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 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Content
 Back Cover






Title: A small boy and his friends
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00049076/00001
 Material Information
Title: A small boy and his friends
Alternate Title: One small boy
Physical Description: 46 p. : ill. ; 14 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Felter, John D ( Engraver )
Davis, J. P ( Engraver )
Handy, Richard ( Printer )
Dodd, Mead & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: Dodd, Mead & Company
Place of Publication: New York
Manufacturer: Richard Handy
Publication Date: c1879
 Subjects
Subject: Boys -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1879   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1879
Genre: Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Cover title: One small boy.
General Note: Some illustrations engraved by John D. Felter or J.P. Davis.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00049076
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001615417
oclc - 23831351
notis - AHN9852

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Front Matter
        Page 3
    Frontispiece
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Content
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Back Cover
        Page 47
        Page 48
Full Text







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A SMALL BOY

AND


HIS FRIENDS.






ILL US TRA TED.






NEW YORK:
DODD, MEAD & COMPANY,
PUBLISHERS.

































Copyright, x879,
By DODD, MEAD & COMPANY.
















PRESS OF RICHARD HANDY,
62 & 64 Duane St.,
NEW YORK.











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"DEAR me!" said the small boy's
"LDEAR me!" said the small boy's







8 A SMALL BOY.

sis-ter May, "there he is in mis-chief
a-gain."
Sure e-nough, Tot, as the small boy
was named, had his fin-ger deep in the
pick-le jar. It did not taste so well as
he ex-pect-ed, and he set up such a cry
that his mamma had to come at once
and pick him up. It took her a good
five min-utes to quiet the lit-tle man,
though she had his pet rag ba-by in
her hand. At length his sobs died
a-way, and his head be-gan to droop.
"Oh, good !" thought his mam-ma," he's
real-ly go-ing to sleep; now there will


























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to A StMALL BOY.

be some quiet." In a min-ute or two
he was off in dream-land. Then, as it
was a bright warm day, she laid him
down in his era-die out in the yard,
while she sat down to rest in a chair
"close at hand. But this was not to
last ve-ry long. In half an hour his
eyes o-pened, and not a min-ute more
would he stay in that cra-dle. Det
up !" he cried, and out he scram-bled.
He made such haste that he fell flat
on his face in the path, but that he
did not mind at all. In a mo-ment
he was on his feet a-gain look-ing


















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12 A SMALL BOY.

a-round for some-thing to do.
Pon-to, the big black dog, came up
at once for a romp, and they played
with each oth-er in the grass for a long
time. But soon Tot grew tired, for
the dog was a lit-tle rough, and he
climbed up on the steps. Pon-to came
too, so Tot took up a stick and gave
him a good cut with it, and that soon
mad- him quiet. Then Tot sat down
on the step, and his mam-ma brought
him a slice of bread and but-ter, which
he ate with great pleas-ure. Pon-to
stood by, and ev-e-ry once in a while










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14 A SMALL BOY.

his mas-ter gave him a piece, which he
swal-lowed in no time. Just as the
last mouth-ful was gone, out came
grand-mam-ma with a nice lit-tle stick.
Tot got a-stride of it at once, and
played horse up and down the path.
But Pon-to want-ed no play in which
he could not share. He seized the
stick in his mouth and ran off with it,
and a long chase Tot had be-fore he
caught him and got it back.
The small boy had two grand-
mam-mas. One lived with him all the
time, but the oth-er lived ma-ny a mile




























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16 A SMALL BO Y.

a-way. Once he went to vis-it her.
and he could just re-mem-ber what a
kind old la-dy she was. They found
her sit-ting in the sun knit-ting, for it
was a warm day. Her hus-band was
a mil-ler, and close by was a cart filled
with bags of meal, while in the mill
there was a sound of grind-ing wheels,
and the air was filled with a cloud of

dust. Tot was tak en to the win-dow
at the back, where he could see the
mill wheel dash-ing a-round, while the
air was full of the spray of the white
wa-ter.



















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I8 A SAIALL BO Y.

And who was the small boy's fa-
ther? IHe was a lum-bcr-man. All
the win-ter he was a-way from home.
With a gang of men he lived in the
woods ma-ny a long mile to the
north-ward. ill day long, while the
snow-flakes were com-ing stead-i-ly
down, the strokes of his axe might
have been heard, and once in a while
a great crash, as some huge tree that
he was cut-ting down, gave way un-deY
his blows and fell pros-trate. How
large it looked as it lay stretched
a-long at full length. But the small








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20 A SMALLL BOY.

boy's fa-ther had seen so ma-ny just
like it that it was no new sight to
him. He would lay down his axe,
and one of the men would take hold
of a saw with him, and they would
cut the tree in-to lengths for load-ing
on the sleds. By this time, per-haps,
it would be night, and they would all
sit a-round the fire and eat their
sup-per, and then go to sleep in the
lig ca-bin they had built.
When morn-ing came, the sleds
drawn by ox-en would come with
oth-er men, and the great logs would







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22 A SMALL BOY.

be piled up on to it, and car-ried to
the edge of some fro-zen stream. Here,
tossed off on to the ice, they were
to lie till the warm spring sun melted
all the snow. Then, when the qui-et
brook turned in-to a wild rush-ing
tor-rent, all these logs would be
hur-ried on down the stream in-to
.some riv-er, and then down that till

they came to some saw-mill, where
they were to be cut up in-to boards.
But some-times on their way there
would come a jam, the logs would
,get caught in the stream, and would-














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24 A SMALL BOY.

pile up wild-ly, stop-ping all those

that were com-ing on be-hind. Then
Tot's fa-ther would have to run out

in the midst of the trou-ble with his
bill-hook and loos-en the jam, then
rush back to the shore for his life,

just as the logs, all set free, went
once more tear-ing on-ward. It was
hard work, and ma-ny times the small
boy's fa-ther made up his mind that
he would nev-er go again. But each
year he went just the same for all

that. It was Oc-to-ber when he left,
and before he came back it was May
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26 A SMALL BO Y.

