Short stories & anecdotes for the young

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Short stories & anecdotes for the young
Portion of title:
Short stories and anecdotes for the young
Physical Description:
1 v. (various pagings) : ill. (some col.) ; 16 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Gardner, Alex ( Publisher )
Publisher:
Alex. Gardner
Place of Publication:
Paisley
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1881   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1881
Genre:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Scotland -- Paisley

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
General Note:
Frontispiece printed in colors.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002237464
notis - ALH7951
oclc - 62137264
System ID:
UF00049066:00001

Full Text











w. ,-.
I-I

























The Baldwin Libray
RmBUn
//^^f fU^^ -:





































A DEATH GRIP, Page 8.









SHORT



STORIES & ANECDOTES














PAISLEY: ALEX. GARDNER.

















CONTENTS.



No. I. Page.
"A Negro Slave, 1
"A Drunkard for Seventeen Years, 5
"A Good Home Lesson, 5
A Word to the Boys, 6
"A Small Unkindness," 6
S A Minister Valued, 7
A Boy's Reproof, 7
Afraid in the Dark, 7
"A Death-Grip, 8
"A Child's Answer, 9
Beautiful and True, 10
A Powerful Sermon, 10
Gospel-Nothing else will Satisfy, 11
Death, .12
Contentment, 12
Besetting Sins Like Leeches, 12
A Moral Pestilence, 13
Faith, 14
Ignorance, 16

No. II.
The Widow's Son, 1
The Preacher's Reward. 6
Prayer Answered after Death, 7
Day by Day, 8
Faith, 9
Heaven-To be Shut Out of at Last, 10
Stop the Holes Up," 11
Lost and Found, 12
A Hindoo Thief and the King's Pardon, 14
Obedience, 16









iv. CONTENTS.

No. III. Page.
Little Lewis, 1
Poor-as Hearers, 5
The Efficacy of the Cross, 5
Heaven-a Sustaining Prospect, 6
Mercy, 6
Obeying God-with delight, 7
Omniscience, 8
Persecution-Not to be Feared, 8
Prayer-and Activity, .. 8
Deeds not Words, 9
Come Unto Me, 9
Velvet Tongues, 10
Hidden Jewels, 10
The Wool-Cleaner, .11
What One Tract Did, .12
Humility, .14
Christ-Trophies of his Power, 14
Bible-How to Read, .15
Body and Soul, 16


No. IV.
The Jew. 1
Consistency, 5
Bible-Why Priests Withhold it, 5
Bible-Cause of Interest in it, 5
Advent-Looking for the, 6
Absence from Week-Night Services, 7
Attendance at Public Worship-Invitation to, 7
Royal Example, 9
Governor Pollock and the Convict, 9
The Roll-Call in Heaven, .10
The Old Adam, 11
"If You Please, Make me a Christian," 11
Want of Occupation, .12
How a Bible was Preserved, 12
A Swearer Alone with God, .13
Honest Frank, 14
The Right Kind of Prayer, .15
"Just a Little More," 16
Riches, 16









CONTENTS. V.

No. V. Page.
The Orphan, 1
The Eleventh Commandment, 4
Shall I be One of Them 5
Leviathan, 6
Two Meetings, 6
Who Will Carry Me Over ? 7
Overcome Evil with Good, 8
Bees and Wasps, 9
Hearing and Doing, 9
The Exact Truth, 9
The Reason Why, .10
Our Rock, .10
Experimental Religion, 11
Prayers-of a Father, -12
Procrastination, .13
Procrastination-Deprecated, 13
Quarrels, 14
Sabbath-Views of Heaven then Enjoyed, 14
Safety of Believers, .14
Sermons-Must be Full of Christ, 15
Martin Luther's Will, 16
Seed Thoughts, 16


No. VI.
The Twins, 1
Gold From the Mine, 5
Out of the Mouth of Babes," 6
Forgiveness, 6
Sin-How to Overcome, 7
Suffering-True Service, 8
Sin-One, the Soul's Ruin, 8
My Own Happy Experience," 9
Truisms, .10
Keep the Sabbath Day, 10
Come Unto Me, 12
Gold From the Mine, 12
Second Thoughts are Best, 13
It's Very Hard, 14
"I Wonder what God would Like Me to Do?" 15









vi. CONTENTS.

No. VII. Page.
The Little Miner Boy, 1
Jesus Everywhere, 5
A Near Relative, 6
Luther's Argument with Satan, 7
Faith, 7
The Name of Jesus, 8
Two Precious Words, 9
Love God, but Hate the Devil, 9
Gold From the.Mine, 9
Nellie's Idea of Prayer, 10
United Prayer, 11
Excellency of Faith, 12
The Benevolence of Law, 18
The "Land Flowing with Milk and Honey," 14
The Sabbath, 15
What is a Boy Good For? 15
The Little Sweep; or, Learning to Read, 15
The Practical Proof, 16

No. VIII.
The Power of the Bible, 1
The Bible, 5
A Lesson, 5
The Bible, 7
Church Clocks, 8
My Beautiful Money," .
Do Your Gods Love You ?" 10
"Lord, Save Me !" 11
A Boy's Thought, 12
Worldliness-To be Avoided, 12
Make Your Own Sunshine, 13
Stoop-Stoop 15
Beauty and Truth, 15
Try Prayer, 16
Christian -What he should be, 16

No. IX.
One Unguarded Moment, 1
Charlie Bell's First Prayer, 6
The Efficacy of Prayer, 9
Faith, 11









CONTENTS. vii.

Page.
Riches-Not all to be Desired, 11
Sabbath Desecration, .12
Covetousness-Its Insidiousness, 13
Corruptions-Vitality of, .14
A Mother's Influence, 14
How He Got a Place, 15
The Old Thresher and His Bible, 16

No. X.
Do Unto Others-A New York Story for Boys, 1
A Backwoods Adventure, 7
Rap Sharply, 9
For the Young, .10
The Old Bible, 11
Detached Thoughts, 12
God in Nature, .13
Motives, .14
Early Impressions, 14
Borrow Not a Few, 15
The Market-Place, 15
Italics, 16
The Bible, .16

No. XI.
Half for Johnny, 1
The Widow's Wall, 5
Take Hold, 8
Never Despair, 9
The Devil is Dead, 9
The End of the Scoffer, 10
Keep the Sabbath--God Commands It, 11
The Little Bible Reader, 12
God on His Side, 16
Christian-A Royal Patronage, 16

No. XII.
The Brahmin Boy-A Story for the Young, 1
"That Voice," 4









Viii. CONTENTS.

Page.
Impolite Things, 6
The Captain and the Jew, 7
The Italian Apple-Girl, 9
The Meat ofLife, .11
The Bible and the Koran, 11
Sowing Light, 12
A Hard Sum, 13
"Stop Thief 13
Dig a Well, 16
Danger of the Christian, .16













STOftIES ,uiii tpiE TETS $.



A NEGRO SLAVE.
-- T- was a coloured girl, and was
born at Kingston, Jamaica. Her mother dying
when she was but a child left her, with two sisters,
to the care of her father, who had been brought to
know the Saviour, and whose character as a man
and a Christian was held in high esteem. Regard-
ing with deep interest the eternal welfare of his
children, he gave all diligence to bring them up
in the nurture and admonition of the Lord ;" nor
did he labour in vain, for his heavenly Father was
not unmindful of his prayers, but granted him
the pleasure of seeing them united to the church.
Jane Thomson on giving evidence of a change of
heart was baptized and added to the church. She
was generally regular and serious in her attendance
on the means of grace, and though from her re-
served manner it was not easy to discover what
actual progress she was making in the knowledge of
Christ, the result evidently showed that God had
prepared her heart for the reception of his word,
and that it was taking deep and permanent root.
She was, at length, taken ill ; and though for some
No. 1.








2

months she entertained but little doubt of her re-
covery, her friends but too plainly saw that she was
far advanced in that wasting disease, which, while
it flatters, destroys She bore the affliction with
much Christian patience; often praying that it
might be sanctified, whatever might be its issue.
She often spake of her unworthiness, of which she
appeared to have very clear views, hoping for sal-
vation entirely through the merits of Christ. On
one occasion when Satan endeavoured to shake her
faith in the Saviour, by representing her sins as
numerous, she exclaimed, Oh Lord, have mercy
on me, though my sins are many, they do not ex-
ceed thy grace." She viewed God's design in send-
ing affliction as mercifully intended to fit her
for the celestial inheritance, frequently calling to
mind the language of the apostle, whom the Lord
loveth he chasteneth." From the promises she de-
rived great comfort, and pleaded the sufferings of
Christ as an argument with the bestower of mercies,
for patience to bear her trial without murmuring,
saying 0 blessed Jesus, 0 man of sorrows and
acquainted with grief I beseech thee, grant me
grace to hear with patience the affliction which
thou hast sent." A few days before her death,
wishing to know particularly the state of her mind,
and to have her dying testimony of the love of
Christ, the missionary, who was her pastor, asked
her if she did really feel that the Lord was gracious,
and that he was precious to her soul. She replied








3

with great energy, 0 my dear minister, I do in-
deed feel that he is precious-I have trusted that
the Lord is gracious-I feel his love now to be
better than every thing, and should he raise me up
again, how would I beseech all my young friends,
and especially my young sisters in the church, to
obey all his commandments, and to cleave unto
him with full purpose of heart." Her father seeing
her at one time very faint and low, whispered in
her ear, "My dear child, trust in the Lord," when
she instantly exclaimed, whom have I to trust in
but Jesus the Lover of souls: 0 yes, I can trust in
him, he is my comforter." And then in nearly the
language of the pious Pearce she said, "Sweet
affliction, sweet affliction, thus to cause my soul to
be stayed on my blessed Jesus. Come thou dear
Redeemer, come thou Lover of my soul, for I feel
it would be far better to depart and be with thee.
O blessed Jesus, thou knowest that I love thee."
She spoke with delight of the pleasure she had en-
joyed in the appointed ordinances of Christ; but
it was not in her past attention to those she hoped
for salvation, but in the atonement of her Saviour.
Yet in speaking of her past enjoyment in the house
of God, she would urge on her young friends the
necessity of showing their obedience to Christ by a
diligent attention to all his institutions, and the
pleasure which resulted on a dying bed in being
able to say, I have, through Jesus, kept the
faith, and fought a good fight." On beholding an








4

intimate friend much grieved, she said, "Don't
weep and break your heart for me ; but live near
to God and He will direct and bless you." A
striking proof of what religion can do, in weaning
the heart from all terrestrial connections. Here
was a young person surrounded with all the com-
forts of life ; and yet without a sigh she could com-
mit her friends to the care of God, and cheerfully
bid them farewell, to join the Saviour in the
heavenly world, and who for that purpose bought
her with his own.precious blood. On the night of
her departure she called her family and friends
about her, and bidding them all farewell, she said,
"I am going-but I am going where I shall see
Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, with all the patriarchs,
and family of the redeemed. In that glorious state
I shall behold my beloved mother who is gone be-
fore me; but above and beyond all others I shall
behold my beloved Saviour Jesus Christ; for I
shall see him face to face." After this, she suffered
a short interruption of her peace and joy ; but she
cried unto her Saviour, saying, Come thou blessed
Redeemer and my Saviour, for 1 am truly thine."
And here she could not refrain from exulting aloud
in the triumph she had obtained, through Christ,
over the powers of darkness. Her strength now
failed, and in a few minutes she breathed out her
ardent spirit into his hands who gave it, faintly
uttering, 0 sweet affliction-O my blessed Jesus-
Jesus-Jesus."








5

A DRUNKARD FOR SEVENTEEN YEARS.
MR. MOODY tells of the conversion of a confirmed
drunkard through the medium of his special ser-
vices at Chicago. He was down in the gutter, but
God raised him up. He had received a note be-
ginning: "My dear friend," which very much
surprised him, because he thought he had no friend
in all the world. His nervous system was com-
pletely shattered, and an effort to conquer his
appetite caused him to shake and tremble to that
extent that he was unable to stand up. But at
last he found Christ at the Woman's Temperance
Meeting, and, from the moment that God took
possession of his soul, all appetite for liquor had
ceased. Soon he took the first holiday of any sort
in which he had not been drunk for the last seven-
teen years. I had one foot in the grave," said
he ; "I had lost all hope ; I expected to die in a
few days more, and I could see the bottomless pit
before me, but Christ has saved me, and how
thankful I am My mother died a few days ago-
died before she heard that I had be;n saved, but I
am satisfied that she has heard of it up in heaven."

A GOOD HOME LESSON.
IN his Life of the Prince Consort," Mr. Martin
states that, while wishing to be guided in all things
relating to the education of the royal children by
the Prince's wishes, Her Majesty from time to time
placed upon record, in writing, her own views








5

A DRUNKARD FOR SEVENTEEN YEARS.
MR. MOODY tells of the conversion of a confirmed
drunkard through the medium of his special ser-
vices at Chicago. He was down in the gutter, but
God raised him up. He had received a note be-
ginning: "My dear friend," which very much
surprised him, because he thought he had no friend
in all the world. His nervous system was com-
pletely shattered, and an effort to conquer his
appetite caused him to shake and tremble to that
extent that he was unable to stand up. But at
last he found Christ at the Woman's Temperance
Meeting, and, from the moment that God took
possession of his soul, all appetite for liquor had
ceased. Soon he took the first holiday of any sort
in which he had not been drunk for the last seven-
teen years. I had one foot in the grave," said
he ; "I had lost all hope ; I expected to die in a
few days more, and I could see the bottomless pit
before me, but Christ has saved me, and how
thankful I am My mother died a few days ago-
died before she heard that I had be;n saved, but I
am satisfied that she has heard of it up in heaven."

