Cats cradle

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Material Information

Title:
Cats cradle rhymes for children
Physical Description:
60 p. : col. ill. ; 25 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Willett, Edward, 1830-1889
Kendrick, Charles ( Illustrator )
Worthington, R ( Publisher )
New York Lithographing & Engraving Co
Publisher:
R. Worthington
Place of Publication:
New York
Manufacturer:
Drawn and printed by New York Lithographing & Engraving Co.
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Pets -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1881   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1881
Genre:
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Edward Willett ; illustrated by Charles Kendrick.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002225258
notis - ALG5530
oclc - 08618659
System ID:
UF00049528:00001


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vhymes Von Children
BY
E7DWA RD ,uIILLETT
ILLUSTRATED
BY
SHL. 'R, L .E S ,-"---NENCuR C- K."


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THE REDBIRD'S Eco 20
S A BOY' NEWS ITEM 21
STOSING. THE KIfrEN 22
I \HAT TO DO WITH THE B. 23
THE CAT AND THE RAI 24
S\ PEEP SHOW 25
GLDEN- ROD 6. . . . 6
ON THE SEAS-HORE 27
M.ijHER RAcHETT AND HER FAMILY 28
Ir l' ASN'T I 30
THE BOY AND THE G:rT 3. .
THE SPELLING LESSON 32
BIRD IN A CAGE 4
BIRD AT LIBERTY 35
SEVEN CATS 36
Lip AND DOWN 37
LEMO:NLAND 38
-I iSI SHE CARED FOR NOBODY 39
CHAINN. SHADOWS 40
GRANDDADDY GRUFF 42
MV NlSQUIRREL .44
S AFTER THE SWIM .
\! ':NDERLAND 46
-lI,,w MAN ._. 47
DTTY' DIMPLE 48
MATILDA MIUFFET .49
THE FROG IN THE WALL 50
NOBODY 51
KITTEN, CAT, AND DOG 52
THE PoNY 54
THE WONDERFUL BEAN-VINE .56
SiX JOLLY TAILORS 57
A QUEER FEAST 58
PET'S PLAY-HousE 59
THE SEASONS 6o





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"' "-"MUD PIES.
1 WITH a little water mix a little clay;
I. Stir it with a crooked stick half the day;
Sweeten it with sand, put in some biscuit crumbs,
White stones for citron and black stones for plums;
STake it up carefully, roll it on a board,
Then you have the best pie money can afford.
Put it on a flat stone, set it in the sun;
There let it bake till the mud pie is done.




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CAT'S CRADLE.

MAMMA, leave your dish and ladle, There you have it. Off it goes!
Come and make a kitten's cradle. Pussy's standing on her toes.
Wrap the string about your hands,- Now it's nice, but not quite ready.
Not in quite so many bands,- Hold your fingers, Mamma, steady,
Just as I do, don't you see? While the cradle-maker comes,
There! now wait, and let it be. With her fingers and her thumbs.
See! it changes in a minute!
Bend your biggest finger flat; Kitty's waiting to get in it.
Take this loop up, then take that.
Mamma, that's well done for you- Very careful you must be,
Look. and see what I can do, While I hold it patiently.
As the cradle now I take, Put your thumbs and fingers there;
Where the strings two corners make. Lift the corners in the air;
Ready, Mamma! Let it go! Turn them under these, and then
Off the cradle comes, just so! We will have a change again.

Now it's your turn, Mamma dear. There! you let that corner go-
Crook your little fingers here, What a shame to spoil it so!
Picking up the strings so straight. Such a tangled thing as that
No, not that one-Mamma, wait! Would not do for any cat.
Watch the motions of my nose, Kitty never could get in it,
When it points at these and those. And again we must begin it.



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A POT OF PANSIES.
COME and see my pot of pansies;
SSee the little buds unfold,
With their purple and their gold,
Velvet lips and starry eyes,
Where the sweetest odors rise,
And a hundred pretty fancies
Swarm about my pot of pansies.
























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".- WHAT BABY DOES.

"THATr'S the way that baby goes,
iOn his fingers and his toes,
Then he tumbles on his nose-
That's the way that baby goes.

