Mother Goose's melodies for her little goslings

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Material Information

Title:
Mother Goose's melodies for her little goslings
Uniform Title:
Mother Goose
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 21 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Publisher:
McLoughlin Bros.
Place of Publication:
New York
Publication Date:
Edition:
Linen ed.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's poetry -- 1881   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- 1881   ( rbgenr )
Baldwin -- 1881
Genre:
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002251140
notis - ALK2903
oclc - 62295513
System ID:
UF00049527:00001


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Full Text
















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MOTHER GOOSE'S RHYMES.
















THERE was an old woman named Nothing-at-all,
Who rejoiced in a dwelling exceedingly small;
A man stretched his month to its utmost extent,
And down at one gulp, house and old woman want!

A, B, 0 and D, P, Q. R and S,
Pray, playmates agree. Love may we possess.
Says E, F and G, With T, U and V,
"Well, so it shall be." May we always agree.
H, I, J, K and L, W, X aud Y,
In peace we will dwelL Be not naughty or sly.
"With M, N and 0, With Z, and with &,
To play, let us go. Go to school at command.
The BaiCwur L;nir
Uwurity
________ ^______________ of










Jack ran to his mother,
The news for to tell;
She call'd him a good boy,
SAnd said it was well.


Jack sold his gold egg,
To a rogue of a Jew;
Who cheated him out.
Of the half of his due.


Then Jack went a courting
A lady so gay;
As fair as the illy,
And sweet as the May.


But old Mother Goose
That instant came in;
And turned her son Jack, _
Into famed Harlequin.


She then with her wand,
Touched the lady so fne;
And turned her at once,
Into sweet Columbine.


Then turning around
She caught the goose soon,
And mounting its back,
Flew away to the moon.







ONE misty, mois '
Morning;
When cloudy was
The weather;
I met an old man,
Clothed all
In leather.
He began to
Compliment,
And I began
To grin;
How do you do?
And how do you do?
SAnd how do you do?
Again.


ZANY, Zany, Zaddlepate,
Go to bed early, and get up
late.



Hourly locks, curly locks,
Will you be mine ?
You shall not wash dishes,
Nor feed the swine;
But sit on a cushion,
And sew up a seam;
And feed upon strawberries,
. Sugar and cream. "







ONE misty, mois '
Morning;
When cloudy was
The weather;
I met an old man,
Clothed all
In leather.
He began to
Compliment,
And I began
To grin;
How do you do?
And how do you do?
SAnd how do you do?
Again.


ZANY, Zany, Zaddlepate,
Go to bed early, and get up
late.



Hourly locks, curly locks,
Will you be mine ?
You shall not wash dishes,
Nor feed the swine;
But sit on a cushion,
And sew up a seam;
And feed upon strawberries,
. Sugar and cream. "







ONE misty, mois '
Morning;
When cloudy was
The weather;
I met an old man,
Clothed all
In leather.
He began to
Compliment,
And I began
To grin;
How do you do?
And how do you do?
SAnd how do you do?
Again.


ZANY, Zany, Zaddlepate,
Go to bed early, and get up
late.



Hourly locks, curly locks,
Will you be mine ?
You shall not wash dishes,
Nor feed the swine;
But sit on a cushion,
And sew up a seam;
And feed upon strawberries,
. Sugar and cream. "









A CAT came fiddling
Out of a barn,
With a pair of bag-pipes
"Under her arm;
-She could sing nothing
r But fiddle cum fee,
"The mouse has married
The bumble-bee;
Pipe, cat-dance, mouse,
SA wedding we'll have
2 At our good house.


0A little cock-sparrow,
Sat on a tree;
H iggledy, Piggledy, Looking as happy,
My black hen; As happy could be.
She lays eggs, Till a boy came by,
For gentlemen. With his bow and arrow;
Sometimes nine, And frightened away,
And sometimes ten; The little cock-sparrow.
Higgledy, Piggledy,
SMy blnck Hen I



Dickery, dickery, dare,
The pig flew up in the air.
The man in brown, --
Soon brought him down;: -
Dickery, dickery, dare.
i~i~wi ^ '









A CAT came fiddling
Out of a barn,
With a pair of bag-pipes
"Under her arm;
-She could sing nothing
r But fiddle cum fee,
"The mouse has married
The bumble-bee;
Pipe, cat-dance, mouse,
SA wedding we'll have
2 At our good house.


0A little cock-sparrow,
Sat on a tree;
H iggledy, Piggledy, Looking as happy,
My black hen; As happy could be.
She lays eggs, Till a boy came by,
For gentlemen. With his bow and arrow;
Sometimes nine, And frightened away,
And sometimes ten; The little cock-sparrow.
Higgledy, Piggledy,
SMy blnck Hen I



Dickery, dickery, dare,
The pig flew up in the air.
The man in brown, --
Soon brought him down;: -
Dickery, dickery, dare.
i~i~wi ^ '









A CAT came fiddling
Out of a barn,
With a pair of bag-pipes
"Under her arm;
-She could sing nothing
r But fiddle cum fee,
"The mouse has married
The bumble-bee;
Pipe, cat-dance, mouse,
SA wedding we'll have
2 At our good house.


0A little cock-sparrow,
Sat on a tree;
H iggledy, Piggledy, Looking as happy,
My black hen; As happy could be.
She lays eggs, Till a boy came by,
For gentlemen. With his bow and arrow;
Sometimes nine, And frightened away,
And sometimes ten; The little cock-sparrow.
Higgledy, Piggledy,
SMy blnck Hen I



Dickery, dickery, dare,
The pig flew up in the air.
The man in brown, --
Soon brought him down;: -
Dickery, dickery, dare.
i~i~wi ^ '









A CAT came fiddling
Out of a barn,
With a pair of bag-pipes
"Under her arm;
-She could sing nothing
r But fiddle cum fee,
"The mouse has married
The bumble-bee;
Pipe, cat-dance, mouse,
SA wedding we'll have
2 At our good house.


0A little cock-sparrow,
Sat on a tree;
H iggledy, Piggledy, Looking as happy,
My black hen; As happy could be.
She lays eggs, Till a boy came by,
For gentlemen. With his bow and arrow;
Sometimes nine, And frightened away,
And sometimes ten; The little cock-sparrow.
Higgledy, Piggledy,
SMy blnck Hen I



Dickery, dickery, dare,
The pig flew up in the air.
The man in brown, --
Soon brought him down;: -
Dickery, dickery, dare.
i~i~wi ^ '





















A LONG-TAILED pig, or a short-tailed pig, or a pig without a tail;
A sow-pig, or a boar-pig, or a pig with a curly tail.


How many miles to Babylon ? Three score and ten,
Can I get there by candle-light? Yes, and back again.













FOUR-AND-TWENTY tailors went to kill a snail,
The best man among them durst not touch her tail.
She put out her horns, like a little Kyloe cow;
Run, tailors, run, or she'll kill;you all just now.

/,





















A LONG-TAILED pig, or a short-tailed pig, or a pig without a tail;
A sow-pig, or a boar-pig, or a pig with a curly tail.


How many miles to Babylon ? Three score and ten,
Can I get there by candle-light? Yes, and back again.













FOUR-AND-TWENTY tailors went to kill a snail,
The best man among them durst not touch her tail.
She put out her horns, like a little Kyloe cow;
Run, tailors, run, or she'll kill;you all just now.

/,





















A LONG-TAILED pig, or a short-tailed pig, or a pig without a tail;
A sow-pig, or a boar-pig, or a pig with a curly tail.


How many miles to Babylon ? Three score and ten,
Can I get there by candle-light? Yes, and back again.













FOUR-AND-TWENTY tailors went to kill a snail,
The best man among them durst not touch her tail.
She put out her horns, like a little Kyloe cow;
Run, tailors, run, or she'll kill;you all just now.

/,






















MARY, Mary, quite contrary,
How does your garden grow?
With silver bells and cockle-shells,
And pretty maids all of a row.



Pussy-cat, Pussy-cat, where have you been?
"I've been up to London, to look at the Queen,"
Pussy-cat, Pussy-cat, what did you there ?
"I frightened a little mouse under the chair."



As I was going, Bryan O'Lin, and his wife
"To sell my eggs; And his wife's mother;
I met a man, They all went over,
With bandy legs. The bridge together.
Bandy legs, The bridge broke down
And crooked toes; And they all fell in;
I tripped his heels, "The deuoe take you all,
And he fell on his nose. Says Bryan O'Lin.






















MARY, Mary, quite contrary,
How does your garden grow?
With silver bells and cockle-shells,
And pretty maids all of a row.



Pussy-cat, Pussy-cat, where have you been?
"I've been up to London, to look at the Queen,"
Pussy-cat, Pussy-cat, what did you there ?
"I frightened a little mouse under the chair."



