• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 How the Froggies Go to Sleep
 The Mince Pie Prince
 A Bad Fix
 The Hen's Adventure
 The Two Laste Knyghtes and Their...
 The Dancing Cow
 The Tables Turned
 Retaliation
 Johnny Skye
 A Hop
 The Fiddling Wolf
 How They Received the King
 The Tragical History of Chang Fung...
 Coming
 Advertising
 Back Cover






Title: The children's funny book
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00049078/00001
 Material Information
Title: The children's funny book
Physical Description: 27 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Nutting, John Keep, 1832-1917
Hopkins, Livingston, 1846-1927 ( Illustrator )
Sweeney, Morgan J ( Illustrator )
Cox, Palmer, 1840-1924 ( Illustrator )
D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: D. Lothrop & Co.
Place of Publication: Boston Mass. (30 & 32 Franklin Street)
Publication Date: 1879
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1879   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1879   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1879
Genre: Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by J. K. Nutting ... et al. ; illustrated by L. Hopkins, "Boz," and Palmer Cox.
General Note: "Boz" is American illustrator Morgan J. Sweeney.
General Note: Includes 4 p. publisher's catalog.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00049078
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001602828
oclc - 14551434
notis - AHM7073

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Plate
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
    How the Froggies Go to Sleep
        Page 1
        Page 2
    The Mince Pie Prince
        Page 3
        Page 4
    A Bad Fix
        Page 5
        Page 6
    The Hen's Adventure
        Page 7
        Page 8
    The Two Laste Knyghtes and Their Laste Battel; or, The Wise Fowles and the Foolish Menne
        Page 9
        Page 10
    The Dancing Cow
        Page 11
        Page 12
    The Tables Turned
        Page 13
    Retaliation
        Page 14
    Johnny Skye
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    A Hop
        Page 19
    The Fiddling Wolf
        Page 20
    How They Received the King
        Page 21
        Page 22
    The Tragical History of Chang Fung Loo
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Coming
        Page 27
    Advertising
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Back Cover
        Cover 3
        Cover 4
Full Text















































SrA
~~4 I



a
* .1!































I:;


I'



i..










IN
ii
lii



git













The Bald-n Ln rary
n UB Fix&
y FIX










I





















x .u Li
















A_-___ __--___ =



















MIDSUMMER SPRITES.








THE

CHILDREN'S FUNNY BOOK.







ILLUSTRATED BY
L. HOPKINS, BOZ," AND PALMER COX.




















BOSTON:
D. LOTHROP & CO., PUBLISHERS,
30 & 32 FRANKLIN STREET.








































COPYRIGHT,

1879,

By D. LOTHROP & CO.






































UNIVERSITY PRESS: JOHN WILSON & SON,
CAMBRIDGE.
















CONTENTS.






I.
MIDSUMMER SPRITES.
II.
HOW LHE FROGGIES GO TO SLEEP.
III.
THE MINCE PIE PRINCE.
IV.
A BAD FIX.
V.
TIE HENS' ADVENTURE.
VI.
THE LAST KNYGHTES.
VII.
THE DANCING COW.
VIII.
THE TABLES TURNED.
IX.
RETALIA TION.

X.
J,... .\ SKYE.
XI.
A HOP.
XII.
THE FIDDLING WOLF.
XIII.
HOW THEY RECEIVED THE KING.
XIV.
CHANG FUNG LOO.
XV.
COMING.






HOW THE FROGGIES GO TO SLEEP.



HOW THE FROGGIES GO TO SLEEP.

BY J. K. NUTTING.

C OME, Winnie, come; the clock strikes eight! And all the frogs -
The pillow waits to feel How they grumble,
These curly locks of silk and gold, And scold,
And cool these rosy cheeks. -
What! Still too wide awake?
The Fun
Just leaks out at your eyes !
And every finger-tip so white
Is tingling like a roguish Puck, \ ,
All ready to play pranks on me! ,

Well, come and climb up on my knee, 1/
And let me tell you-what, d'ye think?
I'll tell you let me see 0, yes! i I '. "
I'll tell you how the Big, Old Frog-- /- i., ---i- '
The Great, Green, Goggle-eyed Old Frog, H'' -
The sle-e-epy old Papa-frog,
And the ca-re-ful old Mamma-frog,
And the gray old Uncle-frog, i-''i
And the lean, long Aunty-frog, -- II h!1


"THE CA-RE-FUL OLD MAMMA-FROG."

And coax,
And worry,
Because the Little, Wee Froggies
Won't go to sleep!
Won't go to sleep
When the night grows dark,
And far away
The little dogs bark,
And the young birds rest
Every one in its nest,
Si [ Under its mother's wing.

.!/ ,I [ [111 For the Little, Wee Froggies
"THE SLE-E-EPY OLD PAPA-FROG." Are, every one,
And the jolly young Cousin-frog, Choke-full of fun !
With his spotted jacket the dog And they wink, and blink,
Such a dandy as he on a log, And chatter, and squeak :
And the sweet, white-breasted frog Cutty up cutty up / Rick-a-jink /
(The Cousin-frog's own Miss Frog), Wide-awake/ Wide-awake! Chick-a-rink/






HOW THEFROGGIES GO:TO SLEEP.

Rick-a-jink, fink, jink / So the wee-bit-folk,
Can't sleep/ not a wink wink And the big old folk,
S-And the smart young folk,
S-- Keep grumbling,
-And fretting,
And peeping,
And growling,
SAnd all together:

"' "0- I 0K I.(i i Go-der-sleep Dill mor-nin' !"
.ii '/i Cutty-up! Cutty-up/
Wide-awake!"
: Hush-my-dears 'Shkmyde ars "
Rick-a-jink! Rick-a-jink/"
r "__-, <-~ Sparetherod! Sp'ilthechild!"
"" I-" Did you evah Ine7ah !"
STHE (,iAY OLD UNCLE-FROG."
Then the Great,Green,Goggle-eyed Old Frog roars out,
GO-DER-ZLEEP! GO-DER-ZLEEP !
HUSH-YER-NOJSE HUSH-YER-NOISE -
GO-DER-ZLEEP"
But the little wee froggies say,
Wide-aw7ake! Wide-awake I
Cutty-up Cutty-up -


Then the old Mamma-frog quavers out, T -
"Hushmydears / Hushmydears /







Sp'ill child! sp'ilthe THE LITTLE, WEE FROGGIES.
child!"
childd"
And the Cousin-frog Spank'em 1 Spank'em "
snarls, Wide awake! Wide awake!"
" Ker-flog !flog flog" "Ker-flog Ker-flog/"
And the pretty Miss Getting slee-py
Frog, ; Good-nzght!"
Drawls out in disgust, "GO-DER-ZLEEP DILL MORNIN'!
" Deai me! Did you GOOD JILDREN! GOOD JILDREN!"
evzah! / H'shmyde .. ars / H'shmyde-ars "
Aoisy things! Noisy -- -" Fast.asleep !
things Till mor. r nin' /
Things ." Miss FROG." Sleep!"





THE MINCE PIE PRINCE.





THE MINCE PIE PRINCE.


BY KIRK MUNROE.



