The merry group of ladies and children are

wending their way through the woods toward some quiet
~-3-
lake, to indulge in the graceful pastime of skating, and the
two youngest children are inducing old "Nep" to carry
Jolij Wilol'1 Vidftuie Qmlleiy. their skates for them, which he seems perfectly willing to do,
-..T-- .- to judge from the patient manner in which he stands to have
;' John Wilson had been a rich man, he would have the skate straps affixed to his collar.
-, had a grand gallery of fine oil paintings, by both
ancient and modern painters, in handsome gilt frames,
costing lots of money; but John Wilson happened to be pfii e-tilne.
a poor man with a rich taste for art. He was neverthe- .,
less a happy man, even though he could not get the fine N all ages poets have sung in praise of spring,
paintings in gilt frames, for could he not always get one or and artists have shown us how gay nature makes
more of those large engravings similar to what appeared in the fields and hedgerows, when, as Chaucer tells us,
"Chatterbox Quartette," and paste it up on the wall ? and all go forth








THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

"J]Vly ITittle 3i'.< then, when his wife and family were around, he took as great
pleasure in seeing it placed on the wall correctly, as if it had
ARLY every morning I go to the kitchen to feed my cost thousands of dollars.
feathered friends. No sooner do I appear with my
large basin of water, and scatter the crumbs about, than my
friends come flocking in through the open window-birds
of all kinds, large and small, for they are all friends lle JNew Villk.
of mine.
R. BROWN takes great delight on winter evenings
Many of them are pigeons, and so very tame that they I.
in making all sort of mechanical toys and ornaments
will come when I call them and eat out of my hand. They
out of wood and paper with his knife. Why, he could
belong to the "fan-tail" variety of pigeons, and are very out of wood and paper with his knife. Why, he could
beautiful birds. They are quite white, and are something make almost anything with his knife,. from a toothpick to
beautiful birds. They are quite white, and are something
an eight-day clock.
like a swan in their manner of walking. Sometimes my an eight-day clock.
He once made a train of cars, with engine attached,
pigeons will put their heads back among their tail feathers.e once made a train of cars, with engine attached,
out of wood, and a windmill for little Robert, who is now
Some people call fan-tail pigeons "shakers," because they out of wood, and a windmill for little Robert, who is now
constantly move the head up and down. looking intently at the completion of the villa, wondering
constantly move the head up and down.
There are numerous varieties of pigeons in England; and if the different parts will stick together after his father with-
There are numerous varieties of pigeons in England; and
draws his hands from the card villa. But no doubt it will
in America there is a bird very like our English friends,
prove highly satisfactory, and become an ornament to the
which is known as the "passenger pigeon." These birds fly prove highly satisfactory, and become an ornament to the
in immense flocks from various parts of the United States, sitting-room.
and are killed in numbers by men and beasts who lie in wait *
for them. The mass of pigeons extends for one hundred or
two hundred miles in length, in close-following detachments; o g tig
and it is a very curious sight to watch them, for every de- i pretty scene, which Mr. Davis has placed before
tachment moves through the air as the first one did,-just in ne which will win the sympathies of all
the same curves and circles.
he same curves and circlesbeholders. The merry group of ladies and children are

wending their way through the woods toward some quiet
~-3-
lake, to indulge in the graceful pastime of skating, and the
two youngest children are inducing old "Nep" to carry
Jolij Wilol'1 Vidftuie Qmlleiy. their skates for them, which he seems perfectly willing to do,
-..T-- .- to judge from the patient manner in which he stands to have
;' John Wilson had been a rich man, he would have the skate straps affixed to his collar.
-, had a grand gallery of fine oil paintings, by both
ancient and modern painters, in handsome gilt frames,
costing lots of money; but John Wilson happened to be pfii e-tilne.
a poor man with a rich taste for art. He was neverthe- .,
less a happy man, even though he could not get the fine N all ages poets have sung in praise of spring,
paintings in gilt frames, for could he not always get one or and artists have shown us how gay nature makes
more of those large engravings similar to what appeared in the fields and hedgerows, when, as Chaucer tells us,
"Chatterbox Quartette," and paste it up on the wall ? and all go forth








THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

"J]Vly ITittle 3i'.< then, when his wife and family were around, he took as great
pleasure in seeing it placed on the wall correctly, as if it had
ARLY every morning I go to the kitchen to feed my cost thousands of dollars.
feathered friends. No sooner do I appear with my
large basin of water, and scatter the crumbs about, than my
friends come flocking in through the open window-birds
of all kinds, large and small, for they are all friends lle JNew Villk.
of mine.
R. BROWN takes great delight on winter evenings
Many of them are pigeons, and so very tame that they I.
in making all sort of mechanical toys and ornaments
will come when I call them and eat out of my hand. They
out of wood and paper with his knife. Why, he could
belong to the "fan-tail" variety of pigeons, and are very out of wood and paper with his knife. Why, he could
beautiful birds. They are quite white, and are something make almost anything with his knife,. from a toothpick to
beautiful birds. They are quite white, and are something
an eight-day clock.
like a swan in their manner of walking. Sometimes my an eight-day clock.
He once made a train of cars, with engine attached,
pigeons will put their heads back among their tail feathers.e once made a train of cars, with engine attached,
out of wood, and a windmill for little Robert, who is now
Some people call fan-tail pigeons "shakers," because they out of wood, and a windmill for little Robert, who is now
constantly move the head up and down. looking intently at the completion of the villa, wondering
constantly move the head up and down.
There are numerous varieties of pigeons in England; and if the different parts will stick together after his father with-
There are numerous varieties of pigeons in England; and
draws his hands from the card villa. But no doubt it will
in America there is a bird very like our English friends,
prove highly satisfactory, and become an ornament to the
which is known as the "passenger pigeon." These birds fly prove highly satisfactory, and become an ornament to the
in immense flocks from various parts of the United States, sitting-room.
and are killed in numbers by men and beasts who lie in wait *
for them. The mass of pigeons extends for one hundred or
two hundred miles in length, in close-following detachments; o g tig
and it is a very curious sight to watch them, for every de- i pretty scene, which Mr. Davis has placed before
tachment moves through the air as the first one did,-just in ne which will win the sympathies of all
the same curves and circles.
he same curves and circlesbeholders. The merry group of ladies and children are

wending their way through the woods toward some quiet
~-3-
lake, to indulge in the graceful pastime of skating, and the
two youngest children are inducing old "Nep" to carry
Jolij Wilol'1 Vidftuie Qmlleiy. their skates for them, which he seems perfectly willing to do,
-..T-- .- to judge from the patient manner in which he stands to have
;' John Wilson had been a rich man, he would have the skate straps affixed to his collar.
-, had a grand gallery of fine oil paintings, by both
ancient and modern painters, in handsome gilt frames,
costing lots of money; but John Wilson happened to be pfii e-tilne.
a poor man with a rich taste for art. He was neverthe- .,
less a happy man, even though he could not get the fine N all ages poets have sung in praise of spring,
paintings in gilt frames, for could he not always get one or and artists have shown us how gay nature makes
more of those large engravings similar to what appeared in the fields and hedgerows, when, as Chaucer tells us,
"Chatterbox Quartette," and paste it up on the wall ? and all go forth








THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

To fetch the flowers fresh, and braunche and blome;" And he did come. I calmly slept
And namely hawthorne brought both page and grome, And dreamed, devoid of care-
With fresh garlandes, party blew and white." Oh! they were childhood's happy dreams,

And I dare say it is for some such purpose that the ladies For Santa Claus was there!
and children depicted in our engraving have sallied forth.
Burleigh describes how His hair was scant, his beard was long,
And white as snow itself-
The bursting buds look up,
And greet the sunlight while it lingers yet One night I woke, and there I found
On the warm hill-side; and the violet Him perched upon the shelf;
Opens her azure cup A roguish yet a merry smile
Meekly, and countless wild flowers wake to fling Played lightly on his face,
Their earliest incense on the gales of spring." And yet, though he seemed very old,

But it would be impossible to quote all the beautiful an Care there had left no trace.
tender lines which have been written on the opening season
of the year, when nature throws off her winter's sleep, and There was a kind and holy light
wakes again to fresh life and beauty. The denizens of towns That glistened in his eyes--
at this time of the year rejoice in the glimpse of sunshine, A forehead broad, and wide and high,
and envy their more fortunate brethren whose business lies That told me he was wise;
where- And how I wondered how it was

-Nature hangs her mantle green He got into the house-
On every blooming tree, It was down the chimney, I supposed,
And spreads her sheets of daisies white That way came Santa Claus.
Out o'er the grassy lea."

Had I but dreamed ? It could not be,
For when the morning came
Se. I found the fairy gifts he'd left-
The toys, the childish game.

II for the days when Santa Claus Well I remember with what joy
S At Christmas-tide came round, Those offerings I received-

And brought me gifts from fairy land, How very, very firmly I
And earth seemed fairy ground, In Santa Claus believed.
Sometimes I found them on my bed
(What wakings then I knew), Long years have passed away since when
And sometimes in my stockings placed, He sat upon that shelf,
And sometimes in my shoe. And now I am (a secret this)
A Santa Claus myself;
When Christmas winds blew bleak and loud, And though those fairy dreams of youth
And rattled at the pane, Were all too bright to last,
They bade me hush-'twas Santa Claus, I love them still, and feel that I
They said, had come again. Am better for the past.
























































DREAMING.-THE NIGHT BEFORE CHRISTMAS.











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JESUS AND THE WOMAN OF SAMARIA.
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JESUS BLESSING LITTLE CHILDREN.


























































BISHOP'S HEAD.-COAST OF MAINE.











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THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

i3hbe iln % $ket. Jesus, on his return from Judea to Galilee, passed this'
way, notwithstanding the contempt with which he and his
disciples might expect to be treated. Feeling weary, he sat
BY EDWARD WILLETT.
down beside a well, while his companions went into the city
of Sychar to obtain provisions. This was the well which had
UR little toddlekins here you may see, been dug by Jacob centuries before, and is to this day known
Stuffed in a basket as tight as can be; as Jacob's well. A Samaritan woman came to the well to
Four little boys and girls, chubby and stout, draw water, and Jesus, being thirsty, asked her for a drink.
One little baby girl, crying without. The woman, seeing that he was a Jew, looked at him in
amazement, and reminded him that the Jews had no deal-
Who is their father, and where is he gone ? ings with the Samaritans.
Why does their mother thus leave them alone ? Jesus said unto her, "If thou knewest the gift of God,
What are they doing, stuck away there ? and who it is that saith to thee, Give me to drink, thou
Thus they are carried home from the fair. wouldest have asked of him, and he would have given thee
living water."
Eight little naked feet, forty small toes, The woman saith unto him, Sir, thou hast nothing to
Out of a broken hole one of them shows; draw with, and the well is deep; from whence then hast
Two little naked feet, down on the stone, thou that living water ?"
Those of the little one sitting alone. Then Jesus made his meaning more clear to her, and
told her so many wonderful things that she was convinced
One little baby boy sends out a cry; he was a great prophet.
One little girlie will join by and by; The woman said unto him, "When Messias cometh he
One little wanderer, seated outside, will tell us all things."
Wipes off the tears she already has cried. Jesus saith unto her, I that speak unto thee am He."


Why does their mother not hasten to come ?.
Hurry up, father, and carry them home !
Wait, little toddlekins; wait without fear; jeu Be irjg J little 0ildier .
Je^ Sg led ii Little ChildeiL
Father and mother soon will be here.

HE crowds that followed Jesus were composed of
-I men, women, and children, all eager to get as near
him as possible. Among them were many mothers, who,
Jelu &aqd the \VoMrri of kagiL i,. having listened to his words of solemn import, were anx-

.. ious that their little ones should receive a special blessing
AMARIA was situated between Judea and Galilee, and from him.
pilgrims to and from Jerusalem would naturally pass He had taught them that the kingdom of heaven was not
through it. The Samaritans hated the Jews, and had to be won by ceremony and fasting, and, by simple parables
for long been in the habit of vexing and annoying them. It that even a child could understand, had shown them the
was not pleasant for a Jew to pass through the country of efficacy of good deeds.
the Samaritans, for he was certain of insult or injury. Jesus had said much in reference to their home life, of








THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

i3hbe iln % $ket. Jesus, on his return from Judea to Galilee, passed this'
way, notwithstanding the contempt with which he and his
disciples might expect to be treated. Feeling weary, he sat
BY EDWARD WILLETT.
down beside a well, while his companions went into the city
of Sychar to obtain provisions. This was the well which had
UR little toddlekins here you may see, been dug by Jacob centuries before, and is to this day known
Stuffed in a basket as tight as can be; as Jacob's well. A Samaritan woman came to the well to
Four little boys and girls, chubby and stout, draw water, and Jesus, being thirsty, asked her for a drink.
One little baby girl, crying without. The woman, seeing that he was a Jew, looked at him in
amazement, and reminded him that the Jews had no deal-
Who is their father, and where is he gone ? ings with the Samaritans.
Why does their mother thus leave them alone ? Jesus said unto her, "If thou knewest the gift of God,
What are they doing, stuck away there ? and who it is that saith to thee, Give me to drink, thou
Thus they are carried home from the fair. wouldest have asked of him, and he would have given thee
living water."
Eight little naked feet, forty small toes, The woman saith unto him, Sir, thou hast nothing to
Out of a broken hole one of them shows; draw with, and the well is deep; from whence then hast
Two little naked feet, down on the stone, thou that living water ?"
Those of the little one sitting alone. Then Jesus made his meaning more clear to her, and
told her so many wonderful things that she was convinced
One little baby boy sends out a cry; he was a great prophet.
One little girlie will join by and by; The woman said unto him, "When Messias cometh he
One little wanderer, seated outside, will tell us all things."
Wipes off the tears she already has cried. Jesus saith unto her, I that speak unto thee am He."


Why does their mother not hasten to come ?.
Hurry up, father, and carry them home !
Wait, little toddlekins; wait without fear; jeu Be irjg J little 0ildier .
Je^ Sg led ii Little ChildeiL
Father and mother soon will be here.

HE crowds that followed Jesus were composed of
-I men, women, and children, all eager to get as near
him as possible. Among them were many mothers, who,
Jelu &aqd the \VoMrri of kagiL i,. having listened to his words of solemn import, were anx-

.. ious that their little ones should receive a special blessing
AMARIA was situated between Judea and Galilee, and from him.
pilgrims to and from Jerusalem would naturally pass He had taught them that the kingdom of heaven was not
through it. The Samaritans hated the Jews, and had to be won by ceremony and fasting, and, by simple parables
for long been in the habit of vexing and annoying them. It that even a child could understand, had shown them the
was not pleasant for a Jew to pass through the country of efficacy of good deeds.
the Samaritans, for he was certain of insult or injury. Jesus had said much in reference to their home life, of








THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

i3hbe iln % $ket. Jesus, on his return from Judea to Galilee, passed this'
way, notwithstanding the contempt with which he and his
disciples might expect to be treated. Feeling weary, he sat
BY EDWARD WILLETT.
down beside a well, while his companions went into the city
of Sychar to obtain provisions. This was the well which had
UR little toddlekins here you may see, been dug by Jacob centuries before, and is to this day known
Stuffed in a basket as tight as can be; as Jacob's well. A Samaritan woman came to the well to
Four little boys and girls, chubby and stout, draw water, and Jesus, being thirsty, asked her for a drink.
One little baby girl, crying without. The woman, seeing that he was a Jew, looked at him in
amazement, and reminded him that the Jews had no deal-
Who is their father, and where is he gone ? ings with the Samaritans.
Why does their mother thus leave them alone ? Jesus said unto her, "If thou knewest the gift of God,
What are they doing, stuck away there ? and who it is that saith to thee, Give me to drink, thou
Thus they are carried home from the fair. wouldest have asked of him, and he would have given thee
living water."
Eight little naked feet, forty small toes, The woman saith unto him, Sir, thou hast nothing to
Out of a broken hole one of them shows; draw with, and the well is deep; from whence then hast
Two little naked feet, down on the stone, thou that living water ?"
Those of the little one sitting alone. Then Jesus made his meaning more clear to her, and
told her so many wonderful things that she was convinced
One little baby boy sends out a cry; he was a great prophet.
One little girlie will join by and by; The woman said unto him, "When Messias cometh he
One little wanderer, seated outside, will tell us all things."
Wipes off the tears she already has cried. Jesus saith unto her, I that speak unto thee am He."


Why does their mother not hasten to come ?.
Hurry up, father, and carry them home !
Wait, little toddlekins; wait without fear; jeu Be irjg J little 0ildier .
Je^ Sg led ii Little ChildeiL
Father and mother soon will be here.