Tot re-mem-bered see-ing his mam-ma
stand-ing at the gate wait-ing with
his wee ba-by sis-ter Bess be-side
her, on the ev-en-ing she heard that
he was to be at home. And he

re-mem-bered how his pa-pa, when he
did come, tossed him up in his arms,
and said what a big boy he had
grown.
But now that we have told a-bout
Tot's fa-ther and his grand-mam-ma,
"we must go back to Tot him-self.

We left him play-ing horse with a
stick. All at once the wind blew a











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28 A SMALL BO Y.

piece of pa-per o-ver the fence in-ta
the yard. Tot pranced af-ter it and
picked it up. It had a pic-ture on it,
and he said "Whoa !" to his horse, and
took it up to look. Pshaw !" he said
"noth-ing but an old tree," and he
threw it down a-gain. By and by he
grew tired of play-ing horse. Out
by the front gate there grew an ap-ple
tree, and a-gainst it lay a lad-der. ". I'll
climb up into that tree," said the small
boy to him-self, and up he went. I
sup-po::e his mam-ma would have
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30 A SMALL BOY.

seen such a small boy up a tree,
but noth-ing hap-pened to him.
" What lots I can see," said he.
"There is a girl draw-ing wa-ter at
the brook way down the road. I
wish my mam-ma would let me go
and play there.' He watched the
girl as she went down the street, but
she was soon out of sight. Be-
hind her came an old man lean-
ing on a stick, and with him a lit-tle
girl. The girl leaned down o-ver
the bridge, and let her hands play
in the wa-ter. But the old man called



















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32 A SMALL BOY.

to her to come, and they were
soon out of sight, and so he
turned a-bout to see what he could

see else-where. A-cross the way, on a
fine lawn in front of a large house,

he spied two lit-tle girls. They were
walk-ing side by side, and had stopped
to look at a squir-rel who was on the
branch of an old tree. Tot won-dered
what their names were, and was just
on the point of call-ing out to ask
them, when a la-dy came out of the
house, and they ran to meet her, and
all went in-doors to-geth-er.



















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31 A SMALL _BO Y

Tot felt quite lone-ly af-ter they
had gone, for not a per-son was to be 1
seen; but all at once a girl came
down the street trund-ling her hoop

Just as she passed the house, she
stopped and leaned a-gainst a wall to
rest, for she was quite out of breath.
She watched some swal-lows, that were

fly-ing o-ver-head, for a short time,
then she felt fresh once more and on
she ran.

Just as she went out of sight, Tot

heard some one speak. He looked
down, and there in the ve-ry next yard

















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36 A SMALL BOY.

was a lit-tle girl deep in a big book.
She was just about his own age. Close
by her, on a bench, sat her mam-ma, and
it was her voice that Tot had heard.
She had just said, Come, Grace, it is
time to go in." So the lit-tle girl shut
up her book, and they both got up
and went in-to the house. A big cqt
walked a-long by their side blink-ing
sleep-i-ly, and the lit-tle girl held the
door o-pen for her to pass through,
and that was the last Tot saw of a-ny
of them.
After this, no one was to be seen for































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38 A SMALL BOY.

some time, and Tot had just a-bout
made up his mind to go down, when
he saw an old wo-man come out of a
house wittf a ta-ble. On it she put
some dish-es, and then she and an old
man sat down and be-gan to eat their
din-ner. The sight re-mind-ed Tot
that he was ve-ry hun-gry, and so he
made his way slow-ly down to the
ground and ran in-doors. There he
found his mam-ma ve-ry bu-sy get-ting
din-ner.
"Oh Tot," she cried, "why did you
not play five min-utes longer, then you












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40 A SMALL BO Y.

would not have been in Ily way at
all. Here, jump up in-to the win-dow
seat and look at your pic-ture book,
and din-ner will be read-y in no time."
Tot took the book and turned o-ver

the pic-tures. He had seen them all
be-fore; the one of the boy and girl

at the sea-side he knew all a-bout,
so he did not find the book ve-ry
in-ter-est-ing.
Can't I det down ?" he asked.
No! no !" said his mam-ma; "in
a few min-utes din-ner will be all
read-y."












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42 A SMALL BOY.

My's wer-ry tired," said Tot; but
he turned o-ver the leaves of his book
a-gain. But noth-ing in it seemed to
meet his fancy. There was one pic-ture
of a boy and his two sis-ters who were
play-ing camp-ing out on the prai-rie
un-der an um-brel-la. They seemed
to be hav-ing a ve-ry good time, and
Tot wished he had a broth-er and sis-
ter to play with. But wish-ing did
no good, and so he went back once
more to the book. There was a
pic-ture of a girl who was stand-ing
on the sea-shore at night. The waves












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44 A SMALL BOY.

were dash-ing close to her, and the
moon was shin-ing on the wa-ter.

"That lit-tle girl ought to be in bed,"
said Tot, it's too late for her to be
up."
Just then his mam-ma said that
din-ner was all on the ta-ble, and so
the small boy was marched off to have
his face and hands washed. What a
din-ner he ate His mam-ma said that
if he kept on at that rate there would
be a fam-ine. Well, at last his hun-ger
was appeased, and he got down from
his chair and ran--but where, I am













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46 A SMALL BO Y.

not go-ing to tell you, for I do not

know my-self. And of what the small

boy did af-ter that morn-ing I know

on-ly one thing, and that was that he

grew up.












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