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Group Title: Florida review (Tallahassee, FL)
Title: Florida review
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE PAGE TEXT
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00049005/00071
 Material Information
Title: Florida review
Physical Description: 5 v. : ill. ; 31 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Bureau of Immigration
Publisher: Bureau of Immigration, Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: 1926-1930
Frequency: semimonthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Industries -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (June 7, 1926)-v. 5, no. 9 (Oct. 20, 1930).
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00049005
Volume ID: VID00071
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001744570
oclc - 01279992
notis - AJF7332
lccn - sn 00229569

Table of Contents
    Balanced rations
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Full Text

S.D ept, of Lgricultur6,

'*'; .i...i.g.fon -n.





Jforiba 3&ebiet

PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY BY

BUREAU OF IMMIGRATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA


MAY 6, 1929


No. 23


TABLE OF CONTENTS


Page
Balanced Rations ..... ... .. 1
Mayo t le M ap M aker ...... ........ .... .. 4
McEwen'.s Forty-Aere Walternielon Ferlt ...... ... 4
Short Talks .... . ... ... 4
223 Bushels Per Acre Is Average Potato Yield Here ...... 4
Roimancec o' tihe Poultry Industry ... ..
Rules and Regulations Adopted for Extermination of Fruit Fly 6i
Mediterranean Fruit Fly Quarantine ... ..... .. 7
Week's Vegetable Sales Total More Than $114,000 ... 11
First Watermelon of Season Sent Out ............. ..11
Rabbit Show Big Success ........ ...... .. ..... ... ...... ..... 11
ild Spainish Trail Marker Dedication Is Viewed by Thousands 12
Former LaBelle Citizen Is Raising Narcissus Bulbs ........ 12
Drug Plants Grow Wild in Everglades ............... ... ..... 12
Another Industry for Florida ............ ......... ..... ..... 12
Quarter Million Dollars Came to ('City on "Cukes".. ...... 13


Page
Fllorida's Bumnper 'Cuelumber Crop ............ ......... 13
Value Florida Fisheries Shows Good Inerve se.... .................... 13
Bean Crop Promises Rich Returns. .... ................. ....... 14
Fishermen and Shrinmpers Make Good Catches ........... 14
Big Phosphoric Acid Plant Gets Site Near Tampa ...... 14
Shipper Predicts Great Growth in Berry Culture .. .......... 14
Lumber Being Taken to Africani Ports ................ .. 14
First ('Carlod Tolnmaoes Moved Yesterday 1.. ............. 15
(arload of Native Rock Will Be Used Daily-40 Employes .... 15
Clewiston Company .. .. .... ............ .. .. ...... 15
Correction ..... .. ... .... ............... ... ... .. .... ....... 15
E english Peas in Solid Car ......... .. ............................... 16
Florida Papayas Seen in Broadway...... ....... .... ....... 1(
Hundred and Twenty Cars of Cukes Are Shipped froln Wauchula 16
Railroads Announce New Shipping Plan for Tourist Autos ..... 16
7:i Hors. Weighing 15i.(00 Pounds, Shipped at Largo.. ............ 16


BALANCED RATIONS


By T. J. BROOKS, Chief Clerk, Department of Agriculture


HIS is not an article on dietetics. There
is such a thing as a balanced ration for
animals and for plants. An unbalanced
ration will not kill the animal or the
plant unless a poison is introduced or generated
by the combination of foods or elements that
are taken into the system.
Organic bodies, both vegetable and animal,
are made up of mineral elements. Therefore all
organic materials are essentially mineral.
It is also true that much of the earth's
minerals were at one time organic. Coal is a
mineral but was once vegetable. Nitrate is a
mineral, but the part of the ore that is used as
nitrogen in fertilizer, and that part of the by-
product which is iodine, were both of vegetable
origin. Both nitrogen and iodine are found in
other minerals, but geologists tell us that the
great nitrate beds of Chile are accumulations
of seaweed which drifted on the shore of the
Andes when all but the highest ranges were
under water. As the ages passed the Andes
rose high above the ocean and a great trough
filled with seaweed was lifted, drained and
dried. As more aeons passed, this great bed of
seaweed was covered and mixed with erosion


from the mountains on either side and became
nitrate ore. Seaweed obtains nitrogen from the
air and stores it away by an organic process.
When an animal eats a vegetable he is eating
minerals. When a vegetable grows from the
soil and air it eats minerals. Different plants
require different minerals. Plants requiring the
same minerals also require them in different
proportions and combinations. Different ani-
mals require different minerals. Animals re-
quiring the same minerals also require them in
different proportions and combinations.
An unbalanced ration for a plant will affect
it in proportion to the lack of balance and the
hardiness of the plant. An unbalanced ration
for an animal will affect it in proportion to the
lack of balance and the hardiness of the animal.
A proper diet and physical surroundings
suited to a plant of a certain species is supposed
to be suited to all plants of that species.
A proper diet and physical surroundings
suited to an animal of a certain species is not
always suited to all animals of the same species.
Each species of plants has its own peculiar
combination of elements, determined by the life
principle governing its growth. This life prin-


Vol. 3









2 FLORIDA REVIEW


ciple can appropriate only such elements as are
available in the soil and air. Some plants are
far more sensitive to the different soil elements
than others. It might not be possible to de-
termine whether or not corn had all the ele-
ments necessary for its perfect development or
whether it had to contend with too much am-
monia or suffer from too little lime. But it is
quite easy to detect whether sugar cane grew
in an old horse lot, on black rich humus-loam
or on light soils.
It has been found quite possible to affect the
quality of citrus fruit by the kind and quality
of fertilizer used. It is even easier to determine
the quality of celery by the discriminating use
of fertilizers.
In other words, it is not always possible to
determine a balanced ration for people by
simply naming the vegetable and meat food to
be used. You may say that the variation is too
slight to deserve mention. If you speak of only
one meal perhaps this is true. If you speak of
a year's meals-a thousand meals-that is dif-
ferent.
We drink waters of different mineral content.
One drink will do neither good nor harm, but
in a run of months and years they matter very
materially. Some people need one kind of water
and other people need another kind of water.
The same combination of minerals in water will
affect different people differently because of
digestive idiosyncrasies. The same is true of
foods. The medical world is not agreed on the
broad subject of dietetics. But this fact does
not mean that nothing is known on the subject.
There is room for a broad field of investiga-
tion on the subject of determining quality and
content of foods by the scientific feeding of the
plant or the animal.

CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
Washington, D. C., March 19, 1929.
My Dear Commissioner Mayo:
I want you to know how much I appreciate this Re-
source Map of Florida which you have sent me, and to
tell you that it was exactly what I wanted and needed.
I have been considering by what means I might have
in evidence some device for letting people know the pos-
sibilities and accomplishments of Florida, and this map
is exactly what I wanted. I have it hanging on the wall
of my office along with some handsome oil paintings of
Florida flowers and palms, with which it harmonizes well,
besides its very practical value.
If you could spare me another one, I would appreciate
it very much if you would send it to my resident secre-
tary, Walter S. Buckingham of Vero Beach, Florida, as I
believe he could make extremely good use of it.
I want to compliment your department on getting out
this splendid evidence of Florida's versatility, and with


renewed thanks for your thoughtfulness in sending me
one, I am
Sincerely yours,
RUTH BRYAN OWEN, M. C.

UNITED STATES SENATE
Committee on Commerce
March 30, 1929.
Honorable Nathan Mayo,
Commissioner of Agriculture,
Tallahassee, Florida.
My dear Mr. Mayo:-I thank you very much for the
Products Map of Florida, which I am placing on my wall.
It is a very instructive and valuable map.
Sincerely yours,
DUNCAN U. FLETCHER.

CZECHOSLOVAK CONSULATE GENERAL
300 West Adams Street, Chicago
March 21, 1929.
Honorable Nathan Mayo,
Commissioner of Department of Agriculture,
Tallahassee, Florida.
My dear Sir:-On my tour through Florida I came
across your excellent Resource Map of Florida. May we
have a copy of it for our office?
Thanking you in advance, I am
Very truly yours,
LADISLAV URBAN, Vice-Consul.

STANDARD AUTOMOBILE LEGAL ASSOCIATION
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
March 29, 1929.
Hon. Nathan Mayo,
Commissioner of Agriculture,
Tallahassee, Florida.
Dear Sir:-Will you please send to us one Resource
Map of Florida? We feel this to be one of the most at-
tractive maps we have seen issued and will have it dis-
played in our headquarters here. If there is any charge
for the map please so bill us.
Respectfully yours,
M. G. BOYCE, Division Manager.

BOSTON AND MAINE RAILROAD
Boston, March 19, 1929.
Mr. Nathan Mayo,
Commissioner of Agriculture,
Tallahassee, Florida.
Dear Mr. Mayo:-Congratulations on the resource
map of Florida, which is one of the best things of its
kind which has come to our desk.
Very truly yours,
T. F. JOYCE,
Assistant Vice-President.

RAINBOW REALTY COMPANY, INC.
STUART, FLORIDA
March 22, 1929.
State Department of Agriculture,
Tallahassee, Florida.
Gentlemen:-Please send us one of your new Florida
Products Maps. We have seen one of them and con-
sider it the best piece of advertising that we have ever
seen for the State of Florida.
Yours very truly,
P. R. McCRARY, President.










FLORIDA REVIEW


Slariba 6itefa

Published Semi-Monthly by
Bureau of Immigration, Department of Agriculture
Tallahassee, Florida

NATHAN MAYO .............. Commissioner of Agriculture
T. J. BROOKS. .......... Director Bureau of Immigration
Entered as second-class matter, June 25, 1926, at the Post Office
at Tallahassee, Florida, under the Act of June 6, 1920.
Will be mailed free to anyone upon request.


Vol. 3


MAY 6, 1929


No. 23


HANOVER FIRE INSURANCE CO.
NEW YORK
Lake North, Fla., April 8, 1929.
Hon Nathan Mayo,
Commissioner of Agriculture,
Tallahassee, Florida.
Dear Sir:-Will you kindly send me a copy of the new
map of Florida, such as I have been getting from year
to year, and also a copy of the map which shows the
products of the state? The "product" map is a most
remarkable production, and I want to display it in my
office.
Very truly yours,
W. E. MENOHER.

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, LABOR AND
STATISTICS
FRANKFORT, KENTUCKY
February 7, 1929.
Hon. Nathan Mayo,
Commissioner of Agriculture,
Tallahassee, Florida.
My dear Commissioner:-Your very splendid produc-
tion map of Florida received. Permit me to thank you
for this wonderful map; it surpasses anything of its kind
that I have ever seen. It occupies a very prominent place
on the walls of my office and I shall let no opportunity
pass to call the attention of the passing public to the
wonderful possibilities of your State.
With kindest regards and best wishes, I beg to remain,
Sincerely yours,
NEWTON BRIGHT,
Commissioner of Agriculture.