HE crowds that followed Jesus were composed of
-I men, women, and children, all eager to get as near
him as possible. Among them were many mothers, who,
Jelu &aqd the \VoMrri of kagiL i,. having listened to his words of solemn import, were anx-

.. ious that their little ones should receive a special blessing
AMARIA was situated between Judea and Galilee, and from him.
pilgrims to and from Jerusalem would naturally pass He had taught them that the kingdom of heaven was not
through it. The Samaritans hated the Jews, and had to be won by ceremony and fasting, and, by simple parables
for long been in the habit of vexing and annoying them. It that even a child could understand, had shown them the
was not pleasant for a Jew to pass through the country of efficacy of good deeds.
the Samaritans, for he was certain of insult or injury. Jesus had said much in reference to their home life, of







THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

the duty of parents to children, and of children to parents, So clear and fair is now the night
and many of these mothers had pondered over his sayings, That sailor's children need not fear;
and desired that some of the wonderful grace of which he But storms, before the morning's light,
spoke might be imparted to them and their offspring. May sink the boat to us so dear.
Anxious also to dedicate their children to the service of
This night, before we go to bed,
so kind a master, they brought to Jesus their little ones that
he might bless them. Together let us kneel and pray
he might bless them.
That He who made the Bishop's Head
The disciples rebuked their familiarity; but Jesus,
May guard our father night and day !
pleased at this proof that their hearts had been touched, re-
ceived them graciously. He was not a king to be admired
and worshipped at a distance, but one who sought to estab- alling lekve .
lish a throne in the hearts of the people.
BY EDWARD WILLETT.
Jesus said unto his disciples, Suffer little children, and
forbid them not, to come unto me; for of such is the king- spring the leaves are fresh and green,
iN spring the leaves are fresh and green,
dom of heaven." w t j
N o fairer sight is ever seen,
And he took the little ones in his arms, and blessed And gladly every living thing
And gladly every living thing
them. Beholds the miracle of spring.


ed. Then, through the summer's heat, we see,
^t St10op' Se d.
The spreading boughs of every tree

BY EDWARD WILLETT. In all their leafy robes arrayed,
And bless them for the pleasant shade.

ISES the great, round, silver moon, w O nig g c ,
'But when October nights grow cold,
From where the sea and sky are wed,
They change to crimson and to gold;
And shines, this lovely night in June, rr r rm
&They borrow colors from the sky,
On Grand Menan and Bishop's Head.
And gain a glory as they die.

See, Jennie, how the big waves break, And when November's breezes blow,
And when November's breezes blow,
"With spots of silver everywhere, The dead leaves fall like flakes of snow;
As up the rocks a run they take, In whirling clouds they fill the air,
And throw the spray so high in air. And leave the branches stripped and bare.

The giant cliff of Bishop's Head May we our parts as fairly play,
Is like the tallest kind of fort, And do our duty while we may;
To which the troops of waves are led, In youth be just as fresh and fair,
And backward flung, as if in sport. And shed a fragrance on the air.

See, Jennie, far away at sea, Through all our lives may we, like leaves,
Where silver circles ring it round, Hold fast the good that nature gives,
Our father's vessel sailing free, And when at last like leaves we fall.
And steering toward the fishing-ground. May God's great mercy guard us all!







THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

the duty of parents to children, and of children to parents, So clear and fair is now the night
and many of these mothers had pondered over his sayings, That sailor's children need not fear;
and desired that some of the wonderful grace of which he But storms, before the morning's light,
spoke might be imparted to them and their offspring. May sink the boat to us so dear.
Anxious also to dedicate their children to the service of
This night, before we go to bed,
so kind a master, they brought to Jesus their little ones that
he might bless them. Together let us kneel and pray
he might bless them.
That He who made the Bishop's Head
The disciples rebuked their familiarity; but Jesus,
May guard our father night and day !
pleased at this proof that their hearts had been touched, re-
ceived them graciously. He was not a king to be admired
and worshipped at a distance, but one who sought to estab- alling lekve .
lish a throne in the hearts of the people.
BY EDWARD WILLETT.
Jesus said unto his disciples, Suffer little children, and
forbid them not, to come unto me; for of such is the king- spring the leaves are fresh and green,
iN spring the leaves are fresh and green,
dom of heaven." w t j
N o fairer sight is ever seen,
And he took the little ones in his arms, and blessed And gladly every living thing
And gladly every living thing
them. Beholds the miracle of spring.


ed. Then, through the summer's heat, we see,
^t St10op' Se d.
The spreading boughs of every tree

BY EDWARD WILLETT. In all their leafy robes arrayed,
And bless them for the pleasant shade.

ISES the great, round, silver moon, w O nig g c ,
'But when October nights grow cold,
From where the sea and sky are wed,
They change to crimson and to gold;
And shines, this lovely night in June, rr r rm
&They borrow colors from the sky,
On Grand Menan and Bishop's Head.
And gain a glory as they die.

See, Jennie, how the big waves break, And when November's breezes blow,
And when November's breezes blow,
"With spots of silver everywhere, The dead leaves fall like flakes of snow;
As up the rocks a run they take, In whirling clouds they fill the air,
And throw the spray so high in air. And leave the branches stripped and bare.

The giant cliff of Bishop's Head May we our parts as fairly play,
Is like the tallest kind of fort, And do our duty while we may;
To which the troops of waves are led, In youth be just as fresh and fair,
And backward flung, as if in sport. And shed a fragrance on the air.

See, Jennie, far away at sea, Through all our lives may we, like leaves,
Where silver circles ring it round, Hold fast the good that nature gives,
Our father's vessel sailing free, And when at last like leaves we fall.
And steering toward the fishing-ground. May God's great mercy guard us all!






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THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

PiLtiLtg the iokef Red-Rot. day parties are things of the past-well enough, perhaps, for
the "little ones," but unbecoming the dignity of one who is,
in her own estimation at least, no inconsiderable unit in the
HE performance of a Christmas pantomime by a stroll-
performance of a Christmas pantomime by a stroll-great mass we call society. So as we grow older we lose the
ing theatrical company in any country town requires
ingtheatrical company in any country town requires habit of celebrating our birthdays. And not without reason.
some preparation of stage "properties;" and here
In our earlier years, when all is bright and rosy, each suc-
is the clown, who will presently divert a rustic audience
ceeding birthday brings us nearer and nearer to that mythi-
with his laughable jokes and gambols, making a poker terri- a p o h in (i i
cal period of fancied happiness (which, alas I is always in
ble with red paint, as though it were heated in a fire. It is the future), whenwe shall be emancipated from the school-
"the future), when we shall be emancipated from the school-
to be applied, with dreadful menaces of vengeance, to the
room and the drudgery of uncongenial tasks, when governess
hinder parts of a brother comedian, in full view of several and tuor h no orni s, when we
and tutor shall no more have dominion over us, when we
hundred spectators, who are sure to relish this kind of fun. s ,
shall be our own masters and mistresses, and with
The clown's little daughter, already dressed for her own part
as Queen of the Fairies, sits behind the big drum, and "Youth at the prow and Pleasure atthe helm,"
watches her father engaged in the queer operation, while he we shall embark gayly on a calm and smiling, but still un-
we shall embark gayly on a calm and smiling, but still un-
inwardly chuckles as he says, on't I make them jump!" known, sea. But when the days of our freedom are arrived,

when we have made the grand discovery that

"Man never is, but always to be, blest;"
Tle e vele$ Xtu&e.
when the liberty that seemed so alluring brings with it a
heavy weight of care and responsibility; when each year
ITTLE Amy Herbert was out giving her dolly an air-
in o wn seems but a record of struggles not always successful, and of
ing one day, when up came Charlie Marston rolling
S contests from which we emerge weary, and sometimes almost
his hoop, and when he stopped and spoke to Amy she
vanquished; then we cease to celebrate the epoch, leave
was so delighted with the account of the party that he
birthday parties to our juniors, and settle down quietly and
was at lately that she forgot all about dolly, who had fallen contentedly to our duties to ourselves and to humanity.
contentedly to our duties to ourselves and to humanity.
off the seat, and was hanging head downward in great dan- B i i o r r r-
But it is otherwise in Germany. Although the birth-
ger of falling off the carriage and being run over. Poor
days of Carl and of Amalie, of Fritz and of Gretchen are ob-
dolly she might have met with a terrible accident, and had s w b f t n d o t
served with becoming festivity, the natal days of the elders
her head bruised and otherwise mutilated, had not nurse ap-
-are by no means forgotten, although in their case it is the
peared and rescued her from danger.
peered and rescued her from dagerjuniors who offer tokens of affection and congratulations to
Their parents. Such a scene is depicted in our illustration.
It is mamma's birthday, and her youthful family-who were
kiy %kppy Retutmq of the Dky." up with the lark-are come to the door of her chamber to
wish her "Many happy returns of the day." They have
UR illustration is from a painting by Herr Wilhelm evidently succeeded in winning the good graces of the gar-
k Schiitze, and represents one of those charming fam- dener, for the younger girl carries a bouqui with which to
ily. customs so prevalent in Germany. greet mamma on her appearance. The little lady in the
In England the celebration of birthdays, though relig- background has a letter in her hand (who shall tell the pains
iously observed with regard to the younger members of the 4hat letter cost !), in which, daintily expressed, in the choicest
family, is generally dropped as they grow up. Tom goes to phrases at command, is set forth the love of the family for
Eton, and so, in a certain sense, outgrows birthdays; the their "Miitterchen;" while the boy, to whom" the task of
paternal tip and affectionate letters from mother and sis- saluting mamma in a set speech had been intrusted, shrinks
ters being the only reminders that he has advanced one year timidly back as the door opens and reveals-not mamma, but
further in his "'teens." Grace comes out, and for her, birth- Jeannette, with the announcement that her "well-born








THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

PiLtiLtg the iokef Red-Rot. day parties are things of the past-well enough, perhaps, for
the "little ones," but unbecoming the dignity of one who is,
in her own estimation at least, no inconsiderable unit in the
HE performance of a Christmas pantomime by a stroll-
performance of a Christmas pantomime by a stroll-great mass we call society. So as we grow older we lose the
ing theatrical company in any country town requires
ingtheatrical company in any country town requires habit of celebrating our birthdays. And not without reason.
some preparation of stage "properties;" and here
In our earlier years, when all is bright and rosy, each suc-
is the clown, who will presently divert a rustic audience
ceeding birthday brings us nearer and nearer to that mythi-
with his laughable jokes and gambols, making a poker terri- a p o h in (i i
cal period of fancied happiness (which, alas I is always in
ble with red paint, as though it were heated in a fire. It is the future), whenwe shall be emancipated from the school-
"the future), when we shall be emancipated from the school-
to be applied, with dreadful menaces of vengeance, to the
room and the drudgery of uncongenial tasks, when governess
hinder parts of a brother comedian, in full view of several and tuor h no orni s, when we
and tutor shall no more have dominion over us, when we
hundred spectators, who are sure to relish this kind of fun. s ,
shall be our own masters and mistresses, and with
The clown's little daughter, already dressed for her own part
as Queen of the Fairies, sits behind the big drum, and "Youth at the prow and Pleasure atthe helm,"
watches her father engaged in the queer operation, while he we shall embark gayly on a calm and smiling, but still un-
we shall embark gayly on a calm and smiling, but still un-
inwardly chuckles as he says, on't I make them jump!" known, sea. But when the days of our freedom are arrived,

when we have made the grand discovery that

"Man never is, but always to be, blest;"
Tle e vele$ Xtu&e.
when the liberty that seemed so alluring brings with it a
heavy weight of care and responsibility; when each year
ITTLE Amy Herbert was out giving her dolly an air-
in o wn seems but a record of struggles not always successful, and of
ing one day, when up came Charlie Marston rolling
S contests from which we emerge weary, and sometimes almost
his hoop, and when he stopped and spoke to Amy she
vanquished; then we cease to celebrate the epoch, leave
was so delighted with the account of the party that he
birthday parties to our juniors, and settle down quietly and
was at lately that she forgot all about dolly, who had fallen contentedly to our duties to ourselves and to humanity.
contentedly to our duties to ourselves and to humanity.
off the seat, and was hanging head downward in great dan- B i i o r r r-
But it is otherwise in Germany. Although the birth-
ger of falling off the carriage and being run over. Poor
days of Carl and of Amalie, of Fritz and of Gretchen are ob-
dolly she might have met with a terrible accident, and had s w b f t n d o t
served with becoming festivity, the natal days of the elders
her head bruised and otherwise mutilated, had not nurse ap-
-are by no means forgotten, although in their case it is the
peared and rescued her from danger.
peered and rescued her from dagerjuniors who offer tokens of affection and congratulations to
Their parents. Such a scene is depicted in our illustration.
It is mamma's birthday, and her youthful family-who were
kiy %kppy Retutmq of the Dky." up with the lark-are come to the door of her chamber to
wish her "Many happy returns of the day." They have
UR illustration is from a painting by Herr Wilhelm evidently succeeded in winning the good graces of the gar-
k Schiitze, and represents one of those charming fam- dener, for the younger girl carries a bouqui with which to
ily. customs so prevalent in Germany. greet mamma on her appearance. The little lady in the
In England the celebration of birthdays, though relig- background has a letter in her hand (who shall tell the pains
iously observed with regard to the younger members of the 4hat letter cost !), in which, daintily expressed, in the choicest
family, is generally dropped as they grow up. Tom goes to phrases at command, is set forth the love of the family for
Eton, and so, in a certain sense, outgrows birthdays; the their "Miitterchen;" while the boy, to whom" the task of
paternal tip and affectionate letters from mother and sis- saluting mamma in a set speech had been intrusted, shrinks
ters being the only reminders that he has advanced one year timidly back as the door opens and reveals-not mamma, but
further in his "'teens." Grace comes out, and for her, birth- Jeannette, with the announcement that her "well-born








THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

PiLtiLtg the iokef Red-Rot. day parties are things of the past-well enough, perhaps, for
the "little ones," but unbecoming the dignity of one who is,
in her own estimation at least, no inconsiderable unit in the
HE performance of a Christmas pantomime by a stroll-
performance of a Christmas pantomime by a stroll-great mass we call society. So as we grow older we lose the
ing theatrical company in any country town requires
ingtheatrical company in any country town requires habit of celebrating our birthdays. And not without reason.
some preparation of stage "properties;" and here
In our earlier years, when all is bright and rosy, each suc-
is the clown, who will presently divert a rustic audience
ceeding birthday brings us nearer and nearer to that mythi-
with his laughable jokes and gambols, making a poker terri- a p o h in (i i
cal period of fancied happiness (which, alas I is always in
ble with red paint, as though it were heated in a fire. It is the future), whenwe shall be emancipated from the school-
"the future), when we shall be emancipated from the school-
to be applied, with dreadful menaces of vengeance, to the
room and the drudgery of uncongenial tasks, when governess
hinder parts of a brother comedian, in full view of several and tuor h no orni s, when we
and tutor shall no more have dominion over us, when we
hundred spectators, who are sure to relish this kind of fun. s ,
shall be our own masters and mistresses, and with
The clown's little daughter, already dressed for her own part
as Queen of the Fairies, sits behind the big drum, and "Youth at the prow and Pleasure atthe helm,"
watches her father engaged in the queer operation, while he we shall embark gayly on a calm and smiling, but still un-
we shall embark gayly on a calm and smiling, but still un-
inwardly chuckles as he says, on't I make them jump!" known, sea. But when the days of our freedom are arrived,

when we have made the grand discovery that

"Man never is, but always to be, blest;"
Tle e vele$ Xtu&e.
when the liberty that seemed so alluring brings with it a
heavy weight of care and responsibility; when each year
ITTLE Amy Herbert was out giving her dolly an air-
in o wn seems but a record of struggles not always successful, and of
ing one day, when up came Charlie Marston rolling
S contests from which we emerge weary, and sometimes almost
his hoop, and when he stopped and spoke to Amy she
vanquished; then we cease to celebrate the epoch, leave
was so delighted with the account of the party that he
birthday parties to our juniors, and settle down quietly and
was at lately that she forgot all about dolly, who had fallen contentedly to our duties to ourselves and to humanity.
contentedly to our duties to ourselves and to humanity.
off the seat, and was hanging head downward in great dan- B i i o r r r-
But it is otherwise in Germany. Although the birth-
ger of falling off the carriage and being run over. Poor
days of Carl and of Amalie, of Fritz and of Gretchen are ob-
dolly she might have met with a terrible accident, and had s w b f t n d o t
served with becoming festivity, the natal days of the elders
her head bruised and otherwise mutilated, had not nurse ap-
-are by no means forgotten, although in their case it is the
peared and rescued her from danger.
peered and rescued her from dagerjuniors who offer tokens of affection and congratulations to
Their parents. Such a scene is depicted in our illustration.
It is mamma's birthday, and her youthful family-who were
kiy %kppy Retutmq of the Dky." up with the lark-are come to the door of her chamber to
wish her "Many happy returns of the day." They have
UR illustration is from a painting by Herr Wilhelm evidently succeeded in winning the good graces of the gar-
k Schiitze, and represents one of those charming fam- dener, for the younger girl carries a bouqui with which to
ily. customs so prevalent in Germany. greet mamma on her appearance. The little lady in the
In England the celebration of birthdays, though relig- background has a letter in her hand (who shall tell the pains
iously observed with regard to the younger members of the 4hat letter cost !), in which, daintily expressed, in the choicest
family, is generally dropped as they grow up. Tom goes to phrases at command, is set forth the love of the family for
Eton, and so, in a certain sense, outgrows birthdays; the their "Miitterchen;" while the boy, to whom" the task of
paternal tip and affectionate letters from mother and sis- saluting mamma in a set speech had been intrusted, shrinks
ters being the only reminders that he has advanced one year timidly back as the door opens and reveals-not mamma, but
further in his "'teens." Grace comes out, and for her, birth- Jeannette, with the announcement that her "well-born









THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

lady" will soon come down to take her chocolate. At length home. She looks as if she had not a friend in the world, ex-
the door opens again, and this time it is really mamma. But, cept perhaps the rubber ball which she has in her hand.
alas! for all the preparations. The speech is forgotten, the And, oh! how she wishes her father would return, and re-
bouquet is pushed into her hand, and the manner in which lieve her of that horrid big umbrella, which is even bigger
the letter is delivered (from Miss Geary's point of view) than herself, and she could then have a romp all to herself
leaves much to be desired. But the world is full of compen- with the ball among the barrels and boxes. But her parents
stations; and the wealth of genuine affection with which she will soon return and introduce her to the home that she is to
is greeted more than makes amends for the want of ceremony occupy on the ship for the next two weeks to come.
with which the children offer their mother their birthday .
congratulations.
"" "Te ^et' ^)i iei.