T HE Mince Phic Prince. \iith his curly hair, ..- .
J S t i .n s lt .'.i . l ..i I t ir : .'.
Oif tle br:oid r1].ii t Icli,] rin up .to the imoon.,. -.' : ..


Where all -I; t i i l i ; ... '
\ lh re thier, i;.:, ,il- t. ,r .1 .ik. liut |-.l.n' "f.r .' .
Said the -I nc Pic [r 'iL, r-- I i, *II L. herc sooi." -
'-* -",{: ';0''-. .' '-:'..--a .



.. ....... ... .. ... .......
.,h -, q *
-l., ,, J.., ,..: '. p
*. .,+..









'4.~. came'aLii mnce piest1k. ni ,u n.-'


T e.e % c .i. c a-id i r
















S. For the o. iner, the ettr, the 'rc. :'u t the
St: rway.
('amt- a. ..: n iH,














-"-For the so'rer, te I-"cier 'ie 'r o'ut of the,






THE MINCE PIE PRINCE.

Chances like this come but seldom enough, Three by three, and four by four,
When they do the pies are apt to be tough. Till at last there weren't any mince pies more.
But these are so nice that I'll not leave one,
No, not one for the princes yet to come." Then the Mince Pie Prince, he said, with a grin,
S" At length I've stuffed the last one in;
So he set to work with a royal will
And now I'll go and look for more
And made of himself a mince pie mill
For I have the key of the pantry door;
One by one they vanished from sight,
o ty And there, in the stronghold, we shall see,
Two by two they left the light;
If I am or am not the M. P. P."


"..- But the Mince Pie Prince, when he tried to rise,
S : Found to his horror and surprise,
"That he couldn't get up, but was held fast doI h
S. By mince pie crust so flaky and brown;
By raisins, and citron, and wine, and spice,
:'.' And all that makes a mince pie nice.



!-;. t.









-A'







In vain his struggles, in vain his cries
No one came but a few mince pies,
Who only came to laugh and to jeer,
But who didn't dare to venture near.
"The moral is this: When mince pies you see, .
Dear children, beware of gluttony. .
-, .- :._ .., .. ; .. .:_ :.. .: ,: ., .
.~~ !,' ,.,,:, :t. ,'- 7 .,. ,
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ""*: -" ';,,-,... .,; ,::';;.





ta chlrn .ear ,, gutn ., ,. "."):."-






A BAD FIX.









C*.-3I RA A RLQANO ARR


\E I .: arI .l lii tcr nith ,iin !,.: i, 1 .!,',
T h b J .s er, ab.ril:r,: .l ,. I th:i-;r n- i,:al

S\\h,n "" (r the hbal am a i:.i l:i.:1 ta.

\ .-.- ... -." t ,i .:!,tln I-I.
A.,id nr.-i IrE, atir Iii i, .arden but me!












"', ,.i' ect., r! Ill Ill up n btCkt u

T l-,e :.th r ill sLIP rr." ur rr:,m -, ,:i.:.i O.,
SF.I. j tlil > d:.. 1 It !!a : v.,.t n,' all ... cr ', .--'
flic. -1 :r',
,$]









:r.. i,.! N i.eIr ff! I u Tli,:n is u: -,ings.

i ii_ e ua r hea1,i ;ri urlr udf.:.. n 1lze ia '

f nd t:i i.*>tn i;j:-. th1e n I f iii ir:ik e a r. id : im-
"*" r:l u i ,:, ,;ear me!

S 'n be b\r, ad If i taken f. c r1.
* 11- .



u:: i~. he:r i







F _-- -- -






A BAD FIX.


r~.-- .-.. ...

I'll sI kei oft S m--- poIllrn, andl tlien I'm all right "
r >. _:t ut, Vi.Ar I.. the Jtc.., it "" 'tuck r .. .: as a brotherr"
He u-t ke.:l like a Icr': : \et. :l*.. w hl t ihe mii-. t, .
S H i [- : --: a 'l-.. i :t of r.. i ,.:l' to an.:.ther.
"-=' ^ .B .-/': -- ,- th,-, I-,,1'. it- ,i.ttcieLd '
Beili sj iirtetI
V.. -,.. .. .\'. :.ni tlhc ril ir L.-,,: .ni li hie ]leipl ;y fluttered.

S .\ X us, ,..II ider ,t .:1 sh. _rt m in her spinning
4 \ h ih. ..in heari'. the n i-e, a.:ld :an lite .io t : the -liadl .
5., 1 Then, 1110t nig a I l l. d : .11 i at tlir c a-.,rin ni

An..I a. bu.. lincat :li.i trim
SHurri..rl up .:. the briun
i i a dainti, llu -r: ,e t.: r peep i e at him.












Ak inch .. I. -' I'l V 1 I l l, Of _
H -t.... .. .. it I .. .. i t l c r--
11s1h..1:.p.- r [I:. i z LI Ir 11 1l. l I ll. -
,e' "ne c'.. tip Cl ho o te
A nd \Iiici, ]. t he.. o t rill .li : ,t l nt. ;,lh l rover.



H tr fr .iiti.:. A i.1 e- b Itt.-r-
rC.ne kir i I' an.l lainned I I.t. l .ilh her
.\nd rl ,a. ic .' .1'tI i e, -.lh l e .f t.. h ,," ia SrI I. -d r. -


He 11cd fi..tn the :irr.vc ia mud luinLCJl clii
"A ";I nrll -n ic t
H-:ipp1ed out o: a ticket. U -
.And 3%e hl'ii a t -ceer, ,as ILe [.i ,cd thr,-:L 11 1h1 6
%\ itr k, ;

7- -. .
- -:,, ._-::: : i"! --: i .: --~~ :. : -::-:-- ") k -
S :.-~ H~p'. : .;.t 77-- I -- i l~;c.'- -.-"-







THE HENS' ADVENTURE.




't-

























THE HENS' ADVENTURE.


BY PALMER COX.


THREE setting hens forsook their nests in pleasant summer weather,
And, searching for a needful bite, they started out together;
Through pasture land and stubble field they ran a mile or more,
All struggling for the locust prize that hopped along before.
Sometimes they climbed across a fence, at times they crowded through,
Now one, more active than the rest, would lead the other two;
At times the race was neck and neck, with expectation high,
But when almost within their reach away again he'd fly.
Five minutes only could they spare in which to scratch a meal,
No wonder, then, the race they ran was carried on with zeal.
It seemed a woeful waste of time to follow such a sprite,
But hope was large and hunger keen, and nothing else in sight.
At length a pond before them lay, and into this he flew,
And swam across its surface smooth, and that they could not do.
But ere they had a moment's time to ponder on their woes,
From out his burrow in the ground a cunning fox arose;
A daring rascal, that had long been plundering up and down,
And always kept the price of eggs and chickens high in town.






THE HENS' ADVENTURE.

His Christmas lasted all the year, for, eight days out of nine,
Though traps were fixed and poisons mixed, he would on poultry dine.
Now, faster than they had gone forth, when urged by hunger's pain,
They homeward ran, for horrid fear now spurned them o'er the plain.
The fox was close behind their tails, but, let him yelp or growl,







'4 .." ..-






Fri., N









-_:. I.,






"- ,. -\ .4
.-- *"' '. K.


