A GOOD HOME LESSON.
IN his Life of the Prince Consort," Mr. Martin
states that, while wishing to be guided in all things
relating to the education of the royal children by
the Prince's wishes, Her Majesty from time to time
placed upon record, in writing, her own views








6

upon the subject. Here is one note :-" The
greatest maxim of all is, that the children should
be brought up as simply and in as domestic a way
as possible ; that (not interfering with their les-
sons), they should be as much as possible with
their parents, and learn to place their greatest
confidence in them in all things."

A WORD TO THE BOYS.
BoYs, did you ever think that this world, with all
its wealth and woe, with all its mines and moun-
tains, oceans, seas, and rivers, and with all its
shipping, its steamboats, railroads, and magnetic
telegraphs, with all its millions of groping men,
and all the science and progress of ages, will soon
be given over to the boys of the present age-boys
like you ? Believe it, and look abroad upon your
inheritance, and get ready to enter upon its posses-
sion. The presidents, kings, governors, statesmen,
philosophers, ministers, teachers, men of the future,
are all boys now.-Temperance Chronicle.

"A SMALL UNKINDNESS."
Since trifles make the sum of human things,
And half our misery from our foibles springs;
Since life's best joys consist in peace and ease,
And few can save, or serve, but all can please;
0 let the ungentle spirit learn from hence,
A small unkindness is a great offence.
HANNAH MORE.








6

upon the subject. Here is one note :-" The
greatest maxim of all is, that the children should
be brought up as simply and in as domestic a way
as possible ; that (not interfering with their les-
sons), they should be as much as possible with
their parents, and learn to place their greatest
confidence in them in all things."

A WORD TO THE BOYS.
BoYs, did you ever think that this world, with all
its wealth and woe, with all its mines and moun-
tains, oceans, seas, and rivers, and with all its
shipping, its steamboats, railroads, and magnetic
telegraphs, with all its millions of groping men,
and all the science and progress of ages, will soon
be given over to the boys of the present age-boys
like you ? Believe it, and look abroad upon your
inheritance, and get ready to enter upon its posses-
sion. The presidents, kings, governors, statesmen,
philosophers, ministers, teachers, men of the future,
are all boys now.-Temperance Chronicle.

"A SMALL UNKINDNESS."
Since trifles make the sum of human things,
And half our misery from our foibles springs;
Since life's best joys consist in peace and ease,
And few can save, or serve, but all can please;
0 let the ungentle spirit learn from hence,
A small unkindness is a great offence.
HANNAH MORE.










A MINISTER VALUED.
SOME years ago, a Glasgow minister was called in
Sto see a man who was very ill. After finishing his
visit, as he was leaving the house, he said to the
man's wife :-" My good woman, do you not go to
any church at all ?" Oh, yes, sir ; we gang to the
Barony Kirk." Then why in the world did you
send for me-why didn't you send for Dr. Mac-
leod?" "Na, na, sir; deed no; we wad na risk
him. Do ye no ken it's a dangerous case o'
typhus !"

A BOY'S REPROOF.
DURING the sudden rise of the Spring River, in
South-west Missouri, on the 27th of May, 1872, a
family was obliged to seek safety on the house-top.
The father, in trying to prevent a drifting log from
striking the house, used a fearful oath, when his
little boy, Charlie, not five years old, looked up
earnestly and said : 0 pa, don't swear so; you
had better pray !" Then turning to his mother,
who was also unconverted, he asked her to pray
too. The simple, yet powerful, reproof of the
little boy resulted in the conversion of both the
parents, and they are now members of the Church.

AFRAID IN THE DARK.
BRIGHT little four-year-old Lulu was very much
afraid in the dark, and for that reason had great
dread of bed-time. Complaining of this to a friend










A MINISTER VALUED.
SOME years ago, a Glasgow minister was called in
Sto see a man who was very ill. After finishing his
visit, as he was leaving the house, he said to the
man's wife :-" My good woman, do you not go to
any church at all ?" Oh, yes, sir ; we gang to the
Barony Kirk." Then why in the world did you
send for me-why didn't you send for Dr. Mac-
leod?" "Na, na, sir; deed no; we wad na risk
him. Do ye no ken it's a dangerous case o'
typhus !"

A BOY'S REPROOF.
DURING the sudden rise of the Spring River, in
South-west Missouri, on the 27th of May, 1872, a
family was obliged to seek safety on the house-top.
The father, in trying to prevent a drifting log from
striking the house, used a fearful oath, when his
little boy, Charlie, not five years old, looked up
earnestly and said : 0 pa, don't swear so; you
had better pray !" Then turning to his mother,
who was also unconverted, he asked her to pray
too. The simple, yet powerful, reproof of the
little boy resulted in the conversion of both the
parents, and they are now members of the Church.

AFRAID IN THE DARK.
BRIGHT little four-year-old Lulu was very much
afraid in the dark, and for that reason had great
dread of bed-time. Complaining of this to a friend










A MINISTER VALUED.
SOME years ago, a Glasgow minister was called in
Sto see a man who was very ill. After finishing his
visit, as he was leaving the house, he said to the
man's wife :-" My good woman, do you not go to
any church at all ?" Oh, yes, sir ; we gang to the
Barony Kirk." Then why in the world did you
send for me-why didn't you send for Dr. Mac-
leod?" "Na, na, sir; deed no; we wad na risk
him. Do ye no ken it's a dangerous case o'
typhus !"

A BOY'S REPROOF.
DURING the sudden rise of the Spring River, in
South-west Missouri, on the 27th of May, 1872, a
family was obliged to seek safety on the house-top.
The father, in trying to prevent a drifting log from
striking the house, used a fearful oath, when his
little boy, Charlie, not five years old, looked up
earnestly and said : 0 pa, don't swear so; you
had better pray !" Then turning to his mother,
who was also unconverted, he asked her to pray
too. The simple, yet powerful, reproof of the
little boy resulted in the conversion of both the
parents, and they are now members of the Church.

AFRAID IN THE DARK.
BRIGHT little four-year-old Lulu was very much
afraid in the dark, and for that reason had great
dread of bed-time. Complaining of this to a friend









8

one day, she was told that if she would remember
always that "darkness and light are alike to God,"
she would no longer be afraid. The next morn-
ing, upon entering the breakfast-room, the little
one exclaimed: Well, Mrs. --, I was 'fraid
agin last night! "Why, how was that," asked
the lady; "did you not remember what I told
you ? 1Oh, yes," replied Lulu ; I memberedd
it, but the 'fraid is in me, and can't be got out of
me."

A DEATH-GRIP.
A SEA captain related at a prayer-meeting in Boston
a short time ago, a thrilling incident in his own
experience : "A few years ago," said he, I was
sailing by the island of Cuba, when the cry ran
through the ship, 'man overboard !' It was im-
possible to put up the helm of the ship, but I
instantly seized a rope and threw it over the ship's
stern, crying out to the man to seize it as for his
life. The sailor caught the rope just as the ship
was passing. I immediately took another rope,
and making a slip-noose of it, attached it to the
other, and slid it down to the struggling sailor, and
directed him to pass it over his shoulders and under
his arms, and he would be drawn on board. He
was rescued ; but he had grasped that rope with
such firmness, with such a death-grip, that it took
hours before his hold relaxed, and his hand could
be separated from it. With such eagerness, in-








9

deed, had he clutched the object that was to save
him, that the strands of the rope became imbedded
in the flesh of his hands !" Thus it seems as if God
had let down from heaven a rope to every sinner on
earth, that every strand was a precious promise, and
that we ought to be so intensely eager to secure
these promises, as to lay hold on them as for our
lives, and suffer neither the powers of earth or
hell to shake our confidence or disturb our hope.

A CHILD'S ANSWER.
THE King of Prussia, while visiting a village in his
land, was welcomed by the school children of the
place. After their speaker had made a speech for
them, he thanked them. Then taking an orange
from a plate, he asked, To what kingdom dces
this belong?" "The vegetable kingdom, sire,"
replied a little girl. The king took a gold coin
from his pocket, and holding it up, asked, And
to what kingdom does this belong ?" "To the
mineral kingdom," said the little girl. "And to
what kingdom do I belong then ?" asked the king.
The little girl coloured deeply, for she did not like
to say "the animal kingdom," as he thought she
would, lest his majesty should be offended. Just
then itflashed into her mindthat "Godmade man in
SHis own image," and looking up with a brighten-
ing eye, she said, "To God's kingdom, sire." The
king was deeply moved. A tear stood in his eye.
He placed his hand on the child's head, and said,








10

most devoutly, "God grant that I may be ac-
counted worthy of that kingdom." Thus did the
words of a child move the heart of a king. Little
children, learn from this that even your words
may do both good and harm. A pert word from
a child may wound the heart of a mother; a lov-
ing one may make it glad. My little children, let
your words be kind, true, and right.
BEAUTIFUL AND TRUE.
THE late eminent judge, Sir Allan Park, once said
at a public meeting in London, We live in the
midst of blessings till we are utterly insensible to
their greatness, and of the Source from whence
they flow. We speak of our civilisation, our arts,
our freedom, our laws, and forget entirely how
large a share is due to Christianity. Blot Christi-
anity out of the page of man's history, and what
would his laws have been-what his civilisation ?
Christianity is mixed up with our very being and
our daily life : there is not a familiar object around
us which does not wear a different aspect because
the light of Christian love is on it; not a law
ivhich does not owe its truth and gentleness to
Christianity; not a custom which cannot be traced,
in all its holy, healthful parts, to the Gospel."
A POWERFUL SERMON.
" I FELT yours to be a very powerful sermon," said
I to the clergyman of a village church in Devon-
shire as I walked homeward with him. "Did you?"








10

most devoutly, "God grant that I may be ac-
counted worthy of that kingdom." Thus did the
words of a child move the heart of a king. Little
children, learn from this that even your words
may do both good and harm. A pert word from
a child may wound the heart of a mother; a lov-
ing one may make it glad. My little children, let
your words be kind, true, and right.
BEAUTIFUL AND TRUE.
THE late eminent judge, Sir Allan Park, once said
at a public meeting in London, We live in the
midst of blessings till we are utterly insensible to
their greatness, and of the Source from whence
they flow. We speak of our civilisation, our arts,
our freedom, our laws, and forget entirely how
large a share is due to Christianity. Blot Christi-
anity out of the page of man's history, and what
would his laws have been-what his civilisation ?
Christianity is mixed up with our very being and
our daily life : there is not a familiar object around
us which does not wear a different aspect because
the light of Christian love is on it; not a law
ivhich does not owe its truth and gentleness to
Christianity; not a custom which cannot be traced,
in all its holy, healthful parts, to the Gospel."
A POWERFUL SERMON.
" I FELT yours to be a very powerful sermon," said
I to the clergyman of a village church in Devon-
shire as I walked homeward with him. "Did you?"








11

he replied, and added, after a pause, "And I too
have had a powerful sermon.' As I looked for an
explanation, the clergyman said, 'There was an
old man accompanied by his little grandchild
among the congregation. How earnest was that
man's attention as he stood up in his eagerness to
listen to the sermon ?" "I observed both him and
his clean, happy-looking child," I replied. "That
man was once the greatest drunkard in the village;
a shame and a pest to the place. The sudden
death of the beer-shop keeper,-who dropped down
with an oath on his lips, first arrested the thoughts
of the aged drunkard; a zealous member of the
temperance society followed up the first conviction
by words of kind advice, and old Martin became a
reformed man. As soon as his brain was clear
from the fumes of drink he began to feel that he
had a soul, and to attend the House of God; and
now he is among the most regular and devout of
attendants at public worship. As I see him lead-
ing in his grandchild and bending his hoary head
in worship it is a powerful sermon to me to sow
beside all waters.' "-Mrs. C. L. Balfour.

GOSPEL-Nothing else will Satisfy.
TAKE away a toy from a child, and give him an-
other, and he is satisfied ; but if he be hungry no
toy will do. As new-born babes, true believers
desire the sincere milk of the Word; and the de-
sire of grace in this way is grace.-John Newton.








12

DEATH.
THE late Mr. Young of Jedburgh, was once visit-
ing the death-bed of an aged member of his con-
gregation, who was hourly looking for his last
change. "Well, my friend," said the. minister,
"how do you feel yourself to-day ?" Very weel,
sir," was the calm and solemn answer, Very weel,
but just a wee confused wi' the flittin'."-Record.

CONTENTMENT.
MAKING a day's excursion from Botzen in the
Tyrol, we went along the very narrowest of roads
mere alleys, to which our country lanes would be
turnpike roads. Well, you may be sure that we
did not engage an ordinary broad carriage, for that
would have found the passage as difficult as the
needle's eye to the camel; but our landlord had a
very narrow chaise for us, just the very thing for
threading those fourfeet passages. Now, I must
make you hear the moral of it, you fretful little
gentlemen. When you have a small estate, you
must have small wants, and by contentment suit
your carriage to your road. "Not so easy," say
you ? "Very necessary to a Christian," say I.-
Spurgeo n.

BESETTING SINS LIKE LEECHES.
A TRAVELLER in Burmah, after fording a certain
river, found his body covered all over by a swarm
of leeches, busily sucking his blood. His first im-








12

DEATH.
THE late Mr. Young of Jedburgh, was once visit-
ing the death-bed of an aged member of his con-
gregation, who was hourly looking for his last
change. "Well, my friend," said the. minister,
"how do you feel yourself to-day ?" Very weel,
sir," was the calm and solemn answer, Very weel,
but just a wee confused wi' the flittin'."-Record.

