• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Frontispiece
 Duck
 Eider duck
 Canvas-back
 Widgeon
 Wild goose
 Barnacle-goose
 Swan
 Herring-gull
 Albatross
 Loon
 Penguin
 Cormorant
 Pelican
 Advertising
 Back Cover






Group Title: Prang's natural history series for children
Title: Swimming birds
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00049083/00001
 Material Information
Title: Swimming birds
Series Title: Prang's natural history series for children
Physical Description: 16 p., 4 leaves of plates : col. ill. ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Calkins, Norman A ( Norman Allison ), 1822-1895
Diaz, Abby Morton, 1821-1904 ( joint author )
L. Prang & Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: L. Prang
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: 1878, c1877
 Subjects
Subject: Waterfowl -- Juvenile literature -- United States   ( lcsh )
Birds -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1878   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1878
Genre: Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Norman A. Calkins and Mrs. A.M. Diaz.
General Note: Printed paper covers.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00049083
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001590032
oclc - 15006933
notis - AHL4010

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Frontispiece
        Plate
    Duck
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Plate
    Eider duck
        Page 5
    Canvas-back
        Page 6
    Widgeon
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Wild goose
        Page 8
    Barnacle-goose
        Page 9
    Swan
        Page 10
    Herring-gull
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Albatross
        Page 12
        Plate
    Loon
        Page 13
    Penguin
        Page 14
    Cormorant
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Pelican
        Page 16
        Plate
    Advertising
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Back Cover
        Cover 3
        Cover 4
Full Text




PRANGNS B

NA TUALHISTORY SERIES




I
CHILDREN
















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The Baldwin Library
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PRANG'S



NATURAL HISTORY SERIES


FOR CHILDREN.




SWIMMING BIRDS.



CLASSIFICATION
BY
NORMAN A. CALKINS,
SUPERINTENDENT OF PRIMARY SCHOOLS, NEW YORK CITY,
AND TEXT BY
MRS. A. M. DIAZ,
AUTHOR OF "THE WILLIAM HENRY LETTERS."









BOSTON:
L. PRANG AND COMPANY.
1878.












































COPYRIGHT.
BT L. PRANG & CO.
1877.


































SwrLcH

IIIIIER17








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j2, :. .. ----

MNJIARL LUCOK.












PRANG'S


NATURAL HISTORY SERIES FOR CHILDREN.



SWIMMING BIRDS.
My way is on the bright blue sea,
My sleep upon its rocking tide."
DUC. water, such as ducks, gulls, pelicans;
WHAT a handsome bird! said this kind makes the third group. The
Fred. water group are called Swimmers.' "
Why, I thought he was a Duck!" See if Tiptoes understands it,"
said little Tiptoes. said Cousin Kate. Tiptoes, can you
"A Duck is a bird," said Fred. mention a bird which stays on the
"See! there are the wings' and the ground?"
feathers and the bill." Chicken cried Tiptoes.
O, please let me tell something! Now one which lives in the air?"
cried Nannie. Our teacher told us "Humming-bird! "
beautiful things one day. Geese are "And one which belongs in the
birds; and so are turkeys and hens. water?"
There are three three I don't re- "Duck! "
member what. Earth, air, and water. "Very well forTiptoes," said Cousin
Three somethings. One on the Kate.
earth, one in the air, one in the water; We might know, just by looking
but I don't remember the word." at a Duck, that he belonged to the
"Wait a minute," said Fred, "I water," said Fred.
am remembering. It is an easy word. Please tell why we might know,"
It begins with G. Cousin Kate, where said Cousin Kate.
do words stay while we are trying to Because its body is shaped like a
remember them ? Gr- gr -" boat," said Fred. "Teacher said
". Groups!" cried Nannie with a that the people who first made boats
shout. took their pattern from the shape
""0 yes," said Fred. "Three groups. of sea-fowl. But there's another way
There are birds which stay on the of telling that a Duck belongs to
ground, such as hens, turkeys, pea- the water-group. Look, little Tiptoes.
cocks ; this kind makes one group. Don't you see something between the
There are birds which stay above the Duck's toes? "
earth, such as robins, crows, eagles; I don't believe a Duck could stand
this kind makes another group. Then on tiptoe," said Nannie.
there's the kind that belongs to the Why ? ". asked Fred.









2 SWIMMING BIRDS.

Because," said Nannie, when he turns them flat side down, because
Tiptoes stands on tiptoe, his toes bend it is easier to draw them through the
back, and I don't believe a Duck's toes water that way. A Duck, in swim-
can bend back. I suppose those little ming, does just about the same thing.
black hooks are his toes, are n't they?" First, you know, he gives himself a
Why no," said Fred. "Those push with his feet spread wide, as you
must be his toe-nails. His toes reach see them in the picture."
all the way to his leg." And that sends him ahead," said
They are long enough, I hope! Fred.
said Nannie. But then lie has only "Yes," said Cousin Kate, and in
three." going ahead he has to draw his feet
Three and a half," said Fred. after him, just as a rower has to draw
" Don't you see that little one stick- his oar along. Now a Duck cannot
ing out behind ?" make his foot quite as thin as the
What for does he have that cloth edge of an oar, but if you look in
on his toes ?" asked Tiptoes. the corner above the picture you will
You little precious! cried Nan- see what he does do with it."
nie; "that is n't cloth, that is skin. He shuts it up very small," said
Skin fastens the toes together. I re- Nannie.
member, now, teacher called it a web. And in such a way that the
All the Swimmers are webbers." middle toe makes a sharp edge to
"You mean 'web-footed,' not'web- cut the water with," said Fred.
bers,' said Cousin Kate. Perhaps So a Duck swims by pushing his
Fred can tell us why the Swimmers feet out behind and pulling them in
are web-footed." again," said Nannie.
Teacher told us," said Fred, that, Yet to see him gliding so smoothly
calling a Duck a boat, his feet would over the water," said Cousin Kate,
be the oars. He has to push himself you would not think he moved his
along through the water with his feet feet at all. I suppose you know that
just as a boat is pushed along by its a Duck has to wear his waterproof
oars. You could n't do anything with cloak all the time."
.an oar that is full of great holes; "I don't see any waterproof,"
the water would go through the holes. said Tiptoes, almost touching his nose
A Duck could n't push himself along to the picture.
without that web to join his toes to- "It is a handsome feather water-
gether; the water would go between proof cloak," said Cousin Kate.
them." But why do you call it a water-
I see," said Nannie, "he wants proof ?" asked Nannie.
the web to push with." Because," said Cousin Kate, "it
There's another way in which a is a waterproof. When Fred fell into
Duck uses its feet as a rower uses his the water the other day he was wet to
oars," said Cousin Kate. "When a his skin. A Duck cannot be wet to
rower has given a push with his oars his skin. None of the group of Svim-
R____ --