And do his utmost in the race, he could not catch a fowl!
Yet not until the frightened hens in barn and stable flew,
And dogs bow-wowed I" and children screamed, from chase the rogue withdrew.
And then *the rooster stamped around, and did for hours scold,
Because these poor old biddies found that all their eggs were cold.






THE TWO LAST KNYGHTES AND THEIR LAST BATTEL.


THE TREWE AND ANTIENTE BALLAD OF

THE TWO LAST KNYGHTES AND THEIR LAST BATTEL; OR,

THE WISE FOWLES AND THE FOOLISH MENNE.

BY J. K NUTTING.

T WO Valyant Knyghtes wer off olde, Unkyndeste Fate att length them found,
Sir Bon and eke Sir Bo, By chance they met together;
So muste they fyghte and holde their ground,
Or shewe the pale white fethere.


'Twas on a comely Meade they met,
Uarde bye a royall Toune:
The lines were drawne, the tourney sette,
"The Kynge was onne his Throne.


Plate ye First. Shewing ye two valyant Knyghtes blowing y' own Horns. A tilte they rode, a lance they broke,
Ande att yt yette agayne;
Which were alle dighte in steele and Golde Withe harms blow-on-blowe they woke
Withe harmless blow-on-blowe they woke
So bravely for to shewe.
The echoes off the Playne.


Grette Spurres they wore, as blazing starres
Upon eache heele to shine,
And Plumes, y-wonne in other warres,
Did from each Creste decline.



Eache Knyghte bare a Clarion shrille,
To blasted Defyance forth
Whenas he blewe his challenge still
To Easte, Weste, -Southe and Northe. ---"

Plate ye Second. Wherein may be seene ye downright deadline Conflict,
Ful well they wot, they were the Laste Beholde also ye Spectators--Royal and otherwise--in ye back.
grownde.
Of alle the Knyghtlie crew,
Therefore, as if his cheekes wold barst, At last to mende their faylinge breth
Eache doughtie Champion blewe. They called a truce for reste,






THE TWO LAST KNYGHTES AND THEIR LAST BATTEL.

But either sware to be the dethe He cried, Let no manne doe them {kaythe /
Of t' other, Bye his Creste! But lette them winne or dye:
Brief is their tyme-- to-morrowe, faythe,
Thenne came upon the beaten erthe, They'll both bee inn ye
SThey'l1 bothe bee inn ap ye1 "
Betwyxt these Champions bolde,


The Cockes they stood, with ruff erected,
All ready for the Fraye . ..
But solemnlie they didde reflect
On what the Kynge didde saye.


Plate ye Third.- Skewing forth ye Challenge of y rival Roosters. Quoth one, I feel myne anger coole .
To morrowe, lo, we dye .......
A lytle Cocke (of noble birthe
Lette fethereless fowles goe played the foole
And knyghtlie, I am tolde). Let Byrdes of Wisdome-
Let Byrdes of Wisdome Flye!"

His fetheres were alle steele and Golde
His spurrs alle sharpe and trewe,
The whyle he wold Defyance peale 'n .- _
Whenas hee bravely crewe! l
- ", '- ,/+ 4, "--

No sooner did this gallant crowe,
Than other crewe agayne,
And from his perche that other flew
To meet hym on the playne.

The Knyghtes satte puffing in their place Plate ye Fifth (and laste. In which ye bellicose Knyghtes departed in
Si i ir pursuit of ye Cockes at ye Royal Commande whereat ye Populace seemeth
The Cockes to warre did goe; much excited.

Soe said, soe done! eache flewe amayne,
Eache flewe a diverse waye:
Sir Knyghtes goe bring them back agayne !"
The jolle old Kynge did saye.
Plate ye Fourth. Shewing ye Unfriendly attitude of ye belligerent
Poultry. The Cockes they flewe, the Knyghtes they rode,
The people ranne to see;
Wheratte the Kynge (with mirthe and Grace Eache Knyghte tooke his several roade,
Whose harte did overflowe), Ande .. never back came hee -






THE DANCING COW.










#, ALL you children, all over the world,
SFrom the land of ice and snow
To the land of bananas and oranges,
Did you ever happen to know
Of the good old woman under the hill
Who'd a little black cow that would never stand still ?


When Goody came out with her tin milk-pail,
Her cow would commence to prance;
When Goody sat down on her milking-stool,
Her cow would continue to dance,L I
Till she'd turn a back somersault over the pen
When she'd pick herself up and be off again. I,


One day as she stood at the garden gate
A-watching that frisky cow,
She shook her head and sighed to herself
"How shall I catch her? Oh how?"
A voice at her elbow said, Madam, permit
I Me to tell you the way to accomplish it."
S'Twas the voice ot her neighbor, the Bramble-bush
Man,
.I, ,, The man so wondrously wise;
S- She listened with joy to his tones while the tears
Of gratitude gushed from her eyes.
"They sprinkle salt," said he, "on the tails
SOf birds to catch them and the thing never fails.


"It stands to reason," he said in a slow "' \
And calm argumentative way,
"That a cow that flies like that must be
Some sort of a bird; and I say ..
Just bring out your salt-jar we'll try it at least, t '
And if you once catch her, just stable the beast." i






THE DANCING COW.











So she brought the salt-jar; and then there began
A most indescribable race
'Twixt the good old dame and the dancing cow
( And the Man with the bramble-scratched face.
But when in the course of human events,
S-S\ he'd tossed the Bramble-man over the fence,


She picked up the dame on the end of her horns 1 i
And sent her also on high;
There, balanced in air, midway between
The garden fence and the sky,
The good dame's strength began to fail,
And she dropped the salt on the dancer's tail! .


And then what a sight you might have seen
-- If you'd only been there to see !
i The dancing cow sprang up from the ground
l As light as light could be,
S'... 'And the good dame saw as she slowly rose
SHow she shook her horns and turned out her toes.


"Up, up, still up till with airy grace -
She had leaped quite over the moon.
And then the old woman sighed and said,
Alas! she'll be back again soon '
But she wasn't at all; and never thenceforth /
Was that cow seen alive on the face of the earth. >
For the Man in the Moon when he saw a cow
Where a cow had no business to be,
Just stretched out his fist and hit her a blow
That knocked her down to the sea, /
She fell 'mid a lot of hungry sharks
Who picked their teeth and sighed, "What larks I" 'X\t,- .






THE TABLES TURNED.


THE TABLES TURNED.























T11JS WOtULD PLEASE TH E PATIEN-T ON, TH IS WOULD SUlr THE, CUNNINQ FOX.
,= v^
.i i .

"P"










!V "i .^ ^ ^* I,, .- '~"-,;: i-. : ^ -* ..y ..I



"\ -<./~.' -iF -"'~ I -r;; :" "^:''-, ^ ^ ^


























THiS WOULD AI90ME AMT E THE DOGS, TIND WOULD8'T THIS BE Uti FrOR DrXos
.' '.-K'







-F .`j "uA


-- -I-

TD-ll w'OLJLD IlLr HE PAM THEN DOX, ANDS WOIJLD'NTl THIBE. FUPNIP FOflF&Q





RETALIATION.