As I was going, Bryan O'Lin, and his wife
"To sell my eggs; And his wife's mother;
I met a man, They all went over,
With bandy legs. The bridge together.
Bandy legs, The bridge broke down
And crooked toes; And they all fell in;
I tripped his heels, "The deuoe take you all,
And he fell on his nose. Says Bryan O'Lin.






















MARY, Mary, quite contrary,
How does your garden grow?
With silver bells and cockle-shells,
And pretty maids all of a row.



Pussy-cat, Pussy-cat, where have you been?
"I've been up to London, to look at the Queen,"
Pussy-cat, Pussy-cat, what did you there ?
"I frightened a little mouse under the chair."



As I was going, Bryan O'Lin, and his wife
"To sell my eggs; And his wife's mother;
I met a man, They all went over,
With bandy legs. The bridge together.
Bandy legs, The bridge broke down
And crooked toes; And they all fell in;
I tripped his heels, "The deuoe take you all,
And he fell on his nose. Says Bryan O'Lin.






















MARY, Mary, quite contrary,
How does your garden grow?
With silver bells and cockle-shells,
And pretty maids all of a row.



Pussy-cat, Pussy-cat, where have you been?
"I've been up to London, to look at the Queen,"
Pussy-cat, Pussy-cat, what did you there ?
"I frightened a little mouse under the chair."



As I was going, Bryan O'Lin, and his wife
"To sell my eggs; And his wife's mother;
I met a man, They all went over,
With bandy legs. The bridge together.
Bandy legs, The bridge broke down
And crooked toes; And they all fell in;
I tripped his heels, "The deuoe take you all,
And he fell on his nose. Says Bryan O'Lin.








OLD MOTHER GOOSE, when
''She wanted to wauder;
Would ride through the air,
On d very fine gander.


SMother Goose had a house,
J- 'Twas built in a wood;
SWhere an owl at the door,
For a sentinel stood.


This is her son Jack,
A plain-looking lad;
He is not very good,
Nor yet very bad.


She sent him to market,
- -- A live goose he bought;
S'Here, mother," says he,
| "It will not go for nought."


"Jack's goose and her gander
Then grew very fond;
They'd both eat together,
Or swim in one pond.


. if F And Jack found one morning,
As I have been told,.
His goose had laid for him
"-' An egg of pure gold.l









ROBIN REDBREAST rose up early,
All at the break of day;
He flew to Jenny Wren's house,
And sung a roundelay.
He sang of Robin Redbreast,
And little Jenny Wren; '
And when he came unto the end,
He then began again.



JENNY WREN fell sick,
Upon a merry time;
In came Robin Redbreast,
And brought her sops and wine.

"Eat well of the sop, Jernny, a
Drink well of the wine;"
"Thank you, Robin, kindly.
You shall be mine."

Jenny, she got well, S
And stood upon her feet;
And told Robin plainly,
She loved him not a bit I

Robin being angry,
Hopp'd upon a twig;
Saying, "out upon you, Jenny
Fy upon you, bold faced jig !"








A, apple-pie;
B, bit it;
C, cut it;
D, dealt it;
E, envied it;
F, fought for it; I rau THE BELL!
G, got it;
M,; had it;
I, into it;
J, "joined it;
K, kept it; _
" L, longed for it;
M, muncheS it7; KNOCK AT T'E DOOR!
N, nodded for it;
O, opened it;
P, peeped in it;
"Q, quartered At;
R, ran for it;
S, stole it; LIFT UP THE LATCH!
T, took it;
U, under it;
V, viewed it;
W, wanted it;
X, Y, Z, and &,
Each took a piece in hand. AND WALK IN


"' Little girl, little girl, "Little girl, little girl,
Where have you been?" What gave she you?"'
"Gathering roses, "She gave me a diamond,
To give to the queen." As big as my shoe!"

:i'k








A, apple-pie;
B, bit it;
C, cut it;
D, dealt it;
E, envied it;
F, fought for it; I rau THE BELL!
G, got it;
M,; had it;
I, into it;
J, "joined it;
K, kept it; _
" L, longed for it;
M, muncheS it7; KNOCK AT T'E DOOR!
N, nodded for it;
O, opened it;
P, peeped in it;
"Q, quartered At;
R, ran for it;
S, stole it; LIFT UP THE LATCH!
T, took it;
U, under it;
V, viewed it;
W, wanted it;
X, Y, Z, and &,
Each took a piece in hand. AND WALK IN


"' Little girl, little girl, "Little girl, little girl,
Where have you been?" What gave she you?"'
"Gathering roses, "She gave me a diamond,
To give to the queen." As big as my shoe!"

:i'k








PETER PIPER picked a peck of pepper,-
A peck of pepper Peter Piper picked.
If Peter Piper picked a peck of pepper.-
Where's the peck of pepper, Peter Piper picked?


i ). PAT-A-CAKE,
i i Pat-a-cake, baker's man;
[i "': So I wil, master,
'', As fast as I can;
I C Pat it, and prick it,
And mark it with B,
o e Put it in the oven,
"For baby and me.



Pitty Patty Polt,.
Shoe the wild colt;
tHere a nail,
e.nd there a nail,
S I Pitty Patty Polt.


Pussy Cat Mole, jumped over a coal,
And in her best petticoat burnt a great hole;
Poor Pussy's weeping, she'll have no more milk,
Until her best petticoat's mended with silk.


Milkman, milkman, where have you been
"In Buttermilk-channel, up to my chin;
f lost my milk, and spoiled my olothee,
And got a long aicle, hung to my nose.*








PETER PIPER picked a peck of pepper,-
A peck of pepper Peter Piper picked.
If Peter Piper picked a peck of pepper.-
Where's the peck of pepper, Peter Piper picked?


i ). PAT-A-CAKE,
i i Pat-a-cake, baker's man;
[i "': So I wil, master,
'', As fast as I can;
I C Pat it, and prick it,
And mark it with B,
o e Put it in the oven,
"For baby and me.



Pitty Patty Polt,.
Shoe the wild colt;
tHere a nail,
e.nd there a nail,
S I Pitty Patty Polt.


Pussy Cat Mole, jumped over a coal,
And in her best petticoat burnt a great hole;
Poor Pussy's weeping, she'll have no more milk,
Until her best petticoat's mended with silk.


Milkman, milkman, where have you been
"In Buttermilk-channel, up to my chin;
f lost my milk, and spoiled my olothee,
And got a long aicle, hung to my nose.*








PETER PIPER picked a peck of pepper,-
A peck of pepper Peter Piper picked.
If Peter Piper picked a peck of pepper.-
Where's the peck of pepper, Peter Piper picked?


i ). PAT-A-CAKE,
i i Pat-a-cake, baker's man;
[i "': So I wil, master,
'', As fast as I can;
I C Pat it, and prick it,
And mark it with B,
o e Put it in the oven,
"For baby and me.



Pitty Patty Polt,.
Shoe the wild colt;
tHere a nail,
e.nd there a nail,
S I Pitty Patty Polt.


Pussy Cat Mole, jumped over a coal,
And in her best petticoat burnt a great hole;
Poor Pussy's weeping, she'll have no more milk,
Until her best petticoat's mended with silk.


Milkman, milkman, where have you been
"In Buttermilk-channel, up to my chin;
f lost my milk, and spoiled my olothee,
And got a long aicle, hung to my nose.*








PETER PIPER picked a peck of pepper,-
A peck of pepper Peter Piper picked.
If Peter Piper picked a peck of pepper.-
Where's the peck of pepper, Peter Piper picked?


i ). PAT-A-CAKE,
i i Pat-a-cake, baker's man;
[i "': So I wil, master,
'', As fast as I can;
I C Pat it, and prick it,
And mark it with B,
o e Put it in the oven,
"For baby and me.



Pitty Patty Polt,.
Shoe the wild colt;
tHere a nail,
e.nd there a nail,
S I Pitty Patty Polt.


Pussy Cat Mole, jumped over a coal,
And in her best petticoat burnt a great hole;
Poor Pussy's weeping, she'll have no more milk,
Until her best petticoat's mended with silk.


Milkman, milkman, where have you been
"In Buttermilk-channel, up to my chin;
f lost my milk, and spoiled my olothee,
And got a long aicle, hung to my nose.*








PETER PIPER picked a peck of pepper,-
A peck of pepper Peter Piper picked.
If Peter Piper picked a peck of pepper.-
Where's the peck of pepper, Peter Piper picked?


i ). PAT-A-CAKE,
i i Pat-a-cake, baker's man;
[i "': So I wil, master,
'', As fast as I can;
I C Pat it, and prick it,
And mark it with B,
o e Put it in the oven,
"For baby and me.