SWIMMING BIRDS. 3

mers can be wet to their skins. Their Uncle Willie's are tame ones,"
feathers lap over each other so closely, said Cousin Kate, and this is a Wild
and are so full of oil, that not a drop Duck. I suppose the tame Duck's
of water can go through. This oil is great, great, great, many times great
distributed in so beautiful and delicate grandfather was a Wild Duck. But
a way that it does not show at all. It what else do you see in the picture ? "
is there, everywhere there, but neither I see a little round eye! said
by sight nor by touch would you know Tiptoes.
that it is there. And the Swimmers And it is near the top of his head,"
are in no danger of getting out of oil, said Fred. His legs are short, and
for they don't have to buy it at the are far back. No wonder he 's a
grocery stores; it comes from their clumsy walker, with so much of him
own bodies." in front! His head is a great deal
Some of them have so much of it larger than a hen's head. Cousin
in their own bodies," said Fred, that Kate, which knows the most, a duck
they are not fit to eat. Once I smelled or a hen ?"
of a Gull's body that Uncle Willie was The hen knows better how to take
skinning. Ugh !" care of her children than a tame
"' The breast-feathers are thickest," Duck," said Cousin Kate, and this
said Cousin Kate, and the best pro- is why people put Duck's eggs under
vided with oil; and they have a very a hen to be hatched out."
tight, close way of pressing down upon And 0, what a fuss the old hen
and against each other. Sportsmen makes when the little Ducks take to
say that you can't hurt a sea-fowl the water!" said Fred. She squawks
much by shooting at its breast; the and cackles and claps her wings like a
shot glance off. But I wish, now, that crazy creature! "
you would all look at this picture of a "I suppose," said Nannie, that
Duck and tell me what you see in it." she is talking to them in her talk."
I see a little curl on his tail," said "Yes," said Cousin Kate," and say-
Nannie. I wonder if his mother ing,' Come back! Come back! You'll
does it up in papers! ". drown! We don't swim We are not
He has a white collar," said Fred, Ducks Come back! Mind me!'
" and his wing reaches almost to the In China, Duck-raisers keep their
end of his tail." Ducks in boats, three or four hundred
His back is greenish," said Nan- in a boat. Uncle Willie says he has
nie," and his bill is yellow, and his seen thousands of these boats on riv-
feet are orange-colored, -and his head ers near large cities. The Ducks go
is black and green, and his breast is out in the morning for their food, and
brown and red, and his tail is black come back at the call of their masters.
and white, -and his wings are pur- They cannot be very stupid, if each
ple and white and black and brown. one of all this multitude knows and
Uncle Willie's Ducks are not as hand- obeys its master's voice."
some as this one, Cousin Kate." What do they eat ?" asked Nannie.







4 SWIMMING BIRDS.

"Almost everything that is eatable, Wordsworth has some lines about
but chiefly worms, insects, grain, and a wild Duck's nest," said Cousin Kate.
roots of grasses. They are water He calls it a
birds, and are fitted to get their food 'Dimly gleaming nest, -a hollow crown
from the water. Look up at that Of golden leaves inlaid with silver down
drawing of a Duck's bill. It is open. Fine as the mother's softest plumes allow.'"
Do you notice those points on the I once read of a Duck," said Fred,
upper edges ? If you examine a real "who learned to quack little tunes.
bill, the thing itself, as I did once, you His teacher took him when he was first
will find that these points are long, hatched and kept him by himself and
fine, slender teeth, like the teeth of whistled the tunes to him hundreds of
a comb. There are fifty or sixty on times. That Duck was not stupid."
each side, and when the bill closes, Ducks are very interesting to any
they shut into little grooves made just one who will take pains to watch
to fit them in the lower bill. The them," said Cousin Kate. "We may
Duck often takes his food on the not understand their language, but
water. When a mouthful has been they understand it, and each other.
taken this fringe of comb-teeth acts The same of Geese, Swans, and other
like a sort of strainer. It keeps the birds. Sportsmen can tell by their
food inside and lets the water run talk whether they are going to start
out. The edges of the tongue have a on a long journey, or only on a short
strainer, too, but not a stiff one. It flight; also, whether they feel safe, or
is more like a fringe of hairs. Out of feel the presence of danger. I once
water these hairs cling together, and heard of a Mandarin Duck who had
to see them well you have to put the her mate stolen from her. She showed
tongue in water and let them float great sorrow, and stayed apart from
apart. All the Swimmers which have all the others, sad and lonely. In
bills of this kind belong to the Duck three weeks her mate was returned to
Family, as, for instance, Swans and her. At the first sound of his voice
Geese and Widgeons. And as they she set up a quacking that was almost
often have to grope for their food in a screaming. They flew to meet each
the mud, their broad bills are filled other, and crossed necks and seemed
with delicate nerves of touch. These in perfect bliss.
delicate nerves of touch help the bird "I knew of another Duck whose
to tell whether the food his bill hits ducklings, just after she had hatched
in the mud is good to eat or not, them out, were taken into a yard
and help him to find this food." half a mile away and placed under
"Once Grandpa found a wild Duck's a hen with other ducklings. The
nest in a clump of grass," said Fred. wall around this yard was three feet
" It Ihad thirteen eggs in it. It was high and topped by a wire netting
made of grass and leaves, and the in- seven feet high. The Duck found
side of it was soft and downy. The this yard, picked out her own duck-
eggs were pale green." lings, managed to get them over the




















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SWIMMING BIRDS. 5

wall and through the wire netting, countries the people live through the
and so back to her nest. She did this long, dark, icy winter with not much
twice. Ducks are wonderful creatures. to eat but seal-flesh and whale-flesh;
All creatures are wonderful creatures, no bread, no milk, no vegetables.
as any one will find out who watches, There is great gladness in the spring
their movements." when the wild-fowl come home and
build nests and lay eggs."
EIDER DUCK. Come home ? asked Nannie.
DID you children ever hear of the Yes, that is their home. All our
Eider Duck?" asked Cousin Kate. wild-fowl come from the North, -
" Look, Tiptoes, this bird, this Swim- ducks, geese, swans, and others.
mer, with so much white in front, and When the winter sets in and makes
so much black behind the white, is an their feeding-grounds a mass of snow
Eider Duck." and ice, they fly away to warmer
I have heard of Eider down," said countries, where there are open rivers
Fred, and beds of down, and bed- and seas and lakes. They go back
quilts filled with down, so that you in the spring, though, to build their
could lie down on down and have nests, and lay their eggs, and raise
down over you. It is a kind of their families."
feathers, is n't it ? But if the men take away the
Very much lighter and finer and poor mother Duck's down and eggs,
softer thanfeathers," said Cousin Kate. then how can she raise any family ?"
" Do you know how people get it ? asked Nannie.
I suppose," said Fred, "that they She lays more eggs and plucks off
pick it off the Duck." more down ; and if these are taken,
No, the mother Duck herself picks she lays more eggs and plucks off
it off her own breast." more down."
"With her fing-I mean with her- But when it is all plucked out,
her toes ? asked Tiptoes. then what does she do ? asked Fred.
No, with her bill." When this happens, the father
"Does it hurt much ? asked Duck plucks down from his breast.
Tiptoes, looking very sober. It is darker than the mother's. When
I don't think it hurts," said the hunters see this in the nest, they
Cousin Kate. She picks off this say, Hands off, and don't meddle! "
soft down and puts it over and under for they know that the mother Duck
her eggs, to keep them warm; puts a will lay no more eggs, and that if the
good deal of it, sometimes half a peck mother Ducks are not allowed to raise
or more; for the Eider Duck's home families, then there will be no down
is away, 'way in the cold and frozen for them to sell and no eggs to eat."
North. The people there take the "Do you know how the Eider
down to use and to sell. They eat Duck's eggs look ?" asked Fred.
the eggs, and are glad to get them ; I do! cried Uncle Willie, spring-
and no wonder, for in some of those ing through the doorway into the room.