CONTENTMENT.
MAKING a day's excursion from Botzen in the
Tyrol, we went along the very narrowest of roads
mere alleys, to which our country lanes would be
turnpike roads. Well, you may be sure that we
did not engage an ordinary broad carriage, for that
would have found the passage as difficult as the
needle's eye to the camel; but our landlord had a
very narrow chaise for us, just the very thing for
threading those fourfeet passages. Now, I must
make you hear the moral of it, you fretful little
gentlemen. When you have a small estate, you
must have small wants, and by contentment suit
your carriage to your road. "Not so easy," say
you ? "Very necessary to a Christian," say I.-
Spurgeo n.

BESETTING SINS LIKE LEECHES.
A TRAVELLER in Burmah, after fording a certain
river, found his body covered all over by a swarm
of leeches, busily sucking his blood. His first im-








12

DEATH.
THE late Mr. Young of Jedburgh, was once visit-
ing the death-bed of an aged member of his con-
gregation, who was hourly looking for his last
change. "Well, my friend," said the. minister,
"how do you feel yourself to-day ?" Very weel,
sir," was the calm and solemn answer, Very weel,
but just a wee confused wi' the flittin'."-Record.

CONTENTMENT.
MAKING a day's excursion from Botzen in the
Tyrol, we went along the very narrowest of roads
mere alleys, to which our country lanes would be
turnpike roads. Well, you may be sure that we
did not engage an ordinary broad carriage, for that
would have found the passage as difficult as the
needle's eye to the camel; but our landlord had a
very narrow chaise for us, just the very thing for
threading those fourfeet passages. Now, I must
make you hear the moral of it, you fretful little
gentlemen. When you have a small estate, you
must have small wants, and by contentment suit
your carriage to your road. "Not so easy," say
you ? "Very necessary to a Christian," say I.-
Spurgeo n.

BESETTING SINS LIKE LEECHES.
A TRAVELLER in Burmah, after fording a certain
river, found his body covered all over by a swarm
of leeches, busily sucking his blood. His first im-








13

pulse was to tear the tormentors from his flesh,
but his servant warned him that to pull them off
by mechanical violence would expose his life to
danger. They must not be torn off, lest portions
remain in the wounds and become a poison; they
must drop off spontaneously, and so they will be
harmless. The native forthwith prepared a bath
for his master, by the decoction of some herbs, and
directed him to lie down in it. As soon as he had
bathed in the balsam the leeches dropped off.
This illustrates the fact that every unforsaken in-
iquity in the heart is like a leech, sucking the life-
blood. Mere human determination to have done
with it will not cast the evil thing away. You
must bathe your whole being in God's pardoning
mercy, and these venomous creatures will instantly
let go their hold.

A MORAL PESTILENCE.
THE uttering of foul language is, we fear, on the
increase in this country. It is impossible to move
about throughout the streets without getting
audible proofs of the presence of this moral pestil-
ence. From the mouths of individuals scarcely
beyond the age of babes and sucklings, as well as
from those of adults, there are constantly emanat-
ing sounds and sayings of a revolting kind. This
is, indeed, one of the most sad and sickening char-
acteristics of the present day. Language may be
said to be the current coin of thought, but many








14

persons seem to have pocket minds, in which they
deposit, and whence they circulate, only the baser
kinds of this sort of money. Coarse, vulgar, and
brutal conversations are, therefore, prevalent on
all hands. It disseminates itself like a subtle
poison throughout our social system, and is cer-
tainly not confined to the ignorant and the poorer
classes. It creeps into our colleges and schools,
and infects pupils, despite the utmost vigilance of
masters and teachers. In our factories and work-
shops, too, ribaldry is cast from tongue to tongue,
whilst in the haunts of vice and dissipation,
epithets of a villainous nature are employed alike
in the expression of mirthful or of angry feelings.
Why may not the unrepealed statute against pro-
fane swearing be put in force with advantage ?-
The Echo.

FAITH.
THE Emperor Napoleon I. was reviewing some
troops upon the Place du Carrousel, in Paris; and,
in giving an order, he thoughtlessly dropped the
bridle upon his horse's neck, which instantly set off
on a gallop. The Emperor was obliged to cling to
the saddle. At this moment a common soldier of
the line sprang before the horse, seized the bridle,
and handed it respectfully to the Emperor. "Much
obliged to you captain," said the chief, by this one
word making the soldier a captain. The man be-
lieved the Emperor, and, saluting him, asked, "Of









what regiment, sire ?" Napoleon, charmed with his
faith, replied, "Of my guards !" and galloped off.
Now, what will the soldier do ? If he imitates
those who before believing wish to see and feel,
and like the apostle Thomas waits for the palpable
proof before relying upon testimony, he will say,
"a captain of the guard always wears a captain's
uniform, and mine is only that of a common sol-
dier. I cannot, therefore, believe myself a cap-
tain ;" and the soldier would return to the ranks.
But if, on, the contrary, he believes fully and im-
plicitly the emperor's word, and that his rank
as captain of the guard depends not upon the uni-
form he wears, but that the uniform must be the
consequence and evidence of his rank (and this will
be his thought if he honours the emperor), he will
not hesitate because of his dress, nor will he return
to the line. And such, indeed, was the conduct of
the man. As soon as the emperor left, the soldier
laid down his gun, saying, "He may take it who
will," and instead of returning to his comrades, he
approached the group of staff officers. On seeing
him, one of the generals scornfully said, "What
does this fellow want here ?" "This fellow," re-
plied the soldier proudly, "is a captain of the
guards." "You? my poor friend You are mad to
say so !" "He said it," replied the soldier, point-
ing to the emperor, who was still in sight. "I
ask your pardon, sir," said the general respectfully,
"I was not aware of it." Here, then, was







16

exhibited a manifold faith. Since first the
soldier believed the Emperor, upon his word,
because he heard him (as the Samaritans said
of the Saviour), and afterwards, on the sol-
dier's word, the general believed the emperor.
You now see how a person may be sure that God
gives peace ; it is by believing his testimony, just
as this soldier believed that of his emperor. That
is to say, as he believed himself to be a captain be-
fore wearing his uniform; so on the word and pro-
mise of God, one believes himself to be a child of
Jesus, before being sanctified by his Spirit."-Ccesar
Malan, D.D.

IGNORANCE.
SAMUEL WESLEY visited one of his parishoners
as he was upon his dying bed-a man who had
never missed going to church in forty years.
" Thomas, where do you think your soul will go?"
"Soul! soul!" said Thomas. "Yes, sir," said Mr.
Wesley, do you not know what your soul is ?"
" Ay, surely," said Thomas; why, it is a little
bone in the back that lives longer than the body."
" So much," says John Wesley, who related it on
the authority of Dr. Lupton, who had it from his
father, had Thomas learned from hearing ser-
mons, and exceedingly good sermons, for forty
years."-Anecdotes of the Wesleys. By the Rev. J.
B. Wakely.




















THE WIDOW'S SON.

IN' one of our little villages which stands on the
sea-shore, there lately lived a widow and her
little son, a lad of about ten years of age. She
had formerly seen better days. Her husband
was a respectable sea captain, and supported his
family in ease and affluence. But amidst his own
and-the hopes of his family, he was lost at sea.
The widow had two little sons, one of six years
old, and the other, above mentioned, then an
infant. She retired from the circle in which she
had so long moved with esteem, and purchased a
neat little cottage, which stands by the water's
side. Here she brought up her little boys, and
early endeavoured to lead them in the way they
should go." She felt herself to be a pilgrim below,
and taught her sons that this world was never
designed for our home.
In this manner this little family lived retired,
beloved, and respected. The mother would often
No. 2.









2

lead her children on the hard sandy beach, just as
the setting sun was tipping the smooth blue waters
with his last yellow tints. She would then tell
them of their father who was gone, and with her
finger would often write his name upon the sand;
and as the next wave obliterated every trace of
the writing, would tell them that the hopes and
joys of this world are equally transient. When
the eldest son had arrived at the age of twelve, he
was seized with an incurable desire of going to sea.
He had heard sailors talk of their voyages, of visit-
ing other climes and other countries, and his
imagination threw before him a thousand pleasures,
could he visit them. The remonstrances and
entreaties of a tender parent, and an affectionate
little brother, were all in vain. He at length
wrung a reluctant consent from his mother, and
receiving from her a Bible, a mother's blessing and
prayers, he embarked on board a large brig. He
promised his mother, as he gave a last parting
hand, that he would daily read his Bible, and as
often commit himself to God in prayer. A few
tears and a few sighs escaped him as he saw the
last blue tints of his native land fade from his
sight-for there was the cottage of his mother,
and all the joys of his childhood; but all was
novelty around him, and he soon forgot these
pangs amidst other cares and other scenes. For
some time he remembered his promise to his
mother, and daily read his Bible; but the sneers








3

of the wicked crew recalled his mind from review-
ing the instructions of his pious mother, and he
placed his Bible in the bottom of his chest, to
slumber with his conscience. During a severe
storm, indeed, when it seemed as if destruction
was yawning to receive every soul on board, he
thought of his mother, his home, and his promises,
and, in the anguish of his heart, resolved to amend,
should his life be spared. But when the storm
had subsided, the seas were smooth, and the clear
sun brought joy and gladness over the great waters,
he forgot all his promises, and it now seemed as if
the last throb of conscience was stifled. No one
of the crew could be more profane-no one more
ready to scoff at that religion which in his child-
hood and innocence he had been taught to love
and revere.
After an absence of several years, he found him-
self once more drawing near his native land. lHe
had traversed the globe over, but during all this
time he had neither written to his mother, nor
heard from her. Though he had thrown off re-
straint, and blunted the finer feelings of his nature,
yet his bosom thrilled with pleasure at the thought
of once more meeting his parent and brother. It
was in the fall of the year that he returned, and,
on a lovely eve in September, walked towards his
long-deserted home. Those only are acquainted
with the pleasures of the country who have spent
their early days in youthful retirement. As the








4

young sailor drew near the spot where he had
spent his early days-as he ascended the last slop-
ing hill which hid from his sight the little stage on
which he had acted the first scenes in the drama
of life, his memory recalled to his mind all the
scenes of his "happier days," while fancy whispered
deceitfully that hours equally agreeable would
again be realized. He now saw the rising hills
over which he had so often roamed, the grove
through which he had so often wandered while it
echoed with the music of the feathered tribe, the
gentle stream on whose banks he had so often
sported, and the tall spire of the temple of Jehovah
-all tended to inspire the most interesting sensa-
tions. He drew near the cottage of his mother,
and there all was stillness; nothing was to be heard
save the gentlest murmurs of the unruffled waves,
or the distant barking of a village dog. A solem-
nity seemed to be breathed around him, and, as he
stopped at his mother's door, his heart misgave him,
though he knew not why. He knocked, but no
one bade him enter ; he called, but no answer was
returned save the echo of his own voice: it seemed
like knocking at the door of a tomb. The nearest
neighbour, hearing the noise, came, and found the
youth sitting and sobbing on the steps of the door.
"Where," cried he with eagerness, "where is my
mother, and my brother ?-Oh, I hope they are
not"-
"If," said the stranger, "you inquire for widow









- I can only pity you. I have known her but
a short time, but she was the best woman I ever
knew. Her little boy died of a fever about a year
ago, and in consequence of fatigue in taking care
of him, and anxiety for a long-absent son at sea,
the good widow herself was buried yesterday."
"0 heavens!" cried the youth, "have I stayed
just long enough to kill my mother Wretch that
I am! Show me the grave-I have a dagger in my
bundle-let me die with my mother-my poor
broken-hearted parent !"
"Hold, friend," said the astonished neighbour;
"if you are this woman's eldest son, I have a
letter for you, which she wrote a few days before
she died, and desired that you might receive it,
should you ever return."
They both turned from the cottage, and went to
the house of the neighbour. A light being pro-
cured, the young man threw down his bundle
and hat, and read the following short letter, while
his manly cheeks were covered with tears :-
"My dearest, only son when this reaches you,
I shall be no more. Your little brother has gone
before me, and I cannot but hope and believe that
he was prepared. I had fondly hoped that I
should once more have seen you on the shores
"-of mortality, but this hope is now relinquished.
I have followed you by my prayers through all your
wanderings. Often while you little suspected it,
even in the dark cold nights of winter have I







6

knelt for my lost son. There is but one thing
which gives me pain at dying; and that is, my dear
William, that I must leave you in this wicked
world, as I fear unreconciled to your Maker I
am too feeble to say more. My glass is run. As
you visit the sods which cover my dust, oh,
remember, that you too must soon follow. Fare-
well-the last breath of your mother will be spent
in praying for you-that we may meet above."
The young man's heart was melted on reading
these few words from the parent whom he so
tenderly loved ; and I will only add, that this
letter was the means, in the hands of God, of
bringing this youth to a saving knowledge of the
truth, as it is in Jesus ;" that he is now a very
respectable and pious man; and that we may learn
from daily experience, as well as from Scripture,
that "praying breath" shall never be spent in
vain.

THE PREACHER'S RESWAD.
THE Rev. Henry Davies began his labours in Pem-
brokeshire, but was soon dismissed from his station
on account of his faithfulness ; afterward he fre-
quently preached in the open-air. An anecdote is
related of him that as he was walking early one
Sabbath morning to a place where he was going to
preach, he was overtaken by a clergyman on horse-
back, who complained that he could never get
above half a guinea for a discourse. 0, sir," said









Mr. Davies; "Ipreach for a crown." "Do you?"
replied the stranger; then you are a disgrace to
the cloth." To this rude observation he meekly
replied : Perhaps I shall be held in greater dis-
grace in your estimation when I inform you that I
am going nine miles to preach, and I have but
sevenpence in my pocket to bear my expenses out
and in, and do not expect to bring home the poor
pittance that I am now in possession of ; but I look
forward to that crown of glory which my Lord and
Saviour will bestow on me when He appears before
an assembled world."