Pitty Patty Polt,.
Shoe the wild colt;
tHere a nail,
e.nd there a nail,
S I Pitty Patty Polt.


Pussy Cat Mole, jumped over a coal,
And in her best petticoat burnt a great hole;
Poor Pussy's weeping, she'll have no more milk,
Until her best petticoat's mended with silk.


Milkman, milkman, where have you been
"In Buttermilk-channel, up to my chin;
f lost my milk, and spoiled my olothee,
And got a long aicle, hung to my nose.*








RIDE a cock-horse
To Banbury Cross,
To see an old woman
Ride on a white horse; e "
With rings on herfingers,
And bells on her toes,
She shall have music,
TWherever she goes. o "e .



Leg over leg, --
As the dog went to
Dover; _
When he came to a
brook,
Jump, he went over.


Cushy cow bonny,
"Let down thy milk,
And I will give thee
A gown of silk.
A gown of silk,
And a silver treo,
SIf hon wilt let down
Thy milk to me.


DAFFY-DOWN-DILLY haa A little boy was dreaming,
come up to town, Upon his nurse's lap,
In a fine petticoat and a green That pins fell out of all the stars,
gown. And the stars fell in his esp.








RIDE a cock-horse
To Banbury Cross,
To see an old woman
Ride on a white horse; e "
With rings on herfingers,
And bells on her toes,
She shall have music,
TWherever she goes. o "e .



Leg over leg, --
As the dog went to
Dover; _
When he came to a
brook,
Jump, he went over.


Cushy cow bonny,
"Let down thy milk,
And I will give thee
A gown of silk.
A gown of silk,
And a silver treo,
SIf hon wilt let down
Thy milk to me.


DAFFY-DOWN-DILLY haa A little boy was dreaming,
come up to town, Upon his nurse's lap,
In a fine petticoat and a green That pins fell out of all the stars,
gown. And the stars fell in his esp.








RIDE a cock-horse
To Banbury Cross,
To see an old woman
Ride on a white horse; e "
With rings on herfingers,
And bells on her toes,
She shall have music,
TWherever she goes. o "e .



Leg over leg, --
As the dog went to
Dover; _
When he came to a
brook,
Jump, he went over.


Cushy cow bonny,
"Let down thy milk,
And I will give thee
A gown of silk.
A gown of silk,
And a silver treo,
SIf hon wilt let down
Thy milk to me.


DAFFY-DOWN-DILLY haa A little boy was dreaming,
come up to town, Upon his nurse's lap,
In a fine petticoat and a green That pins fell out of all the stars,
gown. And the stars fell in his esp.








RIDE a cock-horse
To Banbury Cross,
To see an old woman
Ride on a white horse; e "
With rings on herfingers,
And bells on her toes,
She shall have music,
TWherever she goes. o "e .



Leg over leg, --
As the dog went to
Dover; _
When he came to a
brook,
Jump, he went over.


Cushy cow bonny,
"Let down thy milk,
And I will give thee
A gown of silk.
A gown of silk,
And a silver treo,
SIf hon wilt let down
Thy milk to me.


DAFFY-DOWN-DILLY haa A little boy was dreaming,
come up to town, Upon his nurse's lap,
In a fine petticoat and a green That pins fell out of all the stars,
gown. And the stars fell in his esp.








RIDE a cock-horse
To Banbury Cross,
To see an old woman
Ride on a white horse; e "
With rings on herfingers,
And bells on her toes,
She shall have music,
TWherever she goes. o "e .



Leg over leg, --
As the dog went to
Dover; _
When he came to a
brook,
Jump, he went over.


Cushy cow bonny,
"Let down thy milk,
And I will give thee
A gown of silk.
A gown of silk,
And a silver treo,
SIf hon wilt let down
Thy milk to me.


DAFFY-DOWN-DILLY haa A little boy was dreaming,
come up to town, Upon his nurse's lap,
In a fine petticoat and a green That pins fell out of all the stars,
gown. And the stars fell in his esp.








BAA, bas,
Black sheep,
b Have you
-" Any wool?
Yes, sir,
Yes, sir,
Three bags
Full.

One for
1, My master,
p 7tarsI And one for
O My dame;
And one

Little boy,
Who lives
In the lane.

oosey, goosey, gander, whither wouldsL thou wander?
p stairs, and down stairs, in my lady's chamber.
l re I met an old man, who wouldn't say his prayers,
I took him by the left leg, and threw him down stairs,


BYE, baby bunting,
Daddy's gone a hunting;
Gone to get a rabbit skin,
To wrap his baby bunting in.



If a man who turnips cries-
Cries not when his father dies;
Tis a proof, that he would rather
Have a turnip than a father I








BAA, bas,
Black sheep,
b Have you
-" Any wool?
Yes, sir,
Yes, sir,
Three bags
Full.

One for
1, My master,
p 7tarsI And one for
O My dame;
And one

Little boy,
Who lives
In the lane.

oosey, goosey, gander, whither wouldsL thou wander?
p stairs, and down stairs, in my lady's chamber.
l re I met an old man, who wouldn't say his prayers,
I took him by the left leg, and threw him down stairs,


BYE, baby bunting,
Daddy's gone a hunting;
Gone to get a rabbit skin,
To wrap his baby bunting in.



If a man who turnips cries-
Cries not when his father dies;
Tis a proof, that he would rather
Have a turnip than a father I








BAA, bas,
Black sheep,
b Have you
-" Any wool?
Yes, sir,
Yes, sir,
Three bags
Full.

One for
1, My master,
p 7tarsI And one for
O My dame;
And one

Little boy,
Who lives
In the lane.

oosey, goosey, gander, whither wouldsL thou wander?
p stairs, and down stairs, in my lady's chamber.
l re I met an old man, who wouldn't say his prayers,
I took him by the left leg, and threw him down stairs,


BYE, baby bunting,
Daddy's gone a hunting;
Gone to get a rabbit skin,
To wrap his baby bunting in.



If a man who turnips cries-
Cries not when his father dies;
Tis a proof, that he would rather
Have a turnip than a father I








BAA, bas,
Black sheep,
b Have you
-" Any wool?
Yes, sir,
Yes, sir,
Three bags
Full.

One for
1, My master,
p 7tarsI And one for
O My dame;
And one

Little boy,
Who lives
In the lane.

oosey, goosey, gander, whither wouldsL thou wander?
p stairs, and down stairs, in my lady's chamber.
l re I met an old man, who wouldn't say his prayers,
I took him by the left leg, and threw him down stairs,


BYE, baby bunting,
Daddy's gone a hunting;
Gone to get a rabbit skin,
To wrap his baby bunting in.



If a man who turnips cries-
Cries not when his father dies;
Tis a proof, that he would rather
Have a turnip than a father I









WE'RE all dry,
With drinking on't-
We're all dry,
With drinking don't.
The piper kissed, .
The fiddler's wife;
And I can't sleep,
For thinking don't.



A FARMER came trotting
Upon his grey mare,
Bumpety, bumpety, bump.
With his daughter behind him,
So rosy and fair,
Lumpety, lumpety, I

A raven cried croak!
And they all tumbled ow
Bumpety, bumpety, bump.
The mare broke her knees,
And the farmer his crown,
Lumpety, lunmety, lump.

The mischievous raven
Flew laughing away,
Bumpety, bumpety, blmp.
And vowed he would serve him
The same next day,
Lumpety, Intdinty, lump









WE'RE all dry,
With drinking on't-
We're all dry,
With drinking don't.
The piper kissed, .
The fiddler's wife;
And I can't sleep,
For thinking don't.



A FARMER came trotting
Upon his grey mare,
Bumpety, bumpety, bump.
With his daughter behind him,
So rosy and fair,
Lumpety, lumpety, I

A raven cried croak!
And they all tumbled ow
Bumpety, bumpety, bump.
The mare broke her knees,
And the farmer his crown,
Lumpety, lunmety, lump.

The mischievous raven
Flew laughing away,
Bumpety, bumpety, blmp.
And vowed he would serve him
The same next day,
Lumpety, Intdinty, lump








LITTLE Bo-peep
"Has lost her sheep,
"And can't tell
Where to find them;
SLeave them alone,
And they'll come home
And bring their tails
Behind them.
Little Bo-peep
Fell fast asleep,
And dreamt she heard
Them bleating;
But when she awoke,
She found it a joke,
For still they were
All fleeting.
Then she took up
Her little crook,
Determined for to
Find them;
She found them indeed,
But it made her heart
bleed;
For they'd left their tails
Behind them.




LITTLE Boy Blue,
Come blow your horn,
The sheep's in the mea-
dow,
The cow's in the corn.

Where is the little boy
Minding the sheep?
Under the haycock
Fast asleep!