6 SWIMMING BIRDS.

" O, I'm a jolly sailor, and I've seen back does n't take his celery put up
their nests Away in Greenland, O, in bunches, in a big goblet. His kind
so merrily, 0! all built of moss and of celery is a sea-plant, and grows in
seaweed, and lined thick with down! deep water. It looks more like tall
Six eggs, six pale green eggs in their grass than like celery ; in fact, it is
downy beds, high up, up, up among not celery at all, and is called celery
the rocks. They are about three only because it has white roots like
inches long." the real celery. The Canvas-backs
I have read about hunting wild- get their clothes for nothing, but they
fowl's nests," said Fred. Some- have to work for their board."
times the hunters are let down by 0 Uncle Willie, you 're joking! "
ropes from cliffs hundreds of feet said Nannie.
high And sometimes they are It is no joke to them," said Uncle
pushed up from the bottom with Willie. For they are not satisfied
poles by men in a boat. Two men with the grass leaves. No. Roots or
are pushed up to a place to stand on ; nothing! say the Canvas-backs. So
then one of these pushes the other up they dive to the bottom and tear up
higher to another place ; then this one the tall grass by the roots, and away
pulls up the lower one, and so on. it goes to the top, and there it floats,
They take anything,-eggs, down, strewn along in windows, like hay in
or the birds themselves. Are Eider a hayfield. That is the way the Duck
Ducks good to eat, Uncle Willie ? sets his table. Pretty soon he comes
Not very," said Uncle Willie. up to eat his dainty white roots, for
" If you want a good Duck for eating, he can't swallow them under water.
take that red-headed fellow there with
the speckled jacket and the black WIDGEON.
shirt-bosom. Canvas-back, they call SOMETIMES the Canvas-back finds
him. that certain of his relatives, by the
CANVAS-BACK. name of NWidgeon, have invited them-
THE back of this Duck does look selves to dinner, and have begun to
something like canvas. If you ever eat before dinner is ready! Now, then,
taste a bit of Canvas-back Duck, you for a squabble, and a racket, and a
will taste something nice." general row-de-dow Such quack-
I suppose," said Cousin Kate, ling from the Ducks, such whe-ow-
"that the flavor of a bird's flesh de- ings from the Widgeons! Imagine
pends upon what he eats." the talk.
"Exactly," said Uncle Willie, and We 've come to dine with you "
the flavor of the Canvas-back's flesh say the Widgeons. We are fond of
depends upon wild celery." white-root."
"What! our kind of celery, such We don't want you !" say the
as we have for dinner?" asked Canvas-backs.
Fred. "We belong to the family! say
"Not a bit of it! The Canvas- theWidgeons. "Whe-ow! whe-ow!"









6 SWIMMING BIRDS.

" O, I'm a jolly sailor, and I've seen back does n't take his celery put up
their nests Away in Greenland, O, in bunches, in a big goblet. His kind
so merrily, 0! all built of moss and of celery is a sea-plant, and grows in
seaweed, and lined thick with down! deep water. It looks more like tall
Six eggs, six pale green eggs in their grass than like celery ; in fact, it is
downy beds, high up, up, up among not celery at all, and is called celery
the rocks. They are about three only because it has white roots like
inches long." the real celery. The Canvas-backs
I have read about hunting wild- get their clothes for nothing, but they
fowl's nests," said Fred. Some- have to work for their board."
times the hunters are let down by 0 Uncle Willie, you 're joking! "
ropes from cliffs hundreds of feet said Nannie.
high And sometimes they are It is no joke to them," said Uncle
pushed up from the bottom with Willie. For they are not satisfied
poles by men in a boat. Two men with the grass leaves. No. Roots or
are pushed up to a place to stand on ; nothing! say the Canvas-backs. So
then one of these pushes the other up they dive to the bottom and tear up
higher to another place ; then this one the tall grass by the roots, and away
pulls up the lower one, and so on. it goes to the top, and there it floats,
They take anything,-eggs, down, strewn along in windows, like hay in
or the birds themselves. Are Eider a hayfield. That is the way the Duck
Ducks good to eat, Uncle Willie ? sets his table. Pretty soon he comes
Not very," said Uncle Willie. up to eat his dainty white roots, for
" If you want a good Duck for eating, he can't swallow them under water.
take that red-headed fellow there with
the speckled jacket and the black WIDGEON.
shirt-bosom. Canvas-back, they call SOMETIMES the Canvas-back finds
him. that certain of his relatives, by the
CANVAS-BACK. name of NWidgeon, have invited them-
THE back of this Duck does look selves to dinner, and have begun to
something like canvas. If you ever eat before dinner is ready! Now, then,
taste a bit of Canvas-back Duck, you for a squabble, and a racket, and a
will taste something nice." general row-de-dow Such quack-
I suppose," said Cousin Kate, ling from the Ducks, such whe-ow-
"that the flavor of a bird's flesh de- ings from the Widgeons! Imagine
pends upon what he eats." the talk.
"Exactly," said Uncle Willie, and We 've come to dine with you "
the flavor of the Canvas-back's flesh say the Widgeons. We are fond of
depends upon wild celery." white-root."
"What! our kind of celery, such We don't want you !" say the
as we have for dinner?" asked Canvas-backs.
Fred. "We belong to the family! say
"Not a bit of it! The Canvas- theWidgeons. "Whe-ow! whe-ow!"