PRAYER ANSWERED AFTER DEATH.
A NOTABLE answer to prayer has just been made
public in Boston. A mother had prayed for years
that a wayward son might be brought to Christ,
and died in the firm faith that her petition would
be granted. Not long had her body reposed in its
quiet resting-place in the cemetery, ere a letter
came to an editor in the city recounting the sins
and the final conversion of the missing young man.
The poor mother had no assurance that her son
was alive and had requested information through
the papers. In a far-away city he saw the notice,
sat down and wrote the editor a letter for publica-
tion, and therein told how his soul had been saved
by that mother's prayers. Dear praying hearts !
mothers with unsaved children, wives or husbands
with unconverted companions, friends with the




$1








8

burden of other souls dearly beloved upon your
own, be comforted God will hear in His own
way and time, so you only pray in faith of His
hearing. Let your desires reach to His throne
unceasingly, and the blessing will come down, even
if you do not live to see it. God will not violate
His promise !

DAY BY DAY.
A PERSON says, "I cannot understand how I am
to get along when I leave my father's house."
Why should you see it till that time comes ? What
if a person going on a journey of five years should
undertake to carry provisions, and clothes, and
gold enough to last him during the whole time,
lugging them as he travelled, like veritable English-
man, with all creation at his back If he is wise
he will supply himself at the different points where
he stops. When he gets to London, let him buy
what he needs there ; when he gets to Paris, let
him buywhat he needs there; when he gets to Rome,
let him buy what he needs there ; and when he gets
to Vienna, Dresden, Munich, St. Petersburg, and
Canton, let him buy what he needs at these places.
He will find at each of them, and all the other cities
which he visits, whatever things he requires.
Why, then, should he undertake to carry them
around the globe with him ? It would be the great-
est folly imaginable. And as to gold, why should
he load down his pockets with that ? Let him take







9

a circular letter of credit, which is good, yet not
usable till he arrives at the places where he needs
it. When he gets to London, let him present it to
Baring Brothers ; when he gets to Paris, let him
present it to the Rothschilds; and as he proceeds, let
him place it in the hands of the bankers of the va-
rious places at which he stops; and he will get the
means for prosecuting his journey. Now God gives
every believer a circular letter of credit for life,
and says, Whenever you get to a place where you
need assistance, take your letter to the Banker, and
the needed assistance will be given you." -Henry
Ward Beecher.

FAITH.
I ONCE heard a father tell, that when he removed
his family to a new residence, where the accom-
modation was much more ample, and the substance
much more rich and varied than that to which they
had previously been accustomed, his youngest son,
yet a lisping infant, ran round every room, and
scanned every article with ecstacy, calling out, in
childish wonder at every new sight, "Is this ours,
father 1 and is this ours ?" The child did not say
" yours," and I observed that the father while he
told the story was not offended with the freedom.
You could read in his glistening eye that the in-
fant's confidence in appropriating as his own all that
his father had, was an important element in his satis-
faction. Such, I suppose, willbe thesurprise, andjoy,







10

and appropriating confidence, with which the child
of our father's family will count all his own, when
he is removed from the comparatively mean con-
dition of things present, and enters the infinite of
things to come. When the glories of heaven burst
upon his view, he does not stand at a distance, like
a stranger, saying, "0 God, these are thine." He
bounds forward to touch and taste every provision
which those blessed mansions contain, exclaiming,
as he looks in the Father's face, "Father, this and
this is ours." The dear child is glad of all the
Father's riches, and the Father is gladder of his
dear child.-W. Arnot.

ILEA VEN-to be Shut Out of at Last. +
SEVERAL years ago we heard an old minister relate
the following incident:-" He had preached the
"Word for many a year in a wood hard by a beautiful
village in the Inverness-shire Highlands, and it was
his invariable custom, on dismissing his own con-
gregation, to repair to the Baptist Chapel in this
village to partake of the Lord's Supper with his
people assembled there. It was then usual to shut
the gates during this service, in order that com-
municants might not be exposed to any disturbance
through persons going out or coming in. On one
occasion the burden of the Lord pressed upon his
servant with more than ordinary severity, and
anxious to deliver it and clear his soul, he de-
tained his hearers a little beyond the time, and







11

consequently had to hurry to the chapel. As he
drew near he noticed the door-keeper retire from
the outer gate, after having shut it. He called to
him, quickening his pace at the same time, but his
cry was not heard, the attendant retreated inside
and the minister came up "just in time" to see the
door put to, and hear it fastened from within. He
walked round the chapel looking up at the win-
dows, but could gain no admittance; there was
only one door, and that one was shut. He listen-
ed and heard the singing, and thought how happy
God's people were inside, while he himself was
shut out. The circumstance made an impression
upon him at the time which he could never after-
wards forget, and he was led to ask himself the
question, "Shall it be so at the last? Shall I come
up to the gate of heaven only in time to be too late,
to find the last ransomed one admitted, and the
door everlastingly shut?'"--Spurgeon.

" STOP THE HOLES UP."
THERE is a fable which tells of a mouse that
went to a spring with a sieve to carry some water
in it. He dipped the sieve into the water; but, of
course, as soon as he raised it up, the water all ran
through. He tried it over and over again, but
still no water would stay in the sieve. The poor
mouse hadn't sense enough to know where the
trouble was. He never thought about the holes in
the sieve. The fable said that while the mouse







12

was still trying, in vain, to get some water in the
sieve to carry home, there came a little bird and
perched on the branch of the tree that grew near
the spring. He saw the trouble the poor mouse
was in, and kindly sang out a little advice to him
in these simple words :
Stop it with moss, and daub it with clay,
And then you may carry it all away."
Trying to make a discontented person happy is
like trying to fill a sieve with water. However
much you pour into it, it all runs out just as fast
as you pour it in. If you want to fill the sieve,
you must stop the holes up. Then it will be easy
enough to fill it. Just so it is with trying to make
discontented people happy. It is impossible to
make them happy while they are discontented.
You must stop up the holes; you must take away
their discontent, and then it is very easy to make
them happy.
LOST AND FOUND.
IN the Indian lands away in the North-West, was
several years ago a very extensive tract of country
entirely covered with pine trees. The timber
being valuable, many lumbermen were induced to
buy the lands, and by their industry and persever-
ance large quantities of the timber were removed,
leaving vast tracts of open country. But they did
not long remain clear. They were soon covered
with small trees, and shrubs, and, fortunately for








13

the natives, blackberry bushes soon sprang up, on
which grew blackberries in exceeding abundance.
In the blackberry season hundreds of persons
flocked to the open fields, and scarcely ever returned
without having gathered a great quantity of the
delicious fruit. One pleasant morning, a party
composed of two gentlemen, an elderly lady,
two young ladies, and two or three little ones,
might have been seen driving slowly toward a great
blackberry field. Having reached a good place
they stopped, and all began to pick the berries,
taking different directions through the patch. The
smallest boy, a lad of three or four years, having
escaped the notice of his mother and grandfather,
wandered off into the neighboring forest. Not
at once missing him they continued picking for an
hour or so, when suddenly a cry of alarm came
from one of the party who had discovered that
little Henry was lost. The company soon assembled
and began to search for the lost boy. After search-
ing for an hour in vain, a burst of anguish came
Forth from the whole party, but especially from
the agonised mother who was overpowered with
grief, wringing her hands in'despair, and crying
"My boy is lost lost! lost !" One of the gentle-
men after a moment of silent prayer, started to-
ward the forest at some distance from the patch,
calling at the top of his voice the name of the lost
boy. Presently he heard the voice of Harry in
answer, and hastening to the spot he found the









14

little boy sitting upon a log, where he had sat down
to rest. With unspeakable joy the man sprang
forward, and taking him in his arms, bore him
triumphantly to his mother. When she saw her
lost child restored to her she clasped him to her
arms, and almost overwhelmed with joy, could
only exclaim, "My boy my boy He was lost
and is found." Dear children, God is calling to
you every day, through His word, through kind
teachers and ministers of the gospel, to come to
Him. Every sin you commit takes you further
and further from God and heaven; and if you
continue on in your sins you will never reach that
happy home which he has prepared for those that
love Him. When you hear the Saviour saying to
you in the tenderest accents of His love, Child,
give me thy heart,"' will you not listen to His
voice ? If Harry had not answered the kind gentle-
man when he called to him, he might have died in
the wild wilderness. If you will come to Jesus
now, He will take you in His arms and bless you
and make you happy while you live, and when you
die will take you to dwell with Him forever.-S. S.
Visitor.

A BINDOO THIEF AND THE KING'S
PARDON.
There is a fable among the Hindoos that a thief,
having been detected and condemned to die,
happily hit upon an expedient which gave him










hope for life. He sent for his jailer and told him
that he had a secret of importance which he desired
to impart to the King, and when that had been
Done he would be prepared to die. Upon receiving
this piece of intelligence the King at once ordered
the culprit to be conducted to his presence. The
thief explained that he knew the secret of causing
trees to grow which would bear fruit of pure gold.
The experiment might be easily tried, and His
Majesty would not lose the opportunity; so accom-
panied by his Prime Minister, his courtiers and his
chief priests, he went with the thief to a spot
selected near the city wall, where the latter per-
formed a series of solemn incantations. This done,
the condemned man produced a piece of gold and
declared that if it should be planted it would pro-
duce a tree, every branch of which would bear gold.
"But," he added, "this must be put into the
ground by a hand, that has never been stained by
a dishonest act. My hand is not clean, therefore,
I pass it to your Majesty." The King took the
piece of gold, but hesitated. Finally he said : "I
remember in my younger days that I have filched
money from my father's treasury, which was not
mine. I have repented of the sin, but yet I hardly
say my hand is clean. I pass, it therefore, to my
Prime Minister." The latter, after a brief consul-
tation, answered: "It were a pity to break the
charm through a possible blunder. I receive taxes
from the people, and as I am exposed to many








16

temptations, how can I be sure that I have been
perfectly honest ? I must give it to the Governor
of our citadel." "No, no," cried the Governor,
drawing back. Remember that I have the serv-
ing out of pay and provision to the soldiers. Let
the High Priest plant it." And the High Priest
said :-" You forget that I have the collecting of
tithes and the disbursements of sacrifice." At
length the thief exclaimed: "Your Majesty, I
think it would be better for society that all five of
us should be hanged, since it appears that not an
honest man can be found among us." In spite of
the lamentable exposure the King laughed, and so
pleased was he with the thief's cunning expedient,
that he granted him pardon.

OBEDIENCE.
"SIR," said the Duke of Wellington to an officer
of engineers, who urged the impossibility of exe-
cuting the directions he had received, "I did not
ask your opinion, I gave you my orders, and I ex-
pect them to be obeyed." Such should be the
obedience of every follower of Jesus. The words
which he has spoken are our law, not our judg-
ments or fancies. Even if death were in the way
it is-
'' Not yours to reason why-
Ours, but to dare and die ;"
and, at our Master's bidding, advance through
flood or flame.--Spurgeon.




















LITTLE LEWIS.

ON arriving at my school one Sabbath morning,
instead of finding my scholars all quiet in
their seats as usual, I found them standing around
the door, some sobbing, others looking frightened
-all silent. On inquiry, they told me that
" Little Lewis-had just been killed by the
mill!" This was all they knew about it. At the
head of my little flock, I hastened to the house
where the little boy lived. At the door I was met
by the father of the child, wringing his hands, his
face red and swollen, his eyes sunken and glaring,
and his breath loaded with the fumes of ardent
spirits.
"Oh!" cried the man, "I might have known
it. I might have known it all."
Might have known what, sir ?"
"Oh, I might have known that to-day one of
my family must go-but I did not think-could
not think it must be my youngest boy !"
No. 3.








2

"Pray how might you have known that one
must die to-day ?"
Why, when I came home last evening, old
Rover," pointing to a stupid old dog that lay
crouched under the table, sat on the door-steps,
with his face to the east, howling and howling.
I knew then that some one-or, I might have
known that some one must go to-day-but I did
not think it must be poor little Lewis "'
Do you believe that there is a God ?"
Oh yes, I have no doubt of it."
"And do you suppose he reveals events to a
dog, a creature without a soul, and without reason,
which he does not reveal to the wisest of men?
Nothing is more common than for a dog to howl
when his master is gone, and he feels lonely ; and
as to his face being towards the east, I see nothing
strange in that, since your house faces the east."
"Ah you may say so, but I might have known
it would come." And again he turned away to
sob, and, I fear, to drink, and then wonder over
his being more stupid than his dog.
I led my scholars into the room. They seemed
to breath only from the top of their lungs. I
lifted up the white napkin, and there was little
Lewis-a mangled corpse The children were
all hushed as we gazed. The little girls covered
their faces with their handkerchiefs and aprons.
The little boys wiped their eyes with their hands
and with the sleeves of their jackets.