LITTLE Bo-peep
"Has lost her sheep,
"And can't tell
Where to find them;
SLeave them alone,
And they'll come home
And bring their tails
Behind them.
Little Bo-peep
Fell fast asleep,
And dreamt she heard
Them bleating;
But when she awoke,
She found it a joke,
For still they were
All fleeting.
Then she took up
Her little crook,
Determined for to
Find them;
She found them indeed,
But it made her heart
bleed;
For they'd left their tails
Behind them.




LITTLE Boy Blue,
Come blow your horn,
The sheep's in the mea-
dow,
The cow's in the corn.

Where is the little boy
Minding the sheep?
Under the haycock
Fast asleep!























NEEDLES and pins, needles and pins;
When a man marries, his trouble begins.


Peg, Peg, with a wooden leg, her father was a miller;
He tossed the dumpling at her head, and said "he couldn't kill her.'


HERE we go up, up, up,
And here we go down, down, downy;
Here we go backward and forward,
"f And here we go round, round, round.



il As I went up Pippin Hill,
Pippin Hill was dirty;
.There I met a pretty miss,
She dropped me a curtsy.

N :" "Little miss, pretty miss,
Blessings light upon you;
If I'd half-a-crown a day,
I'd spend it all upon you."























NEEDLES and pins, needles and pins;
When a man marries, his trouble begins.


Peg, Peg, with a wooden leg, her father was a miller;
He tossed the dumpling at her head, and said "he couldn't kill her.'


HERE we go up, up, up,
And here we go down, down, downy;
Here we go backward and forward,
"f And here we go round, round, round.



il As I went up Pippin Hill,
Pippin Hill was dirty;
.There I met a pretty miss,
She dropped me a curtsy.

N :" "Little miss, pretty miss,
Blessings light upon you;
If I'd half-a-crown a day,
I'd spend it all upon you."























NEEDLES and pins, needles and pins;
When a man marries, his trouble begins.


Peg, Peg, with a wooden leg, her father was a miller;
He tossed the dumpling at her head, and said "he couldn't kill her.'


HERE we go up, up, up,
And here we go down, down, downy;
Here we go backward and forward,
"f And here we go round, round, round.



il As I went up Pippin Hill,
Pippin Hill was dirty;
.There I met a pretty miss,
She dropped me a curtsy.

N :" "Little miss, pretty miss,
Blessings light upon you;
If I'd half-a-crown a day,
I'd spend it all upon you."























NEEDLES and pins, needles and pins;
When a man marries, his trouble begins.


Peg, Peg, with a wooden leg, her father was a miller;
He tossed the dumpling at her head, and said "he couldn't kill her.'


HERE we go up, up, up,
And here we go down, down, downy;
Here we go backward and forward,
"f And here we go round, round, round.



il As I went up Pippin Hill,
Pippin Hill was dirty;
.There I met a pretty miss,
She dropped me a curtsy.

N :" "Little miss, pretty miss,
Blessings light upon you;
If I'd half-a-crown a day,
I'd spend it all upon you."




























THERE was an old woman who lived in a shoe;
She had so many children, she didn't know what to do.
She gave them some broth, without any bread;
Then whipped them all soundly, and sent them to bed-


TELL-TALE-TIT I
Your tongue shall be alit;
And all the dogs in the town,
Shall have a little bit.

There was a rat,
For want of stairs,
^ Went down a rope
To say his prayer




























THERE was an old woman who lived in a shoe;
She had so many children, she didn't know what to do.
She gave them some broth, without any bread;
Then whipped them all soundly, and sent them to bed-


TELL-TALE-TIT I
Your tongue shall be alit;
And all the dogs in the town,
Shall have a little bit.

There was a rat,
For want of stairs,
^ Went down a rope
To say his prayer

























\\V



THE sow came in with the saddle;
The little pig rocked the cradle;
The dish jumped up on the table,
To see the pot swallow the ladle.
The spit that stood behind the door,
Threw the pudding-stick on the floor.
"Oh I" said the gridiron, "can't you agree?
I'm the chief constable, bring them to me."



Bell-horses, Bell-horses, Clap hands, clap hands,
What time of day ? Till Papa oomes home
One ovlook, two o'clock, Papa's got money,
Off and away. And Mamma's got none.

























\\V



THE sow came in with the saddle;
The little pig rocked the cradle;
The dish jumped up on the table,
To see the pot swallow the ladle.
The spit that stood behind the door,
Threw the pudding-stick on the floor.
"Oh I" said the gridiron, "can't you agree?
I'm the chief constable, bring them to me."



Bell-horses, Bell-horses, Clap hands, clap hands,
What time of day ? Till Papa oomes home
One ovlook, two o'clock, Papa's got money,
Off and away. And Mamma's got none.







THERE was an old woman, as I've heard
tell,
She went to market her eggs for to sell.
She went to market all on a market day,
And she fell asleep on the king's highway.

There came by a pedlar whose name was
Stout,
He cut her petticoats all round about; f'
He cut her petticoats up to the knees,
"Which made the old woman to shiver and
freeze.

When this little woman first did awake, -"
She began to shiver and she began to shake;
She began to wonder and she began to cry,
"Lauk a mercy on me, this is none of I ?

"But if it be I, as I do hope it be,
I've a little dog at home, and he'll know
me.
If it be I, he'll wag his little tail;
And if it be not I, he'll loudly bark and
wail."

Home went the little woman all in the
dark;
Up got the little dog, and he began to
bark;
SHe began to bark, and she began to cry, I i
"Lank a mercy on me, this is none of I ---








STWO legs sat upon
: (i i three legs,
PP With one leg in his
lap.
ff In comes four legs,
And runs awny with
one leg;

Up jumps two legs,
Catches up three legs,
Throws it after four
legs ;
And makes him bring
back one leg.


Handy, bandy, Jack-a-dandy,
Loves plum cake and sugar candy.


THE lion and the uni-
Scorn
-/ < Were fighting for the
i .crown,
Some gave them white
bread,
And some gave them
brown;
Some gave them plum
cake,
And sent them out of
town.








STWO legs sat upon
: (i i three legs,
PP With one leg in his
lap.
ff In comes four legs,
And runs awny with
one leg;

Up jumps two legs,
Catches up three legs,
Throws it after four
legs ;
And makes him bring
back one leg.


Handy, bandy, Jack-a-dandy,
Loves plum cake and sugar candy.


THE lion and the uni-
Scorn
-/ < Were fighting for the
i .crown,
Some gave them white
bread,
And some gave them
brown;
Some gave them plum
cake,
And sent them out of
town.























TOM, Tom, the piper's son, stole a pig and away he run;
The pig was eat, and Tom was beat, and he went yelling down the street.



Dance, Thumbkin, dance.
(Keep thumb in motlonl

Dance, ye -nerry men, ev'ry one;
(All the fingers in motion)

Thumbkin, he can dance aiJne.
(The thumb.-nly roving)

Dance, Foreman, dance.
SFirst finger moving)

;/2C-' -Dance, ye merry men, ev'ry one;
(The whole moving)

Foreman, he can dance alone.
,,(First finger only moving)
And so on with the other fingers; naming
the second finger, Longman; the third fln-
ger; Ringmran; and the fourth finger, Lit.
tleman. Littleman cannot dance alone.























TOM, Tom, the piper's son, stole a pig and away he run;
The pig was eat, and Tom was beat, and he went yelling down the street.



Dance, Thumbkin, dance.
(Keep thumb in motlonl

Dance, ye -nerry men, ev'ry one;
(All the fingers in motion)

Thumbkin, he can dance aiJne.
(The thumb.-nly roving)

Dance, Foreman, dance.
SFirst finger moving)

;/2C-' -Dance, ye merry men, ev'ry one;
(The whole moving)

Foreman, he can dance alone.
,,(First finger only moving)
And so on with the other fingers; naming
the second finger, Longman; the third fln-
ger; Ringmran; and the fourth finger, Lit.
tleman. Littleman cannot dance alone.







'TWAS once upon a time,
S' When Jenny Wren was young;
So daintily she danced;
And so prettily she sung.
Robin Redbreast lost his heart,
SFor he was a gallant bird;
SSo he doffed his hat to Jenny Wren,
S.Requesting to be heard.


0 dearest Jenny Wren,
If you will but be mine;
You shall feed on cherry pie,
SAnd drink new currant wine.
I'll dress you like a goldfinch,
Or any peacock gay;
So, dearest Jen, if you'll be mine,
Let us appoint the day.


S Jenny blushed behind her fan,
And thus declared her mind;
Siuce, dearest Bob, I love you well,
i Ill take your offer hind.
' Cherry-pie is very nice,
"And so is currant wine;
But I must wear my plain brown gown,
And never go too fine.