S- -i i



-I 4 -T^ t..
i l, ,) & a c uY L, I j -.,.,' 1 M '
S'-^ } f .- ._._:*__A.'- 4,r, 3 ,,..:. ", ,,\ ,











~iZ e .e lad IIt
^ ,,lr ,.o 3- .. 1 'U: "-
-- ,- -







4, V "- -. C
1, *, i 'c,\ tq .i4h t 4- ,
uit hct.?s~sl r'-1Y& ta 1-h v



, Ji .^. "u, {.-..A "-'.-*,I.$. ,..*^ *-^ .



\ ^'2 1 -''" "' "' \Q







JOHNNY SKYE.














S-- -- -" WE R. e am d MUonn I kye_






-_U PON a mountaingreat and high __ _
Lived a lad named Johnny Skye-7
Ha, ha! the mischief of it I
T he ice was thick, the weather cold, -
--_ -___ And Johnny was a skater bold- ,
-=__- Ha,,ha i the mischief of it!
RN -He-grumbled at the wholesome rule
rhat sent him daily to his school
Ha ha! the mischief of it!
___ The ruddy rogue would rather skate,
And skate, and skate, and always si-A--! -
Ha, ha! the mischief of it !
He growled I hate the Rule of Three,
And Grammar too- and 'Jogafry'!" -
Ha, ha! the mischief of it!
:. He blundered in his lessons all,
And far below.the mark did fall
Ha, ha! the mischief of it! z-
One day- alas, one.dreadful day -
From school be wholly ran away-
UHa, ha i the mischief of it !
All day he skated, skated, till
The sun went down behind the hill
----__--__-- Ha,. ha the mischief of it!
Then home he-sneaked, and naughthe said
S But ate his supper and crept to bed
Ha, ha the mischief of it!
His aching feet, do what he might,-
_-- Went skating, skating, all the niglt
--__ Ha. ha! the mischief of it !-






JOHNNY SKYE.






There came a great Magiciant-gliding solerrmly and-._.
slow,--
His face was swari, his eyewa- sharp' isi be ard was
white as snow -_- --
SAnd fast upon his monstrous feet his magic es
,-:r- were bound, -- -
Whereby he glided o er thie sea or o'er the solid
- ground ----
-Then. with a dreadful fro-n, ne said- in, tones n
i---- earthly deep,-- -
"Ah, yesl 'tis here that truant lad, named. Johnny ,
-Skye, doth sleep! i
U Ali, Johnny Sk;ye I Tlen- Johnrmny ye saL jp Inrd as -waite. as any
Oh, Johnny Skye I Sheet
-2=- Prepare to meet thy fate P itairt"tuck up, ls ., J T
Make ready for the doom. of 'h0o7- 'tattoo beat: --
-Who run away to skate !E er ear1aellearer, earer ca 1 the cu all :is'
u 2_---
__0 1' ever, rxver aad before bebel so dread asight

_______-_-_ The Dark ,.1 ,I:a u Fercrly hissed
.''My name is-Jogafry !
And I am come this iight-for thee
_____ O' wicked. JhimyuySkye 1

Since thou, must .l ite, ,1T2. i-ate thou must -and.

ForTrilskate thee round the world and teacIkthhee
by the way-1-
-Anid ten. Ie vWfved his Magic Wand right over,.
T o bhmny kye,
-"Ba"i_.do ,Mozainbzc'ua7" he cried and rolled his.
awful eye._
riZ,j restal 9qTi6k f-he weaiy Lad xose ip, or 11 ilt or-

Acld at the Dark .Magiclan's side went glidino down
the hill.
Zig! Zag! Skirr! *Whirr!, t -_
asfer, faster! faster faster'" k-
Skirr Whwirr! Zi"' Zao1g __
= Ne' ver achingfoot pmay lag iiiiiiii,
SThey ttrmed-then-towaxr tlhe xis'ui suin.
And. xound the world their way bIegtm. .... ...





JOHNNY SKYE.






"Bowl wowJ" said the GreatlNewfoundland Dog,
Who's this comes gliding through the fog "
SBut fhe Dark MagiianJog.afry,
Andt the truant skater, J6hnny Sky
Never they pause to make reply,
But, huirying, skurrying, on. the fly. -OM I
A great whale raised. his head to blow,
But saw them coming ancLdodged below _
le saw them.flitting above his head, _
Buxie'er a word those skatc r;3 :, [.
Asailor,watched. them from t,, !r.- 1il t
Andlsaid his prayers as on th1-cy ;p .
A polar'bear, on a cake of ice,
Got up on hishaunchesin.a tri:, 7.
And granted. a fervent wish lihat Le _._._-
Could skate like them across Li -. .. .- _....
.- -- ------- ---

Anddnow they came to Erin's isle -
Paddy, he met'em 'wid.a shmile,
Invited em'jist a bit to shtaay
But, while he shpake it, they were awaay
Across, across the narrow sea.!
The Queen (good woman, who but she?')
Cried, "Welcome to the old.countree,
Whereso-whomso-ever you be i"
And Johnny; he gave a loyal nod;
"For al/ good Queens," quoth he, .Thank God!"
But, though. he muchly wished to stay, -
Stillhe skated, skated away!
Past old Dover, past Calais -
Paris, with all its glory too; .- -
Belgium,.Hollana -how they go'! -
Denmark, Sweden and Noroway--
Swiftly glide beneath the eye.
Into Deutschland, "quicKas a cat --
=Kaiser Wilhelm lifts his hat -
Cries, Van Bismareh / 'oss is, djlss? "
Bisniark glances through his glass
Winks, and slowlyrubs his eye.
And says, "Ar!iW .K-a-i-s-e-r / how dey -lyv j
I dinks--vell, I "yoost dinks --dey are--
Dot is -moast ligely-- zum zhootin' sdar 1"
SStill on I Afar, afar!
-_----- --- ---
........... ... ... .






JOHNNY SKYE.






S= Into the empire of theCzar.
SThe good.Czar knows his Yankee friends
And the'very air,with a'greeting rends;
"" Szatchy/kvxskjffsyvitch "'he begins,
In the stickle-back tongue, all spines anid fins._
(If your mouth were full of all that, would you
Think you.could gobble up Turkey, too?)
Long before the word is done
SThey are speeding them toward the Yising sun.
Siberiaa spreads its tiresome waste -
-Beneath their feet. At lengthin haste
They spring athwartthe Chinese Will :
-Four-hundred-millionrat-tails all
Fly up, astonished, in the air,
SAnd, withione general wonder-stare,
Eight-hundred-million almond eyes --
Squint their unspeakable surprise i _-
But on! and on! The clever Japs
(Those Asiatic-Yankee chaps)
Would fain detain them with their wiles,
But they are off for the Sandwich Isles. -
The Golden Gate appears at last
O dear !" says Yohnny, "don't go so fast! -
Please, Mr. Jogafry, let me stop I =
Ifana so tiredlI'm ready to drop. ;
a-~- ~ Besides -fact is, rm awfal cold _
SAnd then I'd like to get some gold."
"But the Ghost-Magician hastens on:
WVe must get around the -world, my son." -
Zig! Zag! "Weary! Weary!
Slowly now more slowly, slowly
Wea-ry! wea..ry! Zig! Zag!
How the tired feet wi llrab
All ationce with a terrible.crash
-- -- 2The ice gives way-
-- o- y ~Dash! Smal-hL
Johnny awakes,'halfrdead with fright,
And roars for his motherwith all his .might.
SThe Dark Magician is gone at last,
Bthie -has fixed one'lesson fast '
i 'For Skating Johnny Skye,
Nor you.(Ihope), nor I,
Will ever run away
__ From Schoolto
SPlay.