WEST CENTRAL GRAMMAR SCHOOL
ST. PETERSBURG, FLA.
February 21, 1929.
Mr. Nathan Mayo,
Commissioner of Agriculture,
Tallahassee, Florida.
Dear Sir:-We greatly appreciate the wonderfully
beautiful product maps of Florida that were sent us
from your office.
The only regrettable feature is we have not enough
to supply all the rooms which are doing intensive work
on the products of our state.
We would greatly appreciate it if you would furnish us
with four more maps.
Thanking you, I am,
Very sincerely,
EMILIE C. SHAW.


MOUNT PLYMOUTH, ORLANDO, FLORIDA
February 9, 1929.
Hon. Nathan Mayo,
Commissioner of Agriculture,
Tallahassee, Florida.
Dear Sir:-The Mount Plymouth Corporation of Or-
lando, Florida, would very much appreciate being in re-
ceipt of four of your Resource Maps recently distributed.
We believe these maps are about the finest portraits
of information about Florida that we have ever seen,
and if you could do so, we would appreciate your sending
us four of them.
Thanking you in advance, we are,
Yours very truly,
H. L. COX.

BONBRIGHT & COMPANY
NEW YORK
January 29, 1929.
State Agricultural Department,
Tallahassee, Florida.
Dear Sirs:-I am writing tardily to thank you for the
very handsome map you sent me on which the products
of Florida have been pictorially depicted. This is a very
fine piece of publicity and I am grateful to you for re-
membering my interest in the matter.
Please accept our thanks, and believe me,
Yours sincerely,
P. M. TUTTLE.

WAUCHULA VALLEY FARMS COMPANY
WAUCHULA, FLORIDA
February 2, 1929.
Hon. Nathan Mayo,
Department of Agriculture,
Tallahassee, Florida.
Dear Sir:-We would appreciate receiving a copy of
the resource map of Florida to hang in our office.
This is a splendidly got up piece of work and I wish
that it might be found in every large business house in
the north-as well as prominently displayed in all bank-
ing institutions.
If enlarged it would make a splendid poster for bill-
board advertising and attract national attention to our
wonderful state and its infinite resources.
Very truly yours,
H. M. SANBORN.

JACKSONVILLE REAL ESTATE BOARD
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
February 20, 1929.
Mr. Nathan Mayo,
Secretary of Agriculture,
Tallahassee, Florida.
My dear Mr. Mayo:-While in the board's office this
morning, Mr. Riddle showed me the resource map of
Florida as issued by your department. I tried every way
in the world to take the map away from him, but with-
out success, so I am going to ask if you won't kindly
send me one for my office.
This is the finest thing that I have ever seen of its
kind and I want to congratulate you upon the fine work
you are doing.
With kind personal regards, I am,
Sincerely yours,
FRANCIS S. MASON, President.


FLORIDA


REVIEW










FLORIDA REVIEW


THE SHAWNEE INVESTMENT COMPANY
TOPEKA, KANSAS
Hon. Nathan Mayo, March 6, 1929.
Commissioner of Agriculture,
Tallahassee, Florida.
Dear Mr. Mayo:-We have received from your office
a map of Florida, done in colors, showing the different
products raised.
We have this on our wall now and we appreciate your
courtesy and kindness in the matter.
We wish you would send us a bill, however, for this,
as it is well worth any charges you make.
Thanking you, we are,
Yours very truly,
STANLEY MEDLICOTT, President.

SILER, CARPENTER & ROOSE
TOLEDO, OHIO
February 19, 1929.
Commissioner of Agriculture,
Tallahassee, Florida.
Dear Sir:-Some days ago we wrote you asking for a
copy of your last Florida map. Shortly afterwards we
received a copy of the large colored map showing Florida
products.
We were very much pleased with this map, and the
writer has received a request from the principal of one
of our schools for two copies of this map to be used
in the fifth grades.
If you will be so kind as to send us two or three of
these maps we will be pleased to deliver same to the
school; and would suggest that, if these maps are not too
expensive, this would be a very efficient way to adver-
tise Florida. The map is most attractive and would make
a very great appeal to the youthful minds, especially if
presented about the time they are studying Florida in
their geography class. If we can be of assistance in
distributing the maps in the schools of Toledo we shall be
very glad to do so.
With best respects, we remain,
Very truly yours,
ERWIN J. WARD.

MAYO THE MAP MAKER

(Palm Beach Independent, March 1, 1929)
We have received from Nathan Mayo, Commissioner
of Agriculture, a large, accurate and beautifully colored
map of Florida, showing the products and industries of
the state, each in its particular locality. Also the leading
product of each locality. For instance, Palm Beach
county has tomatoes, pineapples, cane, peanuts and
beans. All these show up on the map beautifully as well
as accurately. The map is a handsome picture as well
as an instructive chart. We are going to frame ours and
hang it on a wall of the Independent editorial room, for
the instruction as well as the delight of all who may see
it.
It would be appropriate to call Mr. Mayo the Florida
map maker. Every two or three years since he has been
in office his department has issued the best map of
Florida ever made and sent copies of it where they are
most needed-notably, the schools. It is not too much
to say that hundreds of thousands of Floridians know
their state much better by reason of Mayo's maps, be-
cause if there is a school in Florida without one it is
because it did not apply before the supply ran out.


Mr. Mayo should have credit for a welcome innovation,
which it seems should have been thought of by the pro-
fessional map makers. All of us, not only those who have
studied geography, but the large number who often have
need to refer to maps of the state, have been annoyed
by the absurd manner in which the northwestern coun-
ties have been cut off at a little distance west of the
Chattahoochee river, and printed in a separate section
in a way that not only gave the body of the state a
bobbed off appearance, but made it difficult for a student
of the map to join the natural and political lines. Mr.
Mayo, who does not believe in state division, found an-
other objection to this style of map. He said it looked
too suggestive-made it appear as though the main body
of the state wanted to get rid of the fertile and pic-
turesque section west of Chattahoochee. So he had the
big wall map of the state printed all in one piece, so the
eye could travel unhindered from the Atlantic Ocean to
the Perdido River.

McEWEN'S FORTY-ACRE WATERMELON
FARM IS DECLARED BEST IN COUNTY

(Hendry County News, March 28, 1929)
Felda, Hendry County, Florida, bids fair this season
to continue her fine record of sending the first carload
of watermelons out of the state to northern markets.
Mr. Osborne, of LaBelle Heights, whose experience and
success makes him capable of judging, took a trip to the
L. B. McEwen farm this week and says it is producing
the finest watermelons he has seen anywhere this year.
"I walked all over the McEwen melon farm, which con-
sists of two approximately nine acre fields and one twenty
acre field, making nearly forty acres in all. This is
without a doubt the finest melon farm in all this section
of Florida and will be the first to ship melons commer-
cially out of Hendry county, in my opinion, based on
inspection of many fields.

SHORT TALKS

(Times-Union, March 25, 1929)
Where can there be found a company of workers or
of leaders who contribute more to Florida's prosperity
and upbuilding than her county agricultural agents?
These practical specialists in problems of the farm are
adding daily to powers of production and sources of
wealth. They are carrying to the man behind the plow
discoveries of science that are truly creative and
methods of operation that will lighten his labor while they
increase his production.

225 BUSHELS PER ACRE IS AVERAGE
POTATO YIELD HERE

(Clewiston News, April 12, 1929)
Average yield in the potato fields of the Clewiston
company this year has been more than 225 bushels to
the acre, it was reported yesterday by Charles A. Jack-
son, local agronomist, who is in charge of the Clewiston
company's farms.
While the average yield is placed at this figure there
were several instances where more than 300 bushels per
acre were dug.
The 225 bushel average yield is higher than recorded
in any other section of Florida this year and almost 50
bushels higher than the average yield in this section
last year.


REVIEW


FLORIDA









FLORIDA REVIEW 5


ROMANCE OF THE POULTRY INDUSTRY

(Issued by the National Poultry Council, for use in con-
nection with "National Egg Week," May 1 to 7)
There is nothing more romantic or inspiring in the
whole history of American agriculture than the rise to
fame and popularity which the American hen has at-
tained. The products of her industry-eggs and poultry
meat have rapidly come to be one of our most important
factors in feeding our millions of people. The humble
hen produces each year products valued at over one and
a quarter billion of dollars and by doing this becomes
one of our greatest national assets.
Poultry was first included in the Federal census in
1880 and since that time each year has marked a dis-
tinct increase in the number, distribution and value of
the poultry industry of the United States. During the
past two decades, it has jumped ahead by leaps and
bounds. This great increase has been due in part to the
development of the mammoth incubator, the baby chick
industry and especially to the great contributions which
research and science have made in developing improved
methods of management, in bringing about greater pro-
duction and in eliminating losses Irom diseases.
Twenty years ago poultry was a sadly neglected side-
line on the average farm. Today the hen is looked upon
as one of our most efficient branches of the farm opera-
tion. She is given better care and closer attention and
consequently rewards her owner in more eggs and meat
and greater returns. The past twenty years have been
marked especially by the rapid development of thousands
upon thousands of specialized poultry farms and com-
mercial egg farms, more especially on the Atlantic and
Pacific Coast, but they are rapidly being built up in the
heart of the corn belt states, which section, including
the upper Mississippi, Missouri and Ohio River Valley,
is the egg basket of the nation. As our population be-
comes more and more intense and less acres have to
feed more people, we shall expect poultry, as it has done
in older countries, to continue to gain in popular favor
and in prominence as an agricultural pursuit. Today the
poultry industry is the sixth from the top of the list of
our more valuable agricultural products. The value of
poultry and eggs produced is exceeded only by dairy
products, corn, cotton, hay and forage and swine.
What the Poultry Industry Means to Us
The humble hen possesses qualities and attributes
which few of us appreciate:
She Is a Great National Asset.-It is a universally ac-
cepted fact that she is the producer of one of our most
wholesome and universally used human foods-namely,
EGGS; so aptly and appropriately named "Sunshine in
Sealed Packages." On the other hand, she produces an
immense volume of poultry meat which is rapidly com-
ing to be a preferred meat dish on the tables of the
nation. When considering the immense volume of food
which she produces and the fact that she produces with
great economy and efficiency, her position as a real
national asset is well earned.
She Is a Great Creator oT Wealth.-She is found in
ever-increasing numbers on practically every American
farm and is one of our most universal sources of farm
income.
She Is Economically Sound.-The position of leader-
ship which the hen occupies among our various agricul-
tural commodity groups; the very satisfactory remunera-
tion derived by farmers and poultry keepers throughout