SEE-SAW, Margery Daw, See-saw, up and down,
Johnny shall have a new master; Which is the way to go to town?
He shall have but a cent a day, One foot up, and one foot down,
Because he can't work any faster. That's the way to go to town.









*" I ---(- .-- I^" "i


-~ -~ .










There was a man And when he saw
In our town, His eyes were out,
And he was With all his might
Wondrous wise; And main;
He jumped into He jumped into
A bramble bush, Another bush,
And scratched out And scratched them
Both his eyes I In again!







SEE-SAW, Margery Daw, See-saw, up and down,
Johnny shall have a new master; Which is the way to go to town?
He shall have but a cent a day, One foot up, and one foot down,
Because he can't work any faster. That's the way to go to town.









*" I ---(- .-- I^" "i


-~ -~ .










There was a man And when he saw
In our town, His eyes were out,
And he was With all his might
Wondrous wise; And main;
He jumped into He jumped into
A bramble bush, Another bush,
And scratched out And scratched them
Both his eyes I In again!







Snail, snail, come out of your hole,
Or else I will beat you as black as a coal















I <4C U7/ .






SING a song of sixpence, The king was in his countiig-house,
A pocket full of rye; Counting out his money;
Four-and-twenty blackbirds The queen was in the parlor,
Baked in a pie. Eating bread and honey.


When the pie was opened, The maid was in the garden,
The birds began to sing; Hanging out the clothes;
D9as not that a dainty dish, Down came a blackbird,
"*-To set before the king? And pecked off her nose!







Snail, snail, come out of your hole,
Or else I will beat you as black as a coal















I <4C U7/ .






SING a song of sixpence, The king was in his countiig-house,
A pocket full of rye; Counting out his money;
Four-and-twenty blackbirds The queen was in the parlor,
Baked in a pie. Eating bread and honey.


When the pie was opened, The maid was in the garden,
The birds began to sing; Hanging out the clothes;
D9as not that a dainty dish, Down came a blackbird,
"*-To set before the king? And pecked off her nose!








CROSS Patch,
SDraw the latch,


Take a cup,
SAnd drink it up,
1l And call the neighbors in.



Bobby Shaftoe's gone to ,
Silver buckles on his knee '
VHell come back, and marry e,
Pretty Bobby Shaftoe!

CRY, baby, cry,
Put your finger in your eye, Bobby Shaftoe fat and fair,
And tell your mother it wasn't I. Combing down his yellow hair;
He's my love forever more,
Pretty Bobby Shaftoe.
The Man in the Moon,
Came down too soon;
To inquire the way to Norwich.
The man in the South, .
He burnt his mouth;
Eating cold plum porridge.


COOK-a-doodle doo I
My dame has lost her shoe;
My mater's lost his fiddle aick,
S And don't know what to do.


\ ---








CROSS Patch,
SDraw the latch,


Take a cup,
SAnd drink it up,
1l And call the neighbors in.



Bobby Shaftoe's gone to ,
Silver buckles on his knee '
VHell come back, and marry e,
Pretty Bobby Shaftoe!

CRY, baby, cry,
Put your finger in your eye, Bobby Shaftoe fat and fair,
And tell your mother it wasn't I. Combing down his yellow hair;
He's my love forever more,
Pretty Bobby Shaftoe.
The Man in the Moon,
Came down too soon;
To inquire the way to Norwich.
The man in the South, .
He burnt his mouth;
Eating cold plum porridge.


COOK-a-doodle doo I
My dame has lost her shoe;
My mater's lost his fiddle aick,
S And don't know what to do.


\ ---








CROSS Patch,
SDraw the latch,


Take a cup,
SAnd drink it up,
1l And call the neighbors in.



Bobby Shaftoe's gone to ,
Silver buckles on his knee '
VHell come back, and marry e,
Pretty Bobby Shaftoe!

CRY, baby, cry,
Put your finger in your eye, Bobby Shaftoe fat and fair,
And tell your mother it wasn't I. Combing down his yellow hair;
He's my love forever more,
Pretty Bobby Shaftoe.
The Man in the Moon,
Came down too soon;
To inquire the way to Norwich.
The man in the South, .
He burnt his mouth;
Eating cold plum porridge.


COOK-a-doodle doo I
My dame has lost her shoe;
My mater's lost his fiddle aick,
S And don't know what to do.


\ ---








CROSS Patch,
SDraw the latch,


Take a cup,
SAnd drink it up,
1l And call the neighbors in.



Bobby Shaftoe's gone to ,
Silver buckles on his knee '
VHell come back, and marry e,
Pretty Bobby Shaftoe!

CRY, baby, cry,
Put your finger in your eye, Bobby Shaftoe fat and fair,
And tell your mother it wasn't I. Combing down his yellow hair;
He's my love forever more,
Pretty Bobby Shaftoe.
The Man in the Moon,
Came down too soon;
To inquire the way to Norwich.
The man in the South, .
He burnt his mouth;
Eating cold plum porridge.


COOK-a-doodle doo I
My dame has lost her shoe;
My mater's lost his fiddle aick,
S And don't know what to do.


\ ---








CROSS Patch,
SDraw the latch,


Take a cup,
SAnd drink it up,
1l And call the neighbors in.



Bobby Shaftoe's gone to ,
Silver buckles on his knee '
VHell come back, and marry e,
Pretty Bobby Shaftoe!

CRY, baby, cry,
Put your finger in your eye, Bobby Shaftoe fat and fair,
And tell your mother it wasn't I. Combing down his yellow hair;
He's my love forever more,
Pretty Bobby Shaftoe.
The Man in the Moon,
Came down too soon;
To inquire the way to Norwich.
The man in the South, .
He burnt his mouth;
Eating cold plum porridge.


COOK-a-doodle doo I
My dame has lost her shoe;
My mater's lost his fiddle aick,
S And don't know what to do.


\ ---








"BARBER, barber, shave a
I pig;
i .i Il BEARS CREASE How many hairs will make


; '' __ __ "Four and twenty, that's
enough."
S Give the barber a pinch
"of 6Lnff.






Dingti LY


SShe stolo ornuge,
I rfi nl aid.
Aner, manner, moner, Mike, r
Some iu h1 r pockets,
Bassalona, boun, strike; h
Some in her sleeve;
Hare, ware, frown, nack,,
She stole oranges,
Harico, baric', wee, wo,
I do Iel:eve.
Whack!




RAIN, rain,
Go away,
Come again
On April day;
Little Johnny -
Wants to play.








"BARBER, barber, shave a
I pig;
i .i Il BEARS CREASE How many hairs will make


; '' __ __ "Four and twenty, that's
enough."
S Give the barber a pinch
"of 6Lnff.






Dingti LY


SShe stolo ornuge,
I rfi nl aid.
Aner, manner, moner, Mike, r
Some iu h1 r pockets,
Bassalona, boun, strike; h
Some in her sleeve;
Hare, ware, frown, nack,,
She stole oranges,
Harico, baric', wee, wo,
I do Iel:eve.
Whack!




RAIN, rain,
Go away,
Come again
On April day;
Little Johnny -
Wants to play.








"BARBER, barber, shave a
I pig;
i .i Il BEARS CREASE How many hairs will make


; '' __ __ "Four and twenty, that's
enough."
S Give the barber a pinch
"of 6Lnff.






Dingti LY


SShe stolo ornuge,
I rfi nl aid.
Aner, manner, moner, Mike, r
Some iu h1 r pockets,
Bassalona, boun, strike; h
Some in her sleeve;
Hare, ware, frown, nack,,
She stole oranges,
Harico, baric', wee, wo,
I do Iel:eve.
Whack!




RAIN, rain,
Go away,
Come again
On April day;
Little Johnny -
Wants to play.








"BARBER, barber, shave a
I pig;
i .i Il BEARS CREASE How many hairs will make


; '' __ __ "Four and twenty, that's
enough."
S Give the barber a pinch
"of 6Lnff.






Dingti LY


SShe stolo ornuge,
I rfi nl aid.
Aner, manner, moner, Mike, r
Some iu h1 r pockets,
Bassalona, boun, strike; h
Some in her sleeve;
Hare, ware, frown, nack,,
She stole oranges,
Harico, baric', wee, wo,
I do Iel:eve.
Whack!




RAIN, rain,
Go away,
Come again
On April day;
Little Johnny -
Wants to play.








"BARBER, barber, shave a
I pig;
i .i Il BEARS CREASE How many hairs will make


; '' __ __ "Four and twenty, that's
enough."
S Give the barber a pinch
"of 6Lnff.






Dingti LY


SShe stolo ornuge,
I rfi nl aid.
Aner, manner, moner, Mike, r
Some iu h1 r pockets,
Bassalona, boun, strike; h
Some in her sleeve;
Hare, ware, frown, nack,,
She stole oranges,
Harico, baric', wee, wo,
I do Iel:eve.
Whack!