That's the way that baby cries,
Sticks his fingers in his eyes,
1 / Yells and screams and sobs and sighs-
That's the way that baby, cries.








Now let's see how baby sleeps.
That's the way that baby creeps,.
That's the way that baby weeps-
Now let's see how baby sleeps.




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THE WITCH OF BORDENTOWN.

c, .L /. THLERE came a witch to Bordentown-
Sing hey, ho, the witches!-
Sl W no wore a coat instead of a gown,
And sported a pair of breeches.
SShe n worried the dogs and plagued the cats,
And killed the houses and barns with rats,
And stuffed the cellars full of bats,
S And tumbled the beds and broke the slats,
All over Bordentown.

"sl This ugly witch of Bordentown-
Sing hey, ho, the witches!-
S othcrcdl the housewives up and down,
And made them drop their stitches.
-n She spoiled their cakes and tarts and pies,
S'And filled their puddings full of flies,
And bewitched the bread they set to rise,
S Till they gritted their teeth and snapped their eyes,
All over Bordentown.

At last she flew from Bordentown-
*, ~ -.'.*' Sing hey, ho, the witches!-
,,., 'S. &, Over the fields so bare and brown,
'" T Across the roads and ditches.
S,, When all the people got up next day,
.. 'S. "And knew that the witch had gone away,
-' They Ifll on their knees, and began to pray
"., That where she %as she would d always stay.
S"' '" So far from Bo'dentm%\ n




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WHI c annot havem but a bittle of fun,
SAnut t scarcely o ut of M hers lp,



CSomebods every comes and thmakes me run,
With Mustn't."







I am just as high as Papa's knee,
But soon a man I mean to be;
Nobody then will shout at me,
"You Mustn't."

A boy may grow up tall, 'tis true;
But then be careful what you do,
Or law steps up and says to you,
"You Mustn't."
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CALLING THE HOGS AND COWS.

HEAR the farmer call his hogs-
Pig-oh-oh-oh-oh-oh-oo /
They are far away, but the call they know;
They always hear it at night and morn,
And run, for that is their dinner horn-
Little pig and big,
Big and little pig,
Running and grunting and squealing for corn.

Hear the milk-maid call her cows-
Sook-sook-soo-oo-oo-ook /
Cherry and Blossom are down by the brook,
Afar in the meadow, but they hear,
And very soon they are trotting near-
Cherry and dear old Bloss,
Never sulky or cross,
And Mary can milk them both without fear.
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THE REDBIRD'S EGG.

A REDBIRD once laid a very small egg,
And sang a song as she stood on one leg.
Just then a blackbird, so ugly and big,
Came flying down, and hopped on a twig,
And said, as he nodded and winked his eye,
That he never had heard so big a cry
About so little an egg as that,
Which might be laid by a wren or a gnat.

The poor little redbird ceased her song,
Beginning to fear there was something wrong.

" The egg," she said, "may look small to you,
But that is the best that I could, do.
It is all my own, as you may see,
And I love it because it belongs to me.
I mean to take care of that egg and hatch it,
And then will defy any bird to match it."













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A BOY'S NEWS ITEM.

Go, tell the telegraph,
The railroad killed a calf.
He ran on the rail,
And curled up his tail;
The engine came by,
And sent him sky high,
And knocked out the breath of him,
And that was the death of him.
Go, tell the telegraph,
The railroad killed a calf.















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TOSSING ,THE KITTEN.

KITTY, Kitty !
What a pity
That yqu cannot fly!
Let me toss you,
Little Floss, you;
Up you go, so high!

What's it doing ?
Crying? Mewing?
Fie, dear Kitty! fie!
All this fuss, you
Little puss, you,
Will not make you fly.





22









WHAT TO DO WITH THE BOYS.