A HOP.













One very still night, when the folks were asleep,
And moonbeams were lighting up pictures and wall,
The Needles and Pins, that were standing knee-deep
In Annie's blue pin-cushion, awoke, one and all.

"0 O dear said a Darn-needle, turning quite roundd
And stretching his leg in a comical way,
He shook himself softly, and lo! from each side I'e done chi hd w yet no have I found
A small arm, unfolding, came swiftly to view! ,I've done much hard work, and yet none have I found
A small arm, unfolding, came swiftly to view So hard as to stand doing nothing all day."
A wig blossomed out! An eye-glass was supplied
And a long-tailed coat down his back he drew!

While change after change swiftly came o'er them all,
The four tall Tape-needles, with ribbons and tapes,
Out on the broad table seemed decking a hall
With long floating streamers, and fantastic drapes.





SSix Hair-pins, with fiddles and harps well in hand,
// / / / Were ranged on the spool-stand and played with a

// While all in a flutter this fun-loving band
Came gliding and hopping down Pin-cushion Hill.
The Darn-needles led out the Shawl-pins in style;
The Cuff-pins and Brooches went off to one side, The smaller fry followed, all spare room to fill;
And got up a high-toned affair of their own With many a bow and quirksome smile
Yet they were all Pins; that they could not well hide; These one-legged dancers spun through a quadrille.
The very marked difference was the thing to be known.
O, wild grew the dancers They balanced and swung;" ,i j/
Their grand right and left was a stirring affair; A
When all hands round !" from the prompter's lips rung,
The whirl was a marvel beyond all compare.

They danced till the sun the sudden ray sent
That warns the night-folks that morning begins;
And when Annie came down she wondered what lent
The queer, tipsy look to her Needles and Pins.





"WHY DON'T THEY COME DOWN?"
S.. ...------- r ---__ . .. .. .. ... .. .. .. -.... .. ----7 --- "

t- "-. t : .. .

& A.... i,, .- ..- .* .I .
7.),.. - .'.

-i ; a A
~ .; ,
,; ... .. ,| ..
S .- / 1. ;,


-r :I' wW -. "
..-." 1, .-. .,. .
_._ -p t* s : L

















"WHY DON'T THEY COME DOWN?"
"7 "r -- ' : "' .. ., ..I., ." '; Y .. ..... :' -
1 3,. ., ..i. : ,..-.


r WHY DOr THYCO EDO N






HOW THEY RECEIVED THE KING.


4 -' *'', -," _, AI .i1




Y1,,> IS ,y .,-~.^-f, -.. / "




W ALNUT pie and acorn cake, The squirrels sighed; but they dropped them all!
And everything nice a squirrel can make, Right into the river they let them fall !
Was being made in Squirrelville, Whilst they sent forth messengers far to see
In Walnut Grove, just over the hill. If anyone knew of a mulberry tree.
f~ /^ .
Full of bustle, and whisk, and stir, -




The squirrel king, who was white as snow, -'-- .-
With eyes deep red with a ruby glow,
With a tail so fine one almost felt A mulberry tree was found at last
S, t o.e A mulberry tree was found at last
A breath might make its splendor melt -
SAnd the while they gathered and stewed them fast,
SThis foreign squirrel, so grand and wise,
s squirrel so rol and euisite Stood superintending the wonderful pies.
Was coming to Squirrelville on a visit !
But a later one came ; and, shaking his head,
And snuffing those pies, very scornfully said :
S. "What food for a king Why, I tell you, good folks,
S Our king lives on eggs cooked with very hard yolks."

So the mulberry pies were thrown out in dismay,
While messengers started at once, every way,
.To call in the aid of their up-country cousins,
S-: .. And hurry in eggs by the dozens and dozens.


When the walnut pies were baked, each one, .- -
And the acorn cakes all iced and done, -,
In rushed a squirrel from far away
With wonderful things to do and say.

Reviewing their daintiest dishes o'er,
He said: "Toss the whole of them out of the door!
They will not do! And I'll tell you why
Our king eats nothing but mulberry-pie !" 1- .-






HOW THEY RECEIVED THE KING.

<* Soon, bubbling in caldrons, they boiled and they -
'-'. ^boiled; -
". And: the tired little squirrels they toiled and they
S toiled.
Bur. -r.1- they were done, came a grandee the third, r
S\\^,., '. 'wz their king ate only stewed humming-bird!

S Then the poor little squirrels, quite on their last legs, .'
'' Tossed away in the river their baskets of eggs.
SAnd caught humming-birds, that is, all they c...!.:i i I, /
Both in nets and in traps, and made ready t: I.ak.


What work they did have What a stew they were in '. .- -
In such a great hurry they were to begin,
And, while they were hasting and nothing was ready, '-
In walked the white squirrel, the king! and thus
said he :

meet,
"" AAlthough I've been waiting an hour up the street!
S- And here I am fainting for something to eat;
SFor I've stamped myself quite off from my feet! "

S. The worn squirrels gasped, they dropped down on
their knees.
.i z Pray observe, gracious king, we have tried hard to
please;
But your couriers brought word, as indeed we. would
wish,
S_. That your majesty ate of but one royal dish."

"That is true," said the king, looking round with
surprise,
Only acorns I eat, and a few would suffice "
Well, willing they were still to serve and to please,
But each weary squirrel had such a backache And they put the white king, shortly, quite at his ease.
That, at last, not a squirrel could keep wide
awake.
"tPon my soul," said the king, "this is droll -' .
enough!"
And at last he rose and went home in a huff. -- ' 2 r

And, despite their loyalty, labor, and pains,
I'm told that his majesty stoutly maintains '-
That, of all dull people, the dullest still il
Are his subjects that live in Squirrelville. -





THE TRAGICAL HISTORY OF CHANG FUNG LOO.



THE TRAGICAL HISTORY OF
CHANG FUNG LOO.

BY MRS. M. E. BLAKE.

NCE on a time in the Flowery Land
I (A name for China, you understand),
Where the Yangtse Kiang and Hoang Ho
Flow from the beautiful Mounts of Snow,
SWhere the Pe-la-shu are the favorite trees,

In the province of Kwang Tung, near Chow Choo,
Lived a wonderful youth named Chang Fung Loo.