SWIMMING BIRDS. 7

You have n't the uniform sayi does n't that other one have any din-
the Ducks. You are another ner that 's his own ? asked Tiptoes.
branch Quack quack Where The Widgeon ? 0 yes. He gets
are your speckled jackets ? your plenty of dinner along by the water,
black shirt-bosoms ? your black bills? among the salt grass and in the mud.
Where are your red nightcaps ? Off Both Canvas-backs and Widgeons
with you, bald pates! Quack! quack! make their nests in these wet,
quack! marshy places. The Widgeon lays
Whe-ow cry the Widgeons. from eight to twelve yellowish white
"If our heads are bald, we have eggs, about two inches long, and
pretty blue bills, and fine red and nearly oval. The Canvas-backs' eggs
black shawls, made in front like a are pale blue, and of the same shape
cape. Whe-ow Look at our web feet, as the Widgeon's, but a little larger."
at our broad bills, and at the edges I saw a great company of Widg-
of those bills; all just like yours! eons, once," said Cousin Kate, "sev-
Quack! quack!" scream the eral thousands, at least. They hovered
Ducks. Dig and dive as we do, in the air like a dark cloud, and when
as we do they settled upon the water covered a
Whe-ow We don't dive reply space as large as Mr. Derby's Great
the Widgeons; but we will have the Pasture. But they were not bright
celery. Whe-ow-ow-ow! Whe-ow! colored; they looked dark, darker
Whe-ow! Whe-ow ow ow ow than Ducks."
- ow ow We don't dive They are darker," said Uncle
Then you are another branch! Willie, and I suppose those you saw
scream the Ducks! "Quack quack! had not changed their feathers. Wild-
Quackerty, quack! Quackerty-ack- fowl do not wear their bright clothes
erty ackerty ackerty! all the year round. Or perhaps they
And all this time the fight goes on, were Ma Widgeons; their clothes are
with pouncings and dartings and bill- not as bright as the Pa Widgeons.
striking, and at last the Widgeons In journeying from the North, the
are driven away, for- the Canvases Pas of the wild-fowl come first, and
are larger and stronger than the the Mas come afterward with the
Widgeons." children."
Do they really have these fights !" "I suppose the Pas tell the Mas
asked Fred. what course to take," said Cousin
Yes, often. The Widgeons are Kate.
not divers, but they are extremely "Uncle Willie, do they talk?"
fond of these celery roots. So they asked Tiptoes.
keep a lookout while the Canvases 0 yes," said Uncle Willie.
set their table, and snatch away the Sometimes a company of them will
food before the owner comes up to all talk at once, each trying to talk
dinner. Too bad, is n't it, Tiptoes ?" the loudest. Suddenly they stop.
But does n't does n't the The question is decided. They rise








8 SWIMMING BIRDS.

together and carry out the plans "0, you mean his neck," said Nannie.
just made. Ducks fly in silence. "That neck, straightened out, at
Widgeons always keep up their the end of that long body," said
Whe-ow whe-ow Geese go Clang, Cousin Kate, would reach a good
clang, clang, like a trumpet." way down."
O, not as deep as the celery roots!"
WILD GOOSE. cried Nannie.
0 YES I've seen geese fly over !" Geese are not particularly fond of
said Fred. "They fly along in two celery," said Uncle Willie. They
lines and the lines come together in eat bugs, worms, snails, grass, small
a point, so as to look like a V." shell-fish, almost anything."
Yes," said Uncle Willie," and the I wonder," said Nannie, if Geese
V goes point first, because that is the always keep their mouths open, and
easiest way for a V to pass through make their necks crooked."
the air. A strong male bird takes the I've seen them look that way
point, and when he gets tired, another when they were mad," said Fred.
takes his place." Geese do have a habit of keeping
Geese always fly one behind the their mouths open," said Cousin Kate.
other, as if they were strung on a This is one reason why they are
string," said Cousin Kate. "How called stupid. Another reason is their
quick men run for their guns when waddle. Even Tiptoes would look
they see a skein of them flying over, stupid if he waddled along with his
especially about Thanksgiving time!" neck stretched out and his mouth
It is hard to shoot a Goose," said open." Tiptoes tried it, and set
Uncle Willie. "They are sharp to w'erybody laughing.
see, quick to hear, they fly high, and But Geese are not stupid," said
at night they rest upon' the water Uncle Willie. "I know seventeen
instead of resting on land or near Goose-stories. Goose number one was
water, like Ducks and Widgeons. so fond of a workman that it went
Their nests are sometimes in trees, nearly a mile to meet him every morn-
sometimes on the ground among the ing at just the right hour. Goose
water grasses. The eggs about number two, when rats come to get
eight in number are pale yellowish the chickens, cackles till the dog be-
green, at times nearly white, and are gins to bark, then settles into her
rather more than three inches long." nest. Geese hear quicker than dogs.
Do Geese dive for white roots ? We ought to have watch-geese instead
asked Nannie. of watch-dogs. Goose number three;
Geese seldom dive unless they are Goslings fall into a deep hole; Goose
frightened," said Uncle Willie. If waddles to her master; makes great
you look at that picture of a Wild outcry; master follows; Goose wad-
Goose you will see a reason why he dles ahead; Goslings saved; great joy
is saved the trouble of diving, a and cacklings on part of Goose. Goose
long, black, crooked reason." number four; old Roman Goose;








SWIMMING BIRDS. 9

Gauls come to destroy Rome; people side is covered with a sort of down,
sound asleep; Gauls creep softly ; and has numerous little fingers, which
nobody hears; a little farther; no- it spreads out to catch its food. They
body hears; almost there; nobody look like a feathery fringe. The bar-
hears; closer and closer; Cackle nacle is held on to the rock by a little
cackle cackle !' cries the Goose; up stalk. The people thought this stalk
start the dogs; Bow, wow, wow !' was the neck of the Goose, and that
up start the people; Who 's there ?' the down and feathery fringe were
off scamper Gauls; Rome is saved, its feathers and wings, just begin-
As the Latin book has it:-- ning to grow. There's a book in
'The silvery Goose before the shining gate the library which tells all about it."
There flew, and by her cackle saved the state.'" Uncle Willie got the book, and
But this Goose is not silvery," Cousin Kate read an extract from
said Nannie. an old writer, telling how the shell
No," said Cousin Kate, this is a gapeth open," and how next come
wild Goose. The Roman Goose must the legs of the bird hanging .
have been of the kind called the Grey* till at length all is come forth and it
lag. It is thought our tame Geese hangeth only by the bill." Then, it
come from the Greylag." falleth into the sea, and gathereth
feathers, and growth into a fowl."
BARNACLE GOOSE. The people who told these stories,"
WHY, here's a different kind of said Cousin Kate, had not learned
Goose," said Nannie. This one has to use their eyes. They were careless
more black and white about him. See, see-ers. Because Geese and Goslings
Tiptoes! The black on his neck were plenty among the rocks and
reaches very far down; and'how even drift-wood, where barnacles grew, it
those white rows are on his wings I was taken for granted that they came
should like to have a fan made of from the barnacles."
such feathers. B, a, r, Barnacle. Uncle Willie, did you ever see a
Uncle Willie, why do they call him a Barnacle Goose ? asked Nannie.
Barnacle Goose? No, Nannie, I never did. I have
For a funny reason," said Uncle seen a great many kinds of birds,' as
Willie. "Away over the ocean there's I sailed, as I sailed,' but the Barnacle
a country called Scotland. Many Goose and I never happened to meet.
years ago the people who lived in If we ever do, I shall take off my hat
one part of that country used to think and say, with a low bow, Brother
that these Geese were not hatched Barnacle, I have at home a niece; a
from eggs, but came from barnacles, laughing, dancing, chattering, hop-
Barnacles are a kind of shell-fish with perty-skipping Nannie kind of niece,
one shell, which stick to rocks and who would like one of your wings for
old timbers by the sea-shore. Some a fan, if you please !' "
are more than half as long as my "And if he says, 'Excuse me,
thumb. The soft little creature in- Brother Seafellow,'" said Cousin Kate,