RAIN, rain,
Go away,
Come again
On April day;
Little Johnny -
Wants to play.






-, LITLLE Miss Netticoat,
S .. In a white petticoat,
4Lk. -' *"e And a red nose;
The longer Lhe stands,







rLittle To Tier' dog,





.- sw rm o jee. i. ay,
S- Bowi wowrt a o ow,


i- nt b-es i t July,




Little Torn a Tinker's do
S' eWhose diog art thou'


A swarm f bee in
Is worth a load of hay

r: A. swarm of bees in June,
Is worth a silver spoon.
-But beesd in hot JUIV,
_Are never worth a fly.

bar !Chari Wag,
"h ae tf'a uodding
nAnd ]eftjhe bagl '"


ITILE Miss Muffett, w
SanL in a tuffet,
atin igf cards and whe-;
:j : -fhere came a black spider,.,
L_ 4 And sat down beside her,
Sri sd frighten'd Miss Muffett rawa.
'-






-, LITLLE Miss Netticoat,
S .. In a white petticoat,
4Lk. -' *"e And a red nose;
The longer Lhe stands,







rLittle To Tier' dog,





.- sw rm o jee. i. ay,
S- Bowi wowrt a o ow,


i- nt b-es i t July,




Little Torn a Tinker's do
S' eWhose diog art thou'


A swarm f bee in
Is worth a load of hay

r: A. swarm of bees in June,
Is worth a silver spoon.
-But beesd in hot JUIV,
_Are never worth a fly.

bar !Chari Wag,
"h ae tf'a uodding
nAnd ]eftjhe bagl '"


ITILE Miss Muffett, w
SanL in a tuffet,
atin igf cards and whe-;
:j : -fhere came a black spider,.,
L_ 4 And sat down beside her,
Sri sd frighten'd Miss Muffett rawa.
'-






-, LITLLE Miss Netticoat,
S .. In a white petticoat,
4Lk. -' *"e And a red nose;
The longer Lhe stands,







rLittle To Tier' dog,





.- sw rm o jee. i. ay,
S- Bowi wowrt a o ow,


i- nt b-es i t July,




Little Torn a Tinker's do
S' eWhose diog art thou'


A swarm f bee in
Is worth a load of hay

r: A. swarm of bees in June,
Is worth a silver spoon.
-But beesd in hot JUIV,
_Are never worth a fly.

bar !Chari Wag,
"h ae tf'a uodding
nAnd ]eftjhe bagl '"


ITILE Miss Muffett, w
SanL in a tuffet,
atin igf cards and whe-;
:j : -fhere came a black spider,.,
L_ 4 And sat down beside her,
Sri sd frighten'd Miss Muffett rawa.
'-






-, LITLLE Miss Netticoat,
S .. In a white petticoat,
4Lk. -' *"e And a red nose;
The longer Lhe stands,







rLittle To Tier' dog,





.- sw rm o jee. i. ay,
S- Bowi wowrt a o ow,


i- nt b-es i t July,




Little Torn a Tinker's do
S' eWhose diog art thou'


A swarm f bee in
Is worth a load of hay

r: A. swarm of bees in June,
Is worth a silver spoon.
-But beesd in hot JUIV,
_Are never worth a fly.

bar !Chari Wag,
"h ae tf'a uodding
nAnd ]eftjhe bagl '"


ITILE Miss Muffett, w
SanL in a tuffet,
atin igf cards and whe-;
:j : -fhere came a black spider,.,
L_ 4 And sat down beside her,
Sri sd frighten'd Miss Muffett rawa.
'-






-, LITLLE Miss Netticoat,
S .. In a white petticoat,
4Lk. -' *"e And a red nose;
The longer Lhe stands,







rLittle To Tier' dog,





.- sw rm o jee. i. ay,
S- Bowi wowrt a o ow,


i- nt b-es i t July,




Little Torn a Tinker's do
S' eWhose diog art thou'


A swarm f bee in
Is worth a load of hay

r: A. swarm of bees in June,
Is worth a silver spoon.
-But beesd in hot JUIV,
_Are never worth a fly.

bar !Chari Wag,
"h ae tf'a uodding
nAnd ]eftjhe bagl '"


ITILE Miss Muffett, w
SanL in a tuffet,
atin igf cards and whe-;
:j : -fhere came a black spider,.,
L_ 4 And sat down beside her,
Sri sd frighten'd Miss Muffett rawa.
'-








LITTLE Jack Horner,
Sat in the corner,
"Eating a Christmas pie;
.He put in his thumb,
And pull'd out a plum,
Aud said,
"What a good boy am I 1"


Three men in a tub,
And who do you think they be?
Bonny, brown bat, The butcher, the baker,
The candlestick maker,
Come under my hat;
Turn 'em o(ut, kI;ic-ts all three
And I'll give you a piece,
Of bacon fat Hickery, dickery, 6 and 7,
Alabone, crack abone, 10 and 11;
Spin, span, muskidan,
LITTLE Robin Red-breast, Twiddleum, twaddleum,
ZI ls, all Zdtn.
Sat upon a rail; Z s, al Zan.
Niddle noddle went his head,
And waggle went his tail. ,




LITTLE Tommy Tucker
Sang for his supper; i, i .
What shall he eat?
White bread and butter.
How shall he cut it,
Without e'er a knife?
How will he marry, .:
Without e'er a wife? ,








LITTLE Jack Horner,
Sat in the corner,
"Eating a Christmas pie;
.He put in his thumb,
And pull'd out a plum,
Aud said,
"What a good boy am I 1"


Three men in a tub,
And who do you think they be?
Bonny, brown bat, The butcher, the baker,
The candlestick maker,
Come under my hat;
Turn 'em o(ut, kI;ic-ts all three
And I'll give you a piece,
Of bacon fat Hickery, dickery, 6 and 7,
Alabone, crack abone, 10 and 11;
Spin, span, muskidan,
LITTLE Robin Red-breast, Twiddleum, twaddleum,
ZI ls, all Zdtn.
Sat upon a rail; Z s, al Zan.
Niddle noddle went his head,
And waggle went his tail. ,




LITTLE Tommy Tucker
Sang for his supper; i, i .
What shall he eat?
White bread and butter.
How shall he cut it,
Without e'er a knife?
How will he marry, .:
Without e'er a wife? ,








LITTLE Jack Horner,
Sat in the corner,
"Eating a Christmas pie;
.He put in his thumb,
And pull'd out a plum,
Aud said,
"What a good boy am I 1"


Three men in a tub,
And who do you think they be?
Bonny, brown bat, The butcher, the baker,
The candlestick maker,
Come under my hat;
Turn 'em o(ut, kI;ic-ts all three
And I'll give you a piece,
Of bacon fat Hickery, dickery, 6 and 7,
Alabone, crack abone, 10 and 11;
Spin, span, muskidan,
LITTLE Robin Red-breast, Twiddleum, twaddleum,
ZI ls, all Zdtn.
Sat upon a rail; Z s, al Zan.
Niddle noddle went his head,
And waggle went his tail. ,




LITTLE Tommy Tucker
Sang for his supper; i, i .
What shall he eat?
White bread and butter.
How shall he cut it,
Without e'er a knife?
How will he marry, .:
Without e'er a wife? ,








LITTLE Jack Horner,
Sat in the corner,
"Eating a Christmas pie;
.He put in his thumb,
And pull'd out a plum,
Aud said,
"What a good boy am I 1"


Three men in a tub,
And who do you think they be?
Bonny, brown bat, The butcher, the baker,
The candlestick maker,
Come under my hat;
Turn 'em o(ut, kI;ic-ts all three
And I'll give you a piece,
Of bacon fat Hickery, dickery, 6 and 7,
Alabone, crack abone, 10 and 11;
Spin, span, muskidan,
LITTLE Robin Red-breast, Twiddleum, twaddleum,
ZI ls, all Zdtn.
Sat upon a rail; Z s, al Zan.
Niddle noddle went his head,
And waggle went his tail. ,




LITTLE Tommy Tucker
Sang for his supper; i, i .
What shall he eat?
White bread and butter.
How shall he cut it,
Without e'er a knife?
How will he marry, .:
Without e'er a wife? ,








LITTLE Jack Horner,
Sat in the corner,
"Eating a Christmas pie;
.He put in his thumb,
And pull'd out a plum,
Aud said,
"What a good boy am I 1"