SHe was wonderful, just as a phoenix would be,
Or anything equally rare to see-
A blackbird white, or a sunlit night, I Ti'lllj
Or a walking fish, or a wingless bird,
Or anything else that is quite absurd j F 1 .i
For he was a glutton Just think of that 1 [p Ia, l'11
In a country with stomachs so small and nice
That they make a whole meal of one frog-if fat- /
Or some infinitesimal grains of rice.
Yes, he was a glutton. For breakfast he'd eatB m ,
S A couple of dozen of pickled pigs' feet,
A gallon or two of elegant stew
Made from the delicate Sho-kia-yu,
A yard of bread, and a three-quart pot
Of ginger preserve, uncommonly hot,
And wash it all down, as the case might be, /
With thirty or forty cups of tea.





S'Perhaps you think he would want no lunch ?
S&' :l' Well, just let me tell you ; he'd swallow a bunch
/. Of edible birds' nests, a quarter of hog,

Sbushel of oysters, a score of larks,

BEA M ^T ?,-f^^






THE TRAGICAL HISTORY OF CHANG FUNG LOO.



SThe fins of unlimited numbers of sharks,
And then he'd sit down on the bamboo floor,
And this terrible boy would cry for more! l

"It still is a question in my mind whether
If he had not been born with the peacock feather
(Which in those barbarous lands of the South
Is the same as our silver spoon in the mouth)
He would not be whipped till he lost his breath,
Or hung, if you please, or flayed to death,
Or banished away, as they sometimes do,
To Sing Chu Ling, or to Yung Chow Foo.


But his father was Kung! And, besides all that,
He wore a big ruby on top of his hat.
"So, whenever his son asked a slave for a dish,
That moment 'twas brought, be it flesh, be it fish;
And poor Chang in the end, as was likely you see,
^ Was as spoiled as a boy with a pig-tail could be.



Day by day his appetite grew,
Day by day the whole year through;
, Till all that he wished, and all that he said,
And all that he thought of, living or dead,
Big or little, or sour, or sweet,
Was just to get something more to eat.

No matter how horrid the kind of beast,
"He did not care in the very least;
But would stick big pins -
In his poor slaves' shins,
If they were not ready with some new feast- I
Elephants' trunks and tiger roast,









A5^ jfw






THE TRAGICAL HISTORY OF CHANG FUNG LOO.



Boa Constrictor served up on toast,
Walrus haunch and Zebra stew,
Rump steak cut from the Horned Gnu,
SHippopotamus and pickled Seal,
Rhinoceros baked in cochineal,
Crocodile tails and Camels' humps,
X Monkeys cut into strips and lumps,
Neck of Camelopard, spiced and cloved -















It happened one day as he went to court,
Driving his long-tailed ponies four

He heard them talk, in a frightened way,
SOf a monster seen in Chow Choo bay -
A horrible thing, all teeth and claws,
, With a pair of tremendous bony jaws,
, And a dorsal fin all black and red,
S And a waterspout in a giant head, -
And a scaly length of a mile or mor me,
Hobbling and wriggling along the shore,
And a cyclop eye in a horned tail,
A double head, double dyed, double u (w) hale.
My Junk My Junk! was all Chang said,
And flung his whip at a pony's head.
Sound the loud tam-tam Beat the drum ,
"Bid all my bold retainers come!
Shout for my brave harpooner bold! --
Fling out my sails of cloth of gold!
S Belay the anchor and douse the glib Out from the shore the good junk sailed,
S 'll su to-night on that monster's rib!" Her sides, like dragons', golden scaled;
139 'kd 4l 1m* bodrtinr





THE TRAGICAL HISTORY OF CHANG FUNG LOO.
















Rising and falling above the oars;
A hundred gallant soldiers dressed
With spear and helmet and shield on breast; r'-~
SThe brave harpooner with spear so strong, M
Two hundred and seventy-five feet long ;
And Chang himself on the deck- the upper -
Smacking his lips as he thought of supper!

Avast your helm the lookout cried,
"There she blows on the larboard side !

Before they could turn, before they could think,
I Before they could even have time to wink,
The sea-serpent rose on his hinder claws,
He lifted the junk in his terrible jaws,
And swallowed them !- sailors and soldiers tall,
Chang, the harpooner, spear and all,
Mast, and rigging, and keel, and sail, A fa ^, }.
And winked with the eye in his horned tail!

SSo Chang, who had gobbled so many a dish,
SGot gobbled at last by a sea-serpent fish.



The moral that is if a moral there be -
Is this: that a boy who sets up for a glutton
Must watch, or some still bigger gobbler than he
1 Will get him at last, just as sure as a button. .

BH^^A ^i^^-^^^^^^gri ^Aa

e"

























41Z-
,''. .. '...I
,i.. ': ', --.. ,
.-^,- ... .' .* .











COMING I

a~-c*






TO THE FATHERS AND MOTHERS
OF -

THE WIDE AWAKE CHILDREN:
Here is the Book you want to buy for the Christmas Stockings aud the Christ-
mas Trees:
THE CHILDREN'S ALMANAC.
GOOD FOR FIVE YEARS!
This superb little pocket-companion, edited by ELLA FARMAN, has been made
especially for the children; and for it twelve leading American poets, Longfellow,
Whittier, Aldrich, Mrs. Thaxter, Mrs. Piatt, &c., &c., have each written a month-
poem. Miss L. B. Humphrey and Robert Lewis have given it twenty-four illustrations,
and Miss Lathbury four exquisite tinted chromo-lithographs. It has Calendars for five
years, and Memoranda leaves. A charming and helpful feature is the Conduct and
Birthday Mottoes for each day in the year, selected from the poets. It is superbly
bound with beautiful silver-and-gold covers, gilt edges. Silver-and-gold edition, $1.00.
Plain Cloth, 50 cents. Sent pqst-paid on receipt of price.

To All Sunday-School Teachers and Members of Bible Classes:
"6 lFrom Darkness Into Light, 9
By MARY A. LATHBURY,
Is the most beautiful and appropriate religious gift-book of the year. Eight origi-
nal poems of the inner life, illustrated by the author with eight fine full-page drawings,
also exquisite vignettes. Quarto. Gilt. Heavy plate paper. Price, $3.00. Sent
post-paid on receipt of price.
An Illustrated Christmas Gift Book.
JESUS, LOVER OF MY SOUL.
This time-honored hymn, dear to the hearts of thousands, has been finely illus-
trated by Robert Lewis, and is now ready, and has been placed at a low price to meet
the wants of the people at large. Quarto. Gilt. Heavy plate paper. Price, $i.oo.
Sent post-paid on receipt of price.

"( e Wiety anr Aine"
Illustrated by ROBERT LEWIS.
Now ready, a new edition, containing, additionally, music for the words, and a letter
from tne sister of Elizabeth C. Clephane, giving many particulars respecting the writer
of this famous hymn. Quarto. Gilt. Heavy plate paper. Price, $1.50. Sent post-
paid on receipt of price. For these books address
D. Lothrop & Co., Boston.










fintet of all t1e Mtligiou &ift w33it 1I





OUT OF DARKNESS INTO LIGHT.


BY MARY A. LATHBURY.

Eight original Poems of the inner life, illustrated by the Author with eight masterly full-page

drawings, twenty exquisite vignettes, and a beautiful and suggestive title page.