10 SWIMMING BIRDS.

" you can beg the Swan for one of "To get some dinner? asked Tip-
his great feathery white ones toes, putting his finger upon the red
0, what a big fan said Nannie. dot by the Swan's eye.
It would blow us all out of the Yes, to get insects, weeds, roots,
room!" said Fred. young frogs, or whatever may be
Tiptoes has seen a Swan," said thrown at them; bread-crumbs, grain,
Cousin Kate. Nannie, if you show vegetables."
him the picture, he will remember." Are they themselves good to
eat ? asked Fred.
SWAN. "Not very good," said Uncle Willie.
"THERE," said Nannie, "that white Their flesh is dark and tough, espe-
one with the beautiful wings and the cially that of the wild ones."
long neck is a Swan. His neck is But we know who are glad to get
prettier than the Goose's neck." it," said Cousin Kate. Those peo-
0 yes," cried Tiptoes, I saw ple far in the cold North, who have
him! I fed him with bread! A to eat whales and things They are
great big fellow! glad when the Swans come flying
Yes, much bigger than a Goose," home to build nests and lay eggs,"
said Uncle Willie. "They are strong "And they are among the first
fellows, too. They look peaceful and wild-fowl to get back," said Uncle
gentle, but just provoke them, then Willie, "for they are strong flyers.
you 'll see the blows laid on, and feel They fly in a V like Geese. Their
them! Look at that long neck and wings make a pleasant noise in the
that stout bill, and see if you don't air, and their cry is a loud Hoop !
think Swans could give hard blows to hoop! Tame ones have a gentler
a boy who tried to rob their nests! cry. Swans are so heavy that they
The Swan builds her nest of water make a great ado in rising. A herd
weeds, and lays two large white or of them will beat their long wings
yellowish eggs, rather over four inches against the water with a noise that
long. The nest is half a foot high, sounds as if every bone in all the
and about half a yard across." wings were cracking."
I read a story once," said Fred, Cousin Kate, do Swans really sing
" of a fight between an Eagle and a when they are dying? asked Fred.
Swan. Each tried to hold the other's So some people say. In Australia,
head under water." which is thousands of miles from here,
Swans are used to putting their they have black Swans, and it is said
heads under water," said Uncle Willie, that their dying song has a creaky
"but they can keep them under only a sound."
few minutes. Instead of diving, like
Ducks, they sit on the water and HERRING-GULL.
thrust their heads in, like Geese. "THAT Herring--Gull's neck looks
Tiptoes, why do they thrust their rather different from the Swan's,"
heads in ?" said Nannie.









10 SWIMMING BIRDS.

" you can beg the Swan for one of "To get some dinner? asked Tip-
his great feathery white ones toes, putting his finger upon the red
0, what a big fan said Nannie. dot by the Swan's eye.
It would blow us all out of the Yes, to get insects, weeds, roots,
room!" said Fred. young frogs, or whatever may be
Tiptoes has seen a Swan," said thrown at them; bread-crumbs, grain,
Cousin Kate. Nannie, if you show vegetables."
him the picture, he will remember." Are they themselves good to
eat ? asked Fred.
SWAN. "Not very good," said Uncle Willie.
"THERE," said Nannie, "that white Their flesh is dark and tough, espe-
one with the beautiful wings and the cially that of the wild ones."
long neck is a Swan. His neck is But we know who are glad to get
prettier than the Goose's neck." it," said Cousin Kate. Those peo-
0 yes," cried Tiptoes, I saw ple far in the cold North, who have
him! I fed him with bread! A to eat whales and things They are
great big fellow! glad when the Swans come flying
Yes, much bigger than a Goose," home to build nests and lay eggs,"
said Uncle Willie. "They are strong "And they are among the first
fellows, too. They look peaceful and wild-fowl to get back," said Uncle
gentle, but just provoke them, then Willie, "for they are strong flyers.
you 'll see the blows laid on, and feel They fly in a V like Geese. Their
them! Look at that long neck and wings make a pleasant noise in the
that stout bill, and see if you don't air, and their cry is a loud Hoop !
think Swans could give hard blows to hoop! Tame ones have a gentler
a boy who tried to rob their nests! cry. Swans are so heavy that they
The Swan builds her nest of water make a great ado in rising. A herd
weeds, and lays two large white or of them will beat their long wings
yellowish eggs, rather over four inches against the water with a noise that
long. The nest is half a foot high, sounds as if every bone in all the
and about half a yard across." wings were cracking."
I read a story once," said Fred, Cousin Kate, do Swans really sing
" of a fight between an Eagle and a when they are dying? asked Fred.
Swan. Each tried to hold the other's So some people say. In Australia,
head under water." which is thousands of miles from here,
Swans are used to putting their they have black Swans, and it is said
heads under water," said Uncle Willie, that their dying song has a creaky
"but they can keep them under only a sound."
few minutes. Instead of diving, like
Ducks, they sit on the water and HERRING-GULL.
thrust their heads in, like Geese. "THAT Herring--Gull's neck looks
Tiptoes, why do they thrust their rather different from the Swan's,"
heads in ?" said Nannie.








SWIMMING BIRDS. 11

"When a Gull is flying," said a spy-glass. They gather on the flats
Cousin Kate, lie shows more neck at low tide, say early in May. The
than that one in the picture, and gentlemen Gulls choose their mates,
looks much more graceful, make bows to them, walk round them
'0, the white sea-gull, the wild sea-gull. A joy- with swelling throats, throwing their
ful bird is he !' own heads upwards, and going through
sings Mary Howitt. with various odd motions."
Don't you remember how we You don't mean that Gulls build
watched the Gulls from our boat, their nests on the trees ?" said Fred.
last summer, and how white they That's the curious part of it,"
looked in the sunlight, and how said Uncle Willie. "Let a few peo-
gracefully they moved their long ple come to live near the nesting-
wings ?" places, and the Gulls will stop build-
0 yes! said Nannie. And ing nests on the ground and build in
Aunt Hattie had a pair of Gull's the trees. Now, this is acting for a
wings. She said they were the sil- reason. There's another thing the
veriest gray she ever saw. She put Gull does for a reason. He takes
the breast-feathers in her hat, and shell-fish in the air and drops them
they were white as snow on a rock for a reason, and the rea-
Roast Turkey, roast Goose, roast son is that he wants what is inside.
Duck," said Fred. We don't have If the shell does not break at the first
roast Gull." dropping, he tries again and again,
No, I thank you," said Uncle and takes it higher each time, for the
Willie, "none for me. But the eggs reason that the fall will be heavier."
are good, and far at the North, where I read once in Dr. Kane's book,"
so many Gulls go every summer to said Fred, that he saw Ducks' nests
lay their eggs, the people salt down all over the rocks, and so close to-
the young birds for winter eating. gether you could n't step without
I tell you it is quite a sight to treading on them, and that the Gulls
see Gulls by thousands and thou- used to suck the eggs and swallow
sands, swarming over the rocks, young Ducks whole."
alighting on trees, building nests, Yes," said Uncle Willie, and
sitting on eggs, feeding their young they rob each other. Sometimes
and leading them to the water. The when a Herring-Gull swoops down
nests are made of seaweed and moss, and scoops a fish out of water with
carefully arranged, and are two thirds his strong bill, the Great Burgomas-
of a yard across. The eggs three ter Gull will swoop down on him and
eggs are drab, or greenish, blotched snatch the fish away."
with dark colors, and are nearly three Now, I am going to tell a Gull
inches long. But the drollest sight story," said Cousin Kate. Once
is to see Gulls choosing their mates. there was a Gull which was caught
They do this before they fly North. young and brought up with a family
I have often watched them through of Ducks. It became tamer than the