I TI ITTLE Maud Morgan was a very busy little girl, and
HIS little girl, who is now holding the skein of cotton
er her h hd bn o id a t mrnin was always looking about for something to do, and
over her hands, had been outside all the morning
with her pretty d d d, ad h g in doing so she very often got into mischief before she
with her prettily dressed doll, and having played
Swas discovered. The big dog that guarded the house had
with the big dog, Rover, until she was beginning to feel
five little pups that were so fat that they could scarcely
tired, she thought she would return to the house and take a
walk, and sometimes when they fell down they would tumble
rest for a little while, but no sooner had she entered the room
over and over before they could get on their feet again.
than she saw her mamma preparing to wind some cotton into
Maud was very fond of the little pups, and played with
a ball, when she threw her parasol on the carpet, and poor
them as often as she could get a chance, and they were just
dolly was pitched on the seat and left hanging there head
as fond of Maud, and would follow her all over the garden,
downward, in danger of choking to death, and she ran to-
ward her amma, exclaiming, Oh! mam do let me hold racing after her as fast as their little legs could carry them.
ward her mamma, exclaiming, Oh mamma, do let me hold
,, One day the big dog was taken away from her pups,
the thread." Her mamma assented, and having got it placed
which were left with Maud to take care of, and her father
over her hands, the unwinding commenced; but before it had
gave her strict instructions to be sure and feed them with
continued a great while, Eva began to think that it took a very
plenty of nice milk, and keep them safe until his return.
long time to do; and then sometimes it would tangle, and it
Maud felt quite proud of her charge, and she had fine fun
was such a bother to get it right again, and she felt so tired,
with her little pets for some time, but they soon began to
and dolly would soon be choked, and, and, everything else
Sw uil s b v feel hungry, and to weary for their mother's return, and as
went wrong, until she became very sorry that she had under-
she did not make her appearance they began to whine
taken to do it; but her mamma told her that as she was in
in their own peculiar way, and all looked the picture
the habit of taking up and laying down when she desired
of misery. Maud thought it was time to give them some-
everything that she undertook to do, she would test her o m M -
patience on this occasion, and told her how clever it would thing to eat, so away she ran into the house and got a large
be to finish it. And, by ting s t t s basin of milk, and tried to coax her little friends to have
be to finish it. And, by telling stories, the time slipped
some dinner, but never having been fed in this way before,
away, and the ball was completed before long, and she felt
glad that she had exercised so much patience and pleased they would not take the milk. So at last, in despair, she got
glad that she had exercised so much patience and pleased
mamma. hold of each of her pets, and placing their mouths in the
"-- basin, and by coaxing and saying to them Do have a little

Ihe J little Mntigit t. more," she induced them to take milk, and gave them so
much that when her father returned he said she had given
HIS poor little girl has been left among the baggage on them as much as would last them for a week, and it was sur-
the steamship wharf, while her father and mother prising that she had not made them sick, but if she would
are looking after their berths on board the ship not feed them so much, she might have full charge of them
which is to take them thousands of miles away from their for the future, which was just exactly what Maud wanted.









THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

lady" will soon come down to take her chocolate. At length home. She looks as if she had not a friend in the world, ex-
the door opens again, and this time it is really mamma. But, cept perhaps the rubber ball which she has in her hand.
alas! for all the preparations. The speech is forgotten, the And, oh! how she wishes her father would return, and re-
bouquet is pushed into her hand, and the manner in which lieve her of that horrid big umbrella, which is even bigger
the letter is delivered (from Miss Geary's point of view) than herself, and she could then have a romp all to herself
leaves much to be desired. But the world is full of compen- with the ball among the barrels and boxes. But her parents
stations; and the wealth of genuine affection with which she will soon return and introduce her to the home that she is to
is greeted more than makes amends for the want of ceremony occupy on the ship for the next two weeks to come.
with which the children offer their mother their birthday .
congratulations.
"" "Te ^et' ^)i iei.

I TI ITTLE Maud Morgan was a very busy little girl, and
HIS little girl, who is now holding the skein of cotton
er her h hd bn o id a t mrnin was always looking about for something to do, and
over her hands, had been outside all the morning
with her pretty d d d, ad h g in doing so she very often got into mischief before she
with her prettily dressed doll, and having played
Swas discovered. The big dog that guarded the house had
with the big dog, Rover, until she was beginning to feel
five little pups that were so fat that they could scarcely
tired, she thought she would return to the house and take a
walk, and sometimes when they fell down they would tumble
rest for a little while, but no sooner had she entered the room
over and over before they could get on their feet again.
than she saw her mamma preparing to wind some cotton into
Maud was very fond of the little pups, and played with
a ball, when she threw her parasol on the carpet, and poor
them as often as she could get a chance, and they were just
dolly was pitched on the seat and left hanging there head
as fond of Maud, and would follow her all over the garden,
downward, in danger of choking to death, and she ran to-
ward her amma, exclaiming, Oh! mam do let me hold racing after her as fast as their little legs could carry them.
ward her mamma, exclaiming, Oh mamma, do let me hold
,, One day the big dog was taken away from her pups,
the thread." Her mamma assented, and having got it placed
which were left with Maud to take care of, and her father
over her hands, the unwinding commenced; but before it had
gave her strict instructions to be sure and feed them with
continued a great while, Eva began to think that it took a very
plenty of nice milk, and keep them safe until his return.
long time to do; and then sometimes it would tangle, and it
Maud felt quite proud of her charge, and she had fine fun
was such a bother to get it right again, and she felt so tired,
with her little pets for some time, but they soon began to
and dolly would soon be choked, and, and, everything else
Sw uil s b v feel hungry, and to weary for their mother's return, and as
went wrong, until she became very sorry that she had under-
she did not make her appearance they began to whine
taken to do it; but her mamma told her that as she was in
in their own peculiar way, and all looked the picture
the habit of taking up and laying down when she desired
of misery. Maud thought it was time to give them some-
everything that she undertook to do, she would test her o m M -
patience on this occasion, and told her how clever it would thing to eat, so away she ran into the house and got a large
be to finish it. And, by ting s t t s basin of milk, and tried to coax her little friends to have
be to finish it. And, by telling stories, the time slipped
some dinner, but never having been fed in this way before,
away, and the ball was completed before long, and she felt
glad that she had exercised so much patience and pleased they would not take the milk. So at last, in despair, she got
glad that she had exercised so much patience and pleased
mamma. hold of each of her pets, and placing their mouths in the
"-- basin, and by coaxing and saying to them Do have a little

Ihe J little Mntigit t. more," she induced them to take milk, and gave them so
much that when her father returned he said she had given
HIS poor little girl has been left among the baggage on them as much as would last them for a week, and it was sur-
the steamship wharf, while her father and mother prising that she had not made them sick, but if she would
are looking after their berths on board the ship not feed them so much, she might have full charge of them
which is to take them thousands of miles away from their for the future, which was just exactly what Maud wanted.









THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

lady" will soon come down to take her chocolate. At length home. She looks as if she had not a friend in the world, ex-
the door opens again, and this time it is really mamma. But, cept perhaps the rubber ball which she has in her hand.
alas! for all the preparations. The speech is forgotten, the And, oh! how she wishes her father would return, and re-
bouquet is pushed into her hand, and the manner in which lieve her of that horrid big umbrella, which is even bigger
the letter is delivered (from Miss Geary's point of view) than herself, and she could then have a romp all to herself
leaves much to be desired. But the world is full of compen- with the ball among the barrels and boxes. But her parents
stations; and the wealth of genuine affection with which she will soon return and introduce her to the home that she is to
is greeted more than makes amends for the want of ceremony occupy on the ship for the next two weeks to come.
with which the children offer their mother their birthday .
congratulations.
"" "Te ^et' ^)i iei.

I TI ITTLE Maud Morgan was a very busy little girl, and
HIS little girl, who is now holding the skein of cotton
er her h hd bn o id a t mrnin was always looking about for something to do, and
over her hands, had been outside all the morning
with her pretty d d d, ad h g in doing so she very often got into mischief before she
with her prettily dressed doll, and having played
Swas discovered. The big dog that guarded the house had
with the big dog, Rover, until she was beginning to feel
five little pups that were so fat that they could scarcely
tired, she thought she would return to the house and take a
walk, and sometimes when they fell down they would tumble
rest for a little while, but no sooner had she entered the room
over and over before they could get on their feet again.
than she saw her mamma preparing to wind some cotton into
Maud was very fond of the little pups, and played with
a ball, when she threw her parasol on the carpet, and poor
them as often as she could get a chance, and they were just
dolly was pitched on the seat and left hanging there head
as fond of Maud, and would follow her all over the garden,
downward, in danger of choking to death, and she ran to-
ward her amma, exclaiming, Oh! mam do let me hold racing after her as fast as their little legs could carry them.
ward her mamma, exclaiming, Oh mamma, do let me hold
,, One day the big dog was taken away from her pups,
the thread." Her mamma assented, and having got it placed
which were left with Maud to take care of, and her father
over her hands, the unwinding commenced; but before it had
gave her strict instructions to be sure and feed them with
continued a great while, Eva began to think that it took a very
plenty of nice milk, and keep them safe until his return.
long time to do; and then sometimes it would tangle, and it
Maud felt quite proud of her charge, and she had fine fun
was such a bother to get it right again, and she felt so tired,
with her little pets for some time, but they soon began to
and dolly would soon be choked, and, and, everything else
Sw uil s b v feel hungry, and to weary for their mother's return, and as
went wrong, until she became very sorry that she had under-
she did not make her appearance they began to whine
taken to do it; but her mamma told her that as she was in
in their own peculiar way, and all looked the picture
the habit of taking up and laying down when she desired
of misery. Maud thought it was time to give them some-
everything that she undertook to do, she would test her o m M -
patience on this occasion, and told her how clever it would thing to eat, so away she ran into the house and got a large
be to finish it. And, by ting s t t s basin of milk, and tried to coax her little friends to have
be to finish it. And, by telling stories, the time slipped
some dinner, but never having been fed in this way before,
away, and the ball was completed before long, and she felt
glad that she had exercised so much patience and pleased they would not take the milk. So at last, in despair, she got
glad that she had exercised so much patience and pleased
mamma. hold of each of her pets, and placing their mouths in the
"-- basin, and by coaxing and saying to them Do have a little

Ihe J little Mntigit t. more," she induced them to take milk, and gave them so
much that when her father returned he said she had given
HIS poor little girl has been left among the baggage on them as much as would last them for a week, and it was sur-
the steamship wharf, while her father and mother prising that she had not made them sick, but if she would
are looking after their berths on board the ship not feed them so much, she might have full charge of them
which is to take them thousands of miles away from their for the future, which was just exactly what Maud wanted.










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"Take one, dear I"








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THE FIRST BOUQUET OF SPRING,








THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

SIt Melofil one of the thousand accidents to which children in their
apple-blossoming time are peculiarly liable.
T How through the vista of perchance fourscore years will
OTHING is our own; we hold our pleasures yr
Just a little while, ere they ar fled the memory of those happy apple-blossom times be garnered
e by oe life ros us of or treasures; and swept clean! By that time the elder sister shall have
At^ One by one life robs us of our treasures;
Nothing ifr orobn eus t our teas7 been gathered to her fathers, after having been seen as a hale
"Nothig is our on e t our d and hearty old woman, as deft at knitting as on the day,
They are ours, and hold in faithful keeping; seventy years before, when she, having followed the heir of
Safe forever, all they took away. the farm into the orchard, laid down worsted and knitting
Cruel life can never stir that sleeping; needles in order to raise his highness to the dancing blos-
Cruel time can never seize that prey. soms, which he covets and yet half fears to touch.
That sweet encouragement which the elder sister affords
Justice pales ; truth fades; stars fall from heaven; the rough, yellow-headed bairn shall have been his through
Human are the great whom we revere; all their lives-advice varying according to the altering times.
No true crown of honor can be given Mayhap sixty-seventy years hence, the boy, then a hale
Till we place it on a funeral bier. old man, shall suddenly look up and say to the still more
How the children leave us : and no traces aged but equally hale old sister, "Dost thou remember,
Linger, of that smiling angel band. Lotte, when you lifted me in the old orchard to pull off the
Gone, forever gone; and in their places apple-blossoms ? And she would nod her ancient and
Weary men and anxious women stand. honored head, and answer "Yes," with a smile, even before
a word has had time to reach her lips.
Yet we have some little ones, still ours ; Time has passed and passed, rounding an old wall here,
They have kept the baby smile we know, softening the ancient features of some statue there; men
Which we kissed one day, and hid, with flowers have come and men have gone; their children's children are
On their dead white faces, long ago. up honestly fighting the good fight in the world of work; the
face of continents has been changed; thousands of inven-
When our joy is lost-and life will take it- tions have ameliorated the condition of mankind; and yet
Then no memory of the past remains; the charm of the old time in the apple orchard still prevails
Save with some strange, cruel sting, to make it now and again over all the delights of life, and there returns
Bitterness beyond all present pains. the sweet blossoming-time when the sister lifted the little
Death, more tender-hearted, leaves to sorrow yellow-haired brother to the apple branch, and he, half dar-
Still the radiant shadow, fond regret. ing, half-fearing, plucked the charming flowers.
We shall find in some fair, bright to-morrow, Ah as he pulls the bough there falls upon him a rain
Joy that he has taken living yet. of waning blossoms. He clings to the loving arms which en-
circle him, now more than half afraid. But he holds the
apple blossom toward which his little hand was stretched.
e 0 So may it be with the apple blossom of your life-so may
apple lo on0 you grasp and keep it, though for a moment frightening
showers of dead, if snowy, leaves rain upon you; so may
SWEET time of the year for the orchard, the apple you have loving arms to support you in all the apple-blos-
blossom, and the apple-blossom gatherers Every leaf soms you would gather until the time comes when the bloom
is a revelation; there are tender shadows under every is gathered for you, and carried with you to the last peace-
blade of grass. All nature is alive again, and the pink-tinted ful home.
white cups of the apple blossom are filling the orchard with
" spring snow." Then it is that the sturdy little limbs, which
were scarcely more than toddling when the autumn leaves ie Wl ir\ter of j gNe.
were falling, begin to find their strength and carry their little
owner, staring with wide-opened eyes to immeasurable dis-
tances (the real length away a stone's throw), and the short- LITTLE longer yet-a little longer,
frocked voyager goes on huge voyages of discovery round Shall violets bloom for thee, and sweet birds sing;
the corner, up the hillock, down the road, and, above all, And the lime branches, where soft winds are blowing,
through the open gate away into that immense world of for- Shall murmur the sweet promise of the spring!
est and flower which he knows is called the orchard. There, A little longer yet-a little longer
he barely remembers, grew those wonderful round apples, Thou shalt behold the quiet of the morn;
some of which he has seen stored in the apple-loft, which he While tender grasses and awakening flowers
scaled on that great voyage of discovery over the farm-yard Send up a golden mist to greet the dawn !
and up the wooden steps. There he remained until he was
discovered by the keenness of the dogs, to the vast delight of A little longer yet-a little longer,
his people, who imagined an end had come to him by some The tenderness of twilight shall be thine,








THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

SIt Melofil one of the thousand accidents to which children in their
apple-blossoming time are peculiarly liable.
T How through the vista of perchance fourscore years will
OTHING is our own; we hold our pleasures yr
Just a little while, ere they ar fled the memory of those happy apple-blossom times be garnered
e by oe life ros us of or treasures; and swept clean! By that time the elder sister shall have
At^ One by one life robs us of our treasures;
Nothing ifr orobn eus t our teas7 been gathered to her fathers, after having been seen as a hale
"Nothig is our on e t our d and hearty old woman, as deft at knitting as on the day,
They are ours, and hold in faithful keeping; seventy years before, when she, having followed the heir of
Safe forever, all they took away. the farm into the orchard, laid down worsted and knitting
Cruel life can never stir that sleeping; needles in order to raise his highness to the dancing blos-
Cruel time can never seize that prey. soms, which he covets and yet half fears to touch.
That sweet encouragement which the elder sister affords
Justice pales ; truth fades; stars fall from heaven; the rough, yellow-headed bairn shall have been his through
Human are the great whom we revere; all their lives-advice varying according to the altering times.
No true crown of honor can be given Mayhap sixty-seventy years hence, the boy, then a hale
Till we place it on a funeral bier. old man, shall suddenly look up and say to the still more
How the children leave us : and no traces aged but equally hale old sister, "Dost thou remember,
Linger, of that smiling angel band. Lotte, when you lifted me in the old orchard to pull off the
Gone, forever gone; and in their places apple-blossoms ? And she would nod her ancient and
Weary men and anxious women stand. honored head, and answer "Yes," with a smile, even before
a word has had time to reach her lips.
Yet we have some little ones, still ours ; Time has passed and passed, rounding an old wall here,
They have kept the baby smile we know, softening the ancient features of some statue there; men
Which we kissed one day, and hid, with flowers have come and men have gone; their children's children are
On their dead white faces, long ago. up honestly fighting the good fight in the world of work; the
face of continents has been changed; thousands of inven-
When our joy is lost-and life will take it- tions have ameliorated the condition of mankind; and yet
Then no memory of the past remains; the charm of the old time in the apple orchard still prevails
Save with some strange, cruel sting, to make it now and again over all the delights of life, and there returns
Bitterness beyond all present pains. the sweet blossoming-time when the sister lifted the little
Death, more tender-hearted, leaves to sorrow yellow-haired brother to the apple branch, and he, half dar-
Still the radiant shadow, fond regret. ing, half-fearing, plucked the charming flowers.
We shall find in some fair, bright to-morrow, Ah as he pulls the bough there falls upon him a rain
Joy that he has taken living yet. of waning blossoms. He clings to the loving arms which en-
circle him, now more than half afraid. But he holds the
apple blossom toward which his little hand was stretched.
e 0 So may it be with the apple blossom of your life-so may
apple lo on0 you grasp and keep it, though for a moment frightening
showers of dead, if snowy, leaves rain upon you; so may
SWEET time of the year for the orchard, the apple you have loving arms to support you in all the apple-blos-
blossom, and the apple-blossom gatherers Every leaf soms you would gather until the time comes when the bloom
is a revelation; there are tender shadows under every is gathered for you, and carried with you to the last peace-
blade of grass. All nature is alive again, and the pink-tinted ful home.
white cups of the apple blossom are filling the orchard with
" spring snow." Then it is that the sturdy little limbs, which
were scarcely more than toddling when the autumn leaves ie Wl ir\ter of j gNe.
were falling, begin to find their strength and carry their little
owner, staring with wide-opened eyes to immeasurable dis-
tances (the real length away a stone's throw), and the short- LITTLE longer yet-a little longer,
frocked voyager goes on huge voyages of discovery round Shall violets bloom for thee, and sweet birds sing;
the corner, up the hillock, down the road, and, above all, And the lime branches, where soft winds are blowing,
through the open gate away into that immense world of for- Shall murmur the sweet promise of the spring!
est and flower which he knows is called the orchard. There, A little longer yet-a little longer
he barely remembers, grew those wonderful round apples, Thou shalt behold the quiet of the morn;
some of which he has seen stored in the apple-loft, which he While tender grasses and awakening flowers
scaled on that great voyage of discovery over the farm-yard Send up a golden mist to greet the dawn !
and up the wooden steps. There he remained until he was
discovered by the keenness of the dogs, to the vast delight of A little longer yet-a little longer,
his people, who imagined an end had come to him by some The tenderness of twilight shall be thine,








THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

SIt Melofil one of the thousand accidents to which children in their
apple-blossoming time are peculiarly liable.
T How through the vista of perchance fourscore years will
OTHING is our own; we hold our pleasures yr
Just a little while, ere they ar fled the memory of those happy apple-blossom times be garnered
e by oe life ros us of or treasures; and swept clean! By that time the elder sister shall have
At^ One by one life robs us of our treasures;
Nothing ifr orobn eus t our teas7 been gathered to her fathers, after having been seen as a hale
"Nothig is our on e t our d and hearty old woman, as deft at knitting as on the day,
They are ours, and hold in faithful keeping; seventy years before, when she, having followed the heir of
Safe forever, all they took away. the farm into the orchard, laid down worsted and knitting
Cruel life can never stir that sleeping; needles in order to raise his highness to the dancing blos-
Cruel time can never seize that prey. soms, which he covets and yet half fears to touch.
That sweet encouragement which the elder sister affords
Justice pales ; truth fades; stars fall from heaven; the rough, yellow-headed bairn shall have been his through
Human are the great whom we revere; all their lives-advice varying according to the altering times.
No true crown of honor can be given Mayhap sixty-seventy years hence, the boy, then a hale
Till we place it on a funeral bier. old man, shall suddenly look up and say to the still more
How the children leave us : and no traces aged but equally hale old sister, "Dost thou remember,
Linger, of that smiling angel band. Lotte, when you lifted me in the old orchard to pull off the
Gone, forever gone; and in their places apple-blossoms ? And she would nod her ancient and
Weary men and anxious women stand. honored head, and answer "Yes," with a smile, even before
a word has had time to reach her lips.
Yet we have some little ones, still ours ; Time has passed and passed, rounding an old wall here,
They have kept the baby smile we know, softening the ancient features of some statue there; men
Which we kissed one day, and hid, with flowers have come and men have gone; their children's children are
On their dead white faces, long ago. up honestly fighting the good fight in the world of work; the
face of continents has been changed; thousands of inven-
When our joy is lost-and life will take it- tions have ameliorated the condition of mankind; and yet
Then no memory of the past remains; the charm of the old time in the apple orchard still prevails
Save with some strange, cruel sting, to make it now and again over all the delights of life, and there returns
Bitterness beyond all present pains. the sweet blossoming-time when the sister lifted the little
Death, more tender-hearted, leaves to sorrow yellow-haired brother to the apple branch, and he, half dar-
Still the radiant shadow, fond regret. ing, half-fearing, plucked the charming flowers.
We shall find in some fair, bright to-morrow, Ah as he pulls the bough there falls upon him a rain
Joy that he has taken living yet. of waning blossoms. He clings to the loving arms which en-
circle him, now more than half afraid. But he holds the
apple blossom toward which his little hand was stretched.
e 0 So may it be with the apple blossom of your life-so may
apple lo on0 you grasp and keep it, though for a moment frightening
showers of dead, if snowy, leaves rain upon you; so may
SWEET time of the year for the orchard, the apple you have loving arms to support you in all the apple-blos-
blossom, and the apple-blossom gatherers Every leaf soms you would gather until the time comes when the bloom
is a revelation; there are tender shadows under every is gathered for you, and carried with you to the last peace-
blade of grass. All nature is alive again, and the pink-tinted ful home.
white cups of the apple blossom are filling the orchard with
" spring snow." Then it is that the sturdy little limbs, which
were scarcely more than toddling when the autumn leaves ie Wl ir\ter of j gNe.
were falling, begin to find their strength and carry their little
owner, staring with wide-opened eyes to immeasurable dis-
tances (the real length away a stone's throw), and the short- LITTLE longer yet-a little longer,
frocked voyager goes on huge voyages of discovery round Shall violets bloom for thee, and sweet birds sing;
the corner, up the hillock, down the road, and, above all, And the lime branches, where soft winds are blowing,
through the open gate away into that immense world of for- Shall murmur the sweet promise of the spring!
est and flower which he knows is called the orchard. There, A little longer yet-a little longer
he barely remembers, grew those wonderful round apples, Thou shalt behold the quiet of the morn;
some of which he has seen stored in the apple-loft, which he While tender grasses and awakening flowers
scaled on that great voyage of discovery over the farm-yard Send up a golden mist to greet the dawn !
and up the wooden steps. There he remained until he was
discovered by the keenness of the dogs, to the vast delight of A little longer yet-a little longer,
his people, who imagined an end had come to him by some The tenderness of twilight shall be thine,









THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

The rosy clouds that float o'er dying daylight, 'Tis then one would dream of defiance
Nor fade till trembling stars begin to shine. To custom, and whisper, sweet maid!
Of a priest, and a Spanish Alliance,
A little longer yet-a little longer, Of a priest, and a Spanish Alliance,
Shall starry night be beautiful for thee; That is- e were no afraid
And the cold moon shall look through the blue silence,
Flooding her silver path upon the sea.
A little longer yet-a little longer, fow i tLt, Gl'i td rqngmyI ?"
Life shall be thine; life with its power to will;
Life with its strength to bear, to love, to conquer, :
Bringing its thousand joys thy heart to fill. INNIE was anxious to be a good sewer, so that she
i., might be useful to her dear mother. One day when
A little longer yet-a little longer, .- grandmother was on a visit, Minnie was anxious to
The voices thou hast loved shall charm thine ear; show her one of her best specimens of sewing. The happy
And thy true heart, that now beats quick to hear them, old lady examined the hemmed handkerchief carefully, and
A little longer yet shall hold them dear. then said-" Now, Minnie, my dear child, do not be dis-
A little longer yet-joy while thou mayest; courage, but you must take all this work out. See, there
Love and rejoice for time has naught in store: are two places where you have 'drawn' the thread too tightly,
And soon the darkness of the grave shall bid thee and that spoils the work. Shall I sing to you, dear Minnie,
Love and rejoice and feel and know no more. some pretty lines written by Mr. Hickson, which I sang to
your mother when she had done some bad sewing when
she was a little child ? They are about-

Tlte Nooi'i4 l1 hidelr PERSEVERANCE.

CATARINA. 'Tis a lesson you should heed- If we strive, 'tis no disgrace
TRY AGAIN. Though we may not win the race;
.* IIf at first you don't succeed, What should you do in that case ?
RRANT artists with pencils that capture TRY AGAIN. TRY AGAIN.
"The comeliest faces and forms, Then your courage should appear, If you find your task is hard,
Say, whence that one ripple of rapture For if you will persevere, TRY AGAIN.
In the eyes of this lady of storms ? You will conquer, never fear-- Time will bring you your reward-
Smiling under those locks Oriental-- TRY AGAIN. TRY AGAIN.
Blue-black, and as wild as her will- Once or twice though you should fail, All that other folks can do,
Is a brow that is wondrously gentle, Y AGAIN. Why, zWith PATIENCE, should not you ?
While her lips, for a wonder, are still. If you would at last prevail, Only keep this rule in view-
TRY AGAIN. TRY AGAIN.
II.
Catarina (for so we will name her)
Though in summers and culture a child,
Is a spoiled one, requiring, to tame her, hie ihgt !8ouqiuet of p'ir g.
Occasional measures, not mild. O
Could you see her with rival and suitor,
Scant need for your guide to explain ELCOME, all hail to thee! Welcome, young Spring!
(Whether Murray or painstaking tutor) Thy sun-ray is bright on the butterfly's wing.
How the Moors intermarried in Spain. Beauty shines forth in the blossom-robed trees;
Perfume floats by on the soft southern breeze.
II.
The sun's in the rich blood that courses Music, sweet music, sounds over the earth;
Through the veins of that faintly rosed cheek One glad choral song greets the primrose's birth;
With the speed (may we say of wild horses ?) The lark soars above, with its shrill matin strain;
In her moments of passion and pique: The shepherd boy tunes his reed-pipe on the plain.
Not the shores vexed by Biscay's wild water-
Not the home of the lithe mountaineer- The hedges luxuriant with flowers and balm,
Can mother this leopard-like daughter Are purple with violets, and shaded with palm,
Of Spain-and of tawny Tangier. The zephyr-kissed grass is beginning to wave,
Fresh verdure is decking the garden and grave.
IV.
When thy feet, Catarina, have woven Welcome, all hail to thee, heart-stirring May !
The rhymes set by tender guitars- Thou hast won from my wild harp a rapturous lay ;
And good-night resolves are all cloven And the last dying murmur that sleeps on the string
By the mystical spell of the stars, Is, welcome! All hail to thee, welcome, young Spring I









THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

The rosy clouds that float o'er dying daylight, 'Tis then one would dream of defiance
Nor fade till trembling stars begin to shine. To custom, and whisper, sweet maid!
Of a priest, and a Spanish Alliance,
A little longer yet-a little longer, Of a priest, and a Spanish Alliance,
Shall starry night be beautiful for thee; That is- e were no afraid
And the cold moon shall look through the blue silence,
Flooding her silver path upon the sea.
A little longer yet-a little longer, fow i tLt, Gl'i td rqngmyI ?"
Life shall be thine; life with its power to will;
Life with its strength to bear, to love, to conquer, :
Bringing its thousand joys thy heart to fill. INNIE was anxious to be a good sewer, so that she
i., might be useful to her dear mother. One day when
A little longer yet-a little longer, .- grandmother was on a visit, Minnie was anxious to
The voices thou hast loved shall charm thine ear; show her one of her best specimens of sewing. The happy
And thy true heart, that now beats quick to hear them, old lady examined the hemmed handkerchief carefully, and
A little longer yet shall hold them dear. then said-" Now, Minnie, my dear child, do not be dis-
A little longer yet-joy while thou mayest; courage, but you must take all this work out. See, there
Love and rejoice for time has naught in store: are two places where you have 'drawn' the thread too tightly,
And soon the darkness of the grave shall bid thee and that spoils the work. Shall I sing to you, dear Minnie,
Love and rejoice and feel and know no more. some pretty lines written by Mr. Hickson, which I sang to
your mother when she had done some bad sewing when
she was a little child ? They are about-

Tlte Nooi'i4 l1 hidelr PERSEVERANCE.

CATARINA. 'Tis a lesson you should heed- If we strive, 'tis no disgrace
TRY AGAIN. Though we may not win the race;
.* IIf at first you don't succeed, What should you do in that case ?
RRANT artists with pencils that capture TRY AGAIN. TRY AGAIN.
"The comeliest faces and forms, Then your courage should appear, If you find your task is hard,
Say, whence that one ripple of rapture For if you will persevere, TRY AGAIN.
In the eyes of this lady of storms ? You will conquer, never fear-- Time will bring you your reward-
Smiling under those locks Oriental-- TRY AGAIN. TRY AGAIN.
Blue-black, and as wild as her will- Once or twice though you should fail, All that other folks can do,
Is a brow that is wondrously gentle, Y AGAIN. Why, zWith PATIENCE, should not you ?
While her lips, for a wonder, are still. If you would at last prevail, Only keep this rule in view-
TRY AGAIN. TRY AGAIN.
II.
Catarina (for so we will name her)
Though in summers and culture a child,
Is a spoiled one, requiring, to tame her, hie ihgt !8ouqiuet of p'ir g.
Occasional measures, not mild. O
Could you see her with rival and suitor,
Scant need for your guide to explain ELCOME, all hail to thee! Welcome, young Spring!
(Whether Murray or painstaking tutor) Thy sun-ray is bright on the butterfly's wing.
How the Moors intermarried in Spain. Beauty shines forth in the blossom-robed trees;
Perfume floats by on the soft southern breeze.
II.
The sun's in the rich blood that courses Music, sweet music, sounds over the earth;
Through the veins of that faintly rosed cheek One glad choral song greets the primrose's birth;
With the speed (may we say of wild horses ?) The lark soars above, with its shrill matin strain;
In her moments of passion and pique: The shepherd boy tunes his reed-pipe on the plain.
Not the shores vexed by Biscay's wild water-
Not the home of the lithe mountaineer- The hedges luxuriant with flowers and balm,
Can mother this leopard-like daughter Are purple with violets, and shaded with palm,
Of Spain-and of tawny Tangier. The zephyr-kissed grass is beginning to wave,
Fresh verdure is decking the garden and grave.
IV.
When thy feet, Catarina, have woven Welcome, all hail to thee, heart-stirring May !
The rhymes set by tender guitars- Thou hast won from my wild harp a rapturous lay ;
And good-night resolves are all cloven And the last dying murmur that sleeps on the string
By the mystical spell of the stars, Is, welcome! All hail to thee, welcome, young Spring I









THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

The rosy clouds that float o'er dying daylight, 'Tis then one would dream of defiance
Nor fade till trembling stars begin to shine. To custom, and whisper, sweet maid!
Of a priest, and a Spanish Alliance,
A little longer yet-a little longer, Of a priest, and a Spanish Alliance,
Shall starry night be beautiful for thee; That is- e were no afraid
And the cold moon shall look through the blue silence,
Flooding her silver path upon the sea.
A little longer yet-a little longer, fow i tLt, Gl'i td rqngmyI ?"
Life shall be thine; life with its power to will;
Life with its strength to bear, to love, to conquer, :
Bringing its thousand joys thy heart to fill. INNIE was anxious to be a good sewer, so that she
i., might be useful to her dear mother. One day when
A little longer yet-a little longer, .- grandmother was on a visit, Minnie was anxious to
The voices thou hast loved shall charm thine ear; show her one of her best specimens of sewing. The happy
And thy true heart, that now beats quick to hear them, old lady examined the hemmed handkerchief carefully, and
A little longer yet shall hold them dear. then said-" Now, Minnie, my dear child, do not be dis-
A little longer yet-joy while thou mayest; courage, but you must take all this work out. See, there
Love and rejoice for time has naught in store: are two places where you have 'drawn' the thread too tightly,
And soon the darkness of the grave shall bid thee and that spoils the work. Shall I sing to you, dear Minnie,
Love and rejoice and feel and know no more. some pretty lines written by Mr. Hickson, which I sang to
your mother when she had done some bad sewing when
she was a little child ? They are about-

Tlte Nooi'i4 l1 hidelr PERSEVERANCE.