3

For some weeks it had been very dry, and the
streams had become low. But during the pre-
ceding day and night a heavy rain had fallen. A
mill, on a small stream hard by, which had stood
still for some time for want of water, was set in
motion early on Sabbath morning. I need not
ask if the miller feared God.
About an hour before the Sabbath School usually
came together, little Lewis went down to the
mill-stream to bathe. The poor boy had never
seen his parents keep the Sabbath holy. He swam
out into the stream. The current was strong, too
strong for him-he raised the cry of distress-the
miller heard him and saw him, but was too much
frightened to do anything. The current swept
along-the little boy struggled-again cried for
help-the waters rushed on-he was sucked down
under the gate-the great mill wheel rolled round
-crash !-he was in a moment crushed and dead !
Scarcely had his last cry reached the ears of the
miller before his mangled corpse came out from
under the wheel. It was the same little boy who
had looked so disappointed on a previous Sabbath, be-
cause I omitted to talk about the holy Sabbath.
"While standing beside the lifeless clay of this
fair child, with all the children about me, my
feelings were sad indeed. It seemed as if every
child would cry out, "Oh, had you kept your
word, and told us about breaking the Sabbath, he
would not have gone into-the water-he would not








4

have lain there dead." It seemed as if the lips,
though sealed by the hand of death, would open
and reproach me. Had I not put off my duty,
probably this life would have been saved-perhaps
an undying soul would have been saved from the
guilt of being the everlasting enemy of God.
What sacrifices would I not make could that child
once more come into my Sabbath School !" Such
were my thoughts.' I have never been able to look
back upon that scene without keen anguish. I
have sometimes mentioned it to Sabbath School
teachers, and by it, urged them never to put off
till the next Sabbath any duty which can be per-
formed on this. And since I have been a minister,
when I have felt weary and feeble, and tempted to
put off some duty to a more convenient season, I
have recalled that scene to my mind; and truly
thankful shall I feel in the great judgment day,
if you, my dear children, will learn from this
simple story two things.
1. To remember and keep holy the Sabbath
day.
2. Never to put off any duty, or any oppor-
tunity to do good, because you do not like doing
it now. You may never have the opportunity
again.
Should you live and grow up, I have no doubt
that you will be prosperous and happy; that you
will be respected and useful, very much as you
"keep the Sabbath. God will honour those who









honour him. He does not ask us to attend his
house for nothing. Christ is there, waiting to
receive you : think what he has done and suffered
for you. Think how he loves you ; and will not
you love and serve him, and ask him to give you
the blessings of this life and of that which is to
come? My dear children, may all these great
mercies be yours. Amen.-Todd.

POOR-as Hearers.
JoHN WESLEY always preferred the middling and
lower classes to the wealthy. He said, "If I
might choose, I should still, as I have done hither-
to, preach the Gospel to the poor." Preaching in
Monktown church, a large old, ruinous building,
he says, I suppose it has scarce had such a con-
gregation during this century. Many of them
were gay, genteel people, so I spoke on the first
elements of the gospel, but I was still out of their
depth. Oh, how hard it is to be shallow enough
for a polite audience !"-Anecdotes of the Wesleys.

THE EFFICACY OF THE CROSS.
THE value of the sin-offering can never fail; and
all who are under it, that is, the whole family of
faith, all who have not rejected the record God
hath given of his Son are surely protected from
condemnation by its everlasting efficacy.-B. W.
Newton.









honour him. He does not ask us to attend his
house for nothing. Christ is there, waiting to
receive you : think what he has done and suffered
for you. Think how he loves you ; and will not
you love and serve him, and ask him to give you
the blessings of this life and of that which is to
come? My dear children, may all these great
mercies be yours. Amen.-Todd.

POOR-as Hearers.
JoHN WESLEY always preferred the middling and
lower classes to the wealthy. He said, "If I
might choose, I should still, as I have done hither-
to, preach the Gospel to the poor." Preaching in
Monktown church, a large old, ruinous building,
he says, I suppose it has scarce had such a con-
gregation during this century. Many of them
were gay, genteel people, so I spoke on the first
elements of the gospel, but I was still out of their
depth. Oh, how hard it is to be shallow enough
for a polite audience !"-Anecdotes of the Wesleys.

THE EFFICACY OF THE CROSS.
THE value of the sin-offering can never fail; and
all who are under it, that is, the whole family of
faith, all who have not rejected the record God
hath given of his Son are surely protected from
condemnation by its everlasting efficacy.-B. W.
Newton.








6

HEA VEN-a Sustaining Prospect.
ONE Palmer, of Reading, being condemned to die,
in Queen Mary's time, was much persuaded to re-
cant, and among other things a friend said to him,
"Take pity on thy golden years and pleasant
flowers of youth, before it be too late." His reply
was as beautiful as it was conclusive-" Sir, I long
for those springing flowers which shall never fade
away." When he was in the midst of the flames
he exhorted his companions to constancy, saying,
"We shall not end our lives in the fire, but make
a change for a better life; yea, for coals we shall
receive pearls." Thus do we clearly see, that al-
though "if in this life only we have hope in
Christ, we are of all men most miserable," yet the
prospect of a better and enduring substance en-
ables us to meet all the trials and temptations
of this present life with holy boldness and joy.
--Spurgeon.

MERCY.
A BENEVOLENT person gave Mr. Rowland Hill a
hundred pounds to dispense to a poor minister,
and thinking it was too much to send him all at
once, Mr. Hill forwarded five pounds in a letter,
with simply these words within the envelope,
"More to follow." In a few day's time, the good
man received another letter by post-and letters
by the post were rarites in those days; this second
messenger contained another five pounds, with the








6

HEA VEN-a Sustaining Prospect.
ONE Palmer, of Reading, being condemned to die,
in Queen Mary's time, was much persuaded to re-
cant, and among other things a friend said to him,
"Take pity on thy golden years and pleasant
flowers of youth, before it be too late." His reply
was as beautiful as it was conclusive-" Sir, I long
for those springing flowers which shall never fade
away." When he was in the midst of the flames
he exhorted his companions to constancy, saying,
"We shall not end our lives in the fire, but make
a change for a better life; yea, for coals we shall
receive pearls." Thus do we clearly see, that al-
though "if in this life only we have hope in
Christ, we are of all men most miserable," yet the
prospect of a better and enduring substance en-
ables us to meet all the trials and temptations
of this present life with holy boldness and joy.
--Spurgeon.

MERCY.
A BENEVOLENT person gave Mr. Rowland Hill a
hundred pounds to dispense to a poor minister,
and thinking it was too much to send him all at
once, Mr. Hill forwarded five pounds in a letter,
with simply these words within the envelope,
"More to follow." In a few day's time, the good
man received another letter by post-and letters
by the post were rarites in those days; this second
messenger contained another five pounds, with the









same motto, "And more to follow." A day or
two after came a third and a fourth, and still the
same promise, "And more to follow." Till the
whole sum had been received the astonished min-
ister was made familiar with the cheering words,
"And more to follow."
Every blessing that comes from God is sent with
the self-same message, "And more to follow."
"I forgive you your sins, but there's more to
follow." "I justify you in the righteousness of
Christ, but there's more to follow." "I adopt
you into my family, but there's more to follow."
"I educate you for heaven, but there's more to
follow." "I give you grace upon grace, but
there'smore to follow." "I have helped you even
to old age, but there's still more to follow." "I
will uphold you in the hour of death, and as you
are passing into the world of spirits, my mercy shall
still continue with you, and when you land in the
world to come there shall be MORE TO FOLLOW."
-Spurgeon.

OBEYING GOD-with delight.
"I WIsH I could mind God as my little dog minds
me," said a little boy, looking thoughtfully on his
shaggy friend; "he always looks so pleased to
mind, and I don't." What a painful truth did
this child speak Shall the poor little dog thus
readily obey his master, and we rebel against God,
who is our Creator, our preserver, our Father, our








8

Saviour, and the bountiful Giver of everything we
love ?-Christian Treasury.
OMNISCIENCE,
A PLATE of sweet cakes was brought in and laid
upon the table. Two children played upon the
hearthrug before the fire. "Oh, I want one of
these cakes cried the little boy, jumping up as
soon as his mother went out, and going on tiptoe
towards the table. "No, no," said his sister,
pulling him back ; "no, no; you must not touch."
"Mother won't know it; she did not count them,"
he cried, shaking her off, and stretching out his
hand. "If she didn't, perhaps God counted," an-
swered the other. The little boy's hand was stay-
ed. Yes, children, be sure that God counts!-
Children's Missionary Record for 1852.

PERSECUTION-Not to be Feared.
Do not fear the frown of the world. When a blind
man comes against you in the street you are not
angry at him, you say, He is blind, poor man, or
he would not have hurt me. So you may say of
the poor worldlings when they speak evil of
Christians-they are blind.-M'Cheyne.

PRA YER-and Activity.
"A SCHOLAR at a boarding-school near London
was remarked for repeating her lessons well. A
school companion, who was idly inclined, said to
her one day, How is it that you always say your








8

Saviour, and the bountiful Giver of everything we
love ?-Christian Treasury.
OMNISCIENCE,
A PLATE of sweet cakes was brought in and laid
upon the table. Two children played upon the
hearthrug before the fire. "Oh, I want one of
these cakes cried the little boy, jumping up as
soon as his mother went out, and going on tiptoe
towards the table. "No, no," said his sister,
pulling him back ; "no, no; you must not touch."
"Mother won't know it; she did not count them,"
he cried, shaking her off, and stretching out his
hand. "If she didn't, perhaps God counted," an-
swered the other. The little boy's hand was stay-
ed. Yes, children, be sure that God counts!-
Children's Missionary Record for 1852.

PERSECUTION-Not to be Feared.
Do not fear the frown of the world. When a blind
man comes against you in the street you are not
angry at him, you say, He is blind, poor man, or
he would not have hurt me. So you may say of
the poor worldlings when they speak evil of
Christians-they are blind.-M'Cheyne.

PRA YER-and Activity.
"A SCHOLAR at a boarding-school near London
was remarked for repeating her lessons well. A
school companion, who was idly inclined, said to
her one day, How is it that you always say your








8

Saviour, and the bountiful Giver of everything we
love ?-Christian Treasury.
OMNISCIENCE,
A PLATE of sweet cakes was brought in and laid
upon the table. Two children played upon the
hearthrug before the fire. "Oh, I want one of
these cakes cried the little boy, jumping up as
soon as his mother went out, and going on tiptoe
towards the table. "No, no," said his sister,
pulling him back ; "no, no; you must not touch."
"Mother won't know it; she did not count them,"
he cried, shaking her off, and stretching out his
hand. "If she didn't, perhaps God counted," an-
swered the other. The little boy's hand was stay-
ed. Yes, children, be sure that God counts!-
Children's Missionary Record for 1852.

PERSECUTION-Not to be Feared.
Do not fear the frown of the world. When a blind
man comes against you in the street you are not
angry at him, you say, He is blind, poor man, or
he would not have hurt me. So you may say of
the poor worldlings when they speak evil of
Christians-they are blind.-M'Cheyne.

PRA YER-and Activity.
"A SCHOLAR at a boarding-school near London
was remarked for repeating her lessons well. A
school companion, who was idly inclined, said to
her one day, How is it that you always say your








9

lessons so perfectly?" She replied, "I always pray
that I may say my lessons well." "Do you?" re-
plied the other, "then I'll pray too." But, alas ?
next morning she could not repeat one word of her
lesson. Very much confounded, she ran to her
friend. "I prayed," said she, "but I could not
repeat a word of my lesson." Perhaps," rejoined
the other, you took nopains to learn it." Learn
it learn it !" answered the first, I did not learn
it at all. I didn't know I needed to learn it, when
I prayed that I might say it." She loved her idle-
ness, poor girl; and her praying was but a
mockery."

DEEDS NOT WORDS.
KIND wishes in behalf of others are evidently a
luxury to some, as they sit in their comfortable
arm-chair; they do not bless the widow, or the
orphan, or greatly help the church; indeed, it is
doubted whether such a purpose ever entered into
their mind, as they are a private matter of enjoy-
ment-deeds or gifts are not to be expected. The
person is satisfied with himself, and his pleasures
cost nothing.

COME UNTO ME.
GoD hath spoken unto us by his Son," not only by
what He said, but by what he did and suffered.
"His blood speaketh better things than that of
Abel." To use the words of one in heaven:








9

lessons so perfectly?" She replied, "I always pray
that I may say my lessons well." "Do you?" re-
plied the other, "then I'll pray too." But, alas ?
next morning she could not repeat one word of her
lesson. Very much confounded, she ran to her
friend. "I prayed," said she, "but I could not
repeat a word of my lesson." Perhaps," rejoined
the other, you took nopains to learn it." Learn
it learn it !" answered the first, I did not learn
it at all. I didn't know I needed to learn it, when
I prayed that I might say it." She loved her idle-
ness, poor girl; and her praying was but a
mockery."

DEEDS NOT WORDS.
KIND wishes in behalf of others are evidently a
luxury to some, as they sit in their comfortable
arm-chair; they do not bless the widow, or the
orphan, or greatly help the church; indeed, it is
doubted whether such a purpose ever entered into
their mind, as they are a private matter of enjoy-
ment-deeds or gifts are not to be expected. The
person is satisfied with himself, and his pleasures
cost nothing.

COME UNTO ME.
GoD hath spoken unto us by his Son," not only by
what He said, but by what he did and suffered.
"His blood speaketh better things than that of
Abel." To use the words of one in heaven:








10

" Know ye the language of the wound in his side !
It says, Come, Come."-Dr. John Love.

VELVET TONGUES.
WHEN I was a boy, I and a number of my play-
mates had rambled through the woods and fields
till, quite forgetful of the fading light, we found
ourselves far from home. Indeed, we had lost our
way. It did so happen that we were nearer home
than we thought; but how to get to it was the
question. By the edge of the field we saw a man
coming along, and we asked him to tell us. Whe-
ther he was in trouble or not I do not know, but
he gave us some very surly answer. Just then
there came along another man, a near neighbour,
and with a merry smile on his face. "Jim," said
he, a man's tongue is like a cat's ; it is either a
piece of velvet or a piece of sand-paper, just as he
likes to use it or to make it; and I declare you al-
ways seem to use your tongue for sand-paper.
Try the velvet, man, try the velvet principle.-
Blind Amos.