the nation, and the statistical evidence which has been
gathered in farm management studies, give sufficient
proof of her strong economic position.
She Is a Most Economic Producer of Human Food.-
Statistics show and it is generally recognized that there
is no animal on the farm which more efficiently manu-
factures a finished product for human consumption from
the raw material which she consumes than the hen. An
average hen, weighing around four to six pounds, if well
bred and well managed, will produce in a year a product
outside of her body in the form of eggs which weighs
from twenty-five to thirty pounds. To do this, that bird
will consume in the vicinity of from eighty to ninety
pounds of feed. Such efficiency certainly must mean
economic production.
She Is a Universal Favorite.-It is true that a far
greater number of persons in this broad land of ours
are interested in and actually concerned with poultry
than is the case in any other livestock industry. Evidence
of this is found in the wide and diversified groups which
are interested in poultry keeping, ranging all the way
from the back-lot poultry keeper, the farmer, the com-
mercial egg operator, the exhibition breeder and the baby
chick producer. These are but a few of the many which
make up the ranks of the poultry fraternity.
She Is the Safeguard of the Future.-A study of the
old world history will show us that as our population con-
tinues to increase, as our people tend to crowd together
more and more in the cities, as our cheaper farm lands
disappear, we cannot do other than to follow in the foot-
steps of older nations in that we must look more and
more to the small unit as the source of our food supply.
Our people now and in an ever increasing way in suc-
ceeding generations must make poultry and eggs an ever
increasing part of their daily diet, if for no other reason
than the fact that poultry husbandry lends itself readily
to intensive methods and limited areas.
She Is the Producer of One of Our Greatest Food
Products.-The Egg is, first of all, one of our greatest
protective foods, being rich in the more important vita-
mins. It has stored up in it life-giving and growth pro-
moting properties which are found in the ultra-violet
rays of sunlight. It has a greater variety of vitamins
than any other single food product. Its greater use in
the diet of our people will insure complete nourishment
of the body and will protect the human organisms against
important nutritive deficiencies. The meat of the egg
comes to us wrapped in a sealed container, the contents
of which have never been touched by the hands of man.
Truly a wonderful work of nature is this product of "Sun-
shine in Sealed Packages."
To this humble hen, of which there are over four
million on American farms, we owe a distinct debt of
gratitude. It is not too much to ask that during the week
of May first to seventh, which has been designated as
"National Egg Week," we pay special recognition to this
wonderful producer of human food. We are all inter-
ested in biddy-some as producers and some as con-
sumers. Give her half a chance. The hen will continue
to play a greater and greater part in our scheme of
human existence, so, let's do homage to our American
queen by becoming better acquainted with her products
and the place which she plays in our national life and
prosperity.

For satisfactory drainage with tile there should be
a fall of at least one inch in each hundred feet. A
greater fall will likely be more satisfactory.









6 FLORIDA REVIEW


RULES AND REGULATIONS ADOPTED FOR
EXTERMINATION OF FRUIT FLY

(Homestead Leader, April 18, 1929)
Rule 42-A.-Under the provisions of the Florida Plant
Act of 1927, Chapter 12291, approved May 19, 1927, the
State Plant Board of Florida, in session at Gainesville,
Florida, this 15th day of April, 1929, and in accordance
with Section 4, sub-section 9, of said Act, does declare
and give public notice thereof that the Mediterranean
Fruit Fly (Ceratitis capitata Wied) and each and every
fruit and article infested therewith to be a public
nuisance.
Rule 42-B.-Under the provisions of the Florida Plant
Act of 1927, Chapter 12291, approved May 19, 1927, the
State Plant Board of Florida, in session at Gainesville,
Florida, this 15th day of April, 1929, and in accordance
with Section 4, sub-section 10, of said Act, does declare
and give public notice thereof that the following areas
within the State of Florida are areas in which the Medi-
terranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata Wied) is known
to occur, to-wit:
The counties of Orange and Seminole and all of Sec-
tions 25 to 36, inclusive, in Township 19 South, Range 27
East; Sections 23 to 36, inclusive, in Township 19 South,
Range 28 East; Sections 28 to 33, inclusive, in Township
19 South, Range 29 East, and Sections 13, 24 and 25 in
Township 20 South, Range 26 East, in Lake county.
Rule 42-C.-The transportation, movement, shipment
or possession, within the State of Florida, of living Medi-
terranean fruit flies (Ceratitis capitata Wied), or of any
of the living immature stages of said insect, or of any
fruits, vegetables, soil, containers or materials infested
with or containing the Mediterranean fruit fly in any of
its stages, is hereby prohibited; provided, that this rule
shall not be construed as preventing a duly authorized
agent of the board from taking specimens of such insect,
or of fruit infested therewith, under suitable precautions,
for record, or as preventing the movement by agents of
the Plant Board of infested material for purposes of
destruction or eradication; and provided, further, that
this rule shall not apply to owners of infested groves or
properties by reason of such ownership when such owner
thereof complies with all other rules, regulations and
orders of the State Plant Board with reference to or
applicable to such property.
Rule 42-D.-All fruits, vegetables and other mate-
rials, wherever found in this state, infested with the
Mediterranean fruit fly in any of its stages, shall be
subject to immediate confiscation and destruction by
agents and inspectors of the board or in lieu of destruc-
tion shall be subject to such treatment, at the expense
of the owner or possessor of such infested material, as
in the judgment of the inspector shall render such mate-
rial unlikely to disseminate Mediterranean fruit fly.
Rule 42-E.-The movement or shipment of fruits of
all kinds (such as oranges, grapefruit, apples, pears,
bananas, figs, guavas, peaches, plums, pomegranates,
strawberries, blackberries, avocados, mangoes, papayas,
cherries, fruit of palm trees, etc.), from the area desig-
nated in the rules and public notices of the State Plant
Board as areas in which the Mediterranean fruit fly
(Ceratitis capitata Wied) occurs or which are infested
by said fruit fly, into any part of the State of Florida,
except under permit issued by an inspector of the Plant
Board, is hereby prohibited; provided, that this rule shall
not apply to the movement from such areas of processed
fruits (such as canned fruits, jellies, preserves, juices,


etc.), when such processed fruits have been produced,
prepared, packed and transported in a manner not in
contravention with other rules, regulations and orders
of the State Plant Board; and, provided further, that this
prohibition shall not be construed as applying to ship-
ments destined to points outside of the State of Florida
and being transported under such regulations as may be
promulgated by the Secretary of the United States De-
partment of Agriculture.
Rule 42-F.-The movement or shipment of green
beans, eggplants, peppers, pumpkins, gourds, cucumbers,
squash and cantaloupes out of the areas designated in
the rules and public notices of the board as areas in which
the Mediterranean fruit fly occurs, to other parts of the
State of Florida, except under permit issued by an in-
spector of the Plant Board, is hereby prohibited; pro-
vided, that this rule shall not apply to the movement
from such areas of processed vegetables (such as canned
and evaporated vegetables, etc.), when such processed
vegetables have been produced, prepared, packed and
transported in a manner not in contravention with other
rules, regulations and orders of the State Plant Board;
and provided, further, that this prohibition shall not be
construed as applying to shipments destined to points
outside the State of Florida and being transported un-
der such regulations as may be promulgated by the Sec-
retary of the United States Department of Agriculture.
Rule 42-G.-The movement or shipment of soil or
earth and of all vegetables, trees, shrubs and plants and
of other things or materials, out of the areas designated
in the rules and public notices of the board as areas in
which the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata
Wied) is known to occur, with soil or dirt attached to
the roots thereof or mixed therewith is prohibited.
Rule 42-H.-The movement of fruits, vegetables and
of all other agricultural products from any place where
the Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata Wied) is
known to occur or in which the Mediterranean fruit fly
may hereafter be found, except under permit issued by
a duly qualified agent of the board is hereby prohibited.
Extracts from Section 1, Chapter 12291, Laws of
Florida (Plant Act of 1927): "Places.-Vessels, railroad
cars, automobiles, and other vehicles, buildings, docks,
nurseries, orchards and other premises where plants and
plant products are grown, kept or handled."
Rule 42-I.-Work in properties infested with Medi-
terranean fruit fly shall be carried on by the owner or
his employees under the general supervision of agents of
the Plant Board appointed especially for this purpose.
Said agents shall prescribe such precautions in connec-
tion with the grove operations as will tend to prevent the
spread or dissemination of the Mediterranean fruit fly.
Rule 42-J.-The planting, cultivation or harvesting of
any crop in a grove, nursery or other property which is,
has been or shall become infested with Mediterranean
fruit fly, is hereby prohibited until such time as the Plant
Board may deem such procedure unlikely to spread Medi-
terranean fruit fly.
Rule 42-K.-The pasturing, or allowing to run at large,
of livestock, in any grove or other property which is, has
been, or shall become infested with Mediterranean fruit
fly is hereby prohibited until such time as the board may
deem such procedure unlikely to spread the Mediterra-
nean fruit fly.
Rule 42-L.-The removal of livestock, implements,
equipment, tools and vehicles from any property which
has been or may hereafter be found to be infested with
the Mediterranean fruit fly is prohibited except and as









FLORIDA REVIEW 7


all earth, sand and litter, which may serve as a carrier
of immature stages of the Mediterranean fruit fly, have
been entirely removed therefrom.
Rule 42-M.-All packing houses, canneries, cold
storage plants, warehouses and all other agencies pack-
ing, processing, handling or distributing fruits and vege-
tables, located in an area designated in the rules and
public notices of the board as areas in which the Medi-
terranean fruit fly occurs, shall make such disposition of
all cull fruit and vegetables and plant refuse as shall be
required by the inspector of the board.
All such packing houses, canneries, etc., shall conduct
all operations in such manner as may be required by the
inspector.
Rule 42-N.-All hotel and household and other garbage
and refuse containing fruits or vegetables or fruit or
vegetable remains, located in any area designated in the
rules and public notices of the board as areas in which
the Mediterranean fruit fly is known to occur, shall be
disposed of in such manner as may be required by the
inspector of the board to prevent such material from dis-
seminating the Mediterranean fruit fly.
Rule 81.-(A new rule under the nursery series)-The
removal of any nursery stock with soil about the roots
from any area in the State of Florida declared in the
rules or public notices of the board as an area in which
Mediterranean fruit fly is known to occur is hereby pro-
hibited.