Three men in a tub,
And who do you think they be?
Bonny, brown bat, The butcher, the baker,
The candlestick maker,
Come under my hat;
Turn 'em o(ut, kI;ic-ts all three
And I'll give you a piece,
Of bacon fat Hickery, dickery, 6 and 7,
Alabone, crack abone, 10 and 11;
Spin, span, muskidan,
LITTLE Robin Red-breast, Twiddleum, twaddleum,
ZI ls, all Zdtn.
Sat upon a rail; Z s, al Zan.
Niddle noddle went his head,
And waggle went his tail. ,




LITTLE Tommy Tucker
Sang for his supper; i, i .
What shall he eat?
White bread and butter.
How shall he cut it,
Without e'er a knife?
How will he marry, .:
Without e'er a wife? ,








LITTLE Jack Horner,
Sat in the corner,
"Eating a Christmas pie;
.He put in his thumb,
And pull'd out a plum,
Aud said,
"What a good boy am I 1"


Three men in a tub,
And who do you think they be?
Bonny, brown bat, The butcher, the baker,
The candlestick maker,
Come under my hat;
Turn 'em o(ut, kI;ic-ts all three
And I'll give you a piece,
Of bacon fat Hickery, dickery, 6 and 7,
Alabone, crack abone, 10 and 11;
Spin, span, muskidan,
LITTLE Robin Red-breast, Twiddleum, twaddleum,
ZI ls, all Zdtn.
Sat upon a rail; Z s, al Zan.
Niddle noddle went his head,
And waggle went his tail. ,




LITTLE Tommy Tucker
Sang for his supper; i, i .
What shall he eat?
White bread and butter.
How shall he cut it,
Without e'er a knife?
How will he marry, .:
Without e'er a wife? ,























HEY! diddle, diddle, the cat and the fiddle,
The cow jumped over the moon;
The little dog laughed to see such sport,
While the dish ran after the spoon.


Pease porridge hot,
Pease porridge cold;
Pease porridge in the pot,
Nine days old.

1 clever scholar,
You will be;
* If you spell that,
Without a P.

LITTLE Tee Wee,
As round as-an apple, He went to sea,
As deep as a cup ; In an open boat;
All the king's horses, And while afloat
Oan't fill it up. The little boat bended,
A Well. My story's ended.























HEY! diddle, diddle, the cat and the fiddle,
The cow jumped over the moon;
The little dog laughed to see such sport,
While the dish ran after the spoon.


Pease porridge hot,
Pease porridge cold;
Pease porridge in the pot,
Nine days old.

1 clever scholar,
You will be;
* If you spell that,
Without a P.

LITTLE Tee Wee,
As round as-an apple, He went to sea,
As deep as a cup ; In an open boat;
All the king's horses, And while afloat
Oan't fill it up. The little boat bended,
A Well. My story's ended.























HEY! diddle, diddle, the cat and the fiddle,
The cow jumped over the moon;
The little dog laughed to see such sport,
While the dish ran after the spoon.


Pease porridge hot,
Pease porridge cold;
Pease porridge in the pot,
Nine days old.

1 clever scholar,
You will be;
* If you spell that,
Without a P.

LITTLE Tee Wee,
As round as-an apple, He went to sea,
As deep as a cup ; In an open boat;
All the king's horses, And while afloat
Oan't fill it up. The little boat bended,
A Well. My story's ended.























HEY! diddle, diddle, the cat and the fiddle,
The cow jumped over the moon;
The little dog laughed to see such sport,
While the dish ran after the spoon.


Pease porridge hot,
Pease porridge cold;
Pease porridge in the pot,
Nine days old.

1 clever scholar,
You will be;
* If you spell that,
Without a P.

LITTLE Tee Wee,
As round as-an apple, He went to sea,
As deep as a cup ; In an open boat;
All the king's horses, And while afloat
Oan't fill it up. The little boat bended,
A Well. My story's ended.












Says Sleepy-head; i ,








"Jack .e imble Lazy Tu, with jacket blue,
S vs i Sto hi fater u

"Put on tthe pot,"a tt c s

S:,Js Greedjy-gm.p or

"We'll sup, "/--

Before we go."



Jack L6e nimble, L!,zy Turn, wvith jacket blue,
Jack be qi ;IStole his father', gouty shoe;
For all the harm that comes ofI it,
Jack jIluip over, I hope the gouty shoe wmay fit.
The canule-stick.
Diddle, diddle, dumpling, my son John,
Went to b.i-d with his trousers on;
Shoe the hrse, One shoe off, and th, other shto on,

And shoe the mare; Diddle, diddle, .lumpliuL', my sfa John.

And let the little cult, .
Go bare.



Hush-a-bye, baly,

Daddy is near.
Mawmua's a lady,
That'L very clear.



pi












Says Sleepy-head; i ,








"Jack .e imble Lazy Tu, with jacket blue,
S vs i Sto hi fater u

"Put on tthe pot,"a tt c s

S:,Js Greedjy-gm.p or

"We'll sup, "/--

Before we go."



Jack L6e nimble, L!,zy Turn, wvith jacket blue,
Jack be qi ;IStole his father', gouty shoe;
For all the harm that comes ofI it,
Jack jIluip over, I hope the gouty shoe wmay fit.
The canule-stick.
Diddle, diddle, dumpling, my son John,
Went to b.i-d with his trousers on;
Shoe the hrse, One shoe off, and th, other shto on,

And shoe the mare; Diddle, diddle, .lumpliuL', my sfa John.

And let the little cult, .
Go bare.



Hush-a-bye, baly,

Daddy is near.
Mawmua's a lady,
That'L very clear.



pi












Says Sleepy-head; i ,








"Jack .e imble Lazy Tu, with jacket blue,
S vs i Sto hi fater u

"Put on tthe pot,"a tt c s

S:,Js Greedjy-gm.p or

"We'll sup, "/--

Before we go."



Jack L6e nimble, L!,zy Turn, wvith jacket blue,
Jack be qi ;IStole his father', gouty shoe;
For all the harm that comes ofI it,
Jack jIluip over, I hope the gouty shoe wmay fit.
The canule-stick.
Diddle, diddle, dumpling, my son John,
Went to b.i-d with his trousers on;
Shoe the hrse, One shoe off, and th, other shto on,

And shoe the mare; Diddle, diddle, .lumpliuL', my sfa John.

And let the little cult, .
Go bare.



Hush-a-bye, baly,

Daddy is near.
Mawmua's a lady,
That'L very clear.



pi












Says Sleepy-head; i ,








"Jack .e imble Lazy Tu, with jacket blue,
S vs i Sto hi fater u

"Put on tthe pot,"a tt c s

S:,Js Greedjy-gm.p or

"We'll sup, "/--

Before we go."



Jack L6e nimble, L!,zy Turn, wvith jacket blue,
Jack be qi ;IStole his father', gouty shoe;
For all the harm that comes ofI it,
Jack jIluip over, I hope the gouty shoe wmay fit.
The canule-stick.
Diddle, diddle, dumpling, my son John,
Went to b.i-d with his trousers on;
Shoe the hrse, One shoe off, and th, other shto on,

And shoe the mare; Diddle, diddle, .lumpliuL', my sfa John.

And let the little cult, .
Go bare.



Hush-a-bye, baly,

Daddy is near.
Mawmua's a lady,
That'L very clear.



pi












Says Sleepy-head; i ,








"Jack .e imble Lazy Tu, with jacket blue,
S vs i Sto hi fater u

"Put on tthe pot,"a tt c s

S:,Js Greedjy-gm.p or

"We'll sup, "/--

Before we go."



Jack L6e nimble, L!,zy Turn, wvith jacket blue,
Jack be qi ;IStole his father', gouty shoe;
For all the harm that comes ofI it,
Jack jIluip over, I hope the gouty shoe wmay fit.
The canule-stick.
Diddle, diddle, dumpling, my son John,
Went to b.i-d with his trousers on;
Shoe the hrse, One shoe off, and th, other shto on,

And shoe the mare; Diddle, diddle, .lumpliuL', my sfa John.

And let the little cult, .
Go bare.



Hush-a-bye, baly,

Daddy is near.
Mawmua's a lady,
That'L very clear.



pi












Says Sleepy-head; i ,








"Jack .e imble Lazy Tu, with jacket blue,
S vs i Sto hi fater u

"Put on tthe pot,"a tt c s

S:,Js Greedjy-gm.p or

"We'll sup, "/--

Before we go."



Jack L6e nimble, L!,zy Turn, wvith jacket blue,
Jack be qi ;IStole his father', gouty shoe;
For all the harm that comes ofI it,
Jack jIluip over, I hope the gouty shoe wmay fit.
The canule-stick.
Diddle, diddle, dumpling, my son John,
Went to b.i-d with his trousers on;
Shoe the hrse, One shoe off, and th, other shto on,

And shoe the mare; Diddle, diddle, .lumpliuL', my sfa John.

And let the little cult, .
Go bare.