HIDDEN JEWELS.
A CERTAIN nobleman, for political reasons, was
banished from the kingdom. On the eve of de-
parture, he called his steward, and gave into his
keeping a casket of small, but very precious jewels.
Years went by, and still the nobleman was wander-
ing in foreign lands. The steward, in failing








10

" Know ye the language of the wound in his side !
It says, Come, Come."-Dr. John Love.

VELVET TONGUES.
WHEN I was a boy, I and a number of my play-
mates had rambled through the woods and fields
till, quite forgetful of the fading light, we found
ourselves far from home. Indeed, we had lost our
way. It did so happen that we were nearer home
than we thought; but how to get to it was the
question. By the edge of the field we saw a man
coming along, and we asked him to tell us. Whe-
ther he was in trouble or not I do not know, but
he gave us some very surly answer. Just then
there came along another man, a near neighbour,
and with a merry smile on his face. "Jim," said
he, a man's tongue is like a cat's ; it is either a
piece of velvet or a piece of sand-paper, just as he
likes to use it or to make it; and I declare you al-
ways seem to use your tongue for sand-paper.
Try the velvet, man, try the velvet principle.-
Blind Amos.

HIDDEN JEWELS.
A CERTAIN nobleman, for political reasons, was
banished from the kingdom. On the eve of de-
parture, he called his steward, and gave into his
keeping a casket of small, but very precious jewels.
Years went by, and still the nobleman was wander-
ing in foreign lands. The steward, in failing









health, still faithful to his trust, sought a place of
security for the costly and precious stones. Accord-
ingly, he cut into a tender tree, and beneath its
bark hid the treasure. Many years later, the
nobleman was permitted to return from his long
exile. The steward was gone, but his lord knew
well the secret of his deposit. Where the young
tree once stood, now towered the thrifty oak, with
its bark hardened and roughened by time. But
well it had kept its trust. Though the firm wood
had closed over it, and no eye could divine its
hiding place, it was still secure. The tree was
felled, and in its very heart the gems were found;
not a point broken. They flashed in the light
with the same brightness as in former days, and
rejoiced the heart of the owner. Is not each
lesson of truth deposited in the mind of the young
like that hidden treasure ? Is not the teacher like
that faithful steward ? When our Lord, now
banished from His rightful realm on earth, shall
come again to seek His own, may not the precious
jewels which the true preacher quietly and faith-
fully hid, be found beautiful as ever, to the joy of
their rightful owner ?-Smuday School Times.

THE WOOL-CLEANER.
A CLERGYMAN in Wiltshire, walking near a brook,
observed a woman washing wool in a stream. This
was done by putting it in a sieve, and then dipping
the sieve in the water repeatedly, until the wool








12

became white and clean. He engaged in conver-
sation with her, and from some expression she
dropped, asked her if she knew him. "O yes, sir,"
she replied, "and I hope I shall have reason to
bless God to eternity, for having heard you preach
at W- some years ago, your sermon was the
means of doing me great good." I rejoice to
hear it; pray what was the subject ?" "Ah sir,
I can't recollect that ; my memory is so bad."
How then can the sermon have done you so much
good, if you don't remember even what it was
about ?" "Sir, my mind is like this sieve ; the
sieve does not hold the water, but as the water
runs through, it cleanses the wool, so my memory
does not retain the words I hear, but as they pass
through my heart, by God's grace they cleanse it.
Now I no longer love sin, and every day I entreat
my Saviour to wash me in His own blood, and to
cleanse me from all sin." Truly a practical memory
is the best memory.

WHAT ONE TRACT DID.
A MISSIONARY in the East Indies was giving away
tracts, when a little boy, about eight years old,
asked for one. At first he was refused, for he was
so young that the missionary thought it would be
better, as the tracts were scarce, to keep them for
the older people. But the child begged so hard,
. hat one called, The Way to Heavenly Bliss,"
" was given to him. Some days passed, and the








13

little fellow came again with the same request.
"But have you read the other?" he was asked.
"Yes," said he; and standing before the mis-
sionary and several heathen, he repeated the whole
tract from the title to the end.
A copy of this same tract was the means of lead-
ing four persons to Jesus. It was given in a
public market in one of the large cities of India, by
a missionary, to a young man, who read it, and
then came to know more about the way of salva-
tion. He soon became a Christian. A young
girl, who afterwards married this young man, also
learned from this tract to love Jesus. Then his
little brother was persuaded to go to the mis-
sionary's school and to church. After he had
gone some time, he said he had given himself to
Jesus, and asked to be baptized. He was only
eleven years of age, and the missionary wanted to
be sure that he understood what it was to be a
Christian, so he delayed his baptism for a short
time. While they waited, the child was attacked
with cholera. In India, when children are very
ill, the father or mother take up a cocoa-nut, or a
few plantains, and run to the temple, and say,
" Swammie (the name given to the idol), if you will
cure my little boy, I will give you this cocoa-nut,
or these plantains." The mother of this little boy
saw that he was in danger, and she told him that
she wished to go and make offerings to one of her
idols, in order that he might get well. But he








14

begged of her not to go. I do not worship idols,"
said he; "I worship Christ, my Saviour. If He
is pleased to spare me a little longer in the world,
it will be well; if not, I shall go to Him." The
last words which he uttered were, I am going to
Christ the Lord," and then he died. So he joined
the church in heaven first. Then, to the young
man's great joy, his old father was led to give up
the idols, to which he had prayed for more than
thirty years, and prayed to Jesus to save him from
his sins. All this good came from one tract, which
was paid for perhaps by the penny given by a
child.-Intelligencer.
HUMILITY.
Do not affect humility. The moment humility is
spoken of by him that has it, that moment it is
gone. It is like those delicate things which dis-
solve the instant they are touched. You must seek
out the violet : it does not, like the poppy, thrust
itself upon your notice. The moment humility
tells you I am here," there is an end to it.
CHRIST-Trophies of his Power.
Before many a Popish shrine on the Continent
one sees exhibited a great variety of crutches, to-
gether with wax models of arms, legs, and other
limbs. These are supposed to represent the cures
wrought by devotion at that altar; the memorials
of the healing power of the saint. Poor miserable
superstition all of it, and yet what a reminder








14

begged of her not to go. I do not worship idols,"
said he; "I worship Christ, my Saviour. If He
is pleased to spare me a little longer in the world,
it will be well; if not, I shall go to Him." The
last words which he uttered were, I am going to
Christ the Lord," and then he died. So he joined
the church in heaven first. Then, to the young
man's great joy, his old father was led to give up
the idols, to which he had prayed for more than
thirty years, and prayed to Jesus to save him from
his sins. All this good came from one tract, which
was paid for perhaps by the penny given by a
child.-Intelligencer.
HUMILITY.
Do not affect humility. The moment humility is
spoken of by him that has it, that moment it is
gone. It is like those delicate things which dis-
solve the instant they are touched. You must seek
out the violet : it does not, like the poppy, thrust
itself upon your notice. The moment humility
tells you I am here," there is an end to it.
CHRIST-Trophies of his Power.
Before many a Popish shrine on the Continent
one sees exhibited a great variety of crutches, to-
gether with wax models of arms, legs, and other
limbs. These are supposed to represent the cures
wrought by devotion at that altar; the memorials
of the healing power of the saint. Poor miserable
superstition all of it, and yet what a reminder







15

to the believer in Jesus as to his duty and his
privilege Having pleaded at the feet of Jesus, we
have found salvation ; have we remembered to re-
cord this wonder of his hand? If we hung up me-
morials of all his matchlessgrace, what crutches, and
bandages, and trophies of every sort should we pile
together Temper subdued, pride humbled, un-
belief slain, sin cast down, sloth ashamed, careless-
ness rebuked. The cross has healed all manner of
diseases, and its honours should be proclaimed with
every rising and setting sun.-Spurgeon.

BIBLE-How to Read.
To some the Bible is uninteresting and unpro-
fitable, because they read too fast. Amongst the
insects which subsist on the sap of flowers, there
are two very different classes. One is remarkable
for its imposing plumage, which shows in the sun-
beams like the dust of gems ; and as you watch its
jaunty gyrations over the fields, and its minuet
dance from flower to flower, you cannot help ad-
miring its graceful activity, for it is plainly getting
over a great deal of ground. But, in the same
field there is another worker, whose brown vest and
business-like straight-forward flight may not have
arrested your eye. His fluttering neighbour darts
down here and there, and sips elegantly wherever
he can find a drop of ready nectar ; but this dingy
plodder makes a point of alighting everywhere, and
wherever he alights he either finds honey or makes








16

it. If the flower-cup be deep, he goes down to the
bottom; if its dragon-mouth be shut, he thrusts
its lips asunder ; and if the nectar be peculiar or
recondite, he explores all about till he discovers it,
and then having ascertained the knack of it, joyful
as one who has found great spoil, he sings his way
down into its luscious recesses. His rival, of
the painted velvet wing, has no patience for such
dull and long-winded details. But what is the end?
Why, the one died last October along with the flow-
ers ; the other is warm in his hive,to-night, amidst
the fragrant stores which he gathered beneath the
bright beams of summer.

BODY AND SOUL.

"Two things a master commits to his servants'
care,' saith one, "the child and the child's clothes."
It will be a poor excuse for the servant to say, at
his master's return, "Sir, here are all the child's
clothes, neat and clean, but the child is lost !"
Much so with the account that many will give to
God of their souls and bodies at the great day.
"Lord, here is my body; I was very grateful for
it; I neglected nothing that belonged to its content
and welfare; but as for my soul, that is lost and
cast away for ever. I took little care and thought
about it !"-Flavel.














STEtIIE$ AtIM A, sEVTOTEs$.



THE JEW.
TRAVELLING lately through the western part
of Virginia, I was much interested in hearing
an old and highly respectable clergyman give a short
account of a Jew, with whom he had lately be-
come acquainted.
He was preaching to a large and attentive au-
dience, when his attention was arrested by seeing
a man enter, having every mark of a Jew on the
lineaments of his face. He was well dressed, and
his countenance was noble, though it was evident
that his heart had lately been the habitation of
sorrow. He took his seat, and was all attention, .
while an unconscious tear was often seen to wet his
manly cheek. After service the clergyman fixed
his eye steadily upon him, and the stranger re-
ciprocated the stare. The good minister goes up
to him:
Sir, am I correct ; am I not addressing one of
the children of Abraham ?" "You are." "But
how is it that I meet a Jew in a Christian assem-
bly 1"
No. 4.







2

The following narrative was the substance of his
reply :
He was a very respectable man, of a superior
education, who had lately come from London ; and
with his books, his riches, and a lovely daughter of
seventeen, had found a charming retreat on the
fertile banks of the Ohio. He had buried the com-
panion of his youth before he left Europe, and he
now knew no pleasure but the company of his en-
deared child. She was indeed worthy of a parent's
love. She was surrounded by beauty as a mantle ;
but her cultivated mind and her amiable disposition
threw around her a charm superior to any of the
tinselled decorations of the body. No pains had
been spared on her education. She could read and
speak with fluency several different languages, and
her manners charged every beholder. No wonder,
then, that a doting father, whose head was now
sprinkled with grey, should place his whole affec-
tion on this only child of his love, especially as he
knew no source of happiness beyond this world.
Being a strict Jew, he educated her in the strictest
principles of his religion, and he thought he had
presented it with an ornament.
Not long ago this daughter was taken sick. The
rose faded from her cheek, her eye lost its fire, her
strength decayed, and it was soon apparent that
the worm of disease was rioting in the core of her
vitals. The father hung over the bed of his
daughter with a heart ready to burst with anguish.









He often attempted to converse with her, yet he
seldom spoke but in the language of tears. He
spared no trouble or expense in procuring medical
assistance, but no human skill could extract the
arrow of death now fixed in her heart.
The father was walking in a small grove near
his house, wetting his steps with his tears, when he
was sent for by the dying daughter. With a heavy
heart he entered the door of the chamber, which
he feared would soon be the entrance of death.
He was now to take a last farewell of his child, and
his religion gave but a feeble hope of meeting her
hereafter.
She extended to her parent her wasted hand-
"My father, do you love me ?" My child, you
know that I love you-that you are more dear to
me than all the world beside." "But, father, do
you love me ?" "Why, my child, will you give me
pain so exquisite? have I never given you any
proofs of my love "But, my dearest father,
do you love me ?"-The father could not answer;
she added, "I know, my dear father, that you have
ever loved me-that you have been the kindest of
parents, and I tenderly love you. Will you grant
me one request -0, my father, it is the dying re-
quest of your daughter -will you grant it ?" "My
dearest child, ask what you will, though it take all
of my property, whatever it may be, it shall be
granted. I will grant it." "My dear father, I beg








4

you never again to speak against JESUS OF NA-
ZARETH !"
The father was dumb with astonishment.- "I
know," continued the dying girl, I know but
little about this Jesus, for I was never taught.
But I know that he is a Saviour, for he has mani-
fested himself to me since I have been sick, even
for the salvation of my soul. I believe he will
save me, although I have never before loved him;
I feel that I am going to him, that I shall ever be
with him. And now, my dear father, do not deny
me I beg that you will never again speak against
this Jesus of Nazareth! I entreat you to obtain a
Testament that tells of him ; and I pray that you
may know him; and when I am no more, you may
bestow on him the love that was formerly mine."
The exertion overcame the weakness of her feeble
body. She ceased; and the father's heart was too
full even for tears. He left the room in great
horror of mind, and ere he could again summon
sufficient fortitude to return, the spirit of his ac-
complished daughter had taken its flight, as I
trust, to that Saviour whom she loved and honour-
ed, without seeing or knowing. The first thing the
parent did after committing to the earth his last
earthly joy, was to procure a new Testament. This
he read; and, taught by the spirit from above, is
now numbered among the meek and humble fol-
lowers of the Lamb !-Todd.