MEDITERRANEAN FRUIT FLY QUARAN-
TINE

United States Department of Agriculture, Office
of the Secretary, Plant Quarantine and
Control Administration

NOTICE OF QUARANTINE NO. 68
(Approved April 25, 1929; Effective May 1, 1929)
I, Arthur M. Hyde, Secretary of Agriculture, have
determined that it is necessary to quarantine the State of
Florida to prevent the spread of the Mediterranean fruit
fly (Ceratitis capitata Wied), a dangerous insect new
to and not heretofore widely prevalent or distributed
within and throughout the United States.
Now, therefore, under authority conferred by Section
8 of the Plant Quarantine Act of August 20, 1912 (37
Stat. 315), as amended by the act of Congress, approved
March 4, 1917 (39 Stat. 1134, 1165), and having duly
given the public hearing required thereby, I do quaran-
tine the said State of Florida, effective on and after May
1, 1929. Hereafter, under the authority of said act of
August 20, 1912, amended as aforesaid, (1) fruits, vege-
tables and garden and orchard products of all kinds,
(2) sand, soil, earth, peat, compost and manure, (3)
railway cars, boats and other vehicles and containers
which have been used in conveying fruits or vegetables,
(4) fruit-packing equipment and all other articles in-
cluding nursery stock which have been associated with
the production of or commerce in fruits or vege-
tables or have been or are contaminated with sand, soil,
earth, peat, compost or manure shall not be shipped,
offered for shipment to a common carrier, received for
transportation or transported by a common carrier, or
carried, transported, moved, or allowed to be moved
from the said quarantined State of Florida into or through
any other State or Territory or District of the United


States in manner or method or under conditions other
than those prescribed in the rules and regulations here-
inafter made and in amendments thereto; provided, that
the restrictions of this quarantine and of the rules and
regulations supplemental thereto may be limited to the
areas in a quarantined state now, or which may hereafter
be, designated as regulated areas, or as infested or pro-
tective zones, when, in the judgment of the Secretary of
Agriculture, such limitation shall be adequate to prevent
the spread of the Mediterranean fruit fly* to other states
and territories, and when the movement of the restricted
articles intrastate from such regulated areas or zones is
so safeguarded as to prevent the spread of the Medi-
terranean fruit fly therefrom to other parts of the quar-
antined state and thence into interstate commerce; pro-
vided further, that the restrictions in the regulations
supplemental to this quarantine applying to the infested
zone shall apply immediately to the infested area desig-
nated in the quarantine promulgated on April 15, 1929,
by the State Plant Board of Florida, and to such addi-
tional infested points as have been determined and are
being controlled by the said State Plant Board until the
State Plant Board shall have designated infested and
protective zones as defined in the regulations supple-
mental hereto.
Done at the City of Washington this 25th day of April,
1929.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States
Department of Agriculture.


ARTHUR M. HYDE,
Secretary of Agriculture.


Rules and Regulations Supplemental to Notice
of Quarantine No. 68
(Approved April 25, 1929; Effective May 1, 1929)
REGULATION 1.-DEFINITIONS
For the purpose of these regulations the following
words, names and terms shall be construed, respectively,
to mean:
(a) Fruit Flies.-The insects known as the Mediter-
ranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata Wied) in any stage of
development.
(b) The terms "Infested," "Infestation," and the like
relate to infestation with the Mediterranean fruit fly.
(c) Quarantined State.-Any state quarantined by
the Secretary of Agriculture to prevent the spread of
the Mediterranean fruit fly.
(d) Infested Zone.-The area included within one mile
of any property on or in which infestation has been de-
termined: Provided, That the State Plant Board of Flor-
ida, with the approval of the United States Department
of Agriculture, may include in such infested zone such
additional area as may be necessary for accomplishing
eradication of this insect.
(e) Protective Zones.-The area included within nine
miles of the outside boundary of any infested zone: Pro-
vided, that the State Plant Board of Florida, with the
approval of the United States Department of Agriculture,
may include in such protective zone such additional area
as may be necessary to effect the eradication of this in-
sect.
(f) Restricted Articles.-Fruits, vegetables, and garden
and orchard products of all kinds; sand, soil, earth, peat,
compost and manure; railway cars, boats and other ve-

The i terstate I ralsportatio, of living Mediterriaan n fruit
flies in any stag" of development and for any purpose is prohibited
under the provisions of the act approved March 3, 1905. (33
Stat. 1269.)


(Seal)











FLRD RVE


hides and containers which have been used in conveying
fruits or vegetables; and fruit packing equipment and all
other articles including nursery stock which have been
associated with the production of or commerce in fruits
or vegetables or have been or are contaminated with
sand, soil, earth, peat, compost or manure.
(g) Host Fruits and Vegetables.-Fruits, vegetables
and garden and orchard products of all kinds susceptible
to infestation by the Mediterranean fruit fly, namely,
(1) All wild and cultivated fruits, except watermelons,
pineapples, cocoanuts and other nuts; and (2) the fol-
lowing kinds of vegetables: Peppers of all kinds, pump-
kins, gourds, squashes, tomatoes, beans of all kinds, egg-
plants; together with any other fruits or vegetables or
other garden or orchard products which may later be
determined as susceptible and of which due notice will
be given.
(h) Host-free Period.-A period of time during which
no host fruits or vegetables in any stage of development
are produced or permitted to exist within any protected
zone except fruits or vegetables of such varieties, and
fruits or vegetables held under such conditions, as are
prescribed in these regulations.
(i) Inspector.-An inspector of the United States De-
partment of Agriculture.

REGULATION 2.-CONDITIONS REQUIRED IN THE
QUARANTINED STATE
The interstate movement of restricted articles from
any part of the State of Florida will be conditioned on
the said State providing for and enforcing the following
eradication and control measures in manner and by
method satisfactory to the United States Department of
Agriculture, namely:
(A) Infested Zones-Eradication Measures.
(1) Upon determination by the State Plant Board of
Florida of a Mediterranean fruit fly infestation, the area
included within one mile of any property on or in which
such infestation has been determined shall be designated
by said Plant Board as an infested zone: Provided, That
the State Plant Board of Florida, with the approval of
the United States Department of Agriculture, may in-
clude in such infested zone such additional area as may
be necessary to effect the eradication of this insect.
(2) Within every infested zone as prescribed above,
all host fruits, wild and cultivated, and all host vege-
tables, shall be destroyed or processed or treated in a
manner satisfactory to the inspector as soon as possible
after the discovery of infestation therein. No host fruits
or vegetables shall thereafter be permitted to develop to
susceptible stages of maturity or to remain within such
zone, nor shall any host vegetables be planted in such
zone, until the State Plant Board, with the approval of
the United States Department of Agriculture, shall de-
termine that all infestation in such zone has been elim-
inated and that the restrictions of this paragraph shall no
longer remain in force with respect thereto.
(3) Such treatment as shall be satisfactory to the in-
spector shall be applied to the soil of premises in the
infested zone and to all railway cars, boats and other
vehicles and containers which have been used in con-
veying fruits or vegetables therefrom, and to all fruit-
packing equipment and all other articles which have been
associated with the production of, or commerce in, such
fruits or vegetables as are contaminated with sand, soil,
earth, peat, compost or manure from the said infested
zone.


(B) Protective Zone-Host-free Period
(1) Immediately upon the designation of an infested
zone, the area included within nine miles of the outside
boundary of said zone shall be designated as a protective
zone; provided, that the State Plant Board of Florida,
with the approval of the United States Department of
Agriculture, may include in such protective zone such
additional area as may be necessary to effect the eradi-
cation of this insect.
(2) A host-free period shall be maintained each year
throughout the protective zones, beginning on May 1
and continuing for six months*, subject to such modifica-
tion as to duration and dates of commencement and
termination as may be authorized by the United States
Department of Agriculture on presentation of evidence
that such modification is necessary or desirable and does
not involve increase of risk of propagating the Medi-
terranean fruit fly.
(3) Prior. to the commencement of such host-free
period each year, all ripe or ripening citrus fruits grow-
ing within the protective zones shall be removed from
the trees for shipment, destruction or processing.
(4) No host vegetables shall be planted or grown
within the protective zones which will mature or reach
a stage of development susceptible to infestation during
the host-free period.
(5) No host fruits or vegetables of any kind shall be
permitted to grow or exist within the protective zones
at any time during the host-free period except: citrus
fruit on the trees in such stages of immaturity that in
the judgment of the inspector it is not susceptible to in-
festation; and host fruits and vegetables in storage or on
retail sale for immediate consumption, stored or main-
tained under such conditions and for such periods of time
as shall be approved by the inspector.
(C) Inspection.-A system of inspection satisfactory
to the United States Department of Agriculture shall be
carried on throughout the year to provide for the effi-
cient enforcement of these regulations and for the
prompt discovery of any infestations which may occur.
(D) Intrastate Movement.-The intrastate movement
of all restricted articles within the quarantined state
shall be brought under such control as shall be satis-
factory to the United States Department of Agriculture.
(E) Control of Production and Distribution Agen-
cies.-All groves, orchards, truck gardens, packing
plants and all other places in which fruits or vegetables
are produced, packed, processed, manufactured or other-
wise utilized or permitted to remain within the quar-
antined state shall be operated and maintained under
the direct control of the State in such a manner that in
the judgment of the inspector fruit flies could not exist
therein or be disseminated therefrom.

REGULATION 3.-RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTER-
STATE MOVEMENT OF CITRUS FRUITS FROM
A QUARANTINED STATE.
Section A.-Control of Movement.
(1) Citrus fruits, except such as have been manu-
factured or processed in such a manner as in the judg-
ment of the inspector to eliminate danger of carrying
the Mediterranean fruit fly, shall not be moved or allowed
to be moved interstate from a quarantined state to or
through any point outside thereof unless a permit shall
have been issued therefore by the United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture.
The host-free period in 1929 is expected to approximate five
months.