CATARINA. 'Tis a lesson you should heed- If we strive, 'tis no disgrace
TRY AGAIN. Though we may not win the race;
.* IIf at first you don't succeed, What should you do in that case ?
RRANT artists with pencils that capture TRY AGAIN. TRY AGAIN.
"The comeliest faces and forms, Then your courage should appear, If you find your task is hard,
Say, whence that one ripple of rapture For if you will persevere, TRY AGAIN.
In the eyes of this lady of storms ? You will conquer, never fear-- Time will bring you your reward-
Smiling under those locks Oriental-- TRY AGAIN. TRY AGAIN.
Blue-black, and as wild as her will- Once or twice though you should fail, All that other folks can do,
Is a brow that is wondrously gentle, Y AGAIN. Why, zWith PATIENCE, should not you ?
While her lips, for a wonder, are still. If you would at last prevail, Only keep this rule in view-
TRY AGAIN. TRY AGAIN.
II.
Catarina (for so we will name her)
Though in summers and culture a child,
Is a spoiled one, requiring, to tame her, hie ihgt !8ouqiuet of p'ir g.
Occasional measures, not mild. O
Could you see her with rival and suitor,
Scant need for your guide to explain ELCOME, all hail to thee! Welcome, young Spring!
(Whether Murray or painstaking tutor) Thy sun-ray is bright on the butterfly's wing.
How the Moors intermarried in Spain. Beauty shines forth in the blossom-robed trees;
Perfume floats by on the soft southern breeze.
II.
The sun's in the rich blood that courses Music, sweet music, sounds over the earth;
Through the veins of that faintly rosed cheek One glad choral song greets the primrose's birth;
With the speed (may we say of wild horses ?) The lark soars above, with its shrill matin strain;
In her moments of passion and pique: The shepherd boy tunes his reed-pipe on the plain.
Not the shores vexed by Biscay's wild water-
Not the home of the lithe mountaineer- The hedges luxuriant with flowers and balm,
Can mother this leopard-like daughter Are purple with violets, and shaded with palm,
Of Spain-and of tawny Tangier. The zephyr-kissed grass is beginning to wave,
Fresh verdure is decking the garden and grave.
IV.
When thy feet, Catarina, have woven Welcome, all hail to thee, heart-stirring May !
The rhymes set by tender guitars- Thou hast won from my wild harp a rapturous lay ;
And good-night resolves are all cloven And the last dying murmur that sleeps on the string
By the mystical spell of the stars, Is, welcome! All hail to thee, welcome, young Spring I
























































JESUS WITH THE DOCTORS.
























































TRIAL OF ABRAHAM'S FAITH.
TRIAL OF ABRAHAM'S FAITH.







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"GOOD-NIGHT, MOTHER!"
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ON THE OONNEOTICUT RIVER,






















































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4.0 A -, gN.







THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

Je~ul with the Diodtoi. b Isaac said to his father: "Behold the fire and the wood;
but where is the lamb for a burnt-offering ? "
f And Abraham said, "My son, God will provide himself
HEN Joseph and Mary left Egypt, to return to the a lamb for a burnt-offering."
land of Israel, they made their abode in the city When the altar was built, Abraham bound Isaac and
of Nazareth. Jesus grew in strength and stature laid him upon the wood, and stretched forth his hand to slay
like other children, but was filled with a superior wisdom, his son. A voice from heaven stopped him, and as Abraham
for the grace of God was upon him. lifted his eyes he saw a ram caught by his horns in a neigh-
We are told very little of the childhood and youth of boring thicket. And Abraham took the ram, and offered
one who was to play such an important part in the world's him up for a burnt-offering instead of his son.
history, and it is left to our imaginations to picture the quiet,
homely scenes during which the future king passed the period--
of his boyhood.
Joseph and Mary were accustomed to go to Jerusalem oo0- i1 t, Motler !
every year at the feast of the Passover, and when Jesus was
twelve years of age he was permitted to accompany them. BY EDWARD WILLETT.
When the feast was ended, they made preparation to re-
turn home. As great numbers came to Jerusalem at this time
from every part of the country, they traveled in company, O'K. iOD-night, mother Kiss your child
for mutual security. Joseph and Mary supposed that Jesus Let your darling kiss and cling,
was among the crowd. .. While your lips, so soft and mild,
After they had traveled a day's journey from Jerusalem, Lullabies are murmuring.
they began to feel anxious about their boy, and sought for Good-night, mother! While I live
him among their kinsfolk and acquaintance, who knew noth- Pray that I may never miss
ing of his whereabouts. What you love so well to give,
Then Joseph and Mary returned to Jerusalem, and after Darling mother's good-night kiss.
searching for three days found Jesus in the temple, in the
midst of the learned men, both hearing them and asking them Little mother, when I grow,
questions. And all that heard him were astonished at his When I get as big as you,
understanding and answers. Will you love and kiss me so ?
When his parents saw him, they were amazed, and his Will you still be kind and true ?
mother took him to task for causing her so much anxiety
and sorrow. Yes, you will; your earliest born-
Jesus said to them, "How is it that ye sought me ? Wist She whose lips you kiss to-night-
ye not that I must be about my Father's business ? Like the flower beside the corn,
They understood not his meaning, but Mary treasured Then will blossom in your sight.
all his sayings in her heart, and Jesus returned with them to Good-night, mother! Once again
Nazareth. Press me to your loving breast,
Kiss me, mother dear, and then
Lay me gently down to rest.
Good-night, mother! While Isleep,
I shall not forget your kiss;
HE patriarch's abounding faith in God had been put Be my slumber light or deep,
to a severe test when the promise of a son was given That will bring me dreams of bliss.
"after Abraham and his wife had reached a good old
age. Isaac was born, and was the joy and comfort of his ---*---
aged father, who took great delight in the lad.
The most agonizing trial yet remained, and one in which CilldeIella.
the strongest parental feelings would shrink from the act
commanded. BY EDWARD WILLETT.
This child of promise-this only solace of his old age-
God commanded Abraham to sacrifice as a burnt-offering
upon the top of Mount Moriah. OVELY Cinderella,
However the heart of the father may have rebelled, Fair and very pale,
Abraham had no thought of disobeying God, but immedi- Surely you could tell a
ately made preparation for the sacrifice of this most precious Sweetly pretty tale.
offering.
Abraham rose early in the morning, and with Isaac, his While the pot is boiling,
son, went to the place of which God had told him. There you sit alone,







THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

Je~ul with the Diodtoi. b Isaac said to his father: "Behold the fire and the wood;
but where is the lamb for a burnt-offering ? "
f And Abraham said, "My son, God will provide himself
HEN Joseph and Mary left Egypt, to return to the a lamb for a burnt-offering."
land of Israel, they made their abode in the city When the altar was built, Abraham bound Isaac and
of Nazareth. Jesus grew in strength and stature laid him upon the wood, and stretched forth his hand to slay
like other children, but was filled with a superior wisdom, his son. A voice from heaven stopped him, and as Abraham
for the grace of God was upon him. lifted his eyes he saw a ram caught by his horns in a neigh-
We are told very little of the childhood and youth of boring thicket. And Abraham took the ram, and offered
one who was to play such an important part in the world's him up for a burnt-offering instead of his son.
history, and it is left to our imaginations to picture the quiet,
homely scenes during which the future king passed the period--
of his boyhood.
Joseph and Mary were accustomed to go to Jerusalem oo0- i1 t, Motler !
every year at the feast of the Passover, and when Jesus was
twelve years of age he was permitted to accompany them. BY EDWARD WILLETT.
When the feast was ended, they made preparation to re-
turn home. As great numbers came to Jerusalem at this time
from every part of the country, they traveled in company, O'K. iOD-night, mother Kiss your child
for mutual security. Joseph and Mary supposed that Jesus Let your darling kiss and cling,
was among the crowd. .. While your lips, so soft and mild,
After they had traveled a day's journey from Jerusalem, Lullabies are murmuring.
they began to feel anxious about their boy, and sought for Good-night, mother! While I live
him among their kinsfolk and acquaintance, who knew noth- Pray that I may never miss
ing of his whereabouts. What you love so well to give,
Then Joseph and Mary returned to Jerusalem, and after Darling mother's good-night kiss.
searching for three days found Jesus in the temple, in the
midst of the learned men, both hearing them and asking them Little mother, when I grow,
questions. And all that heard him were astonished at his When I get as big as you,
understanding and answers. Will you love and kiss me so ?
When his parents saw him, they were amazed, and his Will you still be kind and true ?
mother took him to task for causing her so much anxiety
and sorrow. Yes, you will; your earliest born-
Jesus said to them, "How is it that ye sought me ? Wist She whose lips you kiss to-night-
ye not that I must be about my Father's business ? Like the flower beside the corn,
They understood not his meaning, but Mary treasured Then will blossom in your sight.
all his sayings in her heart, and Jesus returned with them to Good-night, mother! Once again
Nazareth. Press me to your loving breast,
Kiss me, mother dear, and then
Lay me gently down to rest.
Good-night, mother! While Isleep,
I shall not forget your kiss;
HE patriarch's abounding faith in God had been put Be my slumber light or deep,
to a severe test when the promise of a son was given That will bring me dreams of bliss.
"after Abraham and his wife had reached a good old
age. Isaac was born, and was the joy and comfort of his ---*---
aged father, who took great delight in the lad.
The most agonizing trial yet remained, and one in which CilldeIella.
the strongest parental feelings would shrink from the act
commanded. BY EDWARD WILLETT.
This child of promise-this only solace of his old age-
God commanded Abraham to sacrifice as a burnt-offering
upon the top of Mount Moriah. OVELY Cinderella,
However the heart of the father may have rebelled, Fair and very pale,
Abraham had no thought of disobeying God, but immedi- Surely you could tell a
ately made preparation for the sacrifice of this most precious Sweetly pretty tale.
offering.
Abraham rose early in the morning, and with Isaac, his While the pot is boiling,
son, went to the place of which God had told him. There you sit alone,







THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

Je~ul with the Diodtoi. b Isaac said to his father: "Behold the fire and the wood;
but where is the lamb for a burnt-offering ? "
f And Abraham said, "My son, God will provide himself
HEN Joseph and Mary left Egypt, to return to the a lamb for a burnt-offering."
land of Israel, they made their abode in the city When the altar was built, Abraham bound Isaac and
of Nazareth. Jesus grew in strength and stature laid him upon the wood, and stretched forth his hand to slay
like other children, but was filled with a superior wisdom, his son. A voice from heaven stopped him, and as Abraham
for the grace of God was upon him. lifted his eyes he saw a ram caught by his horns in a neigh-
We are told very little of the childhood and youth of boring thicket. And Abraham took the ram, and offered
one who was to play such an important part in the world's him up for a burnt-offering instead of his son.
history, and it is left to our imaginations to picture the quiet,
homely scenes during which the future king passed the period--
of his boyhood.
Joseph and Mary were accustomed to go to Jerusalem oo0- i1 t, Motler !
every year at the feast of the Passover, and when Jesus was
twelve years of age he was permitted to accompany them. BY EDWARD WILLETT.
When the feast was ended, they made preparation to re-
turn home. As great numbers came to Jerusalem at this time
from every part of the country, they traveled in company, O'K. iOD-night, mother Kiss your child
for mutual security. Joseph and Mary supposed that Jesus Let your darling kiss and cling,
was among the crowd. .. While your lips, so soft and mild,
After they had traveled a day's journey from Jerusalem, Lullabies are murmuring.
they began to feel anxious about their boy, and sought for Good-night, mother! While I live
him among their kinsfolk and acquaintance, who knew noth- Pray that I may never miss
ing of his whereabouts. What you love so well to give,
Then Joseph and Mary returned to Jerusalem, and after Darling mother's good-night kiss.
searching for three days found Jesus in the temple, in the
midst of the learned men, both hearing them and asking them Little mother, when I grow,
questions. And all that heard him were astonished at his When I get as big as you,
understanding and answers. Will you love and kiss me so ?
When his parents saw him, they were amazed, and his Will you still be kind and true ?
mother took him to task for causing her so much anxiety
and sorrow. Yes, you will; your earliest born-
Jesus said to them, "How is it that ye sought me ? Wist She whose lips you kiss to-night-
ye not that I must be about my Father's business ? Like the flower beside the corn,
They understood not his meaning, but Mary treasured Then will blossom in your sight.
all his sayings in her heart, and Jesus returned with them to Good-night, mother! Once again
Nazareth. Press me to your loving breast,
Kiss me, mother dear, and then
Lay me gently down to rest.
Good-night, mother! While Isleep,
I shall not forget your kiss;
HE patriarch's abounding faith in God had been put Be my slumber light or deep,
to a severe test when the promise of a son was given That will bring me dreams of bliss.
"after Abraham and his wife had reached a good old
age. Isaac was born, and was the joy and comfort of his ---*---
aged father, who took great delight in the lad.
The most agonizing trial yet remained, and one in which CilldeIella.
the strongest parental feelings would shrink from the act
commanded. BY EDWARD WILLETT.
This child of promise-this only solace of his old age-
God commanded Abraham to sacrifice as a burnt-offering
upon the top of Mount Moriah. OVELY Cinderella,
However the heart of the father may have rebelled, Fair and very pale,
Abraham had no thought of disobeying God, but immedi- Surely you could tell a
ately made preparation for the sacrifice of this most precious Sweetly pretty tale.
offering.
Abraham rose early in the morning, and with Isaac, his While the pot is boiling,
son, went to the place of which God had told him. There you sit alone,







THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

Je~ul with the Diodtoi. b Isaac said to his father: "Behold the fire and the wood;
but where is the lamb for a burnt-offering ? "
f And Abraham said, "My son, God will provide himself
HEN Joseph and Mary left Egypt, to return to the a lamb for a burnt-offering."
land of Israel, they made their abode in the city When the altar was built, Abraham bound Isaac and
of Nazareth. Jesus grew in strength and stature laid him upon the wood, and stretched forth his hand to slay
like other children, but was filled with a superior wisdom, his son. A voice from heaven stopped him, and as Abraham
for the grace of God was upon him. lifted his eyes he saw a ram caught by his horns in a neigh-
We are told very little of the childhood and youth of boring thicket. And Abraham took the ram, and offered
one who was to play such an important part in the world's him up for a burnt-offering instead of his son.
history, and it is left to our imaginations to picture the quiet,
homely scenes during which the future king passed the period--
of his boyhood.
Joseph and Mary were accustomed to go to Jerusalem oo0- i1 t, Motler !
every year at the feast of the Passover, and when Jesus was
twelve years of age he was permitted to accompany them. BY EDWARD WILLETT.
When the feast was ended, they made preparation to re-
turn home. As great numbers came to Jerusalem at this time
from every part of the country, they traveled in company, O'K. iOD-night, mother Kiss your child
for mutual security. Joseph and Mary supposed that Jesus Let your darling kiss and cling,
was among the crowd. .. While your lips, so soft and mild,
After they had traveled a day's journey from Jerusalem, Lullabies are murmuring.
they began to feel anxious about their boy, and sought for Good-night, mother! While I live
him among their kinsfolk and acquaintance, who knew noth- Pray that I may never miss
ing of his whereabouts. What you love so well to give,
Then Joseph and Mary returned to Jerusalem, and after Darling mother's good-night kiss.
searching for three days found Jesus in the temple, in the
midst of the learned men, both hearing them and asking them Little mother, when I grow,
questions. And all that heard him were astonished at his When I get as big as you,
understanding and answers. Will you love and kiss me so ?
When his parents saw him, they were amazed, and his Will you still be kind and true ?
mother took him to task for causing her so much anxiety
and sorrow. Yes, you will; your earliest born-
Jesus said to them, "How is it that ye sought me ? Wist She whose lips you kiss to-night-
ye not that I must be about my Father's business ? Like the flower beside the corn,
They understood not his meaning, but Mary treasured Then will blossom in your sight.
all his sayings in her heart, and Jesus returned with them to Good-night, mother! Once again
Nazareth. Press me to your loving breast,
Kiss me, mother dear, and then
Lay me gently down to rest.
Good-night, mother! While Isleep,
I shall not forget your kiss;
HE patriarch's abounding faith in God had been put Be my slumber light or deep,
to a severe test when the promise of a son was given That will bring me dreams of bliss.
"after Abraham and his wife had reached a good old
age. Isaac was born, and was the joy and comfort of his ---*---
aged father, who took great delight in the lad.
The most agonizing trial yet remained, and one in which CilldeIella.
the strongest parental feelings would shrink from the act
commanded. BY EDWARD WILLETT.
This child of promise-this only solace of his old age-
God commanded Abraham to sacrifice as a burnt-offering
upon the top of Mount Moriah. OVELY Cinderella,
However the heart of the father may have rebelled, Fair and very pale,
Abraham had no thought of disobeying God, but immedi- Surely you could tell a
ately made preparation for the sacrifice of this most precious Sweetly pretty tale.
offering.
Abraham rose early in the morning, and with Isaac, his While the pot is boiling,
son, went to the place of which God had told him. There you sit alone,









THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

Tired of too much toiling, Our pleasant journey's end we reach,
On the hard hearth-stone. And ground the boat upon the beach,
Where, close beside the elm and oak,
Eyes within whose gleaming We gaze at distant Holyoke.
Pain and sadness lurk,
Tell us you are dreaming Then father deftly casts his line
There beside your work. Where yonder ripples gleam and shine,
Seated in the ashes, And drops the hook he baited well,
, Seated in the ashes,
Si y For sunfish, perch, or pickerel.
Many things you mark,
When the firelight flashes And mother, sister Kate, and I,
Shoot across the dark. Quiet as clouds within the sky,
You could tell a story, In silence sit, and closely watch
Though your lips are dumb, For fish that father hopes to catch.
Of the days of glory The fish are caught, a pretty bunch,
That are yet to come. And on the grass we spread our lunch;
Now you see the fairy, Then up the stream we slowly glide,
With the robe so bright, For we must row against the tide.
Gossamer and airy,
Goss r and And so, through many a summer day,
You will wear at night. '
"You will wear at night. We while the pleasant hours away,
Now your brain, romancing, Beneath the shade of elm and oak,
Tells you of your pride, In sight of great Mount Holyoke.
When the prince is dancing,
Happy at your side.
Now the lords and ladies )oe ,ijrl Vlaw .
Wonder who is she,
Who so well arrayed is,
Fair as fair can be. BY EDWARD WILLETT.
Now the heralds bear a
Banner as they pass, T
Seeking who can wear a, HE sunlight streams across the swamp,
A slipper made of glass. Through its recesses dark and damp,
Ss And from their lair come forth at dawn
Now within the slipper, The gentle doe and timid fawn.
Delicate and neat,
Women pert and chipper Through many a tangled, dim morass,
Try to push their feet. They go, knee deep in dripping grass,
And where, well hid by bush or brake,
Now the prince has found y, Securely sleeps the lazy snake.
Claimed your little hand,
Married you, and crowned you Where giant trees give cooling shade,
Queen of all the land. In quiet pools they drink and wade;
Cinderella, sitting While yonder in the gathered gloom
Lonely and in pain, The lonely bittern sounds his boom.
Thoughts like these are flitting,
Thoughts like these are flitting When noons are hot, they both recline
Through your dreaming brain. Beneath the cypress, oak, or vine,
--- -- While winds that through the forest sigh
Sing mother Nature's lullaby.
O\ tl\e do qedtidut.
When from their shelter forth they go-
The timid fawn and gentle doe-
BY EDWARD WILLETT. The mother's watchful eye and ear
Protect from harm her baby deer.

S on the quiet stream we float, No sound of anything that stirs
And scarcely row our pretty boat, Escapes a sense so fine as hers,
SThe silent current bears us down And even shadows make her fret
A mile or more beyond the town. About her pretty, spotted pet.









THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

Tired of too much toiling, Our pleasant journey's end we reach,
On the hard hearth-stone. And ground the boat upon the beach,
Where, close beside the elm and oak,
Eyes within whose gleaming We gaze at distant Holyoke.
Pain and sadness lurk,
Tell us you are dreaming Then father deftly casts his line
There beside your work. Where yonder ripples gleam and shine,
Seated in the ashes, And drops the hook he baited well,
, Seated in the ashes,
Si y For sunfish, perch, or pickerel.
Many things you mark,
When the firelight flashes And mother, sister Kate, and I,
Shoot across the dark. Quiet as clouds within the sky,
You could tell a story, In silence sit, and closely watch
Though your lips are dumb, For fish that father hopes to catch.
Of the days of glory The fish are caught, a pretty bunch,
That are yet to come. And on the grass we spread our lunch;
Now you see the fairy, Then up the stream we slowly glide,
With the robe so bright, For we must row against the tide.
Gossamer and airy,
Goss r and And so, through many a summer day,
You will wear at night. '
"You will wear at night. We while the pleasant hours away,
Now your brain, romancing, Beneath the shade of elm and oak,
Tells you of your pride, In sight of great Mount Holyoke.
When the prince is dancing,
Happy at your side.
Now the lords and ladies )oe ,ijrl Vlaw .
Wonder who is she,
Who so well arrayed is,
Fair as fair can be. BY EDWARD WILLETT.
Now the heralds bear a
Banner as they pass, T
Seeking who can wear a, HE sunlight streams across the swamp,
A slipper made of glass. Through its recesses dark and damp,
Ss And from their lair come forth at dawn
Now within the slipper, The gentle doe and timid fawn.
Delicate and neat,
Women pert and chipper Through many a tangled, dim morass,
Try to push their feet. They go, knee deep in dripping grass,
And where, well hid by bush or brake,
Now the prince has found y, Securely sleeps the lazy snake.
Claimed your little hand,
Married you, and crowned you Where giant trees give cooling shade,
Queen of all the land. In quiet pools they drink and wade;
Cinderella, sitting While yonder in the gathered gloom
Lonely and in pain, The lonely bittern sounds his boom.
Thoughts like these are flitting,
Thoughts like these are flitting When noons are hot, they both recline
Through your dreaming brain. Beneath the cypress, oak, or vine,
--- -- While winds that through the forest sigh
Sing mother Nature's lullaby.
O\ tl\e do qedtidut.
When from their shelter forth they go-
The timid fawn and gentle doe-
BY EDWARD WILLETT. The mother's watchful eye and ear
Protect from harm her baby deer.

S on the quiet stream we float, No sound of anything that stirs
And scarcely row our pretty boat, Escapes a sense so fine as hers,
SThe silent current bears us down And even shadows make her fret
A mile or more beyond the town. About her pretty, spotted pet.








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THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

i U Oi'oup of Beuitieo. unirqnei ]Voofriirg.

)HOU hast beauty bright and fair, ) iV 0W beauteous, how lovely
"Manner noble, aspect free, .- F Is everything here!
"Eyes that are untouched by care The sun on the hill-side
What then do we ask from thee ? The shade on the weir !
Where, through the bright crystal
Thou hast reason quick and strong, The fishes are seer;
Wit that envious men admire, Where wave o'er the water
And a voice itself a song The alder trees green.
What then can we still desire How glow the bright meadows
How glow the bright meadows
With young verdure new;
Something thou dost want, O queen !
How fresh bloom the flow'rets,
(As the gold doth ask alloy),
Bespangled with dew !
Tears amid thy laughter seen,
The berry already
Pity mingled with thy joy. bl red
Is blushing in red ;
The wheat-field is smiling
With promise of bread.

.Col ley T In the whispering grove;
The blackberry twineth
HAT a charming picture! Who is that lovely The rockstone above
The rockstone above ;
blonde? Such a question was frequently asked
The honey-bee hums
by admirers of the original picture at the Vienna h heyee s
.r h ,. -As he swiftly speeds on ;
Art Exhibition. But such a question is more easily pro-
The frog's croak is drowned
pounded than answered, for the artist has not condescended
In the lark's loudest tone.
to be definite in the title he has given his picture as if to ex-
cite curiosity. That her nationality is German does not ad- How beauteous, how lovely
mit of much doubt, yet he would be a bold man who should Do all things appear;
decide that Kaiser Wilhelm or Kaiser Franz-Josef claimed The waterfall's murmur,
her allegiance. She has some of the characteristics both of The shade on the weir-
the Austrian and the Suabian, and yet so many traits of both On all sides around us,
are wanting as make one declare that she is neither. It may Pure joys are unfurled,
be a sketch of a type of beauty existing only in the artist's To light, with their radiance,
imagination ; or, it may be a design for a costume for a fancy Our path through the world.
ball. Indeed, when we consider attentively the golden head-
dress, the short sleeves (covering only the upper part of the
'Tis sweet to meet the morning breeze,
arm), and note the velvet bodice, the dainty lace, and mas-
Or list the giggling of the brook;
sive chain, we come to the conclusion that they are neither
Or, stretched beneath the shade of trees,
historic nor modern, that they belong neither to the country
Peruse and pause on Nature's book.
nor the town, but that they have been chosen by the artist as
fitting accessories to heighten the charm of the lovely face When nature every sweet prepares
he has painted. Our engraving is from a picture by Anton To entertain our wish'd delay-
Ebert, of Vienna, whose studies of female heads were so The images which morning wears,
much remarked at the Art Exhibition in that city. The wakening charms of early day !








THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

i U Oi'oup of Beuitieo. unirqnei ]Voofriirg.

)HOU hast beauty bright and fair, ) iV 0W beauteous, how lovely
"Manner noble, aspect free, .- F Is everything here!
"Eyes that are untouched by care The sun on the hill-side
What then do we ask from thee ? The shade on the weir !
Where, through the bright crystal
Thou hast reason quick and strong, The fishes are seer;
Wit that envious men admire, Where wave o'er the water
And a voice itself a song The alder trees green.
What then can we still desire How glow the bright meadows
How glow the bright meadows
With young verdure new;
Something thou dost want, O queen !
How fresh bloom the flow'rets,
(As the gold doth ask alloy),
Bespangled with dew !
Tears amid thy laughter seen,
The berry already
Pity mingled with thy joy. bl red
Is blushing in red ;
The wheat-field is smiling
With promise of bread.

.Col ley T In the whispering grove;
The blackberry twineth
HAT a charming picture! Who is that lovely The rockstone above
The rockstone above ;
blonde? Such a question was frequently asked
The honey-bee hums
by admirers of the original picture at the Vienna h heyee s
.r h ,. -As he swiftly speeds on ;
Art Exhibition. But such a question is more easily pro-
The frog's croak is drowned
pounded than answered, for the artist has not condescended
In the lark's loudest tone.
to be definite in the title he has given his picture as if to ex-
cite curiosity. That her nationality is German does not ad- How beauteous, how lovely
mit of much doubt, yet he would be a bold man who should Do all things appear;
decide that Kaiser Wilhelm or Kaiser Franz-Josef claimed The waterfall's murmur,
her allegiance. She has some of the characteristics both of The shade on the weir-
the Austrian and the Suabian, and yet so many traits of both On all sides around us,
are wanting as make one declare that she is neither. It may Pure joys are unfurled,
be a sketch of a type of beauty existing only in the artist's To light, with their radiance,
imagination ; or, it may be a design for a costume for a fancy Our path through the world.
ball. Indeed, when we consider attentively the golden head-
dress, the short sleeves (covering only the upper part of the
'Tis sweet to meet the morning breeze,
arm), and note the velvet bodice, the dainty lace, and mas-
Or list the giggling of the brook;
sive chain, we come to the conclusion that they are neither
Or, stretched beneath the shade of trees,
historic nor modern, that they belong neither to the country
Peruse and pause on Nature's book.
nor the town, but that they have been chosen by the artist as
fitting accessories to heighten the charm of the lovely face When nature every sweet prepares
he has painted. Our engraving is from a picture by Anton To entertain our wish'd delay-
Ebert, of Vienna, whose studies of female heads were so The images which morning wears,
much remarked at the Art Exhibition in that city. The wakening charms of early day !








THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

i U Oi'oup of Beuitieo. unirqnei ]Voofriirg.

)HOU hast beauty bright and fair, ) iV 0W beauteous, how lovely
"Manner noble, aspect free, .- F Is everything here!
"Eyes that are untouched by care The sun on the hill-side
What then do we ask from thee ? The shade on the weir !
Where, through the bright crystal
Thou hast reason quick and strong, The fishes are seer;
Wit that envious men admire, Where wave o'er the water
And a voice itself a song The alder trees green.
What then can we still desire How glow the bright meadows
How glow the bright meadows
With young verdure new;
Something thou dost want, O queen !
How fresh bloom the flow'rets,
(As the gold doth ask alloy),
Bespangled with dew !
Tears amid thy laughter seen,
The berry already
Pity mingled with thy joy. bl red
Is blushing in red ;
The wheat-field is smiling
With promise of bread.

.Col ley T In the whispering grove;
The blackberry twineth
HAT a charming picture! Who is that lovely The rockstone above
The rockstone above ;
blonde? Such a question was frequently asked
The honey-bee hums
by admirers of the original picture at the Vienna h heyee s
.r h ,. -As he swiftly speeds on ;
Art Exhibition. But such a question is more easily pro-
The frog's croak is drowned
pounded than answered, for the artist has not condescended
In the lark's loudest tone.
to be definite in the title he has given his picture as if to ex-
cite curiosity. That her nationality is German does not ad- How beauteous, how lovely
mit of much doubt, yet he would be a bold man who should Do all things appear;
decide that Kaiser Wilhelm or Kaiser Franz-Josef claimed The waterfall's murmur,
her allegiance. She has some of the characteristics both of The shade on the weir-
the Austrian and the Suabian, and yet so many traits of both On all sides around us,
are wanting as make one declare that she is neither. It may Pure joys are unfurled,
be a sketch of a type of beauty existing only in the artist's To light, with their radiance,
imagination ; or, it may be a design for a costume for a fancy Our path through the world.
ball. Indeed, when we consider attentively the golden head-
dress, the short sleeves (covering only the upper part of the
'Tis sweet to meet the morning breeze,
arm), and note the velvet bodice, the dainty lace, and mas-
Or list the giggling of the brook;
sive chain, we come to the conclusion that they are neither
Or, stretched beneath the shade of trees,
historic nor modern, that they belong neither to the country
Peruse and pause on Nature's book.
nor the town, but that they have been chosen by the artist as
fitting accessories to heighten the charm of the lovely face When nature every sweet prepares
he has painted. Our engraving is from a picture by Anton To entertain our wish'd delay-
Ebert, of Vienna, whose studies of female heads were so The images which morning wears,
much remarked at the Art Exhibition in that city. The wakening charms of early day !









THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

Now let me tread the meadow paths, rush at the fodder he has brought without waiting to bellow
Where glittering dew the ground illumes ; their thanks. Snap, who has helped to find the way, looks
As sprinkled o'er the withering swaths on in surprise at their taste. He thinks: Well, that stuff
Their moisture shrinks in sweet perfumes. would have made me a bed; how stupid to waste it like that!

And hear the beetle sound his horn, Thomson, in the Seasons," thus describes such a scene:
And hear the skylark whistling nigh, Now, shepherds, to your helpless charge be kind,
From his bed of tufted corn, Baffle the raging year, and fill their pens
With food at will; lodge them below the storm,
A hailing minstrel in the sky.
A hailing minstrel in te sky. And watch them strict: for from the bellowing east,

First sunbeam, calling night away In this dire season, oft the whirlwind's wing
To see how sweet thy summons seems ; Sweeps up the burden of whole wintry plains
In one wide waft, and o'er the hapless flocks,
Split by the willow's wavy gray,
Sb t w 's id in the hollow of two neighboring hills,
And sweetly dancing on the streams. The billowing tempest whelms; till, upward urged,

Roaming while the dewy fields The valley to a shining mountain swells,
'Neath their morning burthen lean, Tipped with a wreath high-curling in the sky.

While its crop my searches shields,
Sweet I scent the blossom'd bean. tl .

Making oft remarking stops ;
MakiUTUMN is perhaps the most pleasant time of the
Watching tiny nameless things '
Watching tiny nmele th s whole year, when the earth yields her fruits to man,
Climb the grass's spiry tops
and the herbage on hill-side and field, and the foli-
Ere they try their gauzy wings.
age on the trees is turning to gold; then we can appreciate
and acknowledge how beautiful the earth is. The ladies in
\W ofkiptg 1 etf if't ntip.le'. the picture are enjoying the pleasure of this season in what
is evidently a grand old-fashioned garden-half orchard,
HIS pretty picture is from a painting by a French art- half wood, but wholly beautiful; the ripe apples are being
ist, M. Albert Anker. The little girl who is so in- gathered from the trees in a quiet, unbusiness-like way,
dustriously working at her wool mat evidently intends which shows they are grown more for pleasure than profit.
it as an Easter gift to some loved one, and therefore we need Who would not enjoy being in the garden in autumn-and
not be surprised at the earnestness with which she plies her such a garden, and with such company What says the
needle, and the intentness of her gaze upon her work. The poet ?
pattern is evidently not a very intricate one, but her young Iere is autumn again nere is autumn again!
With her crown of grapes, and her rustling train.
fingers are as yet inexperienced in this kind of work, and
She is lifting her tawny finger up
therefore her elder sister instructs her how to proceed. Let e linen leaf an arn up
Over linden leaf and acorn cup;
us hope that the pleasure which the gift will confer upon the Over the fern and over the bine;
receiver will amply repay the trouble and tediousness which Over claiming jasmine and sprawling vine;
attend all first efforts. Over the crimson clover top,
The russet apple and saffron hop;
-. -.** -----
Over the heather's purple tinge;
$uppei 4t Igi4t. Over the brooklet's mallowy fringe;
r. She touches the butterfly's downy wing,
-'-" *1And the wild thyme's bloom in the fairy ring."
S l is a bitter cold winter's night, and the wind seems the wild thyme's blood i te "iry ring."
She walks like a white ghost over the hill,
S to be blowing all ways at once. Ralph has had hard rap u in her ogroe hill
"Wrap up in her fog-robe-dank and chill;
"work to climb the hills with his bundle of food for Dimming hedgerow green, and river-wave light,

the cows. They thought he was never coming, and now they With the frost at morn and the mist at night.









THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

Now let me tread the meadow paths, rush at the fodder he has brought without waiting to bellow
Where glittering dew the ground illumes ; their thanks. Snap, who has helped to find the way, looks
As sprinkled o'er the withering swaths on in surprise at their taste. He thinks: Well, that stuff
Their moisture shrinks in sweet perfumes. would have made me a bed; how stupid to waste it like that!

And hear the beetle sound his horn, Thomson, in the Seasons," thus describes such a scene:
And hear the skylark whistling nigh, Now, shepherds, to your helpless charge be kind,
From his bed of tufted corn, Baffle the raging year, and fill their pens
With food at will; lodge them below the storm,
A hailing minstrel in the sky.
A hailing minstrel in te sky. And watch them strict: for from the bellowing east,

First sunbeam, calling night away In this dire season, oft the whirlwind's wing
To see how sweet thy summons seems ; Sweeps up the burden of whole wintry plains
In one wide waft, and o'er the hapless flocks,
Split by the willow's wavy gray,
Sb t w 's id in the hollow of two neighboring hills,
And sweetly dancing on the streams. The billowing tempest whelms; till, upward urged,

Roaming while the dewy fields The valley to a shining mountain swells,
'Neath their morning burthen lean, Tipped with a wreath high-curling in the sky.

While its crop my searches shields,
Sweet I scent the blossom'd bean. tl .

Making oft remarking stops ;
MakiUTUMN is perhaps the most pleasant time of the
Watching tiny nameless things '
Watching tiny nmele th s whole year, when the earth yields her fruits to man,
Climb the grass's spiry tops
and the herbage on hill-side and field, and the foli-
Ere they try their gauzy wings.
age on the trees is turning to gold; then we can appreciate
and acknowledge how beautiful the earth is. The ladies in
\W ofkiptg 1 etf if't ntip.le'. the picture are enjoying the pleasure of this season in what
is evidently a grand old-fashioned garden-half orchard,
HIS pretty picture is from a painting by a French art- half wood, but wholly beautiful; the ripe apples are being
ist, M. Albert Anker. The little girl who is so in- gathered from the trees in a quiet, unbusiness-like way,
dustriously working at her wool mat evidently intends which shows they are grown more for pleasure than profit.
it as an Easter gift to some loved one, and therefore we need Who would not enjoy being in the garden in autumn-and
not be surprised at the earnestness with which she plies her such a garden, and with such company What says the
needle, and the intentness of her gaze upon her work. The poet ?
pattern is evidently not a very intricate one, but her young Iere is autumn again nere is autumn again!
With her crown of grapes, and her rustling train.
fingers are as yet inexperienced in this kind of work, and
She is lifting her tawny finger up
therefore her elder sister instructs her how to proceed. Let e linen leaf an arn up
Over linden leaf and acorn cup;
us hope that the pleasure which the gift will confer upon the Over the fern and over the bine;
receiver will amply repay the trouble and tediousness which Over claiming jasmine and sprawling vine;
attend all first efforts. Over the crimson clover top,
The russet apple and saffron hop;
-. -.** -----
Over the heather's purple tinge;
$uppei 4t Igi4t. Over the brooklet's mallowy fringe;
r. She touches the butterfly's downy wing,
-'-" *1And the wild thyme's bloom in the fairy ring."
S l is a bitter cold winter's night, and the wind seems the wild thyme's blood i te "iry ring."
She walks like a white ghost over the hill,
S to be blowing all ways at once. Ralph has had hard rap u in her ogroe hill
"Wrap up in her fog-robe-dank and chill;
"work to climb the hills with his bundle of food for Dimming hedgerow green, and river-wave light,

the cows. They thought he was never coming, and now they With the frost at morn and the mist at night.









THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

Now let me tread the meadow paths, rush at the fodder he has brought without waiting to bellow
Where glittering dew the ground illumes ; their thanks. Snap, who has helped to find the way, looks
As sprinkled o'er the withering swaths on in surprise at their taste. He thinks: Well, that stuff
Their moisture shrinks in sweet perfumes. would have made me a bed; how stupid to waste it like that!

And hear the beetle sound his horn, Thomson, in the Seasons," thus describes such a scene:
And hear the skylark whistling nigh, Now, shepherds, to your helpless charge be kind,
From his bed of tufted corn, Baffle the raging year, and fill their pens
With food at will; lodge them below the storm,
A hailing minstrel in the sky.
A hailing minstrel in te sky. And watch them strict: for from the bellowing east,

First sunbeam, calling night away In this dire season, oft the whirlwind's wing
To see how sweet thy summons seems ; Sweeps up the burden of whole wintry plains
In one wide waft, and o'er the hapless flocks,
Split by the willow's wavy gray,
Sb t w 's id in the hollow of two neighboring hills,
And sweetly dancing on the streams. The billowing tempest whelms; till, upward urged,

Roaming while the dewy fields The valley to a shining mountain swells,
'Neath their morning burthen lean, Tipped with a wreath high-curling in the sky.

While its crop my searches shields,
Sweet I scent the blossom'd bean. tl .

Making oft remarking stops ;
MakiUTUMN is perhaps the most pleasant time of the
Watching tiny nameless things '
Watching tiny nmele th s whole year, when the earth yields her fruits to man,
Climb the grass's spiry tops
and the herbage on hill-side and field, and the foli-
Ere they try their gauzy wings.
age on the trees is turning to gold; then we can appreciate
and acknowledge how beautiful the earth is. The ladies in
\W ofkiptg 1 etf if't ntip.le'. the picture are enjoying the pleasure of this season in what
is evidently a grand old-fashioned garden-half orchard,
HIS pretty picture is from a painting by a French art- half wood, but wholly beautiful; the ripe apples are being
ist, M. Albert Anker. The little girl who is so in- gathered from the trees in a quiet, unbusiness-like way,
dustriously working at her wool mat evidently intends which shows they are grown more for pleasure than profit.
it as an Easter gift to some loved one, and therefore we need Who would not enjoy being in the garden in autumn-and
not be surprised at the earnestness with which she plies her such a garden, and with such company What says the
needle, and the intentness of her gaze upon her work. The poet ?
pattern is evidently not a very intricate one, but her young Iere is autumn again nere is autumn again!
With her crown of grapes, and her rustling train.
fingers are as yet inexperienced in this kind of work, and
She is lifting her tawny finger up
therefore her elder sister instructs her how to proceed. Let e linen leaf an arn up
Over linden leaf and acorn cup;
us hope that the pleasure which the gift will confer upon the Over the fern and over the bine;
receiver will amply repay the trouble and tediousness which Over claiming jasmine and sprawling vine;
attend all first efforts. Over the crimson clover top,
The russet apple and saffron hop;
-. -.** -----
Over the heather's purple tinge;
$uppei 4t Igi4t. Over the brooklet's mallowy fringe;
r. She touches the butterfly's downy wing,
-'-" *1And the wild thyme's bloom in the fairy ring."
S l is a bitter cold winter's night, and the wind seems the wild thyme's blood i te "iry ring."
She walks like a white ghost over the hill,
S to be blowing all ways at once. Ralph has had hard rap u in her ogroe hill
"Wrap up in her fog-robe-dank and chill;
"work to climb the hills with his bundle of food for Dimming hedgerow green, and river-wave light,

the cows. They thought he was never coming, and now they With the frost at morn and the mist at night.









;b .... -*j~ -. :,
-i l --_ .' -
Al ,Tyr.- .. ,= _


kid


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T'o-



""ip
:is. : '[
or:-





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R-- S Al'' ., ,.



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~~~~~ ~- V -V 'F.--, .
THE TAPIRA
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,---~~ '--- --h -=- ,,: --_Z--
s--;,-;--~'r--;-; ---; ~ --~-~-- "-: ."_-'" '= = --'------]-
H 'A I "N "S -=-.-:-- -












































SHOOTING WATER-FOWL IN AFRICA.
























































^ THE SICK LAMBKIN.
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11


















if"HE r;, t




THE LITTLE NURSE.Je




















































































THE PEACOOK'S COMPLAINT TO JUNO.


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Nil -:!.-z, -
















7'----_;, =-----~I_ -==-







THE PASS OF SP UGEN








THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

The >TIpilf hld fii foe. water. The appetite of hunger, as well as that of thirst,
may soon be satisfied by the expert "Africander" when he
arrives on the bank of a river, a lake, or even a swamp afford-
BY MISS EMMA HERZOG. ing both sustenance and cover to flocks of these winged crea-
tures. If he has brought with him a portable boat of india-
.' .'] rubber cloth, such as that of Berthon's folding-up contrivance,
Et1ROUGHOUT South America, from the La Plata which weighs only 50 lbs., or if he can borrow a canoe from
"k [" River to the Isthmus of Panama, there appears in his native friends, the whole reed-overgrown expanse of a
W, the neighborhood of the lakes and rivers the harm- big piece of water, filled with an inconceivable quantity of
less and shy tapir. He is the wild boar of the western world, bird-life, is placed at his entire disposal. This seems to have
but differs from that animal in his manner of living, for he been the fortunate position of our worthy countryman, repre-
indulges in nothing but vegetable nourishment, while the sented in the illustration of Shooting Water-fowl on Lake
wild boar or hog enjoys various kinds of animal food, not Mirambala," who has got a canoe, with a negro to paddle him
even despising donkey meat. about, and is so conveniently enabled to lie in ambush be-
Tapirs are night animals entirely ; they are never seen hind the tall fringe of reeds and rushes, amid the beautiful
"during daylight, save at morning and at evening, when they Victoria Regia flowers and other aquatic plants, till the
seek the streams to bathe and drink. They house in damp, water-fowl rise within sure shooting range of his double-bar-
thick woods, always remember their homes, returning to them reled gun. He will have gathered enough of this booty in a
by the same paths. This makes tapir hunting easy, an em- couple of hours to feed himself and all his servants for a
ployment followed by the white inhabitants industriously, as week. As the heat of the day comes on he will lie down
the meat, hide, and fat of the tapir are equally valuable, in the canoe, beneath a shady roof of thick plaited grass, and
Next to man, the tapir's bitterest enemy is the cruel, enjoy his noonday sleep.
threatening jaguar, sometimes called the American tiger.
Woe to the poor tapir if the hungry jaguar pounces upon -- --
him from the limb of some tree. This time he is safe, for he
is near a river ; the she-tapir is already in the water, and her (i .
mate with a shrill cry is plunging into the stream, where both Ae idk irbk .
of them can swim as well as a duck. This is where they have
the advantage of their hated foe, who is helpless enough any-S went to the field and found
GNES went to the field and found
where not on land.
o This poor sick lamb upon the ground;
SAnd fearing lest it should come to harm,
She took it gently in her arm.

Slootilg W Ltei'-fowl i1q fi'il The poor little thing was weak and ill,
So in her hands it lay quite still;
SeBut the mother followed her down the lane,
"HE European traveler or settler in most parts of Africa, For she wanted her baby back again.
if he be addicted to the use of the rifle and the fowl-
ing-piece, will find a great variety of sport with large Then Agnes told her not to fret,
and small game, four-footed or winged, and no legal or arti- For she would not hurt her little pet,
ficial hindrances to its pursuit. We hear most of the more am- Which by the fire she meant to keep,
bitious chase of such huge beasts as the elephant, rhinoceros, Until once more it could walk and leap.
and hippopotamus, the not less formidable buffalo, or the
diverse species of antelopes which abound in the vast uncul- Our Agnes is so very good
tivated eastern regions of that continent, so prolific of animal To poor dumb creatures, no one could
life. The lion, and the panther or leopard, sometimes erro- Be kinder; so the lamb will fare
neously called the tiger, have become comparatively scarce Right well within her tender care.
within the last thirty years on the accustomed beats of civil-
ized visitors in quest of exciting adventures, or of the hunts-
man's marketable spoils. But the traveler who "hunts for -
the pot," having to find his dinner as he journeys on into the
pathless wilderness of the remote interior, where little better
food than mealies" or some other native grain is to be pro- The ILittle Nuf'Ie.
cured from the villages on his way, does not omit to look out
for some feathered game worth killing for the sake of eating.
Bustards, partridges, sand-grouse, plovers, snipes, moorhens, O. RA Maitland was a very good little girl, and wanted
wild ducks, besides cranes, flamingoes, and other kinds all the time to show how kind and thoughtful she
which inhabit the lands in a tropical or semi-tropical could be. But her mother never seemed to think
climate, are plentifully met with in the neighborhood of she had those qualities, and sometimes would scold her for








THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

The >TIpilf hld fii foe. water. The appetite of hunger, as well as that of thirst,
may soon be satisfied by the expert "Africander" when he
arrives on the bank of a river, a lake, or even a swamp afford-
BY MISS EMMA HERZOG. ing both sustenance and cover to flocks of these winged crea-
tures. If he has brought with him a portable boat of india-
.' .'] rubber cloth, such as that of Berthon's folding-up contrivance,
Et1ROUGHOUT South America, from the La Plata which weighs only 50 lbs., or if he can borrow a canoe from
"k [" River to the Isthmus of Panama, there appears in his native friends, the whole reed-overgrown expanse of a
W, the neighborhood of the lakes and rivers the harm- big piece of water, filled with an inconceivable quantity of
less and shy tapir. He is the wild boar of the western world, bird-life, is placed at his entire disposal. This seems to have
but differs from that animal in his manner of living, for he been the fortunate position of our worthy countryman, repre-
indulges in nothing but vegetable nourishment, while the sented in the illustration of Shooting Water-fowl on Lake
wild boar or hog enjoys various kinds of animal food, not Mirambala," who has got a canoe, with a negro to paddle him
even despising donkey meat. about, and is so conveniently enabled to lie in ambush be-
Tapirs are night animals entirely ; they are never seen hind the tall fringe of reeds and rushes, amid the beautiful
"during daylight, save at morning and at evening, when they Victoria Regia flowers and other aquatic plants, till the
seek the streams to bathe and drink. They house in damp, water-fowl rise within sure shooting range of his double-bar-
thick woods, always remember their homes, returning to them reled gun. He will have gathered enough of this booty in a
by the same paths. This makes tapir hunting easy, an em- couple of hours to feed himself and all his servants for a
ployment followed by the white inhabitants industriously, as week. As the heat of the day comes on he will lie down
the meat, hide, and fat of the tapir are equally valuable, in the canoe, beneath a shady roof of thick plaited grass, and
Next to man, the tapir's bitterest enemy is the cruel, enjoy his noonday sleep.
threatening jaguar, sometimes called the American tiger.
Woe to the poor tapir if the hungry jaguar pounces upon -- --
him from the limb of some tree. This time he is safe, for he
is near a river ; the she-tapir is already in the water, and her (i .
mate with a shrill cry is plunging into the stream, where both Ae idk irbk .
of them can swim as well as a duck. This is where they have
the advantage of their hated foe, who is helpless enough any-S went to the field and found
GNES went to the field and found
where not on land.
o This poor sick lamb upon the ground;
SAnd fearing lest it should come to harm,
She took it gently in her arm.