CONSISTENCY.
"I SHALL not attend Sabbath-school any more,"
said a young girl to one of her class. "Why not ?"
asked her friend. "Because my mother is going
to send me to the dancing-school, and I think it
very inconsistent to attend both at the same time."
Children are sure to reason, if their parents do not.
"Lead us not into temptation," let children pray;
for are they not often led there?
BIBLE-Why Priests Withhold it.
THE true reason why the Papists forbid the Scrip-
tures to be read is not to keep men from errors and
heresies, but to keep them from discovering those
which they themselves impose upon them. Such
trash as they trade in would never go off their
hands if they did not keep their shops thus dark;
which made one of their shavelings so bitterly com-
plain of Luther for spoiling their market, saying
that but for him they might have persuaded the
people of Germany to eat hay. Anything, indeed,
will go down a blind man's throat.-Gurnal.
BIBLE-Cause of Interest in it.
THE lifeboat may have a tasteful bend and beauti-
ful decoration, but these are not the qualities
for which I prize it ; it was my salvation from the
howling sea So the interest which a regenerate
soul takes in the Bible, is founded on a personal
application to the heart of the saving truth which
it contains. If there is no taste for this truth,









CONSISTENCY.
"I SHALL not attend Sabbath-school any more,"
said a young girl to one of her class. "Why not ?"
asked her friend. "Because my mother is going
to send me to the dancing-school, and I think it
very inconsistent to attend both at the same time."
Children are sure to reason, if their parents do not.
"Lead us not into temptation," let children pray;
for are they not often led there?
BIBLE-Why Priests Withhold it.
THE true reason why the Papists forbid the Scrip-
tures to be read is not to keep men from errors and
heresies, but to keep them from discovering those
which they themselves impose upon them. Such
trash as they trade in would never go off their
hands if they did not keep their shops thus dark;
which made one of their shavelings so bitterly com-
plain of Luther for spoiling their market, saying
that but for him they might have persuaded the
people of Germany to eat hay. Anything, indeed,
will go down a blind man's throat.-Gurnal.
BIBLE-Cause of Interest in it.
THE lifeboat may have a tasteful bend and beauti-
ful decoration, but these are not the qualities
for which I prize it ; it was my salvation from the
howling sea So the interest which a regenerate
soul takes in the Bible, is founded on a personal
application to the heart of the saving truth which
it contains. If there is no taste for this truth,









CONSISTENCY.
"I SHALL not attend Sabbath-school any more,"
said a young girl to one of her class. "Why not ?"
asked her friend. "Because my mother is going
to send me to the dancing-school, and I think it
very inconsistent to attend both at the same time."
Children are sure to reason, if their parents do not.
"Lead us not into temptation," let children pray;
for are they not often led there?
BIBLE-Why Priests Withhold it.
THE true reason why the Papists forbid the Scrip-
tures to be read is not to keep men from errors and
heresies, but to keep them from discovering those
which they themselves impose upon them. Such
trash as they trade in would never go off their
hands if they did not keep their shops thus dark;
which made one of their shavelings so bitterly com-
plain of Luther for spoiling their market, saying
that but for him they might have persuaded the
people of Germany to eat hay. Anything, indeed,
will go down a blind man's throat.-Gurnal.
BIBLE-Cause of Interest in it.
THE lifeboat may have a tasteful bend and beauti-
ful decoration, but these are not the qualities
for which I prize it ; it was my salvation from the
howling sea So the interest which a regenerate
soul takes in the Bible, is founded on a personal
application to the heart of the saving truth which
it contains. If there is no taste for this truth,








6

there can be no relish for the Scriptures.-F. W.
Alexander, D.D.

ADVENT-Looking for the.
I was told of a poor peasant on the Welsh
mountains who, month after month, year after year,
through a long period of declining life, was used
every morning, as soon as he awoke, to open his
casement window, towards the east, and look out to
see if Jesus Christ was coming. He was no cal-
culator, or he need not have looked so long; he was
no student of prophecy, or he need not have looked
at all ; he was ready, or he would not have been in
so much haste ; he was willing, or he would rather
have looked another way; he loved, or it would
not have been the first thought of the morning.
His Master did not come, but a messenger did, to
fetch the ready one home. The same preparation
sufficed for both, the longing soul was satisfied
with either. Often when, in the morning, the child-
of God awakes, weary and encumbered with the
flesh, perhaps from troubled dreams, perhaps with
troubled thoughts, his Father's secret comes pre-
sently across him, he looks up, if not out, to feel, if
not to see, the glories of that last morning when the
trumpet shall sound, and the dead shall arise inde-
structible ; no weary limbs to bear the spirit down;
no feverish dreams to haunt the vision; no dark
forecasting of the day's events, or returning me-
mory of the griefs of yesterday.-Fry.









ABSENCE FROM WEEK-NIGHT SERVICES.
"PRAYER-MEETING and lecture as usual on Wednes-
day evening, in the lecture-room. Dear brethren, I
urge you all to attend the weekly meetings. 'For-
-sake not the assembling of yourselves together.' "
Some of the "dear brethren" deported them-
selves in this way: Brother A. thought it looked like
rain, and concluded that his family, including him-
self of course, had better remain at home. On
Thursday evening it was raining very hard, and the
same brother hired a carriage, and took his whole
family to the Academy of Music, to hear M. Agassiz
lecture on-"Intelligence of the Lobster." Brother
B. thought he was too tired to go, so he stayed
at home and worked at the sledge he had promised
to make for Billy. Sister C. thought the pavements
were too slippery. It would be very dangerous for
her to venture out. I saw her next morning, going
.down street to get her old bonnet "done up." She
had an old pair of stockings drawn over her shoes.
Three-fourths of the members stayed at home. God
was at the prayer-meeting. The pastor was there,
-and God blessed them. The persons who stayed
.at home were each represented by a vacant seat.
God don't bless empty seats.-United Presbyterian.

ATTENDANCE AT PUBLIC WORSHIP-In-
vitation to.
IN Edinburgh a Sabbath-school teacher was once
"visiting in a close, and in one of the top flats of a









ABSENCE FROM WEEK-NIGHT SERVICES.
"PRAYER-MEETING and lecture as usual on Wednes-
day evening, in the lecture-room. Dear brethren, I
urge you all to attend the weekly meetings. 'For-
-sake not the assembling of yourselves together.' "
Some of the "dear brethren" deported them-
selves in this way: Brother A. thought it looked like
rain, and concluded that his family, including him-
self of course, had better remain at home. On
Thursday evening it was raining very hard, and the
same brother hired a carriage, and took his whole
family to the Academy of Music, to hear M. Agassiz
lecture on-"Intelligence of the Lobster." Brother
B. thought he was too tired to go, so he stayed
at home and worked at the sledge he had promised
to make for Billy. Sister C. thought the pavements
were too slippery. It would be very dangerous for
her to venture out. I saw her next morning, going
.down street to get her old bonnet "done up." She
had an old pair of stockings drawn over her shoes.
Three-fourths of the members stayed at home. God
was at the prayer-meeting. The pastor was there,
-and God blessed them. The persons who stayed
.at home were each represented by a vacant seat.
God don't bless empty seats.-United Presbyterian.

ATTENDANCE AT PUBLIC WORSHIP-In-
vitation to.
IN Edinburgh a Sabbath-school teacher was once
"visiting in a close, and in one of the top flats of a








8

stair, found a poor family living in a small but
clean room. From conversation with the father
and mother, she soon discovered that it was one of
those cases where, from the long illness of the father,
the family had fallen from comparative comfort
to poverty. He was now, however, better, and had
been able for some time to work a little, so as to
keep his family from destitution, but by no means
to enable them to live in comfort. Having learned
so much of their worldly concerns, their visitor next
began to speak of their souls' interests. She asked
them if they went to any church. "No," said the
father, "We used to go long ago, before I took ill;
but we went no more after that." "But," said
she, "you have been better for a good while."
" Oh," said the father, "nobody ever asked us to
come !" "Well,"said the visitor, "I'll ask you now,"
and she directed him to a church where he would
hear the glad tidings from a faithful minister. Next
Sabbath several of the children were at her Sabbath
school and told her that that day their family had
been at church. Since that day they have been
hearers of the Word. How many souls are perish-
ing in Edinburgh and other towns, "because,
though all things are now ready, NOBODY EVER
ASKED THEM TO COME!" Will not the blood of their
souls be required at the hand of those who profess
to have tasted a Saviour's love, and yet make not
one effort to pluck brands out of the firel-Scottish
Sunday School Teacher's Magazine.








r
9

ROYAL EXAMPLE.
THE Princess Louise is understood to be a total
abstainer. It is stated that the Queen brought up
all her children without alcohol until they were 17
years of age, unless ordered by the family doctor.
The youngest of Her Majesty's married daughters
has seen no reason to depart from the habit which
she had formed in early life.

GOVERNOR POLLOCK AND THE CONVICT.
IN Pennsylvania, when Governor PolloCk, a Chris-
tian man, was Governor of the State, a man was
tried for murder, and the judge had pronounced
sentence upon him. His friends had tried every
means in their power to secure his pardon. They
had sent deputation after deputation to the Go-
vernor, but he had told them all the law should
take its course. When they began to give up
hope, the Governor went down to the prison
and asked the sheriff to take him to the cell of the
condemned man. The Governor was conducted
into the presence of the criminal, and he sat down
by the side of his bed and began to talk to him
kindly, spoke to him of Christ and heaven, and
showed him that, although he was condemned to
die on the morrow by earthly judges, he would
receive eternal life from the Divine Judge if he
would accept salvation. When he was gone, the
sheriff was asked by the condemned man, Who
was that man who was here and talked so kindly








r
9

ROYAL EXAMPLE.
THE Princess Louise is understood to be a total
abstainer. It is stated that the Queen brought up
all her children without alcohol until they were 17
years of age, unless ordered by the family doctor.
The youngest of Her Majesty's married daughters
has seen no reason to depart from the habit which
she had formed in early life.

GOVERNOR POLLOCK AND THE CONVICT.
IN Pennsylvania, when Governor PolloCk, a Chris-
tian man, was Governor of the State, a man was
tried for murder, and the judge had pronounced
sentence upon him. His friends had tried every
means in their power to secure his pardon. They
had sent deputation after deputation to the Go-
vernor, but he had told them all the law should
take its course. When they began to give up
hope, the Governor went down to the prison
and asked the sheriff to take him to the cell of the
condemned man. The Governor was conducted
into the presence of the criminal, and he sat down
by the side of his bed and began to talk to him
kindly, spoke to him of Christ and heaven, and
showed him that, although he was condemned to
die on the morrow by earthly judges, he would
receive eternal life from the Divine Judge if he
would accept salvation. When he was gone, the
sheriff was asked by the condemned man, Who
was that man who was here and talked so kindly








10

to me?" "Why," said the sheriff, "that was
Governor Pollock." Oh, sheriff, why didn't you
tell me who it was ? If I had known that was him,
I wouldn't have let him go out until he had given
me pardon. The Governor has been here in my
cell, and I didn't know it." And the man wrung
his hands and wept bitterly. Let us all remember
there is One greater than the Governor in our
midst. He has sent His Son to redeem us. We
haven't got to go to heaven to bring Him down.
But He is spiritually in our midst. We can be
saved for time and eternity if we will. What
shall we do ? Accept Christ, and receive a crown
of glory; or reject Him, and be lost ? There must
be no delay in the decision.

THE BOLL-CALL IN HEAVEN.
A SOLDIER, mortally wounded, was lying in a hos-
pital, dying. All was still. His last moment was
just at hand. Suddenly the silence was broken,
and the attending surgeon was startled by the voice
of the dying man uttering, clear and strong, the
single word : "Here !" "What do you want ?"
asked the surgeon, hastening to his cot. A moment
elapsed. There was a seeming struggle after recol-
lection. Then the lips of the dying soldier
mumbled: "Nothing, but it was the roll-call in
heaven, and I was answering to my name." These
were his last words on earth. At roll-call in hea-
ven will you be ready to answer to your name ?








11

TEE OLD ADAM.
A SCOTCHMAN being asked by his minister what
kind of a man was Adam, replied: Oh, just like
other folks." The minister insisted on having a
more special description. Weel, naebody got
anything by him, and many lost."

"IF YOU PLEASE, MAKE ME A CHRIS-
TIAN."
I WELL recollect in the course of mylabours a poor
Hindoo youth, who followed me about the garden
of the school, asking of me to make him a Christian.
I said, "It is impossible my dear boy. If it is
possible to do so at all, it is possible only through
the Lord Jesus Christ to make you a Christian.
Pray to Him." How well I recollect the sweet
voice and sweet face of that boy when he soon after
came to me and said, The Lord Jesus Christ has
come and taken His place in my heart." I asked,
How is that ?" He replied, I prayed and said,
Lord Jesus Christ, if you please, make me a
Christian !' and He was so kind that He came down
from heaven and has lived in my heart ever since."
How simple and how touching Lord Jesus
Christ, if you please, make me a Christian !" Can
you say that you have made a similar appeal in
such a spirit as this poor Hindoo boy And can
you say, my young friends, that Jesus Christ has
come down from heaven to live in your hearts 1-
Bev. Dr. Boaz of Calcutta.