FLORIDA


REVIEW









FLORIDA REVIEW 9


(2) Citrus fruit in bulk, including culls and drops in
any manner, shall not be moved or allowed to be moved
interstate from any part of a quarantined state; nor shall
any interstate movement of citrus fruit by mail or by
automobile truck be allowed.
(3) Citrus fruit may be moved under permit from a
quarantined state (except as to fruit produced in an
infested zone), only when packed in standard commer-
cial boxes and when transported in refrigerator or venti-
lated cars or boats equipped for refrigeration, such cars
or boats to be iced or screened in manner satisfactory to
the inspector. This authorization shall apply both to
freight and express movement. Such shipments shall
move only in carlots; provided, that permittees may ship
by express in express cars in less than carlots, citrus
fruits produced in approved groves (see Section B 3 [c]
hereof) when such fruit is packed in standard commer-
cial boxes, each of which has a permit tag issued by the
United States Department of Agriculture securely at-
tached to the outside thereof; provided further, that
whenever such shipment shall pass through any protec-
tive or any infested zone, the car containing such ship-
ment shall be and shall remain securely screened or
closed in a manner satisfactory to the inspector through-
out the entire time such shipment is within such zones.
(4) For the spring shipping season of 1929* citrus
fruits shall not be moved or allowed to be moved inter-
state from any part of a quarantined state after June
15, nor shall any citrus fruits be moved or allowed to
be moved interstate from a protective zone after June 1.
Section B.-Conditions Governing the Issuance of
Permits
(1) Infested Zone.-No permits for the interstate
movement of citrus fruits produced or packed within an
infested zone will be issued.
(2) Protective Zone.-(a) No permits will be issued
for the interstate movement of citrus fruits produced
on premises within any protective zone unless the host-
free period has been maintained on such premises. (See
regulation 2-B.)
(b) Permits may be issued for the interstate move-
ment of citrus fruits from a protective zone only to the
District of Columbia, including Potomac Yards in Vir-
ginia, and to destinations in the States of Maryland and
Pennsylvania and states north and east thereof, includ-
ing shipments via any of such states to foreign coun-
tries. Such shipments shall not be subject to diversion
enroute except to destinations within the territory in-
dicated; provided, that any packing house outside of the
protective zone may be authorized to handle fruit pro-
duced within a protective zone, but in such case such
packing house and its entire output shall thereafter be
subject to the restrictions as to destination indicated in
this paragraph.
(3) Shipments of Citrus Fruits from a Quarantined
State.-Except as restricted in the preceding paragraphs
of this regulation, permits may be issued for the inter-
state movement of citrus fruits from a quarantined state
to points outside thereof upon compliance with the fol-
lowing conditions:
(a) Issuance of permits for interstate movement of
citrus from a quarantined state, exclusive of infested
zones, shall be conditioned on such district or such grove
inspection and such packing house operation as may be
required by the inspector.

Restrictions determined upon for the crop of 1930 and subse-
quent crops will be letter issued.


(b) Packers, shippers, or others intending to move or
allow to be moved citrus fruits shall make application
for a permit to the office of the Plant Quarantine and
Control Administration, Orlando, Florida, as far as possi-
ble in advance of the probable date of shipment. Appli-
cations shall show the nature and quantity of the fruit
it is proposed to move, together with the location at
which it is being or will be packed, the name and address
of the consignor and a list of all premises from which
fruit for packing will be secured, together with their loca-
tions and the names and addresses of the owners.
(c) Each applicant for a permit shall file with his
application a signed statement in which he agrees: to
notify the inspector of all additional premises from
which fruit for packing will be secured; to maintain,
available for examination by the inspector, a complete
list of all consignees, together with the amount and date
of each shipment; not to use nor permit the use of his
permit tags on citrus fruits from any premises until he
has been issued a notice in writing by the inspector that
shipment of fruit from such premises is approved; to dis-
continue packing and shipping fruit from any premises
on notification by the inspector either of the discovery
of an infestation of the Mediterranean fruit fly on such
premises or of failure on the part of the owner or man-
ager of such premises to comply with any other restric-
tions of these regulations.
REGULATION 4.-RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTER-
STATE MOVEMENT OF NON-CITRUS FRUITS
(1) Unrestricted Fruit.-No restrictions are placed on
the interstate movement of watermelons, pineapples,
cocoanuts or other nuts, or of fruits which have been
manufactured or processed in such a manner as in the
judgment of the inspector to eliminate danger of carry-
ing the Mediterranean fruit fly.
(2) Permit Requirements.-Except as provided in
paragraph 1 hereof, non-citrus fruits from a quarantined
state shall not be moved or allowed to be moved inter-
state to or through any point outside thereof, unless a
permit shall have been issued therefore by the United
States Department of Agriculture. Permits may be
issued for such movement upon the receipt of evidence
(a) that the fruit concerned was not produced in an
infested zone, (b) that the premises on which it was
produced were operated in compliance with Federal and
State quarantine regulations, and (c) that the shipment
concerned does not involve risk of spread of infestation.
(3) Prohibited Shipments.-Except as provided in
paragraph 1 hereof, non-citrus fruits, in bulk, shall not
be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from any
part of a quarantined state; nor shall any interstate
movement of such fruit by mail or by automobile truck
be allowed.
(4) Carlots.-Except as provided in paragraph 1
hereof, non-citrus fruits may be moved under permit
from a quarantined state (except as to such fruit pro-
duced in an infested zone), only when packed in standard
commercial boxes and when transported in refrigerator
or ventilated cars or boats equipped for refrigeration,
such cars or boat to be iced or screened in manner satis-
factory to the inspector. This authorization shall apply
both to freight and express movement. Such shipments
shall move only in carlots; provided, that permittees may
ship by express in express cars in less than carlots, non-
citrus fruits produced outside of infested zones when
such fruit is packed in standard commercial boxes, each
of which has a permit tag issued by the United States









10 FLORIDA REVIEW


Department of Agriculture securely attached to the out-
side thereof; provided further, that whenever such ship-
ment shall pass through an infested zone, the car con-
taining such shipment shall be and shall remain securely
screened or closed in a manner satisfactory to the in-
spector throughout the entire time such shipment is
within such zone.
(5) Shipments from a Protective Zone.-Except as
provided in paragraph 1 hereof, non-citrus fruits shall
not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate from a
protective zone to or through any point outside thereof
during the host-free period, and no permits authorizing
the movement from such protective zone of fruits ripen-
ing during such host-free period will be issued.
REGULATION 5.-RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTER-
STATE MOVEMENT OF VEGETABLES
(1) Vegetables Restricted.-Restrictions on the inter-
state movement of vegetables shall until further notice
relate only to those designated as host vegetables;
namely, peppers of all kinds, gourds, squashes, tomatoes,
beans of all kinds, and eggplants. (See Regulation 1.)
(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate move-
ment of host vegetables grown in and moving from any
part of a quarantined state outside of a protective zone,
except that tomatoes shall be shipped green in standard
commercial crates, baskets, or boxes and transported in
refrigerator or ventilated railway cars.
(3) Host vegetables from a protective zone shall not
be moved or allowed to be moved interstate unless a per-
mit shall have been issued therefore by the United States
Department of Agriculture. Permits may be issued for
such movement during other seasons of the year than the
host-free period, on the receipt of evidence, (a) that
the vegetables concerned were produced outside an in-
fested zone, (b) that the premises on which they were
produced were operated in compliance with Federal and
State quarantine regulations, and (c) that the shipment
concerned does not involve risk of spread of infestation.
(4) Host vegetables in bulk from a protective zone
shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate nor
shall any interstate movement of such vegetables from
such zone by mail or by automobile truck be allowed.
(5) Host vegetables from a protective zone may be
moved under permit only when packed in standard com-
mercial containers and when transported in refrigerator
or ventilated cars or boats equipped for refrigeration,
such cars or boats to be iced or screened in manner satis-
factory to the inspector. This authorization shall apply
both to freight and express movement. Such shipments
shall move only in carlots; provided, that permittees may
ship by express in express cars in less than carlots, host
vegetables produced outside of infested zones when such
vegetables are packed in standard commercial boxes, each
of which has a permit tag issued by the United States
Department of Agriculture securely attached to the out-
side thereof.
REGULATION 6.-RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTER-
STATE MOVEMENT OF SAND, SOIL, EARTH,
PEAT, COMPOST AND MANURE.
(1) Soil, earth, compost, and manure of any kind as
to either bulk movement or in connection with other
articles shall not be moved or allowed to be moved inter-
state from an infested or a protective zone to or through
any point outside thereof; provided, that this shall not
apply to Fuller's earth, Kaolin clay, phosphatic sand or
clay, peat, or muck, and similar mined or dredged


products, including sand, when in the judgment of the
inspector such movement does not carry any risk of
spreading the Mediterranean fruit fly.
(2) No restrictions are placed on the interstate move-
ment of sand, soil, earth, peat, compost or manure from
points in a quarantined state outside protected zones.
REGULATION 7.-RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTER-
STATE MOVEMENT OF RAILWAY CARS, BOATS
AND OTHER VEHICLES AND CONTAINERS.
(1) Railway cars, boats, and other vehicles, and con-
tainers which have been used in transporting any article
whose movement is restricted by these regulations within
or from the quarantined state, shall not thereafter be
moved or allowed to be moved interstate until they have
been thoroughly cleaned and, if required by the in-
spector, disinfected, by the destination carrier and/or
the consignee at the point of unloading in manner and
by method prescribed by the Plant Quarantine and Con-
trol Administration.

REGULATION 8.-RESTRICTIONS ON THE INTER-
STATE MOVEMENT OF PACKING EQUIPMENT
AND OTRER CONTAMINATED ARTICLES.
Fruit-packing equipment and articles which have been
associated with the production of or commerce in fruits
and vegetables or are or have been contaminated with
soil, earth, peat, compost or manure, shall not be moved
or allowed to be moved interstate from the quarantined
state to or through any point outside thereof unless a
permit shall have been issued therefore by the United
States Department of Agriculture. Permits may be
issued for such interstate movement upon determination
by the inspector that the said articles have been so
cleaned or treated as to eliminate any danger of their
carrying Mediterranean fruit fly.
REGULATION 9.-NURSERY STOCK.
Nursery stock, including all kinds of plants and plant
roots except portions of plants without roots or soil,
shall not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate
from the quarantined state to or through any point out-
side thereof unless a permit shall have been issued there-
for by the United States Department of Agriculture.
Permits may be issued for such interstate movement
upon determination by the inspector either (a) that the
nursery in question was so situated and so protected as
to eliminate the risk of soil infestation by larvae and
pupae of the Mediterranean fruit fly, or (b) that the
said articles have been so cleaned or treated as to elimi-
nate any danger of their carrying the Mediterranean
fruit fly, or (c) that the said articles have originated
outside any protective zone.
REGULATION 10.-MARKING REQUIREMENTS.
For all shipments in less than carload lots, each box,
crate, or other container of the articles for which permits
are required by these regulations shall be plainly marked
with the name and address of the consignor and shall
bear securely attached to the outside thereof the permit
issued in compliance with these regulations. In the case
of carload lots, no certification will be required of in-
dividual boxes, crates, or other containers, but the per-
mit shall accompany the waybill covering such shipment.
All conductor's manifests, memoranda, or bills of lad-
ing pertaining to such shipments shall be marked with
the number of the permit, and with such instructions
with respect to cleaning of said cars as are given in such
permit.