12 SWIMMING BIRDS.

Ducks. It used to put its head into said Uncle Willie, "but he is a big
the kitchen window, hoping to get fellow, almost as large as a Swan.
bits of fat meat, and used to.run His wings are larger than a Swan's,
after Peggy the woman who and he knows how to use them too!
took care of it with widespread Away in the Southern Ocean some of
wings, screaming for food. It knew these birds followed our ship hundreds
its master's voice, and came at his and hundreds of miles. At one time
call and hovered over his head. At we went a hundred and sixty miles a
last, on a fine spring day, it flew away day, but they kept up. No matter
to the North, and they thought they how hard the wind blew, you'd see
had lost it. But in October its mas- the whole ocean tossing and raging
ter heard one day a great outcry from and foaming, and you'd see these
'Peggy.' Sir! Big Gull is come great, dark-looking birds skimming
back!' And sure enough there it along over the foam, swift and steady,
was. For a great many years Big night and day, never stopping, never
Gull' flew away in the spring and tired. Sometimes they would mount
came back in the autumn." high in air and soar away out of
We sailors have reasons for sight, and then come sailing back and
liking the Gulls," said Uncle Willie. circle round and round us. I say sail-
"In dark, stormy nights their screams ing, because their flight is so steady.
upon the rocks warn us to keep our They don't flap their wings. They
distance. You can hear them farther just spread them out and sail along."
than you can see the light of a light- "But don't they ever light' any-
house. And after a long voyage Gulls where ? asked Fred.
are often the first land-signs we see. Sometimes in calm weather they
They can fly very far out from land dip into the water for a few minutes,"
with their strong, long wings." said Uncle Willie, "but usually they
Eighteen inches long, it says in keep on the wing, and sailors say they
the picture," said Nannie, and the sleep flying. Sailors say, too, that
Eider Duck's wing is only ten to shoot an Albatross will bring bad
Yet the Eider Duck itself meas- luck."
ures almost as many inches as the "But where do they 1gy their eggs?"
Gull," said Cousin Kate. It is the asked Nannie.
Gull's long wings which make him They go to some lonely cliff, some
seem so large when flying." desolate rocky islet rising out of the
ocean. I knew a man who climbed
ALBATROSS, to the top of one of these rocky islets.
THAT big fellow with the big name, He said it was a fearful place. There
A, 1,- Albatross; he has wings long are from one to three eggs in a nest
enough!" said Nannie, and he very large eggs. The nest is a
does n't show even as much neck as pile of mud a quarter of a yard, or
the Gull." half a yard across, with a hollow in
"He looks different when flying," the top for the eggs."




9



























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k-.. . _ir .u _
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SWIMMING' BIRD S. 13

The idea that the Albatross sleeps iing up, or sitting down ? asked
flying has been brought into poetry," I Tiptoes.
said Cousin Kate. Moore speaks of Both," said Uncle Willie.
an old ruined castle standing on a "His legs are so far back," said
point so high that Fred, "that lie can't stand up with-
'The sleeping Albatross out sitting down. I wonder how he
Struck the wild ruins with her wing, would look walking ? "
And from her cloud-rocked slumbering
Started, to find man's dwelling there, His walking," said Uncle Willie,
In her own silent fields of air.' is only a sort of scrambling along,
And in Coleridge's Ancient Mariner' but, once in the water, he darts off
we find something very interesting like a fish. Loons are shy birds.
"atol1.t the mnan who with his cross- You don't catch them following a
bow dared to shoot an Albatross." vessel. You don't catch them, any-
We don't have Albatrosses here, where, very often. They are shy and
do we ?" asked Nannie. sly. Chase one in a boat, and it will
No; yet Bunker Hill Monument swim under water, swift as an arrow,
would be a good place for them to putting its head up away off in places
'light' on," said Uncle Willie, sober- where you are not looking for it. The
ly, and there 's Plymouth Rock. Loon ? Why, the Loon is the most
Think of an Albatross on Plymouth astonishing and remarkable and as-
Rock! founding and wonderful and amazing
Even the Widgeons and wild diver you ever heard of! He just
Geese and Ducks do not belong here," sinks down without taking the trouble
said Cousin Kate. They only stop to go head first. And when he says
by the way as they fly South in the anything, he speaks it out loud."
fall and fly North in the spring." 0 yes cried Nannie; once
"But the Loons stay with us," said when Tiptoes tumbled out of his
Uncle Willie, and the Gulls do not wheelbarrow, grandpa said he hol-
all leave us." lered like a Loon!"
I heard of a Loon who made some
LOON. fishermen 'holler,' said Cousin Kate.
"THERE 'S a Loon Look, Tip- He got caught in their fishing-net,
toes said Cousin Kate. This one and fought them furiously."
is the Loon. Do you see his green Yes," said Uncle Willie, a mad
cap, and his green comforter twisted Loon, fighting for his life, with that
around ? long, strong, peaked bill of his, could
And his black and white checked soon make a hole in a man's arm.
shawl," said Nannie, and his white Loons are much larger than Gulls,
apron ? you know. And they are different
Checked jacket, you mean," said from Gulls in other ways: Gulls fly
Fred, "and white vest. He would n't in flocks; Loons fly singly, or in
wear a shawl and apron pairs. Gullsmare sociable, clamorous,
Say, Uncle Willie, is lie stand- screaming birds; the Loon is unso-








14 SWIMMING BIRDS.

ciable, lonesome, fond of solitude, dark hats and coats, white vests, and
His cry has a mournful sound. One yellow shirt-bosoms. The old birds
curious thing about Loons is that they are constantly running down to the
never fly down to their nests from water to get fish for their children.
the air. They fly over the spot in Ma Penguin lays but one eo_. and
circles, then drop into the water, and has but one baby. She carries the
crawl, or wriggle, up to their nests egg about with her, and keeps it warm
through the mud. To make her nest by the heat of her body. I was told
the Loon collects a large pile of weeds that if she happens to drop it in
and grasses, and makes a hollow in scrambling over rocks, Pa Penguin
the centre nearly half a yard across scolds and beats her. I '11 tell you
by four or five inches deep. Her two how she feeds her baby. Baby Pen-
or three eggs are greenish-brown, with guin stands close to its Ma. Ma
a few dark dots and blotches, and are Penguin lifts up her head, and lifts
about three inches and a half long." up her voice, and makes a long quack-
Are Loons good to eat ?" asked I ering, clattering speech, as loud as if
Fred. it were meant to be heard half a mile
No, not much better than Gulls. off. Then she drops her head and
The Loon is a fish-eater. Birds which opens her bill wide. Baby Penguin
live upon fish are not often good to puts in its bill and takes the food
eat." from its mother's throat. Then Ma
PENGUIN. Penguin lifts up her head and hler
"I SHOULD think that next one voice and makes another noisy speech;
would have to wriggle," said Nannie. then Baby Penguin takes more food,
" Do see what little wings for that and so on. When Baby is old enough,
great great what ? Is he a bird ?" the family go to reside in the water."
"0 yes," said Uncle Willie. He's I once read of a tame Penguin,"
another one that stands up when he said Cousin Kate. It used to fol-
sits down. He is a Penguin bird, low its master around like a dog."
but not a flying bird, except under I wonder if he worked for his
water. He shuffles over the ground master," said Uncle Willie.
with a one-sided motion, and crosses
his great feet at every step. If he CORMORANT.
is in a hurry to reach the water, he "A CORMORANT can be made to
drops down and uses his funny little work for his master. There he is,
wings for front feet, and runs along that dark, fine-looking, long-tailed
like a cat. In the water he uses bird, with green feathers on his wing,
them for wings, or you might call and a black tuft on his head, and a
them paddles. Away off to the South hooked beak, and a red spot just back
I've seen thousands of these Penguins of his eye."
at once, sitting in rows by the sea- What kind of work can he do ?"
shore. They look like companies of asked Nannie.
little men. about a yard high, with Guess," said Uncle Willie.