WHAT shall be done with the boys of a year?
Kiss them, and pet them, and call them dear.
What shall be done with the boys of two ?
Feed them, and give them nothing to do.
What shall be done with the boys of three?
Set them to walking, and let them be.
What shall be done with the boys of four?
Give them some cake, and then some more.
What shall be done with the boys of five?
Give them some honey fresh from' the hive.
What shall be done with the boys of six ?
4 Leave them to learn their plays and tricks
What shall be done with the boys of seven?
Give them some pie to make it even.
What shall b.: don,- with the boys of eight?
SDress them nicely, and let them wait.
\\'hat shall be done with the boys of nine?
Dre;s them better, and see them shine.
/'-f ^ \' What shall be done with the boys of ten?
Then they are boys no more, but men.







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THE CAT .\ND THt. RAT.

%\AIrN I hole til-ru na. a rat.-
Outid, a c.a \. ai I ,
And in the kitchen Mary Ann
A trap was nicely baiting.

With half-closed eyes the careful cat
So warily was watching;
"The rat kept close, because he knew
The cat was bent on catching.

With meal that very careful cat So long the cat kept up his watch,
Then heaped his body over; He starved to death for glory;
No rat could guess that such a pile The rat was starved to death inside,
A cruel cat might cover. And that is all the story


24











A PEEP SHOW.

HERE is a peep show: come, give me a pin,
Only that little, and you can look in.
What is within it you never could guess,
But it is well worth a pin, and no less.
Nothing I charge for babies that creep,
But for all others a pin for a peep.




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A *s if it were queen of the meadow wide.
That beautiful blossom, so tall and odd,
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Is the bloom of the plant called golden-rod.
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4 Nodding and tossing its head in pride,
K As if it were queen of the meadow wide.
That beautiful blossom, so tall and odd,
Is the bloom of the plant called golden-rod.

26












"ON THE SEA-SHORE.

THEY all are off to the sea-shore,- They dig with shovel and stick anrJ hand
J-ennie and Katie, and Jamie and Ben, For shells that lie in. the cool, deep sand,
Two little maids and two little men,-- And houses of sand they build by day,
They all are off to the sea-shore. For the tide at night to wash away.

They watch the waves that break with a r:, r, Then into, the water, so jolly and brave,
Running far up on the sandy shore- They dash, to be tumbled about by the wave,
Running far up on the bright gay beach, And dripping and soaked with sparkling brine,
SThen sliding so swiftly away out of reach. Their little bare legs dnd arms, how they shine

They all come home from the sea-shore,-
Jennie and Katie, and Jamie and Ben,
!, Bright little maids and gay little men,-
"They all come home from the sea-slwre.

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,,,, MOTHER RACHETT AND HER FAMILY.

MOTHER RACHETT, large and fat,
Had a dog and had a.cat;
Mother Rachett, broad and big,
"Had a hog and had a pig.
The dog was large, the cat was small,
The pig was short, the hog was tall,
But Mother Rachett loved them all;
SAnd through the rainy and wintry weather
J J I They lived in a little house together.

Mother Rachett's dog one day
"Out in the garden went to play;.
Mother Rachett's tabby cat
Went below to find'a irat;
Mother Rachett's pig and hog
Hunted acorns under a log;
Then the dog got
scared by a frog,
.i j The hog by a snake.
the cat by a fea-
S, / their.
And all came run-
ning home to-



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IT WASN'T I.

POLICEMAN, what is the matter with you,
With buttons of brass and coat of blue,
And club as big as a little boy's arm?
Go away, policeman, I've done no harm.

I am not the small boy who threw a stone,
And hit the gray kitten, aniabrke a bone;
Nor he who climbed over the farmer's fence,
And stole the eggs from under his hens.

You may look as fierce as fieryr can be,
But you nothing have to do with me,
For I am a good little boy 'to-day.
So, big policeman, just go away!
30














































edge

" Ho." says the rowdy boy. ou

"- Ba," sas the billy gnat. I mean --
tf, sta\

The boy) threw a stone, the goat
tumbled down.
And fell on the boy. and cracked
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THE SPELLING LESSON.

BOGGLING at each letter-- See her, Mamma, staring,
Why should such things fret her? All the while declaring
Must she learn to read ? he can never spell.
As she stands by mother Now she is a baby,
Don't it seem a bother? But will grow up, may be-
Yes, indeed. Time will tell.