FLORIDA REVIEW 11


REGULATION 11.-INSPECTION OF RESTRICTED
ARTICLES IN TRANSIT
Any car, vehicle, basket, box, or other container moved
or offered for movement interstate which contains or
may contain articles the movement of which is prohibited
or restricted by these regulations shall be subject to in-
spection by inspectors at any time or place.
REGULATION 12.-CANCELLATION OF PERMITS.
Any permit issued under these regulations may be
withdrawn or cancelled by the inspector and further per-
mits refused, either upon determination of infestation on
the premises on which the articles concerned are or have
been located, or for any violation of these regulations, or
of the permitted's agreement, or whenever in the judg-
ment of the inspector the further use of such permits
might result in the dissemination of the Mediterranean
fruit fly. After any such permit is withdrawn or can-
celled, the further use of any permit tags issued there-
under is prohibited.
REGULATION 13.-SHIPMENTS FOR EXPERIMEN-
TAL OR SCIENTIFIC PURPOSES
Articles subject to restriction in these regulations shall
not be moved or allowed to be moved interstate for ex-
perimental or scientific purposes in any other manner
than under the full restrictions prescribed in these regu-
lations. *
These rules and regulations shall be effective on and
after May 1, 1929.
Done at the City of Washington this 25th day of
April, 1929.
Witness my hand and the seal of the United States
Department of Agriculture.
(Signed) ARTHUR M. HYDE,
(Seal) Secretary of Agriculture.


WEEK'S VEGETABLE SALES TOTAL MORE
THAN $114,000

(Florida Advocate, March 29, 1929)
Hardee county's vegetable growers received more than
$114,000 for their cucumbers, beans, pepper, eggplant,
squash and potatoes during the past week, according to
figures carefully compiled yesterday by the Advocate
from shipping records at the Bowling Green and Wau-
chula markets.
Strawberry growers sent out 100,160 quarts of berries
this week and received $15,024 for their berries during
the six-day period ending Wednesday night, according
to careful estimates.
The Bowling Green market forwarded 28,000 quarts
by express and eleven cars by freight, making a total of
94,000 quarts from that point during the week.
Wauchula sent out 6,160 quarts, bringing the total
from the county to 100,160 and the total to date to
2,103,031 quarts.
The Bowling Green market handled 3,888 crates of
produce by express this week, while forty-eight cars of
cucumbers and other vegetables and one car of beans
left that point by freight.
By express 3,852 crates left Wauchula during the
week, with 15,966 packages going through the auction
market at Wauchula. This makes a total of nearly fifty
cars of vegetables to roll out of Wauchula during the
week, making the total shipments from the county, ex-


*Se t, lso f oot lote lpage sevenl.


elusive of strawberries, about 114 carloads between
March 21st and March 28th.
Prices at the auction mart in Wauchula showed a slight
decline Wednesday, when the following average prices
were paid: Cucumbers, fancys, $2.70; choice, $1.70;
plains, 75c, and culls, 50c a crate; beans, $2.50; squash,
$1.00; pepper, $1.25; potatoes, $1.25; eggplant, $1.00.
On Monday cucumbers averaged $3.10 while Tuesday's
average price was about $3.00. Last Saturday the
average price at the auction mart was $2.90, which is an
average of nearly $3.00 a crate for the week.
It is believed that the total received for produce dur-
ing the week will be much greater than $114,000, as this
is considered a conservative figure, based on average
prices for that shipped by freight and express and does
not include that sold and consumed locally and hauled
away to larger cities of the east and west coasts of the
state. Hucksters patronize the local markets daily and
haul considerable stuff away during each week, of which
there is no record.
The auction block in Wauchula handled 7,449 packages
last week, 3,282 packages Monday, 3,590 Tuesday, 5,223
on Wednesday, counting only that which was sold. A
small amount went through the market but was shipped
by growers and not included in the report.
The Hardee County Growers have shipped out five
cars of cucumbers, which brings the total for the week
to 114 cars, an average of 19 cars a day.

FIRST WATERMELON OF SEASON IS SENT
OUT

(Times-Union, April 5, 1929)
Fort Myers, April 4.-The first watermelon of the sea-
son to be shipped from Florida went north from this
city today, when a thirty-five pound melon was expressed
to Fred M. Davis of Boston, who several weeks ago put
in a bid for early melons, for medical purposes. The first
carload shipment will go to northern markets late this
month and it is expected that this county will ship the
first carload of melons from Florida.

RABBIT SHOW BIG SUCCESS

(Broward County Independent, April 12, 1929)
So successful was the first show of the St. Petersburg
Rabbit Breeders Association Monday at the Green
Lantern Inn that the 30 members have decided to hold
like bench shows every four months each year, accord-
ing to information given Tuesday evening.
Exhibited at the show were the best of the rabbits in
this city, where there are already about 300 or more,
including chinchillas, white Flemish, white New Zealand
and other breeds. Entries were also shown from ad-
joining neighborhoods, the total entries being more than
100.
Many of the St. Petersburg rabbit breeders are mem-
bers not only of the local association but of the West
Coast Association and of the National Association, but
the local organization has not as yet affiliated with the
national body. The growth of the industry is so rapid
here, however, that this will probably be done in the
near future.
The St. Petersburg association made a big showing at
the Largo Fair, where thousands of people raved over
the beautiful specimens exhibited. The local breeders
captured the bulk of the prizes.-St. Petersburg Times.









12 FLORIDA REVIEW


OLD SPANISH TRAIL MARKER DEDICA-
TION IS VIEWED BY THOUSANDS
AT ST. AUGUSTINE

Spanish Consul and Other Officials Participate
in Program

(Times-Union, April 4, 1929)
St. Augustine, April 3.-In view of thousands of per-
sons massed on the Fort San Marco green, the red and
yellow draperies which shielded the Old Spanish Trail
Marker from public gaze were drawn aside at 2 o'clock
this afternoon by Flora Mallon Rawlings, daughter of
Past President O. W. Rawlings of the Exchange Club, and
chairman of the Old Spanish Trail Marker Committee,
and Nan Bassett, daughter of Mayor-Commissioner
George W. Bassett, Jr.
The fifty or sixty persons who were in the motorcade
from San Diago, Cal., reaching here last night, and
representing various states which the Old Spanish Trail
traverses, were in the splendid crowd taking part in the
dedication ceremonies.
Officials Speak
Mayor George W. Bassett, Jr., presided as master of
ceremonies after being introduced by City Manager W.
N. McDonald, president of the St. Augustine Exchange
Club.
Following the welcome speech by Mayor Bassett, T. J.
Brooks, of Tallahassee, director of the bureau of immi-
gration and official representative for the State of
Florida, was introduced, and spoke eloquently on Trail
Blazers, dwelling on the great work of those who have
led the way toward civilization, advancement, progress.
Senior Rafael de Casares of New York, Spanish Consul
General, and named as official representative of the
Spanish government, expressed delight at being able to
be in St. Augustine, at this particular time. He dwelt
on the Spanish atmosphere of the oldest city, the foreign
aspect, the Spanish names of the old narrow streets, and
the colorful setting furnished through the decorations for
the Ponce de Leon celebration.
For San Diego
Elwood T. Bailey, Redpath Chautauqua lecturer, repre-
senting San Diego, gave the dedicatory address. He
brought greetings from the mayor of San Diego to the
city of St. Augustine, and friends of the Old Spanish
Trail, and gave an eloquent message of inspirational
beauty. In closing the San Diego representative said:
"The ambition of my fellow citizens as well as my own,
is not simply a sheet of cement from St. Augustine to
San Diego, but that this Old Spanish Trail may be a
highway of friendship that will help to bind the two
great play-grounds of the United States. There is the
most genuine feeling of friendship on the part of Cali-
fornia toward Florida, and we are delighted to know that
this Old Spanish Trail is going to be developed so that
people of the world can be in the Southland of the coun-
try between the two oceans, making St. Augustine one
capital and San Diego the other."
Harral B. Ayres, managing director of the Old Spanish
Trail, who organized and directed the motorcade across
the continent, was one of the speakers, expressing elo-
quently his pleasure in the culmination of so many years
of work, of activity, high hope and aspiration.
Mrs. F. W. Sorell, national chairman of Old Spanish
Trail Beautification, introduced Mrs. Alex L. Adams,


president of the City Federation of Woman's Clubs of
San Antonio, made brief remarks concerning the romance
and the historic background of the Old Spanish Trail.
After the dedication exercises, the crowd gathered on
the bay front to view the outboard motor boat regatta
sponsored by the St. Augustine Chamber of Commerce
and directed by the Florida Motor Boat Association.
Tonight a banquet was given by the Old Spanish Trail
Committee of the St. Augustine Exchange Club for the
members of the "Motorcade" at the Alcazar hotel at 7
o'clock.


FORMER LA BELLE CITIZEN IS RAISING
NARCISSUS BULBS

(Hendry County News, April 4, 1929)
G. G. Frye, a former well-known LaBelle citizen, who
sold his little farm here on the Caloosahatchee river and
moved to Gainesville about two years ago, was in LaBelle
for a few days this week, the guest of W. Christie.
Since leaving LaBelle, Mr. Frye has become interested
in the propagation of Narcissus bulbs for profit as well
as for pleasure. He stated that from one acre and a
half of land he sold $1,500 worth of bulbs and still
had forty thousand to plant another crop with.
Mr. Frye is raising the Chinese Sacred Lily (Narcissus)
and says it is the most interesting work he ever engaged
in as well as being profitable. He thinks some varieties
of bulbs would do well along the fertile Caloosahatchee
valley, and prophesies that citizens will yet engage in
this work.


DRUG PLANTS GROW WILD IN EVER-
GLADES

(Everglades News, April 5, 1929)
In Bulletin No. 14, entitled, "Some Drug Plants in
Florida," issued from the office of Commissioner of
Agriculture Nathan Mayo recently, mention is made of
drug plants growing in the Everglades. Poke root, which
grows to an enormous size here, is found all over the
district as are black mustard, jimson weed, mandrake,
castor bean, snake root and Cassia Cinnamon.
Spinach growing wild has also been found in the upper
Everglades, but it is not known whether it is really wild
spinach or plants growing from seed scattered by the
hurricane of last year.


ANOTHER INDUSTRY FOR FLORIDA

(Leesburg Commercial, March 30, 1929)
Florida ash and magnolia have been found superior
to any other wood for automobile bodies, President
Joseph Graham and his brother, Robert Graham, of the
Graham-Paige Corporation, told convention of 150 sales
representatives in session at Orlando early this week.
In order to assure supply of wood from these trees
on an economic basis, the Graham-Paige Company has
erected its own lumber plant near Perry and is now
manufacturing a considerable output, the meeting was
informed, by Mr. Graham.
Enterprises of this kind make up the industrial life of
Florida, already, according to Richard H. Edmonds,
editor of the Manufacturers Record, having a production
twice as great in value as that of all its farms and groves.