11

TEE OLD ADAM.
A SCOTCHMAN being asked by his minister what
kind of a man was Adam, replied: Oh, just like
other folks." The minister insisted on having a
more special description. Weel, naebody got
anything by him, and many lost."

"IF YOU PLEASE, MAKE ME A CHRIS-
TIAN."
I WELL recollect in the course of mylabours a poor
Hindoo youth, who followed me about the garden
of the school, asking of me to make him a Christian.
I said, "It is impossible my dear boy. If it is
possible to do so at all, it is possible only through
the Lord Jesus Christ to make you a Christian.
Pray to Him." How well I recollect the sweet
voice and sweet face of that boy when he soon after
came to me and said, The Lord Jesus Christ has
come and taken His place in my heart." I asked,
How is that ?" He replied, I prayed and said,
Lord Jesus Christ, if you please, make me a
Christian !' and He was so kind that He came down
from heaven and has lived in my heart ever since."
How simple and how touching Lord Jesus
Christ, if you please, make me a Christian !" Can
you say that you have made a similar appeal in
such a spirit as this poor Hindoo boy And can
you say, my young friends, that Jesus Christ has
come down from heaven to live in your hearts 1-
Bev. Dr. Boaz of Calcutta.








12

WANT OF OCCUPATION.
NOTHINa can be more intolerable than the misman-
agement and discomfort to be found in countless
households where there are plenty of grown-up
daughters, who have really little to do but grumble
at the dreariness of their lives, and fret themselves
into permanent ill-health.

HOW A BIBLE WAS PRESERVED.
THERE is, says the New York Observer, a Bible in
Lucas County, Ohio, which was preserved by being
baked in a loaf of bread. It now belongs to a Mr.
Schebolt, who is a native of Bohemia, Austria.
This baked Bible was formerly the property of his
grandmother, who was a faithful Protestant Chris-
tian. During one of the seasons when the Roman
Catholics were persecuting the Protestants in that
country, a law was passed that every Bible in the
hands of the people should be given up to the
priests that it might be burnt. Then those who
loved their Bibles had to contrive different plans
in order to try to save the precious Book. When
the priests came round, it happened to be baking
day. Mrs. Schebolt, the grandmother of the pre-
sent owner of the Bible, had a large family. She
had just prepared a great batch of dough, when
she heard that the priests were coming. She took
her precious Bible, wrapped it carefully up, and
put it in the centre of a huge mass of dough,
which was to fill her largest bread-tin, and stowed








12

WANT OF OCCUPATION.
NOTHINa can be more intolerable than the misman-
agement and discomfort to be found in countless
households where there are plenty of grown-up
daughters, who have really little to do but grumble
at the dreariness of their lives, and fret themselves
into permanent ill-health.

HOW A BIBLE WAS PRESERVED.
THERE is, says the New York Observer, a Bible in
Lucas County, Ohio, which was preserved by being
baked in a loaf of bread. It now belongs to a Mr.
Schebolt, who is a native of Bohemia, Austria.
This baked Bible was formerly the property of his
grandmother, who was a faithful Protestant Chris-
tian. During one of the seasons when the Roman
Catholics were persecuting the Protestants in that
country, a law was passed that every Bible in the
hands of the people should be given up to the
priests that it might be burnt. Then those who
loved their Bibles had to contrive different plans
in order to try to save the precious Book. When
the priests came round, it happened to be baking
day. Mrs. Schebolt, the grandmother of the pre-
sent owner of the Bible, had a large family. She
had just prepared a great batch of dough, when
she heard that the priests were coming. She took
her precious Bible, wrapped it carefully up, and
put it in the centre of a huge mass of dough,
which was to fill her largest bread-tin, and stowed







13

it away in the oven and baked it. The priests
came and searched the house carefully through,
but they did not find the Bible. When the search
was over, and the danger passed, the Bible was
taken out of the loaf, and found uninjured.

A SWEARER ALONE WITH GOD.
A cARRIER in a large town in Yorkshire heard
his carter one day in the yard swearing dreadfully
at his horses. The carrier was a man who feared
God, spent his Sabbaths as a teacher in a Sunday
school, and endeavoured to promote the spiritual
good of his fellow-creatures. He was shocked to
hear the terrible oaths that resounded through the
yard. He went up to the young man, who was
just setting off with his cart for Manchester, and
kindly expostulated with him on the enormity of
his sin, and then added-" But if thou wilt swear,
stop till thou get through the turnpike on S-
Moor, where none but God and thyself can hear."
He then put "The Swearer's Prayer" into his
hand, and left him. The poor fellow cracked his
whip and pursued his journey ; but he could not
get over his master's words. Some time after, his
master observed him in the yard, and was very
much surprised so see him so altered. There was
a seriousness and quietness about him which he had
never seen before; and he often seemed as if he
had something to say which he could not get out.
At length, his master was so much struck with his








14

manner, that he asked him if he wanted anything.
"Ah master," said he, do you remember what
you said to me about swearing, and the tract you
gave me ? I was thunderstruck. I went on the
road, and I got through the turnpike, and reached
S- Moor; and there I thought that, though
I was alone, yet God zas with me; and I trembled
to think how He had been with me, and had
known all my sins and follies all my life long. My
sins came to my remembrance ; I was afraid that
He would strike me dead ; and I thank God that I
have been roused to seek after the salvation of my
poor soul." The master, as may be supposed, was
overjoyed to hear the young man's confession;
and it is gratifying to know that his subsequent
conduct gave proof of his having ceased to be a
slave of sin. "A word spoken in due season, how
good. it is."-Christian Treasury.

HONEST FRANK.
A YOUNG man-we will call him Honest Frank -
who loved truth, was a clerk in the office of a rich
merchant. One day a letter came recalling an
order for goods which had been received the day
before. The merchant handed it to Honest Frank,
and with a persuasive smile, said :-" Frank, reply
to this note. Say that the goods were shipped be-
fore the receipt of the letter countermanding the
order." Frank looked into his employer's face
with a sad but firm glance, and replied, "I cannot







15

sir." "Why not, sir!" asked the merchant angrily.
"Because the goods are now in the yard, and it
would be a lie, sir." I hope you will always be
so particular," replied the merchant, turning upon
his heel and going away. Honest Frank did a bold
as well as a right thing. What do you suppose
happened to him ? Did he lose his place ? No ;
quite different. The merchant was too shrewd to
turn away one who would not write a lying letter.
He knew the untold value of such a youth, and at
once made him his confidential clerk.-Hand and
Reart.

THE BIGHT KIND OF PBA YEB.
UNCLE JOHN marchedin the sitting-room, on Sun-
day, jubilant. Everybody looked at him expect-
antly. "Well ?" said the mother. Well," said
Aunt Debbie, "what is it ?" "I have, at last,"
replied Uncle John, "heard a man pray who knew
how to pray in Sunday-school, for children, and so
as to lead their prayers. It was in a strange Sun-
day-school, not in our own, and I dropped in out
of curiosity. There stood the man, ready to make
the closing prayer, and all the children, some hun-
dreds, stood on their feet and were silent. He
said: 'Lord, we thank Thee for the good words
we have heard and the pleasant songs we have
sung. May we be better boys and girls, better
men and women all this week, because of the time
we have spent here to-day. Keep us from bad







16

thoughts, and bad actions, and unkind words, and
help us to be honest, and true, and loving, for
Christ's sake. Amen.' I call that the right kind
of a prayer."
"JUST A LITTLE MORE."
" OiLY just a little, a very little, a very, very
little!" said the brook to the bank. And the
bank was silent, and the brook wore its side till
the earth melted away, and the sods floated down
the stream. "Just a little more, a very little
more said the brook again. And the waters
pressed against the roots of the willows that grew
beyond the bank, and laid them bare. "Just a
little, little more," said the brook again; and the
widening stream advanced with fresh force till,
one by one, the willows fell and were borne away
in the torrent. "Alas !" cried the meadow, as
the water closed in on it, "if I had not neglected
the attack on my bank my fence would never have
been destroyed ; but now my protection is gone,
and I am rightly served in being turned from a
fruitful field into a watery waste.-Mrs. Prosser.

RICHES.
THERE is a burden of care in getting riches, fear in
keeping them, temptation in using them, guilt in
abusing them, sorrow in losing them, and a burden
of account at last to be given up concerning them.
--Matthew Henry.







16

thoughts, and bad actions, and unkind words, and
help us to be honest, and true, and loving, for
Christ's sake. Amen.' I call that the right kind
of a prayer."
"JUST A LITTLE MORE."
" OiLY just a little, a very little, a very, very
little!" said the brook to the bank. And the
bank was silent, and the brook wore its side till
the earth melted away, and the sods floated down
the stream. "Just a little more, a very little
more said the brook again. And the waters
pressed against the roots of the willows that grew
beyond the bank, and laid them bare. "Just a
little, little more," said the brook again; and the
widening stream advanced with fresh force till,
one by one, the willows fell and were borne away
in the torrent. "Alas !" cried the meadow, as
the water closed in on it, "if I had not neglected
the attack on my bank my fence would never have
been destroyed ; but now my protection is gone,
and I am rightly served in being turned from a
fruitful field into a watery waste.-Mrs. Prosser.

RICHES.
THERE is a burden of care in getting riches, fear in
keeping them, temptation in using them, guilt in
abusing them, sorrow in losing them, and a burden
of account at last to be given up concerning them.
--Matthew Henry.
















STOWE$ 614 AIECtIrTE$.




STHE ORPHAN.
IT was on a pleasant summer's eve that the pastor
of one of our villages was taking his usual walk
after spending the day in study. The good man
was pressing beneath his softly trembling steps the
sods which covered many of his beloved parish-
ioners, when he came to the spot where lay his
wife and three beautiful daughters, whose loveli-
ness, like the opening rose, was blasted ere it was
fully exhibited. The pastor leaned on his staff
and bent over these graves, and was just marking
out by their side the spot where he hoped shortly to
lie in peace, when he was startled by hearing the sobs
of a child. He turned, and at a little distance, be-
held a lovely little white-headed boy who was
kneeling and sobbing over the grave of his father
whose ashes had lately been deposited beneath.
"0 sir# said the child, "let me cry for my
father-he lies deep in that grave ; they tell me he
No. 5.








2

"will never again be my father-I fear that I have
offended him, that he will no more be myTfather,
and I want to ask him to forgive me, and to kiss
me as he used to do !-0 if he would once more be
my father, I would never again offend him. But
they say he is dead O, I would sit here and cry
all night-I would never stop if my poor father
would come to me But he will not come ; for a
few days before they put him into this hole he told
me-0, I do remember it-he told me that he was
going to leave me, and that I should never have a
father any more; and he stroked my hair with his
sick hand, and told me that when he was buried in
the ground I must be a good boy and love God-
O my poor, good father !"
The feeling pastor pressed the hand of the sorrow-
ing child within his ; and ere he could answer him,
he had wet with tears the silken hair of the orphan.
His first object was to soothe him into confidence,
and then to direct him to a Father who would
never forsake him. With patience he satisfied his
curiosity respecting death-how it is a long sleep,
but that the voice of God will one day awaken even
the dead. He told him how death was introduced
into the world, and made him understand that it
was the consequence of sin. He next strove deeply
to impress upon the listening boy, what is "the
chief end of man;" and thus concluded while his
little hearer seemed to hang upon his lips ; And
now, my dear little boy, you have indeed lost a










tender father; but I have been trying to point
you to a Father who has promised never to forsake
the poor orphan."
"But," says the child, "what is it to be an
orphan !"
It is to be left destitute of parents while we are
yet children."
0 yes, but what is a poor orphan ?"
The clergyman was affected, but replied, It is
a child who is left destitute of property, as well as
parents."
Oh, I wish," said the child in the simplicity of
his heart, I wish that I was a poor orphan, if God
would be my father."
The good minister wept; for he knew that the
child's wish respecting property, would be fully
satisfied.
It was now dark, except what light was afforded
by the bright twinkling of the stars. As they left
the graveyard the shepherd directed the attention
of his lamb to these wonderful works of God, and
his heart beat with joy when he exclaimed, My
Father made them all."
He led the orphan to his place of residence-
soothed his grief-assuaged his sorrows, and deter-
mined to adopt and make him his child. But God
ordered otherwise. The faithful pastor was soon
after laid upon the bed of death; and from the
chamber which had for many years been the wit-
ness of the piety of his heart, and which was pri-








4

vileged above the common walks of virtuous life,"
his spirit, as we trust, flew from the snares, the
corruptions and the sins of this transitory world,
and found a shelter in the bosom of his Redeemer
-and left the child a second time an orphan.
At the death of the clergyman the little boy was
thrown upon the wide world with but few friends:-
his patron was dead, and he was forgotten. Many
who saw, felt compassion for him. They saw sor-
row often brooding over his countenance, and the
big tear often gush from his eyes-they saw and
pitied-"hoped he would be provided for," and left
him as they found him. But it should be a matter
of consolation to dying parents that there is One
who heareth even the young ravens when they
cry," and will provide for the fatherless. -Todd.

THE ELEVENTH COMMANDMENT.
ARCHBISHOP Usher, having long heard of "holy
Samuel Rutherford," and how the tender grace of
his daily life made his home a heaven on earth, re-
solved when on a visit to Scotland to witness it for
himself. That he might see it in its simplicity, he
assumed the disguise of a poor wayfarer, knocked
at the door of the manse, and asked for a night's
shelter. He was welcomed with primitive hospi-
tality, and when at a certain hour the master came
down to pray, and converse with his family as all
were gathered round the kitchen ingle, his opening
question to the white-haired stranger was, How