Hush-a-bye, baly,

Daddy is near.
Mawmua's a lady,
That'L very clear.



pi








JACK and Jill
A h ltwent up the
"hill,
To fetch a pail
'-of water;
Jack fell down,
and broke his
crown,
And Jill came
tumbling after.



We're in the dumps, JACK SPRAT could eat no fat,
For hearts, and trumps; His witf could eat no lean;
The kittens, are gone, And so between them both,
To St. Paul They licked the platter clean.
The baf.,i s are Lit; ,
The I.. ,u's ill a fit; i
And h:.ou-ci are built -
Without walls I




Hins, mins,
The old witch winks,
Tho fat begins
To fry!

There's no one bome,
But jumping Joau,
Father, Mother, s,-U "
And I!








JACK and Jill
A h ltwent up the
"hill,
To fetch a pail
'-of water;
Jack fell down,
and broke his
crown,
And Jill came
tumbling after.



We're in the dumps, JACK SPRAT could eat no fat,
For hearts, and trumps; His witf could eat no lean;
The kittens, are gone, And so between them both,
To St. Paul They licked the platter clean.
The baf.,i s are Lit; ,
The I.. ,u's ill a fit; i
And h:.ou-ci are built -
Without walls I




Hins, mins,
The old witch winks,
Tho fat begins
To fry!

There's no one bome,
But jumping Joau,
Father, Mother, s,-U "
And I!








JACK and Jill
A h ltwent up the
"hill,
To fetch a pail
'-of water;
Jack fell down,
and broke his
crown,
And Jill came
tumbling after.



We're in the dumps, JACK SPRAT could eat no fat,
For hearts, and trumps; His witf could eat no lean;
The kittens, are gone, And so between them both,
To St. Paul They licked the platter clean.
The baf.,i s are Lit; ,
The I.. ,u's ill a fit; i
And h:.ou-ci are built -
Without walls I




Hins, mins,
The old witch winks,
Tho fat begins
To fry!

There's no one bome,
But jumping Joau,
Father, Mother, s,-U "
And I!








JACK and Jill
A h ltwent up the
"hill,
To fetch a pail
'-of water;
Jack fell down,
and broke his
crown,
And Jill came
tumbling after.



We're in the dumps, JACK SPRAT could eat no fat,
For hearts, and trumps; His witf could eat no lean;
The kittens, are gone, And so between them both,
To St. Paul They licked the platter clean.
The baf.,i s are Lit; ,
The I.. ,u's ill a fit; i
And h:.ou-ci are built -
Without walls I




Hins, mins,
The old witch winks,
Tho fat begins
To fry!

There's no one bome,
But jumping Joau,
Father, Mother, s,-U "
And I!







I HAD a little husband,
No bigger than my thumb;
I put him in a pint pot,
And there I bid him drum.

I bought a little horse,
That gallop'd up and down;
I bridled him, and saddled him,
And sent him out of town.

I gave him some garters, .
To tie his little hose,
And a little hand-kerchief,
To wipe his little nose._


One's all, Two's all, -, -- _
Three's all, zan;
Bobtail, vinegar,
Little tall man;
Horum, scorum,
Custa-lorum, --
Band-box.


As I was going to St. Ives, John O'Gudgeon,
I met seven wives. He was a wild man;
Each wife had seven sacks, He whipped his children
Each sack had seven cats, Now and then.
Each cat had seven kits. When he whipped them,
Kits, Cats, Sacks and wives, He made them dance;
How many were going Out of Ireland,
To St. Ives? Into Franee.







I HAD a little husband,
No bigger than my thumb;
I put him in a pint pot,
And there I bid him drum.

I bought a little horse,
That gallop'd up and down;
I bridled him, and saddled him,
And sent him out of town.

I gave him some garters, .
To tie his little hose,
And a little hand-kerchief,
To wipe his little nose._


One's all, Two's all, -, -- _
Three's all, zan;
Bobtail, vinegar,
Little tall man;
Horum, scorum,
Custa-lorum, --
Band-box.


As I was going to St. Ives, John O'Gudgeon,
I met seven wives. He was a wild man;
Each wife had seven sacks, He whipped his children
Each sack had seven cats, Now and then.
Each cat had seven kits. When he whipped them,
Kits, Cats, Sacks and wives, He made them dance;
How many were going Out of Ireland,
To St. Ives? Into Franee.







I HAD a little husband,
No bigger than my thumb;
I put him in a pint pot,
And there I bid him drum.

I bought a little horse,
That gallop'd up and down;
I bridled him, and saddled him,
And sent him out of town.

I gave him some garters, .
To tie his little hose,
And a little hand-kerchief,
To wipe his little nose._


One's all, Two's all, -, -- _
Three's all, zan;
Bobtail, vinegar,
Little tall man;
Horum, scorum,
Custa-lorum, --
Band-box.


As I was going to St. Ives, John O'Gudgeon,
I met seven wives. He was a wild man;
Each wife had seven sacks, He whipped his children
Each sack had seven cats, Now and then.
Each cat had seven kits. When he whipped them,
Kits, Cats, Sacks and wives, He made them dance;
How many were going Out of Ireland,
To St. Ives? Into Franee.







I HAD a little husband,
No bigger than my thumb;
I put him in a pint pot,
And there I bid him drum.

I bought a little horse,
That gallop'd up and down;
I bridled him, and saddled him,
And sent him out of town.

I gave him some garters, .
To tie his little hose,
And a little hand-kerchief,
To wipe his little nose._


One's all, Two's all, -, -- _
Three's all, zan;
Bobtail, vinegar,
Little tall man;
Horum, scorum,
Custa-lorum, --
Band-box.


As I was going to St. Ives, John O'Gudgeon,
I met seven wives. He was a wild man;
Each wife had seven sacks, He whipped his children
Each sack had seven cats, Now and then.
Each cat had seven kits. When he whipped them,
Kits, Cats, Sacks and wives, He made them dance;
How many were going Out of Ireland,
To St. Ives? Into Franee.








SIMPLE SIMON met a pieman
( Going to the fair:
S Said Simple Simon to the pieman:
"Let me taste your ware."


Says the pieman to Simple Simon:
22" Show me first your penny.'
S" -- Says Simple Simou to the pieman:
"Indeed, I have not any."


Simple Simon went a fishing
"For to catch a whale;
SI All the water he pad got,
"Was in his mother's pail.

Simple Simon went to look
If plums grew on a thistle;
He pricked his fingers very much,
Which made poor Simon whistle.



THERE was a man of double deed, And when the sky began to roar,
Who sowed his garden full of seed, 'Twas like a lion at the door;
And when the seed began to grow, And when the door began to crack,
"Twas like a garden full of snow. Twas like a stick across your back;
And when the snow began to fall. And when your back began to smart,
'Twas like a bird upon the wall; Twns like a penknife in your heart;
And when the bird away did fly, And when your heart begins to bleed,
'Tw'R like an eagle in the sky; You're dead, and dead, and dead.
indeed.








SIMPLE SIMON met a pieman
( Going to the fair:
S Said Simple Simon to the pieman:
"Let me taste your ware."


Says the pieman to Simple Simon:
22" Show me first your penny.'
S" -- Says Simple Simou to the pieman:
"Indeed, I have not any."


Simple Simon went a fishing
"For to catch a whale;
SI All the water he pad got,
"Was in his mother's pail.

Simple Simon went to look
If plums grew on a thistle;
He pricked his fingers very much,
Which made poor Simon whistle.



THERE was a man of double deed, And when the sky began to roar,
Who sowed his garden full of seed, 'Twas like a lion at the door;
And when the seed began to grow, And when the door began to crack,
"Twas like a garden full of snow. Twas like a stick across your back;
And when the snow began to fall. And when your back began to smart,
'Twas like a bird upon the wall; Twns like a penknife in your heart;
And when the bird away did fly, And when your heart begins to bleed,
'Tw'R like an eagle in the sky; You're dead, and dead, and dead.
indeed.







If you're an honest baby, as I suppose you be,
Neither laugh nor smile, as I tickle you on your knee.



Shoe the eolt, shoe the colt, Sing, sing, what shall I sing?
Shoe the grey mare; Puss has stolen the pudding-string
If the colt won't be shod, Do, do, what shall I do?
Let him go bare. Puss has bit it quite in two


THERE was a little man, '-
And he had a little guu,
And his bullets they were made _r
of lead, lead, lead.

He shot Johnny Sprig,
Through the middle of his wig, I
And he knocked it right off his
head, head, head.



Rosie-Posie softly sleeping,
Nozy-Bozy, up comes creeping;
Stings the cheek of Rosie-Posie,
Tweaky-weaky, Nozy-Bozy. i.



Go to a Tom,
Go to bed Tom,
Merry or sober,
Go to bed Tom.

7