Quarto; gilt; heavy plate paper. Price, $3.00.



i READ. WHAT THE PRESS SAYS: :

"D. Lothrop & Co. show more than their usual ambition in publishing so religious trust. They are sweetly and delicately written, and will appeal to
rich a book of art as the poems and drawings of Mary A. Lathbury, under many hearts whose experiences have been similar. The drawings with which
the title of Out ofDarkness into Light. The pictures are charming. Scarce Miss Lathbury accompanies her poems express in form what her pen has
anything could be more so than the vignettes which accompany the lines My done in words. So full of meaning has she made them that they almost alone
Life.' The verses are in the meter of In Memoriam' and are thoughtful tell the story of the doubt which so many have experienced in their attempts
and well expressed. Miss Lathbury is one of the best of our younger design- to attain to a higher spiritual life. The vignettes are no less artistic and ex-
ers."-The Independent. pressive, each one being emblematic of some sentiment contained in the poem
"This is a remarkable production, the handiwork as well as the mental crea- to which it belongs."-The Metlodis.
"tion of a woman of rare genius. There is poetry in her verses and poetry in Out of Darkness into Light, the elegant gift-book published this season
her pictures. Both pen and pencil are here brought into requisition to ex- by Messers. D. Lothrop & Co., is a volume of illustrated poems of a spiritual
press the soul's glimpses forward from darkness to light. The volume is ded- and allegorical nature, intended to depict the longings of man after a higher
icated to J. G. W. (Whittier, evidently) and is a tribute worthy of this dell- life, the futility of merely human enjoyments and knowledge to secure hap-
cate confidence. The conception is a Gospel prompting, and the delineation pines and content, the condemnation of the law, and, finally, the calm peace
of the author's purpose is exquisitely portrayed. The outline is as follows: and content of a soul secure in the pardon and love of God. We incline to
My Life; Dawn; With Books; Altar-Building; In Shadow; Waiting; Day- think the poems far better than the pictures,-although, indeed, they should
break; Sunward. Appropriate Scriptural texts are included in the develop- be; for the painting of mental attributes and emotions is the most difficult of
ment; and every page gleams with the light that shineth more and more. the artist's triumphs to obtain; the more so, that each one has a varying and
This book seems to have the soul and pulse of life, and to breathe a sweet- individual judgment of facial expression and proper allegorical effect. The
ness which no words can express."-Mfethodist Protestant. vignettes are worthy of all praise, however, and with the larger engravings
"Full of poetic sentiment. one of the choicest as well as cheapest gift- combine to make one of the best gift-books of a season unusually rich in liter-
books."-Illustrated Christian Weekly. ary treasures. Miss Mary A. Lathbury dedicates her work to John J. Whit-
tier, whose religions poems seem to have furnished the key-note of her own
"A magnificentquarto. The paper, letter-press, &c., are superb. Thepoem composite s. rnal of
compositions.P--ournal of Commerce.
is very beautiful aud the illustrations, being by the author, do strikingly ex-
press the ideas. The sentiments are truly evangelical, sweet, instructive and Deep religious feeling."-N. Y. Mail.
comforting. There are eight full page engravings, besides many exquisite vign- "As a work of art, this is a beautiful and attractive volume. The vignettes
"As a work of art, this is a beautiful and attractive volume. The vignettes
ettes, which do credit to Mr. William J. Dana, the engraver."-Religious The
and full-page engravings, alike in design and execution, are admirable. The
Herald. design is to set forth the unfoldingsof life; the dreams and ambition of
"Some of the verses come very close to the Tennysonian spirit .. un. youth; the unsatisfactory nature of earthly enjoyments; the vain attempts of
questionable poetic power."-Boston Evening Traveller. the human soul to right itself, or to conform to the requirements of the law of
The author, Miss Mary A. Lathbury, is both artist and poet. In the sev- God; and the light and peace that come to the struggling, despairing soul
eral poems which make up the book she traces the gradual coming out from the through the cross of Christ. Each phase of life is described in a poem, and
thick darkness of doubt and unbelief into the full broad day of faith and illustrated in the engravings."-The Christian Standard.










FOR GIRLS. CHOICE PRESENTATION BOOKS.
Belle Langley, and other Stories. i6mo. Cloth. Illustrated. 75 cts. New Illustrated Red Line Editions of
A collection of charming tales. The opening one, by Edgar Fawcett, is of a The Golden Treasury of Songs and Lyrics.
wilful young golden-haired beauty who would have her own way. The Book of Praise. (" Roundell Palmer,") Lord Selborne.
Hidden Treasure. By the author of Andy Luttrell." 16mo. Cloth. He Leadeth Me, and other Religious Poems.
Illustrated. $S.25.
The treasure of one generous, loving heart, and the treasure that came to A Garland from the Poets. Selected and arranged by Coventry Pat-
other hearts, of love, good-will, and charity, is here unfolded with much more. In cloth, $3.oo each; Turkey morocco, $5.o0 each.
beauty and true pathos. The Ninety and Nine. By Miss Elizabeth C. Clephane. As sung by
Mr. Ira D. Sankey. Exquisitely illustrated from elegant designs by Robert
Nan, the New-Fashioned Girl. By Mrs. S. C. Hallowell. Large Lewis, engraved by Wm. J. Dana. 4to. Gilt edges. $2.00.
16mo. Cloth. Illustrated. $i.oo.
A book for restless girls; full of fun, good sense, and deep feeling.
A White Hand. By Ella Farman. i2mo. Illustrated. $z.50. FOR HOME LIBRARIES.
A genuine painting of American society. $1000 Prize Series. i6 vols. $24.50.
"Vacation Stories for Girls. By Popular American Authors. $S.o0. $500 Prize Stories. 8 vols. $12.oo.
Happy Hour Stories for Girls. By Popular American Authors. $z.oo. Wholesome, and of the highest literary character.

MISS ELLA FARMAN'S BOOKS.
"Miss Farman has the very desirable knack of imparting valuable ideas
under the guise of a pleasing story."-- The NAew Century.
Mrs. Hurd's Niece. Illustrated. $.50o.
A thrilling story for Girls, especially for those who think they have a "mis-
sion."
The Cooking Club of Tu-Whit Hollow. x6mo. Eight full-page
illustrations. $I.25.
The practical instructions in housewifery, which are abundant, are set in the
midst of a bright, wholesome story.
A Little Woman. i6mo. $i.oo.
The daintiest of all juvenile books.

MISS JULIA A. EASTMAN'S BOOKS.
"Young Rick. Large x6mo. Twelve illustrations by Sol Eytinge. $1x.o.
"A bright, fascinating story of a little boy who was both a blessing and a
bother." Boston journal.
Striking for the Right. Large s6mo. Illustrated. $z.75.
In all quarters it has met with the highest praise.
The Romneys of Hidgemont. 16mo. Illustrated. $1.5o.
Beulah Romney. 16mo. Illustrated. $t.50.
Two stories wondrously alive, flashing with fun, sparkling with tears, throb-
bing with emotion.