Slootilg W Ltei'-fowl i1q fi'il The poor little thing was weak and ill,
So in her hands it lay quite still;
SeBut the mother followed her down the lane,
"HE European traveler or settler in most parts of Africa, For she wanted her baby back again.
if he be addicted to the use of the rifle and the fowl-
ing-piece, will find a great variety of sport with large Then Agnes told her not to fret,
and small game, four-footed or winged, and no legal or arti- For she would not hurt her little pet,
ficial hindrances to its pursuit. We hear most of the more am- Which by the fire she meant to keep,
bitious chase of such huge beasts as the elephant, rhinoceros, Until once more it could walk and leap.
and hippopotamus, the not less formidable buffalo, or the
diverse species of antelopes which abound in the vast uncul- Our Agnes is so very good
tivated eastern regions of that continent, so prolific of animal To poor dumb creatures, no one could
life. The lion, and the panther or leopard, sometimes erro- Be kinder; so the lamb will fare
neously called the tiger, have become comparatively scarce Right well within her tender care.
within the last thirty years on the accustomed beats of civil-
ized visitors in quest of exciting adventures, or of the hunts-
man's marketable spoils. But the traveler who "hunts for -
the pot," having to find his dinner as he journeys on into the
pathless wilderness of the remote interior, where little better
food than mealies" or some other native grain is to be pro- The ILittle Nuf'Ie.
cured from the villages on his way, does not omit to look out
for some feathered game worth killing for the sake of eating.
Bustards, partridges, sand-grouse, plovers, snipes, moorhens, O. RA Maitland was a very good little girl, and wanted
wild ducks, besides cranes, flamingoes, and other kinds all the time to show how kind and thoughtful she
which inhabit the lands in a tropical or semi-tropical could be. But her mother never seemed to think
climate, are plentifully met with in the neighborhood of she had those qualities, and sometimes would scold her for








THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

The >TIpilf hld fii foe. water. The appetite of hunger, as well as that of thirst,
may soon be satisfied by the expert "Africander" when he
arrives on the bank of a river, a lake, or even a swamp afford-
BY MISS EMMA HERZOG. ing both sustenance and cover to flocks of these winged crea-
tures. If he has brought with him a portable boat of india-
.' .'] rubber cloth, such as that of Berthon's folding-up contrivance,
Et1ROUGHOUT South America, from the La Plata which weighs only 50 lbs., or if he can borrow a canoe from
"k [" River to the Isthmus of Panama, there appears in his native friends, the whole reed-overgrown expanse of a
W, the neighborhood of the lakes and rivers the harm- big piece of water, filled with an inconceivable quantity of
less and shy tapir. He is the wild boar of the western world, bird-life, is placed at his entire disposal. This seems to have
but differs from that animal in his manner of living, for he been the fortunate position of our worthy countryman, repre-
indulges in nothing but vegetable nourishment, while the sented in the illustration of Shooting Water-fowl on Lake
wild boar or hog enjoys various kinds of animal food, not Mirambala," who has got a canoe, with a negro to paddle him
even despising donkey meat. about, and is so conveniently enabled to lie in ambush be-
Tapirs are night animals entirely ; they are never seen hind the tall fringe of reeds and rushes, amid the beautiful
"during daylight, save at morning and at evening, when they Victoria Regia flowers and other aquatic plants, till the
seek the streams to bathe and drink. They house in damp, water-fowl rise within sure shooting range of his double-bar-
thick woods, always remember their homes, returning to them reled gun. He will have gathered enough of this booty in a
by the same paths. This makes tapir hunting easy, an em- couple of hours to feed himself and all his servants for a
ployment followed by the white inhabitants industriously, as week. As the heat of the day comes on he will lie down
the meat, hide, and fat of the tapir are equally valuable, in the canoe, beneath a shady roof of thick plaited grass, and
Next to man, the tapir's bitterest enemy is the cruel, enjoy his noonday sleep.
threatening jaguar, sometimes called the American tiger.
Woe to the poor tapir if the hungry jaguar pounces upon -- --
him from the limb of some tree. This time he is safe, for he
is near a river ; the she-tapir is already in the water, and her (i .
mate with a shrill cry is plunging into the stream, where both Ae idk irbk .
of them can swim as well as a duck. This is where they have
the advantage of their hated foe, who is helpless enough any-S went to the field and found
GNES went to the field and found
where not on land.
o This poor sick lamb upon the ground;
SAnd fearing lest it should come to harm,
She took it gently in her arm.

Slootilg W Ltei'-fowl i1q fi'il The poor little thing was weak and ill,
So in her hands it lay quite still;
SeBut the mother followed her down the lane,
"HE European traveler or settler in most parts of Africa, For she wanted her baby back again.
if he be addicted to the use of the rifle and the fowl-
ing-piece, will find a great variety of sport with large Then Agnes told her not to fret,
and small game, four-footed or winged, and no legal or arti- For she would not hurt her little pet,
ficial hindrances to its pursuit. We hear most of the more am- Which by the fire she meant to keep,
bitious chase of such huge beasts as the elephant, rhinoceros, Until once more it could walk and leap.
and hippopotamus, the not less formidable buffalo, or the
diverse species of antelopes which abound in the vast uncul- Our Agnes is so very good
tivated eastern regions of that continent, so prolific of animal To poor dumb creatures, no one could
life. The lion, and the panther or leopard, sometimes erro- Be kinder; so the lamb will fare
neously called the tiger, have become comparatively scarce Right well within her tender care.
within the last thirty years on the accustomed beats of civil-
ized visitors in quest of exciting adventures, or of the hunts-
man's marketable spoils. But the traveler who "hunts for -
the pot," having to find his dinner as he journeys on into the
pathless wilderness of the remote interior, where little better
food than mealies" or some other native grain is to be pro- The ILittle Nuf'Ie.
cured from the villages on his way, does not omit to look out
for some feathered game worth killing for the sake of eating.
Bustards, partridges, sand-grouse, plovers, snipes, moorhens, O. RA Maitland was a very good little girl, and wanted
wild ducks, besides cranes, flamingoes, and other kinds all the time to show how kind and thoughtful she
which inhabit the lands in a tropical or semi-tropical could be. But her mother never seemed to think
climate, are plentifully met with in the neighborhood of she had those qualities, and sometimes would scold her for








THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

The >TIpilf hld fii foe. water. The appetite of hunger, as well as that of thirst,
may soon be satisfied by the expert "Africander" when he
arrives on the bank of a river, a lake, or even a swamp afford-
BY MISS EMMA HERZOG. ing both sustenance and cover to flocks of these winged crea-
tures. If he has brought with him a portable boat of india-
.' .'] rubber cloth, such as that of Berthon's folding-up contrivance,
Et1ROUGHOUT South America, from the La Plata which weighs only 50 lbs., or if he can borrow a canoe from
"k [" River to the Isthmus of Panama, there appears in his native friends, the whole reed-overgrown expanse of a
W, the neighborhood of the lakes and rivers the harm- big piece of water, filled with an inconceivable quantity of
less and shy tapir. He is the wild boar of the western world, bird-life, is placed at his entire disposal. This seems to have
but differs from that animal in his manner of living, for he been the fortunate position of our worthy countryman, repre-
indulges in nothing but vegetable nourishment, while the sented in the illustration of Shooting Water-fowl on Lake
wild boar or hog enjoys various kinds of animal food, not Mirambala," who has got a canoe, with a negro to paddle him
even despising donkey meat. about, and is so conveniently enabled to lie in ambush be-
Tapirs are night animals entirely ; they are never seen hind the tall fringe of reeds and rushes, amid the beautiful
"during daylight, save at morning and at evening, when they Victoria Regia flowers and other aquatic plants, till the
seek the streams to bathe and drink. They house in damp, water-fowl rise within sure shooting range of his double-bar-
thick woods, always remember their homes, returning to them reled gun. He will have gathered enough of this booty in a
by the same paths. This makes tapir hunting easy, an em- couple of hours to feed himself and all his servants for a
ployment followed by the white inhabitants industriously, as week. As the heat of the day comes on he will lie down
the meat, hide, and fat of the tapir are equally valuable, in the canoe, beneath a shady roof of thick plaited grass, and
Next to man, the tapir's bitterest enemy is the cruel, enjoy his noonday sleep.
threatening jaguar, sometimes called the American tiger.
Woe to the poor tapir if the hungry jaguar pounces upon -- --
him from the limb of some tree. This time he is safe, for he
is near a river ; the she-tapir is already in the water, and her (i .
mate with a shrill cry is plunging into the stream, where both Ae idk irbk .
of them can swim as well as a duck. This is where they have
the advantage of their hated foe, who is helpless enough any-S went to the field and found
GNES went to the field and found
where not on land.
o This poor sick lamb upon the ground;
SAnd fearing lest it should come to harm,
She took it gently in her arm.

Slootilg W Ltei'-fowl i1q fi'il The poor little thing was weak and ill,
So in her hands it lay quite still;
SeBut the mother followed her down the lane,
"HE European traveler or settler in most parts of Africa, For she wanted her baby back again.
if he be addicted to the use of the rifle and the fowl-
ing-piece, will find a great variety of sport with large Then Agnes told her not to fret,
and small game, four-footed or winged, and no legal or arti- For she would not hurt her little pet,
ficial hindrances to its pursuit. We hear most of the more am- Which by the fire she meant to keep,
bitious chase of such huge beasts as the elephant, rhinoceros, Until once more it could walk and leap.
and hippopotamus, the not less formidable buffalo, or the
diverse species of antelopes which abound in the vast uncul- Our Agnes is so very good
tivated eastern regions of that continent, so prolific of animal To poor dumb creatures, no one could
life. The lion, and the panther or leopard, sometimes erro- Be kinder; so the lamb will fare
neously called the tiger, have become comparatively scarce Right well within her tender care.
within the last thirty years on the accustomed beats of civil-
ized visitors in quest of exciting adventures, or of the hunts-
man's marketable spoils. But the traveler who "hunts for -
the pot," having to find his dinner as he journeys on into the
pathless wilderness of the remote interior, where little better
food than mealies" or some other native grain is to be pro- The ILittle Nuf'Ie.
cured from the villages on his way, does not omit to look out
for some feathered game worth killing for the sake of eating.
Bustards, partridges, sand-grouse, plovers, snipes, moorhens, O. RA Maitland was a very good little girl, and wanted
wild ducks, besides cranes, flamingoes, and other kinds all the time to show how kind and thoughtful she
which inhabit the lands in a tropical or semi-tropical could be. But her mother never seemed to think
climate, are plentifully met with in the neighborhood of she had those qualities, and sometimes would scold her for








THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

being careless, thoughtless, and so on. Soon after this Mrs. While you, at great Jupiter's side,
Maitland was taken very ill. Every one was very anxious Were queen of the sea and the land.
about her, and Dora was not allowed to see her. The poor
little girl was in sore trouble, for she dearly loved her mother. Olympus he claimed as his home,
But Amy, the nursemaid, tried to comfort her, and told her And thence on the clouds he could ride,
that now was the time to prove her love and thoughtfulness, As fair as queen Juno herself,
by being as quiet and good as she could be, and by doing all An emblem of power and pride.
her mother would like. Dora did her best, and her father Where now is the heaven of old,
said afterward that she was a real help and cheer to him The gods and the goddesses, where ?
during those anxious days. At last there was good news. Long since they have passed from our view,
Mrs. Maitland had taken a turn for the better, and now she And melted away in the air.
wanted plenty of nourishing food and good nursing to make
her strong again. Dora was once more admitted to her A simple religion we have,
mother's room, and her behavior there showed how much The easy religion of love;
she had tried to do what was expected of her. She was al- Its symbol to men is a cross,
ways so ready to do all she could to help that Mrs. Maitland Its emblem on earth is a dove.
loved to have her in the room.
One afternoon as the invalid was lying in bed, gradually Great Juno, the queen of the gods,
returning to health, but still too weak to be moved, she heard Was long ago pushed fro her throne
the door softly opened, and saw a pretty sight. Little Dora And now, a mere statue, she sees
came slowly in, carrying a small tray with a cup and saucer Her peacock complaining alone.
on it, a small teapot, cream-jug, and sugar basin. The child
gave one glance and smile at her mother, and then kept her
eyes fixed on the tray that nothing might be spilled. Alice,
the housemaid, was close behind with a jug of hot water in
her hand; she had opened the door, and now closed it, and {The Ci,4c of f tpliigeq.
quickly lifted a little table to the side of the bed, on which
Dora placed the tray.
What a sweet little nurse you are said Mrs. Mait- BY EDWARD WILLETT.
land, looking lovingly at the curly head and busy face so
earnestly making all comfortable for her. --i
Dora gave her mother a happy smile. "Now, mamma, i E little river tumbles down
shall I pour out tea ? How much sugar, one lump or two ?" The hills and giant mountains,
And she handed the cup to her mother, while Alice wrapped rom where its farthest ource is found
a shawl round her mistress, and put a pillow for her back. In snow and icy mountains.
Then Dora perched herself on the bed. Shall I sing
to you a little, dear mamma, while you are drinking your It rattles gayly on its way,
tea ?" And the sweet, childish voice arose in song. As down the Pass it dashes,
There were tears in Mrs. Maitland's eyes as she put down And sends up airy clouds of spray,
the cup, and placed her arms round her child: You are Through which the sunlight flashes.
the kindest and most thoughtful nurse I ever had, Dora, my
darling. Give me a kiss, and then go down and have a good Up there it turns a clumsy wheel,
run on the lawn with Rollo, before it is time for the nursery To help the honest miller;
tea." Then, after filling tubs with meal,
It gets a little stiller.

It comes from where the hunter bold
The agile chamois chases,
Tl\e oeeLlodk' CoIpclitilt to Jurlo. To where the girls drive goats to fold,
S__Or weave such lovely laces.
BY EDWARDI) WILLETT.
BY __ The man who drew his childish breath
S' I Among those rocks and mountains,
1 H'l EAT Juno, once queen of the gods, Remembers till his day of death
S Now only a statue of stone, Their icy springs and fountains.
-_ Look down from your place, and behold
Your peacock complaining alone. Though it may be his lot to roam
In many lands, yet never
He once was your favorite bird, Will he forget his mountain home,
And stood at your royal right hand, The Pass, the rushing river.








THE ROYAL CHATTERBOX.

being careless, thoughtless, and so on. Soon after this Mrs. While you, at great Jupiter's side,
Maitland was taken very ill. Every one was very anxious Were queen of the sea and the land.
about her, and Dora was not allowed to see her. The poor
little girl was in sore trouble, for she dearly loved her mother. Olympus he claimed as his home,
But Amy, the nursemaid, tried to comfort her, and told her And thence on the clouds he could ride,
that now was the time to prove her love and thoughtfulness, As fair as queen Juno herself,
by being as quiet and good as she could be, and by doing all An emblem of power and pride.
her mother would like. Dora did her best, and her father Where now is the heaven of old,
said afterward that she was a real help and cheer to him The gods and the goddesses, where ?
during those anxious days. At last there was good news. Long since they have passed from our view,
Mrs. Maitland had taken a turn for the better, and now she And melted away in the air.
wanted plenty of nourishing food and good nursing to make
her strong again. Dora was once more admitted to her A simple religion we have,
mother's room, and her behavior there showed how much The easy religion of love;
she had tried to do what was expected of her. She was al- Its symbol to men is a cross,
ways so ready to do all she could to help that Mrs. Maitland Its emblem on earth is a dove.
loved to have her in the room.
One afternoon as the invalid was lying in bed, gradually Great Juno, the queen of the gods,
returning to health, but still too weak to be moved, she heard Was long ago pushed fro her throne
the door softly opened, and saw a pretty sight. Little Dora And now, a mere statue, she sees
came slowly in, carrying a small tray with a cup and saucer Her peacock complaining alone.
on it, a small teapot, cream-jug, and sugar basin. The child
gave one glance and smile at her mother, and then kept her
eyes fixed on the tray that nothing might be spilled. Alice,
the housemaid, was close behind with a jug of hot water in
her hand; she had opened the door, and now closed it, and {The Ci,4c of f tpliigeq.
quickly lifted a little table to the side of the bed, on which
Dora placed the tray.
What a sweet little nurse you are said Mrs. Mait- BY EDWARD WILLETT.
land, looking lovingly at the curly head and busy face so
earnestly making all comfortable for her. --i
Dora gave her mother a happy smile. "Now, mamma, i E little river tumbles down
shall I pour out tea ? How much sugar, one lump or two ?" The hills and giant mountains,
And she handed the cup to her mother, while Alice wrapped rom where its farthest ource is found
a shawl round her mistress, and put a pillow for her back. In snow and icy mountains.
Then Dora perched herself on the bed. Shall I sing
to you a little, dear mamma, while you are drinking your It rattles gayly on its way,
tea ?" And the sweet, childish voice arose in song. As down the Pass it dashes,
There were tears in Mrs. Maitland's eyes as she put down And sends up airy clouds of spray,
the cup, and placed her arms round her child: You are Through which the sunlight flashes.
the kindest and most thoughtful nurse I ever had, Dora, my
darling. Give me a kiss, and then go down and have a good Up there it turns a clumsy wheel,
run on the lawn with Rollo, before it is time for the nursery To help the honest miller;
tea." Then, after filling tubs with meal,
It gets a little stiller.

It comes from where the hunter bold
The agile chamois chases,
Tl\e oeeLlodk' CoIpclitilt to Jurlo. To where the girls drive goats to fold,
S__Or weave such lovely laces.
BY EDWARDI) WILLETT.
BY __ The man who drew his childish breath
S' I Among those rocks and mountains,
1 H'l EAT Juno, once queen of the gods, Remembers till his day of death
S Now only a statue of stone, Their icy springs and fountains.
-_ Look down from your place, and behold
Your peacock complaining alone. Though it may be his lot to roam
In many lands, yet never
He once was your favorite bird, Will he forget his mountain home,
And stood at your royal right hand, The Pass, the rushing river.





















































JONAH CAST FORTH BY THE WHALE.









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