14 SWIMMING BIRDS.

ciable, lonesome, fond of solitude, dark hats and coats, white vests, and
His cry has a mournful sound. One yellow shirt-bosoms. The old birds
curious thing about Loons is that they are constantly running down to the
never fly down to their nests from water to get fish for their children.
the air. They fly over the spot in Ma Penguin lays but one eo_. and
circles, then drop into the water, and has but one baby. She carries the
crawl, or wriggle, up to their nests egg about with her, and keeps it warm
through the mud. To make her nest by the heat of her body. I was told
the Loon collects a large pile of weeds that if she happens to drop it in
and grasses, and makes a hollow in scrambling over rocks, Pa Penguin
the centre nearly half a yard across scolds and beats her. I '11 tell you
by four or five inches deep. Her two how she feeds her baby. Baby Pen-
or three eggs are greenish-brown, with guin stands close to its Ma. Ma
a few dark dots and blotches, and are Penguin lifts up her head, and lifts
about three inches and a half long." up her voice, and makes a long quack-
Are Loons good to eat ?" asked I ering, clattering speech, as loud as if
Fred. it were meant to be heard half a mile
No, not much better than Gulls. off. Then she drops her head and
The Loon is a fish-eater. Birds which opens her bill wide. Baby Penguin
live upon fish are not often good to puts in its bill and takes the food
eat." from its mother's throat. Then Ma
PENGUIN. Penguin lifts up her head and hler
"I SHOULD think that next one voice and makes another noisy speech;
would have to wriggle," said Nannie. then Baby Penguin takes more food,
" Do see what little wings for that and so on. When Baby is old enough,
great great what ? Is he a bird ?" the family go to reside in the water."
"0 yes," said Uncle Willie. He's I once read of a tame Penguin,"
another one that stands up when he said Cousin Kate. It used to fol-
sits down. He is a Penguin bird, low its master around like a dog."
but not a flying bird, except under I wonder if he worked for his
water. He shuffles over the ground master," said Uncle Willie.
with a one-sided motion, and crosses
his great feet at every step. If he CORMORANT.
is in a hurry to reach the water, he "A CORMORANT can be made to
drops down and uses his funny little work for his master. There he is,
wings for front feet, and runs along that dark, fine-looking, long-tailed
like a cat. In the water he uses bird, with green feathers on his wing,
them for wings, or you might call and a black tuft on his head, and a
them paddles. Away off to the South hooked beak, and a red spot just back
I've seen thousands of these Penguins of his eye."
at once, sitting in rows by the sea- What kind of work can he do ?"
shore. They look like companies of asked Nannie.
little men. about a yard high, with Guess," said Uncle Willie.








SWIMMING BIRDS. 15

"I know! I know!" cried Fred. he does this without any chopping-
" I read about it in a magazine." knife. He carries his fish ashore and
".His bill looks as if it might be thrashes it against a tree or rock. He
handy for picking up things," said eats just as long as he has power to
Nannie. swallow."
"That's not it !" cried Fred. "0 I have known some children, and
yes, it is! He picks up fish out of even some grown people, do almost
the water." this very same thing," said Cousin
"Yes," said Uncle Willie, the Kate.
Cormorant is trained to the fishing "Yes," said Uncle Willie, "you
business. He sits quietly on the know we sometimes hear of an appe-
edge of the boat till his master gives tite like a Cormorant's.' Cormorants
the order; then he dives in, pounces make a steady business of fishing and
upon'a fish, and brings it to the boat. eating. They gather around the shore
If the fish happens to be too heavy, in great companies, and a few stand
another Cormorant takes hold and as sentinels and look out for danger,
helps. If the Cormorants are lazy while the others feed. They build
and inclined to gad about among the their nests high among rocky ledges.
waves, their master-shouts at them People who have watched them say
and strikes the water with his oar, they are very careful of their young.
and they immediately go to work The nests are made of coarse seaweeds
again. When the fishing is over, and lined with finer ones, and are
they get their share of the fish." sometimes two feet high. The '.-.-
I have read that even in his wild three eggs -are bluish-green, and
state the Cormorant is a famous fish- nearly three inches long. The egg
erman," said Cousin Kate. has a crust outside which is soft and
"So he is," said Uncle Willie. "I white, but this can be easily scraped
suppose that is why the Chinese off with a knife."
thought of using him. He does not I should think,"' said Nannie,
swoop down upon the fish from high "that the tame Cormorant would
in air, like the Gull and the Albatross, swallow its fishes, and not carry them
neither does he fly far out to sea like to its master."
them. He keeps near shore, flies low, 0, I remember about that! cried
and chases the fish under the water. Fred. The master puts a ring round
He can chase one a long way under its neck, too small for the fish to go
the water. And no minced fish for through."
Master Cormorant! He swallows a I suppose that is while it is being
fish hole, head first. If he catches taught," said Uncle Willie.
one by any other part, he tosses it in Do we have Cormorants here ?"
the air so that it drops head first into asked Nannie.
his mouth. Though if it happens "No, we don't have them," said
to be too big for his throat, then he Uncle Willie. They are found in
has to stop to mince matters. But this part of the country, but they usu-