Why do we beset her? See she's in a flutter,
Surely we had better Wants some bread and butter-
Bid her go and play. How she teases you!
Never mind our duty; Well she knows that feeding
Let the little beauty Easier is than reading-
Have her way. Nicer, too.

Vain is your denying,
For the child is crying;
Tears as big as peas,
From her eyelids flowing,
SProve that she is knowing,
And can tease.

















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Can't get out and fly away. When he pipes his highest note.

BIRD IN A CAGE.

BILLY, Billy, birdie Billy, See his tiny feathers quiver,
Singing in his cage all day, While his singing shakes his throat;
Has to stay there, willy-nilly- All his body seems to shiver
Can't get out and fly away. When he pipes his highest note.

See the merry little fellow, Birdie Billy makes no bother,
Fine and fresh and full of fun, When his cage is swinging high;
Smooth his coat so bright and yellow, 'Tis his home-he knows no other,
When his morning bath is done. And he never learned to fly.


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BIRD AT LIBERTY.

TURN our birdie loose to-morrow,
Freely leaving him to range,
And he soon would come to sorrow,
In the world so wide and strange.

Hawks and owls and jays and sparrows,
Cruel men and naughty boys,
Guns and stones and bows and .arrows,
Soon would end his little joys.

Birdie's cuddled here and petted,
Everybody loves him, too;
Always fed, and never fretted,
Nothing in the world to do.

When our darling birdie marries,
As a grown-up birdie may,
With the finches or canaries
He will then be glad to stay.

















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SEVEN CATS.

ONE white cat, one black cat,
And one Maltese;
One cat lean, and one cat fat
As a tub of grease.

One cat yellow, one cat gray ;.
In all, seven cats.
These seven cats hunt all day
For mice and rats.

These seven cats sit up all night
To raise a riot,
Scream and howl and spit and fight,
And can't keep quiet.
36


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UP AND DOWN.

WHEN Billy Bolus wanted to ride,
And down on a rainbow's edge to slide,
He jumped so high, and he jumped so far,
That he caught on the point of a little star;
And there he hung till a lark came by,
Who picked the hook of his frock from the eye
And down to the earth the little boy fell,
Right into the mouth of a very deep well,
And dropped in a pail that was coming up,
And so he was carried away to the top.

When Billy was safe, he said that he guessed
Hv had better gi* home and take some rest.













































LEMON LAND.

WHERE, oh where, do the lemons grow ?
Ever so far from here, I know.
How strange a country it must be,
Where such a green and pretty tree
So very sour a fruit can yield,
While sugar grows in every field !
If all the ponds were covered ,with ice,
That country would be very nice,
For every one could swim or wade,
As much as he pleased, in lemonade.

38



































LITTLE Tippettt-y-wtchetty --ween da.
Like the ld miller h lived by zteDe



Tippetty-witchetty-wee one day

Fell in the stream, and was swept

Down where the torrent sends ,
up its spray
Then a brave boy, so big and stout,
Juinped in the water and pulled
her out,
Else she would now be dead, :
no doubt.
Little Tippetty-witchetty-wee,

Cares for somebody; yes, does she.
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CHASING SHADOWS.

CHASING shadows on the wall, Thus my little darling one
. Snatching here and grasping there, Chases shadows on the wall,
.Reaching vainly for them all, Till the setting of the sun,
Chasing shadows everywhere. When her weary eyelids fall.

Now she almost catches this, So does Ponto, on the green,
Then she misses, with a sigh, Chase a shadow in his play,
And she calls for mother's kiss, And the bird, by him unseen,
As the shadows flit and fly. Free and merry, flies away.

Chase them, Ponto! Chase them, May I
While the sport is fun to you.
Grown-up dogs and men to-day
Chase all sorts of shadows,.too.






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GRANDDADDY GRUFF.

So old and so tough,
Went to church, and forgot his snuff.
Without snuff for his nose,
S; As you may suppose,
Granddaddy Gruff dropped into a doze.













And drenched him with water, in spite of his groans
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MY SQUIRREL.

BUNNY, dear Bunny, how fast you go,
Running, and running, and whirling your wheel!
You must be tired, dear Bunny, I know;
Stop but a minute, and say how you feel.

That's a good Bunny, and here is a nut-
A nice little nut I have cracked for you.
Take it, and feed on it. Ah! tut, tut!
Biting my finger, sir, never will do.

Bunny, dear Bunny, now don't it feel queer.
Running, and keeping your wheel in a whirl ?
Running like that, I am sure, my dear,
Soon would tire out any boy or girl.
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AFTER THE SWIM.

WHEN Dick came home with his head so Then Dick was bothered and hung his head.
wet, "It was very hot to-day," he said,
His mother began to worry and fret, "And perspiration has ot in my hair,
And said, after looking closely at him, And hasn't had time to dry in the air."
That Dickie had been to the brook to
swim. '"That may be true," she replied, "no doubt;
If not, she would really like to know But how was your shirt turned wrong side
Just how his hair had been wetted so. out?"

Then Dick was bothered worse than
before,
And hung his head, and stammered
some more.
At last he said, with a gleam of sense,
"It must have turned when I climbed
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WONDER LAND.

THE Wonder Land is far away, But sometimes there
And nobody knows just where; We see in the air
But there you may go at the close of the day, The dear, sweet faces of friends we know,
Just after you say your prayer. Who died and left us so long ago.
Then jump into bed,
And cover your head, The Wonder Land that you see at night
And shut your eyelids as tight as can be, Is lost when the morning breaks,
And many and strange are the sights you And everything pretty and gay and bright
will see. Is gone when the dreamer wakes.
And you wonder then
So many people in Wonder Land, If ever again
So many things that are queer, Your feet will be treading that shining
Big and little, and funny and grand, track,
And nothing like things that are here. And wonder how you could ever get back.



46










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DOTTY DIMPLE.

DOTTY DIMPLE, sweet and simple,
Made her doll a paper hat.
When the rain on dolly's head
Fell and spoiled it, Dotty said,
"How could I have thought of that?"

Dotty Dimple had a pimple
Right upon her little nose.
"Had to be there," Dotty said,-
"Had to be so big and red,
'Cause it gets so many blows."



48
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IATILD.1 M FFET.











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.M r I L r kL\ MUlFi-ET In\cd a I,-In
A I i\ n a little Lhou e ,Ir stnI -.I
The -illy wind,\ was unler- 2riund.
The on I door in the roof *.%-as 61.und
"The ,,n!y fire-place a, out of d r...
/ Th, only bed was under the floor-..
/ The- -tairs were so crooked that. \when
I'/ she went up.
She gnt to the bottom instead of the top

She made her tea in a frying-pa1n.
And broiled her beef on a paper fan,
-X And supped her soup ith a tua;ting- fork,
And swec-tened her coffee with a cork,
And baked her pies in soup-tureens,
A nd on a griddle cooked her greens.

S Matilda Muffet lived alone,
"-All in that little house of stone,
Till, on a cold and windy day,.
Shil inst dri-d up and blew away.


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THE FROG IN THE WALL.

THERE was a frog shut up in a wall,
And there he lived on nothing at all;
Not so much as a breath of air had he,
While the years that passed were twenty-three.
At last the wall was broken up,
And Master Froggie out did drop.
Hie opened his mouth, and winked his eye,
"" And didn't know whether to laugh or cry,
Or whether he ought to work or play,
Then stretched his legs and hopped away.
Now how did Froggie live all alone,
ST So many years shut up in a stone ?
He cuddled up, as some suppose,
And sucked his fingers and his toes,
SJust as little baby does.
4 And.sucked his fingera and hisBtoes,













































A QUEER FEAST.

A BEAUTIFUL bird is the trout,
The rabbit's an elegant fish,
" The duck is a very fine beast;
And all cooked together, no doubt,
If nicely served up on a dish,
Would make a delightful feast.








51

































KITTEN, CAT, AND DOG.