FLORIDA REVIEW


QUARTER MILLION DOLLARS CAME TO
CITY ON CUKESS"

$1,200 Per Car Received by Growers for Some
200 Carloads

(Leesburg Commercial, March 31, 1929)
Little if any less than a quarter of a million of dollars
was brought into the Leesburg district last week by
movement of the early cucumber crop, approximately
200 carloads having been shipped and an average price
of close to $1,200 a car realized by growers, according
to figures obtained in survey of the principal cucumber
producing centers made Saturday by the local chamber
of commerce.
While still good, prices were materially lower than
for the preceding week. Fancy, or first grade cucum-
bers, comprising about sixty per cent of the output, sold
as high as $1,500 a car. Second grade cukess" account-
ing for another 25 per cent of the production, went for
$1,000 a carload or less. The third grade seldom
brought as much as $500 a car.
String bean shipments were made during the week,
both in carloads and by express, sales having been made
at figures ranging from $2.75 to $3.50 per hamper.
Next week, it is expected, there will be a considerably
more substantial movement. Cabbage volume again
dropped off, less than 50 cars having left the district.
Total dispatches of cabbage for the season to date have
been in the neighborhood of 350 cars, just about one-
eighth of the Florida output. The best available esti-
mates indicate that this crop has been sold for about
$70,000 f. o. b. loading point. Nearly twice that sum
was paid carriers for freight and icing charges.
Watermelons are reported as in a most promising con-
dition. In most fields bloom was in evidence during the
week and on the early vines melons having begun to set.
It is now believed that shipping will begin between April
25th and May 5th, if there are no set-backs to the crop.


FLORIDA'S BUMPER CUCUMBER CROP

(St. Petersburg Independent, March 29, 1929)
The humble and once largely rejected cuke-to use
its short, popular market name-is growing dollar marks
all over south and central Florida. It is fast growing
into one of the state's big money crops. The market
season has just opened, but already hundreds of carloads
of cukes are rolling north. Reports from the big cuke
belts are that a bumper crop will be harvested and that
within a few weeks the profits will total several hundred
thousand dollars.
In the Leesburg territory the cuke business is boom-
ing. Nearly one hundred carloads went out last week,
leaving the growers an average of about $2,000 a car.
Some of the carloads sold for as high as $2,500 and
others brought only $1,500, depending on size and
quality, but the market was brisk. Growers in that ter-
ritory estimate a total profit of at least $200,000, as
three-fourths or more of the crop is yet to be marketed.
In the Winter Garden territory cuke shipments began
last week with two car lots and a large number of
similar shipments scheduled for this week. Prices are
about $4.25 net a crate, making about $2,000 a car lot.
There are more than eight hundred acres of cukes in
that territory and it is estimated that more than 1,400
carloads will be shipped during April and May.


In south Florida territory extending from the Man-
atee section to the Caloosahatchee truck lands the cuke
movement began sooner. Cuke growing has been ex-
tensively developed in and around Lee county and the
yield is always heavy and prices the best, as the cukes
are of fine quality. Early shipments brought better
prices, and it is expected that there will be a drop to
under $4 net. Still, the average price will be high
enough to insure a comfortable profit.
The rise of the cucumber rivals that of the tomato,
which, prior to half a century ago was known as the
"love apple" and was not considered safely edible. Less
than half a century ago the cuke was held to be a doubt-
ful addition to the diet. Doctors warned against it.
Many regarded it as a sure ague starter. It was ad-
mitted to be non-injurious only when pickled sour. But
now, well, apparently people would not want to have to
get along without cukes. When green and fresh they
are accounted a great delicacy and are served in various
ways. Tons and tons of them are sweet-pickled and
spiced, and still other tons are mildly sour-pickled and
spiced. Also, quite a few carloads of cukes are required
by the fair sex for their freckles, sunburns and other
complexional uses.
So far as cucumber production is concerned, Florida
is "sitting pretty."


VALUE FLORIDA FISHERIES SHOWS GOOD
INCREASE

Fish, Oysters and Sponges Worth $42,770,039
Shipped in Past Two Years

(Polk County Record, March 23, 1929)
Tallahassee, Fla., March 23.-(A. P.)-Substantial in-
creases in the output and valuation of fish, oysters and
sponges during 1927 and 1928, compared with the pre-
vious biennium, are reported by T. R. Hodges, State Shell
Fish Commissioner.
During the biennium just ended, fish, oysters and
sponges valued at $42,770,039 were taken from the
waters of the state, or $5,839,720.70 more than in the
previous two years.
During 1927 and 1928, a total of 198,378,378 pounds
of fish, valued at $39,675,675 were handled. This was
an increase over 1925 and 1926 of 25,526,804 pounds,
valued at $5,065,360.80.
A total of 204,011 barrels of oysters were handled in
1927-28, valued at $612,033, which was 23,539 barrels
more than in 1925-26, and an increase in value of
$70,617.
Sponges handled in 1927-28 amounted to 6,830,465,
valued at $2,482,331.07, or 1,102,210 more than in
1925-26, and an increase in value of $703,743.70.
The commissioner listed his balances as follows:
Cash in treasury, $14,999.34; cash in bank, $9,443.33;
balance in fish hatchery fund, $5,320.01; balance in
2-cent planting fund, $285.46; balance in 3-cent sinking
fund, $11,180.80; balance in special shell fish fund for
counties, $83.91; balance in traveling expenses fish
hatchery commission, $772.37, and balance in appropria-
tion, $20,428.87, or a total of $62,544.09.
The total collections of the shell fish department for
the years 1927 and 1928 amounted to $108,773.57.
The number of arrests made for 1927 and 1928 was
303, and of that number there were 293 convictions.


FLORIDA


REVIEW









14 FLORIDA REVIEW


BEAN CROP PROMISES RICH RETURNS

Carload Expected to Roll Forward Tuesday,
and Crop Will Be Bumper One if
Showers Are Forthcoming

(Ft. Meade Leader, April 4, 1929)
The bean patches in the vicinity of Fort Meade promise
to be miniature gold mines for the next two or three
weeks, according to reports of the growers. There is
one great need just now, however, and that is two or
three good showers of rain. Even one good rain this
week would be estimated as worth a thousand dollars or
more to the bean growers alone.
E. W. Plank and N. J. Johnson have fine bean patches,
as well as many others whose names we are not men-
tioning in this article. The above men say they expect
to have 150 bean pickers out in the fields Monday and
that a carload of beans will roll to the markets Tuesday.
Other farm produce is coming in nicely just at this
time and good prices have prevailed. Within a few weeks
roasting ears and watermelons will be added to the list
of farm produce going out, and as these two items are
shipped from here in large quantities it is expected that
the sheckles will be plentiful this summer.

FISHERMEN AND SHRIMPERS MAKE
GOOD CATCHES

(New Smyrna News, March 29, 1929)
With the fishing and shrimping season in full swing,
the weather for the past week calm, all other conditions
nearly perfect, and the fish and prawn plentiful, those
engaged in these occupations and making New Smyrna
their headquarters, are out in the ocean every day and
bringing in good hauls, according to reports from the
dealers.
The largest catch on record thus far of bluefish was
that made by Anchor Damguard, of Coronado Beach,
who brought in 3,780 pounds, after fishing off the banks,
about 17 miles east of here, for three days. With blue-
fish bringing a good price, this netted him a profit of
over $1,000.
George Paine and W. I. Shivers, of New Jersey, who
have spent the season here, have also done well, and
since arriving here in December, Paine has caught over
50,000 pounds of fish, and Shivers more than 43,000
pounds.
Paine established what is believed to be a record for
solo fishing, bringing in 1,013 pounds in one day last
week with no one to help him. The last trip made, Paine
brought in 500 pounds, mostly red snapper, averaging
up to 25 pounds, and Shivers, 520 pounds, mostly
snappers.
Nathan Pearce, who with Damguard, spends from two
to three days at the banks, has brought in some good
catches, averaging several hundred pounds. The re-
mainder of the fishermen usually spend but one day out
and return the same night, and all have averaged from
150 to 800 pounds of bluefish, red snappers, bass and
groupers each day for about a week. The prices for fish
have been good this winter, averaging from 20 to 35 cents
a pound, according to the variety.
Shrimpers Doing Well
The shrimp fishermen have also been doing well the
past few days, with all boats out every day, the bar,
though being risky to cross, not being so dangerous in


calm weather. Sassa Fodale shipped 68 barrels Monday,
77 Tuesday, and indications are that this same average
will hold good for some time yet, unless bad weather
sets in. The shrimp have moved up into these waters
and practically all the vessels are dragging in the vicinity
of the inlet, a short distance from shore.

BIG PHOSPHORIC ACID PLANT GETS SITE
NEAR TAMPA

(Lakeland Ledger and Star-Telegram, April 14, 1929)
Tampa, April 13.-(A. P.)-Plans for the construc-
tion here of a $3,500,000 plant to manufacture phos-
phoric acid were announced today by H. L. Mead, Florida
manager of the American Cyanamid Company, with the
purchase by the company of 268 acres on Hillsborough
bay, seven miles from the city.
The factory will be constructed on filled-in land on the
bayshore, and a turning basin will be built for ships.
Two railroads will install spur tracks to the factory. The
new plant will give employment to more than 200 per-
sons.
The American Cyanamid Company is one of the prin-
cipal miners of pebble phosphate rock in Florida, with
plants at Brewster, Green Bay and Sidney. The com-
pany owns 15,000 acres in Polk county, and will open a
new deposit in the near future. The new plant here will
handle the output of the company's mines. At the pres-
ent the phosphate rock is shipped to other states to be
converted into fertilizer and other chemical products.

SHIPPER PREDICTS GREAT GROWTH IN
BERRY CULTURE

Britt Says Strawberry Acreage Next Year Will
Increase 100 Per Cent

(Winter Garden Journal, April 11, 1929)
"The successful season that we have had in the rais-
ing and shipping of strawberries I feel will mean an in-
crease in the acreage next year of from one hundred to
two hundred per cent," said M. C. Britt in commenting
on the close of the berry season.
The last full car to leave the local field was sold on
the market Monday. The price was fair. There will
be a heavy crop ready for picking next week although
Mr. Britt stated that the heavy shipments from other
centers might mean that berries could not be moved out
at a profit any more this season.
Winter Garden growers have found two successful
years of berry success and feel that the section is in-
deed a good one for the berry culture.

LUMBER BEING TAKEN TO AFRICAN
PORTS

(Pensacola News, April 12, 1929)
A partial cargo of rough and dressed pine lumber is
being taken to West African ports by the Norwegian
steamship Kvornaas, which cleared today for Accra and
Takoradi.
For Accra the steamer loaded 631,000 feet of rough
and 21,000 feet of dressed pine lumber. A total of
174,000 feet of rough pine lumber was loaded for
Takoradi. The vessel also has a part cargo loaded at
Panama City.
Pensacola Lumber and Timber Co. is agent.