16 SWIMMING BIRDS.

ally stay off among the islands, or into the shallow plaes; thenthy'spen
along the wild sea-shore. They like their great yellow pouches and scoop
wild, lonely places." up these fishes by the thousand. Often
the Gulls keep watch overhead, and
PELICAN. dart down and snatch any fish that
"O, WHAT a funny bird that one may hang out of the pouch. The
is!" cried Tiptoes, laughing, and put- Pelican eats all he can and wishes
ting his finger on the Pelican. he could eat more. Like those glut-
I should think so!" said Fred, tonous people at the feast. Don't
" with that great yellow pouch on his you remember the story, children?
bill '0, did n't they gobble, and didn't they stuff!
And his hair combed out straight And were n't they sorry when they'd eaten
behind! said Nannie. enough !'"
"Feathers, if you please," said "Just so," said Uncle Willie.
Cousin Kate. "Birds don't have Away to the South, in Florida, you
hair." will see these Pelicans sitting, hun-
I wonder why birds have feathers dreds of them together, gorged with
and cats have hair," said Nannie. food, half. asleep, patiently waiting to
Feathers are lighter," said Fred.. be hungry. If one gapes they all
"They have hollow quills, you know." gape. Pelicans are very much troubled
"This great Pelican," said Uncle if their nests are disturbed. These
Willie, has not only hollow quills, nests are sometimes mere hollows in
but very large hollow bones; and he the ground, sometimes made of sticks,
has air-cells all underneath his skin. in low bushes, always near water, and
Four feet and a half! That's as long in I'l-:--. hard to find. The eggs are
as a short man. He would be too not much thicker at the large end than
heavy to fly, if 't were not for all this at the small end. They are white,
air he carries about him." with a roughened shell, and are from
That pouch weighs something! three to nearly four inches long."
said Fred. "The Pelican looks more like a
When he flies," said Uncle Willie, bird than the Penguin does," said
"he draws it in so that it hardly shows Nannie, and his feet are not as
at all. What do you think the Nile splashy as the Penguin's. Now,
boatmen in Egypt use these pouches what's Tiptoes laughing at?"
for? You never will guess, so I'll Tiptoes declared that "that Pel-
tell you. For baling out their boats. lercan was ,so crooked it made him
The bill, you see, makes a very handy laugh."
handle. The birds themselves use "The Penguin makes me laugh,"
these pouches for gobbling up little said Nannie, he does look so sober.
fishes. They stay close in shore, and If I can't remember which has the
splash the water with their great yel- pouch I i shall say, Pelican, pouch,
low feet, and chase the little fishes Pelican, pouch.'"
























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PRANG'S


NATURAL HISTORY SERIES


FOR CHILDREN.
By N. A. CALKINS, Suferintendenl ofPrimary Schoots, New York City, and
MRs. A. M. DIAZ, Author of "William Henry Letters," etc.


MESSRS. L. PRANG & Co. have the pleasure of announcing that they have
begun the publication of a series of works in Natural History, for schools and
families, under the general title of "PRANG'S NATURAL HISTORY SERIES FOR
CHILDREN."
These works will include the best features of PRANG'S NATURAL HISTORY
SERIES FOR SCHOOLS AND FAMILIES," which had the hearty approval and commen-
dation of the late Prof. AGASSIZ, and which has found so much favor in many
schools within the past few years.
It is the aim of the publishers, in issuing these works in the present form, to
aid the efforts now so generally made to elevate the character of the juvenile
literature of the day, by placing within the reach of parents and teachers some of
the interesting facts in Natural History which shall serve not only for the amuse-
ment of children, but which shall tend at the same time to develop their percep-
tive faculties and to enlarge the boundaries of their knowledge. To this end, the
publishers have availed themselves not only of their extensive facilities for pro-
ducing colored illustrations of a high order, but they have secured in addition the
assistance of the best literary, scientific, and educational talent available for the
preparation, arrangement, and description of the various subjects illustrated, so
that they can confidently put this enterprise forward as an entirely exceptional
one in American juvenile literature, and of great practical value in education.
Six works are now issued, with the following titles:-
Swimming Birds, with thirteen colored illustrations of Ducks, Swan, Geese,
Gull, Albatross, Loon, Pelican, etc.
Wading Birds, with thirteen colored illustrations of Herons, Crane, Stork,
Ibis, Flamingo, Bittern, Woodcock, etc.
Scratching Birds, or Gallinaceous Birds, with thirteen colored illustrations
of Turkey, Fowl, Grouse, Quail, Pheasant, Pigeons, etc.
Birds of Prey, with thirteen colored illustrations of Eagles, Vultures, Owls,
Hawks, etc.
Cat Family, with thirteen colored illustrations of Cats, Lion, Tiger, Leopard,
Panther, Lynx, etc.
Cow Family, or Hollow-horned Ruminants, with thirteen colored illustrations
of Cow, Ox, Yak, Zebu, Bison, Goat, Sheep, Chamois, Gnu, etc.










The selection of Quadrupeds and Birds for illustration, and their classification,
has been made by Prof. NORMAN A. CALKINS, Superintendent of Primary Schools
of New York City. The descriptive text has been written by Mrs. A. M. DIAZ,
the author of the "William Henry Letters," and otherwise widely known through
the "St. Nicholas" and other juvenile magazines as a delightful writer for young
people; and further, the publishers have the pleasure of stating that both the
illustrations and text have passed under the supervision of the eminent naturalist,
Prof. J. A. ALLEN, of the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard College.
The object has been in each book to illustrate by appropriate specimens
some of the characteristic features by which certain birds and animals are classi-
fied into families, and also distinguished from other families.
In carrying out this idea, it has been the aim of the authors to make such
selections as would be of the greatest interest to the children; and it is safe to
say that in no similar works accessible to American youth will there be found so
much valuable knowledge presented in so entertaining a manner. One important
feature to which the publishers desire to call particular attention is this, that
the illustrations in these works are accurate, so far as it is possible to make them
accurate within the limits of practical publication. Every bird and Quadruped rep-
resented has been carefully studied in its color and form; and in the preparation of
the text, describing their habits, their method of rearing their young, of building
nests, etc., Mrs. DIAZ has gathered her information from the best authorities; and
it is hoped that these works will not only prove of peculiar interest to children,
but that they may serve a still broader purpose, as valuable sources of sound
knowledge.
The kind of reading which shall be put into the hands of children and
youth is getting to be a matter of very serious concern, not only in their intellec-
tual education, but in their moral development. In this enterprise, an earnest
effort has been made to combine attractiveness in pictorial illustrations with inter-
esting knowledge of a substantial kind; and for the support of this enterprise,
the publishers appeal to parents and teachers who would see the early develop-
ment of children's minds turned in the direction of a healthful and delightful
study of Natural History.

Price of each work, fifty cents.

L. PRANG & CO., Publishers, Boston, Mass.

















PRANG'S

NATURAL HISTORY SERIES

FOR CHILDREN.
CL X iF..OwN tY
N. A. CALKINS,
Supacrittrnl- nit of' 1riimrrlr Srh,,,I-. ii ,Ne a r Fourk City,
IND, iL1:T h,'
MRS. A. M. DIAZ,
The authorr of The Williamn He. iir Litiers," etc.

This Series of Juveniles consi-s of a number of volumes treating of the
h'.bits and peculiar chlra.,teristics of Bird_ and Quadrupeds in a manner
interesting to children.
The works already published in this Series are a follows:-

Swimming Birds, Birds of Prey,
With Thirteen Colored Illustrations. With Thirteen Colored Illustrations.

Wading Birds, Cat Family,
With Thirteen Oolored Illustrations. With Thirteen Colored Illustrations.

Scratching Birds, Cow Family,
or Gallinccous Birds, or Hollow-hornaed Ruminants,
With Thirteen Colored Illustrations. With Thirteen Colored illustrations.


PRICE OF EACH WORK FIFTY CENTS.

L. PRANG & CO., Publishers, Boston.








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