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Title: The story of a pie
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00049086/00001
 Material Information
Title: The story of a pie
Physical Description: 12 leaves : ill. ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Religious Tract Society (Great Britain) ( Publisher )
Kronheim & Co ( Printer )
Publisher: Religious Tract Society
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Kronheim & Co.
Publication Date: [1878]
 Subjects
Subject: Baking -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Generosity -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1878
Genre: fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Date from reward sticker on back cover.
General Note: Leaves 1 and 12 mounted on covers.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00049086
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001871917
oclc - 29228458
notis - AJU6916

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
    Content
        Page 1
        Plate
        Plate
        Page 2
        Plate
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Plate
        Page 5
        Plate
        Plate
        Page 6
    Back Cover
        Cover 2
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.~ !rE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY.
TRROW; 65, ST. PAUL'S CHURCHYARD. AND 164, "PICCADILLy.
- - -. "









THE STORY OF A PIE.



T HE first thing was to pick the currants, for if you are
to have a pie, there must be something to put in it.
We want the inside as. well as the outside. That was
what Rhoda thought, and so she went out to gather the
fruit.
There was a currant-bush at the corner of Rhoda's own
garden. Every day, as she watered her flowers, she
watched the berries getting a little riper and a little redder.
The blackbirds had been watching them, too, for black-
birds are very fond of currants. They had just looked at
each other, and they had said, "We will have some currants
for the children' dinner to-day."
That very morning Rhoda's mother had said, I think
those currants are quite ready now, we will pick them for
a pie, and you shall make it." So Rhoda ran for her
basket, and it was soon quite full of bright red berries.
They did look so good. Rhoda was just going to put
a bunch into her mouth when she remembered her mother
had said, Go and gather them for a pie," not go and
eat them."

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THE STORY OF A PIE.

So the bunch went into the basket instead of into her
mouth. And I think this was a very good beginning to
the Story of a Pie.
So Rhoda was going to make the pie. Her mother
told her how to do it, and so I am going to tell you in
case you should like to make one, too.
The currants were all picked off the stalks and put in a
dish with a little water to make it juicy, and more than a
little sugar to make it sweet.
Then the next thing was to go to the grocers to buy
the butter and the flour. It was only a village shop,
and so Rhoda could get both at the same place, and there
was no need to go to the bakers. Rhoda took her little
sister Lucy with her, because she always liked to do some-
thing to help.
The grocer took down his scales and weighed out a
pound of butter. Then he reached a paper bag full of
flour, and put both into Lucy's basket for her to carry
home. The basket was rather heavy, but Lucy did not
mind. You know a pound of butter would have made
three or four pies, but then the rest could be used for tea
and breakfast, mother said.
The grocer smiled and nodded to the two little girls.
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THE STORY OF A PIE.

lie had some of his own, so he had always a kind word
for the children who came to his shop to do their mother's
errands. But he knew nothing about the Pie.
It was all ready now to begin to make the pie. Rhoda's
mother had the headache and was obliged to keep upstairs,
so Rhoda had the kitchen all to herself. I can assure you
she was very proud of it. But she did not think, as some
children do, that she knew best; no, she meant to do
everything just as her mother told her.
First of all she spread a clean cloth on the table, and on
that she placed a basin with some flour in it, a jug of
water, a board for the paste, and a roller also. She mixed
the flour with some water till it was quite stiff. I ought
to have told you that she had washed her hands because
the flour and water have to be mixed with the fingers, so
this is very important, is it not ?
Then she rolled out the paste, stuck some lumps of
butter all over it, rolled it out again and made it just the
right size to cover the dish with the currants in it. Lucy
sat on a stool by her side, peeling the potatoes and look-
ing up every minute to watch Rhoda. Tom, the pet cat,
did the same, very intently. I think he had rather an idea
that the pie was meant for him.
3







THE STORY OF A PIE.

It was no small thing when the pie was ready to go
into the oven. Rhoda felt as if she had done some great
deed. It was the grandest step in life she had yet made.
I think if you had made a pie your very own self, you
would have felt as she did.
I can enter a little into her feelings, because I well
remember my first pudding. But who ever compares a
pudding to a pie?
I am sure Tom entered into them also, for he was a very
sensible cat. It was clear now to his mind that the pie
was not for him after all. He was very unselfish too, so
he purred his very loudest, as Rhoda, with cautious steps
and with great seriousness, moved the pie off the table and
placed it in the oven. Lucy came and took hold of one
side, and thought she was helping.
Rhoda, like a careful little woman, had turned back her
frock, that it might not catch fire. How heavy the pie
was! but Rhoda's arms were strong, and with a little
patience the task was done. Rhoda gave a sigh of relief,
as people do when some great weight is taken off their
minds; and into the oven went the pie.
If the putting the pie into the oven was important, how
much more the taking it out?
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*el







THE STORY OF A PIE.

I do not wish to say anything to spoil Rhoda's pleasure,
but I may just whisper to you that she had much too
large a fire. She did not know that besides burning her
mother's coals, a large fire is not good for baking. A pie
will bake much better with a smaller fire and a cooler oven.
But, however, it does not look in the picture as if
Rhoda's pie had failed in anything it ought to be. When
the oven door was shut Rhoda tidied up the kitchen and'
put the things away which she had been using. Then
she went up to ask her mother how her headache was,
and tell her all about what she had been doing.
The next thing was to go and lay the table ready for
dinner. She put four plates and spoons for herself and
Lucy and her two brothers, Tom and Harry, who would
now soon come in from school. It was rather dull to
have no plate to put for mother to-day.
By this time Rhoda felt sure the pie would be done.
Harry came in at the happy moment when she was taking
it out, and he agreed with Lucy, that never could there
be seen on any table anywhere, a better pie than that.
So the four .it down to eat the pie. Harry said grace
because he was "the oldest, but Rhoda helped the pie,
which was both right and proper, you know.















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THE STORY OF A PIE.

I need not tell you how good it was. Rhoda felt rather
anxious, of course, about it, "but the others all praised it so
much she could not help believing that it was a splendid
pie, as they said.
But little Lucy did not eat hers, though she had a large
plateful before her. "What's the matter, sister," cried
Harry, ain't it good?"
Oh yes, I should think so," said Lucy, but I was
thinking that-that-it would be so nice to give some
away to little Jem, the lame boy, across the road. He
never gets what's good, and yet he can't eat plain things,
because he is not well. I should so like to send him half
my pie." And as she spoke she put her spoon across her
plate to divide it. I'll do it, too," cried Harry. So
will I," said Tom and Rhoda.
I have not room to tell you how pleased poor little Jem
was with such an unlocked for dinner. I can only say,
" Go and do the same," and you will find that to try and
make others happy is the best way to be happy yourself.
" It is more blessed to give than to receive."
And who the lambs of Christ will feed,
With tender patient care?
They who love Jesus Christ indeed,
Such toil, such honour share.

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