FLORIDA REVIEW 15


FIRST CARLOAD TOMATOES MOVED
YESTERDAY

Another Follows Today Tomato Shipping
Season Is On in Earnest

(Palmetto News, April 5, 1929)
The first carload of tomatoes-as the forerunner of a
well balanced, all around good crop-rolled from Pal-
metto yesterday over the Seaboard, it being shipped by
E. C. McLean to the northern markets. This is the
initial car from this county for this season. Mr. McLean
shipped another car today, and will follow with several
more within the next day or so. By week after next, the
spring tomato shipping season will be on in earnest here,
and our packing houses will be beehives of activity
for from four to six weeks. The tomato shipping season
is short, but lively.

CARLOAD OF NATIVE ROCK WILL BE
USED DAILY-40 EMPLOYES

Total Payroll During Summer Months Esti-
mated at $6,000 Weekly

(Palm Beach Post, April 4, 1929)
Another forward step for West Palm Beach was
marked in the city's history Wednesday with the dedica-
tion of an additional industry at the plant of Mizner
Industries, Inc.
Employing 40 persons with a permanent investment of
$40,000 locally in equipment, Mizner Industries, Inc.,
will start supplying the country with various products
obtained from coquina rock. Brought to West Palm
Beach direct from the company's quarry at Key Largo,
in large eight-ton blocks, the solid rock is cut down to
size, planed off if needed, patterned if necessary, in fact,
handled just as similar products would be if made arti-
ficially, and turned out ready for a job.
Walls, terraces, interior decorating work, bathroom
fixtures-the field is large-will be turned out as needed
and the local concern has agreed to handle a carload of
coquina rock a day from the quarry.
Several hundred persons visited the plant Wednesday
afternoon and watched the big saw slowly eating its way
through the huge blocks, cutting them into two-inch
slabs, getting them ready for the huge plane which is
yet to be installed. A 50-horsepower motor drives the
saw blade, while a three-horsepower motor pushes the
saw into the stone.
While the new addition to Mizner Industries, Inc., is in
its infancy, Addison Mizner visions great expansion in
the near future. Total investment in the new project is
now about $75,000, including the cost of equipment and
installation at both the local plant and at the quarry.
The employment of 40 persons will take place in the
next 30 days, as speedily as the full quota of machinery
is installed. The payroll will increase as the plant grows.
Orders are now arriving from all over the country.
Mayor Barclay H. Warburton, of Palm Beach, who made
a short talk to the crowd Wednesday, showed where
Florida rock was being used in the construction of a
California home. Maurice Fatio, Palm Beach architect,
having the designing of a building on the Pacific coast,
has put in his order for rock from Mizner Industries.
H. G. Wagner, superintendent in charge of the new
plant, is a sculptor of no mean ability and an expert in


his line. With Mr. Wagner already on the field, in-
stallation of the machinery is being supervised by W. J.
McGarry, sales manager of the Patch-Wagner Company,
Rutland, Vermont. Mr. McGarry was in West Palm
Beach on a vacation when the machinery arrived, but is
in daily attendance at the new plant and will be until
everything is in ship shape and ready to be turned over
to the owners.
Addition of the new plant raises the investment of
Mizner Inrustries, Inc., in West Palm Beach to approx-
imately a half million dollars. A payroll which will run
around $6,000 weekly is estimated for the summer, and
if orders for the new product increase as is expected,
there will be another expansion in the near future.
It was rather a gala occasion Wednesday. Refresh-
ments were available for all and the full cigar box was
in evidence for the masculine visitors who desired to
smoke.

CLEWISTON COMPANY

(Ft. Myers Press, March 30, 1929)
Clewiston, March 30.-Planting of an additional 1,500
acres of sugar cane in the Bare Beach and Miami Locks
district east of Clewiston was announced here by W. C.
Henson, district manager for the Southern Sugar Com-
pany, who said that the work is in keeping with his com-
pany's expansion program. P. O. J. varieties are being
planted and the matured cane will be ready for grinding
late this fall.
Of the 1,500 acres planted in the two sections there
are 1,000 acres at Bare Beach and 500 acres at Miami
Locks and the work is part of the planting program, com-
pletion of which will mean an almost unbroken sea of
waving sugar cane over a fifty-mile area in the northern
Everglades from Moore Haven to Canal Point.
The operations of the sugar company have brought
steady payrolls to this community on the shore of Lake
Okeechobee, and it was announced by officials of the com-
pany that the weekly payroll for negro field laborers,
exclusive of white foremen and others engaged in the
industry, is in excess of $10,000.


CORRECTION

(Manatee County Publicity Bureau, April 11, 1929)
The letter below explains an error in issue of April 1:
Hon. Nathan Mayo,
Commissioner of Agriculture,
Tallahassee, Florida.
Dear Mr. Mayo:-I do not know your policy for cor-
recting errors, but I wish to call your attention to a
very grave one in the April 1st issue of the Florida
Review.
On page 14 there appears a story taken from the Pal-
metto News, stating that Manatee county has a 35,000
acre tomato crop this year. That article was published
in the News, but Editor Russell meant to say 3,500 in-
stead of 35,000. He corrected his error in the next issue
of the News. Manatee county has only 32,000 acres
under cultivation for all crops, both fruits and vege-
tables.
The Review is a very instructive publication, and I
trust that errors like the above are few and far between.
Yours very truly,
W. E. MANN,
Director of Publicity Bureau.









16 FLORIDA REVIEW


ENGLISH PEAS IN SOLID CAR

(St. Augustine Record, April 2, 1929)
Hastings, Fla., April 2.-The first solid car of Eng-
lish peas ever to be shipped from Hastings has rolled.
The car contained 496 hampers of the finest quality peas,
which were grown on the R. M. Williams farm by Alex
Stephens, well known local negro farmer.
The peas were planted in the same beds with potatoes,
introducing a new system which has never before been
tried in this section. The yield averaged approximately
50 hampers to the acre, according to the first picking of
the ten-acre field. From the appearance of the potato
plants, they show no ill effects from the growing peas
and it is believed that the potatoes in this particular ten-
acre field will turn out a 40 to 45-barrel crop again,
proving the productiveness of the Hastings soil.
It is said that the grower would probably have a net
return of about $1.00 per hamper. The peas were
shipped 23 pounds to the hamper, but had they been
shipped in bushel hampers no doubt they would have
brought better money on the New York market. The
car was handled through Nix Produce Co., and was
shipped to John Nix & Co., of New York.
Mr. Williams has been successful in growing potatoes
here for several years, but is keenly interested in diversi-
fication. According to present plans he expects to follow
his potato crop with a number of acres planted to cotton.
Some Hastings farmers have already experimented with
growing cotton and have proven that it can be success-
fully grown here.

FLORIDA PAPAYAS SEEN IN BROADWAY

(Miami News, April 6, 1929)
Florida papayas and some of their most popular by-
products are making their debut this week before New
York's Broadway through an exhibit in the windows of
the Seaboard Air Line passenger offices, 42nd street
near Broadway. The display was arranged by J. N. Mc-
Bride, general agricultural agent of the railway, and H.
W. Dorn of South Miami.
Whole chemically-preserved and fresh papayas, jellies,
jams and candies are displayed, with literature and
other information regarding the sub-tropical fruit.
When the trains were bringing fans to the Sharkey-
Stribling fight, the Seaboard served papayas compli-
mentary on the dining cars at Miami.

HUNDRED AND TWENTY CARS OF CUKES
ARE SHIPPED FROM WAUCHULA

Fifteen Cars Shipped Wednesday-Rain Badly
Needed

(Hardee County Herald, April 5, 1929)
Wednesday was the largest day of the cuke season
this year when fifteen cars were shipped from the local
station; this included the shipment of the independent
buyers and the Hardee Growers, Inc. The latter packing
house is working full time and with additional growers
signing up daily are expecting to increase their daily
output.
The continued dry weather is affecting the crops and
all growers are needing rain badly; despite this handi-
cap the growers have marketed an enormous amount of
vegetables from the local platform. The majority of the


cukes and beans have gone through the auction block
and the remainder through the Hardee County Growers,
Inc., packing house.
The berry season has ended here; this is due to the
fact that berries are being shipped from other sections
further north.
The information regarding the carload shipments is
gathered from the buyers and packing house, the A. C. L.
refusing to give out any information.
The total cars shipped last week was 40, and from
Thursday, March 28th to April 3rd, inclusive, a total of
120 cars.
The express shipments of the same dates are as follows:
Cukes ...... .................................. ........... .............. 961
B ean s ............................. ...... .............. 1,358
Squash ... .......... ........... .................... .. 438
E ggplant ....... ........... .... ........ 17
P epp ers .. ........... .................................... ..... 17 2
P ota to es ........................................ ............. ...... 1 1 2


3,237
S5,889


Last w eek .......... .. .....


Total shipment ........ ... ................ .... 9,126

RAILROADS ANNOUNCE NEW SHIPPING
PLAN FOR TOURIST AUTOS

(Tampa Tribune, April 2, 1929)
All the railroads in the southeast territory, except the
Seaboard Air Line, put into effect yesterday a system
by which a tourist may send his automobile home by fast
freight at a cost of three extra railroad fares, which
makes it cheaper than by regular freight.
Last year some of the roads figured on a plan by which
a man could take his car on the same train on which he
traveled himself. This, however, was never worked out.
Now the roads, figuring on the business in and out of
Florida, have adopted what they believe to be the next
best thing.
If you are going to Washington, for example, and want
the car moved rapidly you can buy five railroad tickets
and use two of them for your wife and yourself. But
you can't use the other three tickets for members of the
family. The three extra tickets are required to pay for
transportation of the car.
No schedules have been announced beyond the state-
ment that cars shipped in this way from Jacksonville
will be delivered in Washington or Cincinnati the third
morning. But cars can be shipped ahead. Most tourists
coming to Florida bring their cars, whether they travel
in them or by train. Now the roads are fixing it so
that they won't have to drive home.

73 HOGS, WEIGHING 15,000 POUNDS,
SHIPPED AT LARGO

(Tampa Tribune, April 6, 1929)
Largo, April 5.-(Special)-Fifteen thousand pounds
of pork on the hoof, 73 big Hampshires, from the Ulmer-
ton stock farm, were loaded at Largo this week by J. S.
Means, of Alachua county, who purchased them for
shipment to northern markets. A feature of the loading
was the icing of the car, 100-pound cakes being laid down
the center of the sanded car, to the evident satisfaction
of its occupants.
The Olds dairy farm shipped three carloads of cattle
to Gainesville last week.




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