THERE once was a naughty little kit, The little kitten mewed and cried,
Who neither would lie nor stand nor sit, And to get away in vain he tried,
But all about the house would flit, And wildly ran from side to side,
As if he was crazy for hunting. For the cat was still before him.
That naughty kitten one day got out, But a dog soon answered the kitten's cry,
And then he wandered around and about, And on the cat he fixed his eye,
Till he met a cat so big and stout, And said he would bite him by and by,
And the cat a fight was wanting. For he surely meant to floor him.

Oh, then and there was a fearful fight,
And seldom you see so strange a sight;
But at last the cat was conquered quite,
And cured of snapping and biting.
The kitten then went home with the dog,
And settled himself on the softest rug,
And there he slept quite cozy and snug,
And dreamed of the cat and its fighting.

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THE PONY.

THOUGH his mother is old and bony,
Chief is a fat and pretty pony.
See! right up to the house he comes,
Begging for sugar and pound-cake crumbs,
And Mary has to quit her tasks,
To give the pony what he asks,
Or he will come and help himself,
And eat the pie upon the shelf.

Naughty Chief, so gay and idle,
Needs a saddle and a bridle.
When he gets a little older,
And I grow a little bolder,
I will ride, and he will know me,
And he will not try to throw me!


54



















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THE WONDERFUL BEAN-VINE.

BILLY BOGARDUS planted a bean-vine,
Which grew so fast in a night,
That, when he got up in the morning,
The top was far out of sight.

He made a balloon,
And sailed to the moon,
But there was the bean-vine just as soon.

The Man in the Moon was so
cranky, C
That he ate the beans as fast# i'
they grew,
And he never stopped to boil or
to stew,
And never once said, "Thank ye."

Then Billy came down, and put on
f his boots,
And pulled the bean-vine up by the roots,
And said, It grew well for a night in June,
But I plant no beans for the Man in the Moon."












46























SIX )OLLY TAILORS.

Six j()lly tailor-, went to hI som e tfun
All went a-hunting, and one had a gun

One was to fin d the h .ami. 1-t., t,, chase it down.
Ilhrce %si t, mh,,o it. FOur t:. pick it up
Five %%as to clean it. x t- cook it bromn,
And all six tailors tgel-ther would d Lupi

Six jtll tailors \ %ent to: the wo:,d.
All of them hunting a.; fast as thle c )uld

One Iound a black bar, 1T: ran a.i% aI,
Three tumbled in a ditch. Four climbed a tree;
Five f ll across a 1i.g. Six COLIdn't rstad\.
And all ix tailo:,rs wcre ._r a c,.ul, -Id h







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NOBODY.

SAID Gaffer Gray to Grandmother Gee, Said Grandmother Gee, If Nobody comes,
"Who is it that you have asked to tea ?" Alone I may sit and suck my thumbs.
If Nobody .happens to stay away,
, To Gaffer Gray said Grandmother Gee, A dozen may come to tea to-day.
" Just Nobody I have asked to tea." When Nobody comes, I am all alone,
And yet I am not as Nobody known.
Said Gaffer Gray, Pray make it clear, That this is true you can plainly see,.
If Nobody comes, then who will be here ?" For if Nobody ever sits down to tea,
At that same table you can't find me.":."

S_58
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.PET'S PLAY-HOUSE.

.;"PLENTY of pieces J-f china-ware,
Plenty of scraps of tin and brass,
Plenty of buttons and bits of glass,
Plenty of pictures and nice things there.

Here in the beautiful summer weather,
S. Under the shade of the garden trees,
Safe and happy. and busy as bees,
Dolly and I will play together







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THE SEASONS.

FOUR pretty boys and girls, all in a row,
Faces fresh and fingers red, out in the snow;
Four pretty boys and girls, all very nice,
Skating and sliding about on the ice.

Four pretty boys and girls welcome the Spring,
Hearing the little birds chatter and sing;
Four pretty boys and girls, all in a row,
Picking the flowers wherever they grow.





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Four pretty boys and girls, on a Summer day,
Nothing to do but to laugh and to play;
Four pretty boys and girls, out in the sun,
Running and jumping, and full of their fun.

Four pretty boys and girls growing so tall,
Under the apple trees, late in the Fall;

So come the seasons, and swiftly they go.
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