BOOKS BY "PANSY."
"Pansy" has taken a front rank among the popular authors for young peo-
ple. She puts a wondrous freshness and vitality on every page, and some
of the finest character painting is to be found in her books, the sale of all
of which increases each year.
Four Girls at Chautauqua. z2mo. Illustrated. $.50o.
The most.fascinating of watering-place stories. Every page rustles with the
green leaves and fresh winds of a camping-out life. The four girls, full
of fun, but each with peculiar depths of character, encounter life's most
o profound experiences and changes, during their fortnight at the beautiful
ILLUSTRATION FROM POETS' HOMES. Chautauqua summer resort.
Household Puzzles. i2mo. Illustrated. $1.50.
nR p An DULTS. Howto make one dollar do the work of five. A family of beautiful girls
BOOKS 0 R ADULTS. seek to solve this "puzzle." Piquant, humorous, but written with as
Poets' Homes. Quarto, $2.oo; gilt edges, $2.50. intense purpose.
A collection of entertaining papers, concerning the homes, habits, and work Grandpa's Darlings. i6mo. Illustrated. $1.25.
of prominent American authors, prepared by R. H. Stoddard, George A big book, full of "good times" for the little people of the family.
Lowell Austin, &c. Fully illustrated by views, interior, and portraits. The Chautauqua Girls at Home. A Sequel to Four Girls at Chau.
Unerring Guide (The). By. Rev. H. V. Dexter, D. D. i6mo. taaciua. $.5o0.
Cloth. $o.50.
The texts of the Bible enjoining duties upon man, classified under appropri-
ate headings.
At Eventide. By Nehemiah Adams, D. D. $1.25.
Discourses which are the result of a ripe scholarship. Models for style; fill
of stimulating thoughts and pleasant suggestions; and touching the heart
by a tender pathos.
Bremen Lectures. By eminent European divines.
Words of Truth Series. 4 vols. Extra cloth, $4.o00; Gilt edge, $6.oo.
Words of Truth. Good Times. Pictures from Nature. Life Scenes.
TLight at Evening Time; or Jewels from God's Word. In very large
print, with an introduction by Theodore L. Cuyler, D. D. A delightful
book for old people. With steel Frontispiece. Large 4to. Extra cloth
binding, $2.oo; Japanese leather, $4oo.
Poems. By Mrs. S. M. B. Piatt. Elegant quarto. Illustrated by Miss
L. B. Humphrey, Jessie Curtis, and Robert Lewis. $.50o.
A fine Portrait lends added value to the volume, this being the only collec-
tion of Mrs. Piatt's thus accompanied. ILLUSTRATION FROu POBMS FOR OUr. DARLINGs.









CHOICE BOOKS.




GRADED LIST OF D. LOTHROP & CO,'S iNE & CHOICE BOOKS.
---3^-----

FOR BOYS.
BOOKS FOR THE CHILDREN. P R BOYS.
Pe-he Nu-e, the Tiger Whale. For Boys. By Cart. Barnacle. Large
I mo. Cloth. Illustrated. $.oo.
-, I The thrilling sketch of the capture of the Whale, and the interesting de-
-" ii scriptions of Pacific scenery, render this a book of unusual interest.
-4'. i My Little Gentlemen, and other Stories. By popular American authors.
-- Large i6mo. Cloth. Illustrated. $x.5o.
Stories exactly suited to modern children,
.- .. Walter Neal's Example. By Rev. Theron Brown. 16mo. Ill. $1.25.
'l'' Stories of Success. By S. F. Smith, D. D. i2mo. Illustrated. .s50o.
S African Adventure and Adventurers. By Rev. G. T. Day, D. D.
'6mo. Illustrated. $ 50.
SThe stories of Speke, Grant, Baker, Livingstone, and Stanley are put into
simple shape for the entertainment of young readers.
II Noble Workers. Edited by S. F. Smith, D. D. x6mo. $L.50.
Myths and Heroes. i6mo. Illust Edited by S. F. Smith, D. D. $x.50I
S- Knights and Sea Kings. Edited by S. F. Smith, D. D. i2mo. Il-
lustrated. $z.5o.
Two entertaining books, which will fasten forever the historical and geo-
graphical lessons of the school-room firmly in the student's mind.
Chaplin's Life of Benjamin Franklin. r6mo. Illustrated. $1.50.
Good for-Nothing Polly. By Ella Farman. z6mo. Cloth. Illus-
trated. $z.oo.
A story for Boys; "Polly being a delightful young scapegrace, draws
f l from life.
"Vacation Stories for Boys. By Popular American Authors. $S.oo.
-- Happy Hour Stories for Boys. By popular American Authors. $1.oo.
ILLUSTRATION FUOM SUGAR PLUMS.

From 1 to 5 Years of Age. "
Babyland. Large 4to. Illuminated board covers. 75 cts. ---
Bright Stories gay with Pictures, the delight of the Nursery.
Baby c own Primer. 4to. Illustrated. 40 cts. i
All in large print. Just the book to teach Baby to read.
Baby's Picture Album. A Beautiful Book of Short Stories, with a
Picture on every leaf Square iomo. Extra cloth binding, 75 cts.
My Beautiful Picture Book. Choice, large Pictures exquisitely
printed; with Stories in the largest type ever used in a story book. 4to.
13xf5 inches. Iliuminmad cloth binding, $n.oo. In paper binding, o50 cts.
Sunshine for Baby-Land. By Laurie Loring. Large pri'it. Charm-
ing stories. 4to. More than ioe large illustrations. heavier, on better pa-
per, and more elegantly printed than any book ever before issued at $1.25.

From 6 to 12 Years of Age.
"Little People, in Picture Story. By Pansy. 4to. Large type. Numer-
ous illustrations. Boards, $i.oo; cloth, $l.5o.
Our Darlings; what they Think, Say, and Do. By Pansy. Large print,
fuly illustrated. 4to. Illuminated board covers, $.oo; full cloth, $1.50.
Sugar Plums. Poems by Ella Furman. Pictures by Miss C. A. Northam.
Handsome 4to. Profusely illustrated. $t oo.
A book of sweets for the children. Each loem is of the kind that children
read, remember, and go repeating about the house.

From 5 to 15 Years of Age.
Pictures for our Darlings. Large print. Large 4to. $1.25a. i i .
Poems for our Darlings. Elegant cloth binding, stamped in Black
and Gold. Large 4to. $1.25.
A peerless collection of richly illustrated poems by Celia Thaxter, Elizabeth
Stuart Phelps, Ella Farman, Edgar Fawcett, and others.
Wide Awake Pleasure Book. By the best American A', nors. On
tha finest paper. Numerous fulll-page illustrations. Pge a uttle larger
than "Chatterbox." About 40c .,. .. .-..1 printed at the University
Press. Elegant black and gold .. .... side. $i.50o.
Mother's Boys and Girls. Pansy's Delightful New Picture Story ,
Book, in extra boards, $k.25; cloth binding, $1.75.
"Life and Habits of Wild Animals. Large 4to. With twenty very
fine full-page Pictures. $2.oo. ILLUSTRATION FROM WIDE-AWAKE.













I














I





mlt4
e' rm mmllm
BllAkm
I-A A.hi
S....pz
----- m -- l. L





A4im


21I





University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs