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Group Title: Florida review (Tallahassee, FL)
Title: Florida review
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00049005/00026
 Material Information
Title: Florida review
Physical Description: 5 v. : ill. ; 31 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Bureau of Immigration
Publisher: Bureau of Immigration, Dept. of Agriculture
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: 1926-1930
Frequency: semimonthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Industries -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (June 7, 1926)-v. 5, no. 9 (Oct. 20, 1930).
Funding: Florida Historical Agriculture and Rural Life
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00049005
Volume ID: VID00026
Source Institution: Marston Science Library, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Holding Location: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Engineering and Industrial Experiment Station; Institute for Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS), University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001744570
oclc - 01279992
notis - AJF7332
lccn - sn 00229569

Table of Contents
    State meeting Florida club girls
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Full Text








Jloriba


MONTHLY BY


BUREAU OF IMMIGRATION, DEPAKRTMEIN I U ALKICUL IUK-
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA

Vol. 2 June 20, 1927 No. 2

Table of Contents
Page Page
State Meeting Florida Club Girls (Editorial)..................... 1 Jefferson County to Show Cattle............................... ...... 9
Tarpon and Good W ill ........... .... ... 2 Beef Outranks Pork in Consumption.................... ......... 9
Prolong Your Pension.................... ...... ................ .. 2 Blueberries Are Moving to Market-.....-........... .-.. 10
Tallahassee Bonds Sold Above Par.................... .. 2 Blueberry Grove Beautiful Sight ................................. .. ....... 10
Florida's Bull Is in Registry of Merit .......... ..... .... 2 Excelsior Plum Brings Advance Orders......................... 10
Florida's Distinction ........................ 3 Celery Crop Statistics.............. ... ..... 10
Train Measure .......... ......... ...... .. ..... 3 16,000 Cases Florida Grapefruit Shipped California..... 10
Incoming Tourist Travel Increasing.......... .... 3 Guava Opens New Industry........................... 11
State Shipping Passes Billion -... ...... ........... ........ 4 Citrus Unloadings from Florida and California........... 11
Venice Sanitarium for 1,000 Patients..... ........ 4 Florida State Farm at Ralford ................... ........ 12
Ships M ilk to M iam i..... ......... ............... ................ .. .......... 4 Celery O utput B reaks Record........................... ... ....... 1
Statement Inspection Division............ .. ................. 4 Juicy Florida Cantaloupe Comes Into Market........................ 12
Statement of State Agricultural Departm ent............ 5 W white Potato Statistics.................................................................................. 13
Palm Beach County Dairy Farm s ................... 6 W term elons ................... ........................ ........................... ................ 13
Past, Present and Future of Dairying in Florida ......... 6 Florida Watermelons Bring $1,000 Per Car.......................... 13
W world's Champion Egg Layer... .......... .... 6 Crop Figures Break Record......................... ................................... 14
Lloyd Lines Survey Port for Contact.......... ........ .... 7 Easter Lily Is Profitable Florida Crop ................... .............. 14
Cuba Is Suggested as Florida Market__......................... 7 Yachtsman Here for Sea Fishing ................... ................ .. 14
Iron W ork Is Industry Here .... ...... ............... ...... .. 7 Bird Roosts Profitable Business ............. ............................... 15
Rhode Island Red Hen Makes Record......... .... -.... 8 An Industrial Lesson ............................ 15
Canadians World's Largest Consumers of Eggs............... 8 Trade Board to Get Local Data........................................... 15
Money Spent on Luxuries ....... ..... .. .... .... ........... .. 8 Too Much Invested for Florida to Lag .................................. .. 15
W ool Growers to Hold Meeting.......... ... 8 Higher Prices for Florida Bonds............................................... 16
W ool Growers Make Blankets.................................... ..... ...... 9 Planting Trees on Scenic Highway..... ...... ................................... 16
Trenton Hog Sales Show Big Increase ......... ..... ... ... 9 Great Increase in Fruit Consumption ...... ................ ............ 16



STATE MEETING FLORIDA CLUB GIRLS


ORE than four hundred and fifty Club
Girls representing thirty-one of our
Florida counties have been holding their
Annual Short Course at the Woman's
State College in Tallahassee. This gath-
ering was made notable, not only by its large at-
tendance, but also by the scope of its activities and
the value of its program. Many visitors from Tal-
lahassee and other points were privileged to look in
on the workings of this fine gathering of Florida
girls, and no doubt received from it an inspiring
amount of information. Courses were given by
competent instructors in the following subjects:
Home Improvement, Dressmaking, Nutrition, Care
of the Sick, Upholstering, Basketmaking, Salads,
Gardening, Food Conservation and Millinery.
Very few of us are aware of the size of Club Work
for boys and girls carried on in the United States.
Under the personal supervision of thousands of
County Agricultural Agents and Home Demonstra-
tion Agents, more than six hundred thousand boys
and girls between the ages of ten and eighteen are
enrolled as club members throughout the nation. In
Florida alone we have more than three thousand
boys and more than eight thousand girls who are
receiving active training in this work. Women
Home Demonstration Agents are employed in prac-
tically half of our counties, while more than three-
fourths of our counties have men Demonstration
Agents. Almost one-tenth of the boys and girls on
the farms of Florida are being trained in personal
efficiency, better farm methods, the fine art of


home-making and the qualities of good citizenship
by their club work.
The first Florida State Short Course -for Club
Girls was held in 1912. Club work among girls at
that time was confined to eleven counties with an
aggregate club membership of only five hundred.
The first meeting was a very modest beginning and
was attended by only one girl from each of the
eleven counties participating. These counties were
Alachua, Bradford, Columbia, Clay, Escambia, Hills-
borough, Holmes, Leon, Madison, Pasco and Walton.
Judging by the progress of the past, we feel safe
in venturing the prediction that it will not be many
years until the women of every county will have
the advantages and opportunities afforded by this
work.
The boys' and girls' club work of the state has a
most direct bearing upon our rural life. It is doing
a work which has never and probably can never be
done by our public schools. It is carrying, in a very
definite way, to farm boys and girls instruction
which will make them master many of the difficul-
ties facing country people. This work registers ac-
curately the development of our farm homes and
communities. In a larger sense, it may be said to
be the timekeeper of our social and economic prog-
ress on the farm. It affords opportunity for every
country boy and girl, not only to learn the lessons
which will make them better farmers and better
home keepers, but will also, by reason of its broad-
ening of their activities, develop their powers for
community leadership. When we consider how the


PUBLISHED SEMI-









2 Florida Review


club boy, by applying improved methods, almost
invariably obtains better crop and live stock results
than his father or his neighbors, and when we re-
alize that the girl, who has special training in the
economics of the rural home, is usually able to excel
her mother in the art and science of home making,
we can begin to see and appreciate the worth-while-
ness of club work among farm boys and girls.
The practical value of such training can hardly be
overstated. The cultural value is just as high. Ef-
ficiency, thrift, industry, personal initiative, head-
work, team-work, individual and community pride,
love of home, a healthy desire for progress-these
are some of the habits, virtues and practices ab-
sorbed by our boys and girls in their club work.
May we not indulge the hope that they will, in later
life, justify our faith in them and their present
training by making citizens high in the qualities
that shall add strength, stability and righteousness
to their day and generation.
Florida should have an Agricultural Demonstra-
tion Agent and a Home Demonstration Agent in
every one of its sixty-seven counties. It is idle for
us to hope for the development of our agriculture
in a permanent way unless we plan and work for
the individual and collective training needed by
every farm boy and girl. We had just as well
realize once and for all that if we solve the problem
of country life we must contribute to the efficiency
of country people. Unless the boys and girls of
Florida are trained to master the difficulties that
face them on the farm we need not have much faith
in the future progress of our rural districts.

TARPON AND GOOD WILL

(Fort Myers Press)
More than forty specimens of tarpon are soon to be
mounted and shipped to their northern owners by Ike
Shaw, Fort Myers taxidermist, according to a news story
in yesterday's Press. Many of these fish are going to
nationally prominent business men, who found the thrill
of their life in the waters surrounding Fort Myers when
they pulled "the big one" to gaff. The owners of these
mounted Silver Kings are proud of them. To success-
fully land a good sized tarpon is no mean accomplish-
ment among fishermen. Ike Shaw's handiwork will
grace the wall of many offices, palatial apartments and
residences throughout the nation and on each will be
a little tag marking the specimen as from his master
hand at "Fort Myers, Florida."
A mounted specimen as large as a tarpon is sure to
attract attention, especially in the North, where fish are
more modest in their dimensions. In telling of how it
was caught, the enthusiastic fisherman cannot help but
advertise Fort Myers. He will describe its location as
to river and gulf, he will tell of its ideal climate and the
ease by which the city may be reached by auto, rail or
boat. He will tell all these things in his fish story and
they will register as facts on the minds of his hearers
far more than a realty salesman's outburst or a de-
scriptive catalogue.
Every specimen mounted by Ike Shaw and sent to its
northern owner may be considered a perennial ambassa-
dor for Fort Myers-ever inspiring the retelling of what
advantages Lee county holds for the sportsmen, home-
seeker, farmer and winter visitors.


"PROLONG YOUR PENSION"

(Polk County Record)
The May number of the Locomotive Engineer's Jour-
nal, official organ of the International Brotherhood of
Locomotive Engineers, contains an article on Florida,
written by Mr. Albert F. Coyle, associate editor of the
Journal, who will be remembered as having been the
guest of honor and principal speaker at a Kiwanis club
meeting in Bartow last January.
The article appeared under the caption, "Prolong
Your Pension," and is calculated to impress the members
of the International Brotherhood of Locomotive Engi-
neers, who are readers of the Locomotive Engineer's
Journal, and that means all of them, how they may draw
preferred dividends by means of prolonging life through

residence in Florida, particularly at Venice, where the
Brotherhood is building a great city and establishing a
great agricultural colony which will be populated by
engineers and their descendants in years to come.
The article must be read to be appreciated and should
be read by everyone interested in the future of Florida.
Bartow has an unusual interest in it for the reason that
Mr. Coyle, in speaking of the climate of Florida and the
desirablity of the state as a place for all the year
around residence, quotes liberally from the little pamph-
let prepared by Secretary Clements of the Bartow cham-
ber of commerce, calculated to prove that Florida is a
summer as well as a winter state.

SALE OF $275,000 OF CAPITAL CITY COLLAT-
ERAL BRINGS $10,422.50 ABOVE PAR

Tallahassee Five and a Half Per Cent Bonds Sold Away
Above Par-Issue Goes to Jacksonville and
Orlando Bidders

(Tallahassee Democrat)
The issue was for $275,000, and the amount paid for
the bonds was $285,4"22.50, a premium of $10,422.50, or
103.79 per cent.
The award went to Wright Warlow & Company, of
Orlando, in co-operation with Aldridge & Company, of
the Florida National Bank of Jacksonville. Another
Jacksonville Bank bid $1.02 for the entire issue.
This is the first time within a number of months that
any Florida bonds have sold above par. It speaks vol-
umes for the solidity of Tallahassee property, and for
the capable management of the city government.

FLORIDA'S BULL IS IN REGISTER OF MERIT

(Times-Union)
Gainesville, May 29.-Florida's Majesty, senior herd
bull at the head of the experiment station Jersey herd,
is now a Register of Merit bull. Three of his daughters
on official tests have made the Register of Merit, en-
titling the bull to registry and showing the producing
power of his offspring.
Florida's Majesty was donated to the experiment sta-
tion in the spring of 1917 by Edmund Butler of Mt.
Kisco, N. Y., then a well-known breeder and importer
of Jersey cattle. Florida's Majesty was imported in dam
from the Island of Jersey in August, 1916, by Mr. Butler.
He traces back to high producing blood lines on both
sides of his ancestry.









Florida Review 3


ftoriba 3ebiedu

Published Semi-Monthly by
Bureau of Immigration, Department of Agriculture
Tallahassee, Florida

Nathan Mayo...........................Commissioner of Agriculture
T. J. Brooks..................Director Bureau of Immigration
Phil S. Taylor.............. ............................. Advertising Editor
Entered as second-class matter, June 25, 1926, at the Post Office
at Tallahassee, Fla., under the Act of June 6, 1920.
Will be mailed free to anyone upon request.
Vol. 2 June 20, 1927 No. 2


FLORIDA'S DISTINCTION

(Davenport Times)
There are certain fundamental reasons why Florida's
future prosperity is assured. There are reasons as solid
as the rock of Gibraltar. The first reason is her mon-
opoly of geographical location. Patrick Henry said,
"I have no way of judging the future but by the past."
We find Italy the best analogy to compare with Florida.
Extending down into the warm waters of the Mediter-
ranean Sea, her winter climate more nearly approaches
Florida's than any other accessible region of the world.
For nearly two thousand years, Italy has been the winter
play-ground of Europe. Twice the size of Florida, she
supports a population of forty million people and over
two million winter tourists.
From this analogy of Italy and her history we may
read the future of our own Florida. Turn to a map of
the United States for the second reason. Observe Flor-
ida, the waters of the Gulf of Mexico and the South At-
lantic where the Gulf Stream flows and will continue to
flow. Observe her location with reference to the states
east of the Mississippi. Lying almost directly south of
Cleveland, Ohio, she resembles the handle of a great fan,
spread out from Boston on the East to the twin cities of
Minneapolis and St. Paul on the West, less than two
days' journey by rail. All these wealthy, populous states
are Florida's back country. Here dwell eighty millions
of people, owning three-fourths of the wealth of the
United States. Ten percent of these people are finan-
cially able to gratify their desires for travel and as they
learn of Florida's wonderful climate and charm of
scenery they will more and more plan to make this
state their permanent home for their declining years, or
will make it a refuge from the cold and fierce blizzards
of winter. Astute business men have made provision to
meet this demand for a home and have created thousands
of hotels and apartment houses to care for the winter
population which spends a billion dollars annually, in
this wonderful state.

TRAIN MEASURE

(Tampa Times)
Florida is such a different state that different measure
has to be used in ascertaining and stating what she is
doing along agricultural lines from that commonly
used. In other places the old-time pound and bushel
measures suffice for statements relative to the yields of
the fields, so we hear of so many tons of hay and so
many bushels of corn, and the like. In Florida tons and


bushels are not bothered with. It would take too much
time to compute yields that way. So something else had
to be evolved. It is train measure.
This line of thought has been provoked by the state-
ment in the Florida Advocate that "Wauchula shipped
1,066 solid carloads of fruits and vegetables to northern
markets during the past six months. Over 35 trains of
30 cars each."
Wauchula is one shipping point in Hardee county, of
which it is the county seat. It is the principal one, cer-
tainly. Still, if like figures were in hand from all Hardee
county shipping points it is assured that the number of
30-car trains used in transporting that county's soil
products would be increased.
An impressive thing in this connection is that all that
stuff was shipped "during the past six months," reckon-
ing from last week. "During the past six months," those
men who grow things out of the ground most everywhere
except in Florida have been indoors by fires, trying to
keep warm and waiting the coming of spring, when
frost and ice and snow would disappear and the acres
they were to cultivate might have thawed out sufficiently
to be plowable.
Take this in conjunction with the cold and accurate
figures furnished by Doctor Harper, from the yearbook of
the United States Department of Agriculture, showing
that Florida dirt-tillers receive from 10 to 200 per cent
more for their products than do growers of the entire
United States for similar products and it can be easily
seen what an advantage Florida has as an agricultural
state.
When it comes to not trading one county in any state
for a whole state one county of which ships "35 trains
of 30 cars each" of soil products within six months, as
did Hardee county, Florida, the man who wouldn't do so
-oh, well, what's the use? Wasn't the weather delight-
ful when you got up and got out early yesterday morn-
ing?
It is to be said, though, that Hardee county is not the
Florida county that sends the most car and train loads
of soil-produced stuff to market annually.


INCOMING TOURIST TRAVEL INCREASING,
SAYS ROAD EXPERT

(Times-Union)
The popular conception that everyone leaves Florida
in the spring and no one comes, is erroneous according to
Mrs. Ada Shearer, road expert of the Jacksonville Motor
Slub, who announced yesterday that an average of thirty
tourists, southward bound, called in at the motor club
headquarters for information daily.
"It is true that there is a northward exodus at this
time of the year," Mrs. Shearer said, "but the number
leaving the city is not nearly as large as rumor would
have it. While we have approximately 100 tourists
leaving Florida daily we also have thirty coming in each
day, so there is some profit as well as loss."
According to the records kept at the motor club, tour-
ist travel into the State is twice as heavy this spring as it
was last. About twenty-five inquiries by letter are re-
ceived daily from people of the North who contemplate
a summer vacation in the State, asking for latest road
reports, Mrs. Shearer said.









4 Florida Review


STATE SHIPPING PASSES BILLION

15,421,949 Tons of Commodities Carried to Forty-five
Florida Ports

(St. Petersburg Times)
A total of 15,421,949 tons of commodities valued at
$1,066,723,815 were carried on the 45 ports, rivers,
canals, bays, and other waterways of Florida, recognized
as potential transportation factors by the federal gov-
ernment, according to a report of the water-borne com-
merce of the State just issued by the State Chamber of
Commerce, for the year 1926.
The amazing growth of the water-borne tonnage of the
"long wharf of Florida" is probably one of the very
finest demonstrations of the state's stability in real estate
values, in the interest of the financial world which is
underwriting Florida bond issues and in the unrivaled
increase in agricultural and industrial wealth. The total
tonnage of foreign and domestic commerce for Florida
ports, canals and rivers as shown in this first compre-
hensive report is so big that the figures will surprise
even the most optimistic Floridian.
For the year 1916 the total tonnage was 7,863,973
tons, valued at $242,205; for 1924, 11,874,934 tons,
valued at $824,609,760, were handled, so that the in-
crease for 1926 over 1916 was 340.1 per cent, while the
increase for 1926 over 1924 was 29.4 per cent. Such a
record, made on the diversity of products such as are in-
cluded in these water-borne products and imports, prob-
ably never before was equaled. Other parts of the world,
discovery of oil, or intensive development of coal or
other heavy product, perhaps equalled or excelled such
an increase.
For 1926 the foreign imports were 1,944,158 tons,
valued at $72,688,914; the foreign exports were 1,823,-
415 tons, valued at $57,527,251, a total foreign com-
merce of Florida reaching 3,767,574 tons, valued at
$130,216,192.
People who ask: "Why the ports of Florida, and why
develop port cities in Florida?" have their answer in
these figures.
Even more impressive are the figures for the coastwise
commerce. The total receipts, coastwise, were 4,224,002
tons, valued at $244,541,586; total shipments coastwise
were 2,284,213 tons, valued at $102,959,111, showing a
total coastwise commerce of 6,508,215 tons, valued at
$347,503,697.

ALBEE TO ESTABLISH VENICE SANITARIUM
FOR 1,000 PATIENTS

Engineers Sponsor Institution to Be Open Next Winter

(Tampa Tribune)
Venice, April 25.-(Tribune News Service.)-An-
nouncement was made today through the Venice Cham-
ber of Commerce that work will be begun here by July 1
on a sanitarium with an ultimate capacity of 1,000
patients and with Dr. Fred H. Albee, world famous bone
surgeon, as the directing head.
The institution will embody all of the best features of
similar sanitariums in the world, drawing especially for
some of its methods on certain Swiss institutions. In
addition, Dr. Albee will establish a surgical clinic and do
most of his operating during the winter in Venice.
The consultant staff of the Albee sanitarium will be
drawn from a wide range of localities and will include
specialists of international reputation.


Hotel to Be Used
The plan of the sanitarium calls for the use of the
Villa Nokomis on Venice Bay as a nucleus. Buildings
of the most modern type for the purpose will be added.
The sanitarium is expected to be ready for patients at
least by December. The project is being supported
jointly by the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and
Dr. Albee.
Special stress will be laid on heliotherapy and for this
purpose the advantages of the location of the Albee sani-
tarium will be unparalleled. The roofs of the buildings
will be designed specially for sun ray treatments.
In diet, full advantage is to be taken of the availabili-
ty of fresh vegetables the year round and of citrus fruits.
The Albee institution will invite patients suffering
from overwork, nervous exhaustion and allied ailments.
No contagious or infectious cases will be accepted.
Invented Surgical Tools
Dr. Albee is known throughout the world as the in-
ventor of machine tools which have been used all over
the world for 15 years in reconstruction surgery.
Dr. Albee has lectured on his surgicval specialty in
countries of Europe for many years and will leave New
York for Paris July 2 to lecture before the International
Clinic, associated with the University of Paris. In Octo-
ber he will go to Rumania to demonstrate the use of the
devices he employs in reconstruction surgery.
H. S. Patterson, associated with Walker and Gillette,
architects, of New York, will visit the best sanitariums
in the country to get ideas for the Albee institution.

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Inspection Division
Statement showing transfer of funds from "General
Inspection Fund" to "State Highway Fund" and "Gen-
eral Revenue Fund" during January 1926 and 1927, as
prescribed by Chapter 10149, Acts of 1925.
To State Highway Fund
Unexpended balance from gaso-
line tax, 1925 ........... $21'0,842.46
Unexpended balance from gaso-
line tax, 1926 ............ 298,688.75

Total transfers for 1925-6 .... $509,531.21
To General Revenue Fund
Unexpended balance from
feed and fertilizer tax, 1925 $ 67,202.37
Unexpended balance from feed
and fertilizer tax, 1926 149,344.38

Total transfers, 1925-6 .....$216,546.75
Receipts feed and fertilizer
tax prior to operation Chap-
ter 10149 ............... $110,227.32 $326,774.07

Total net receipts for 1925-6.. $836,305.28


SHIPS MILK TO MIAMI

(Times-Union)
The town of Okeechobee has shipped 2,000 gallons of
milk to Miami during the past week from new dairies lo-
cated in that section. Over 500 dozen eggs were shipped
to market, besides a considerable quantity of poultry, says
the Okeechobee News, which adds that over 1,000 hampers
of beans went out from that city by express during the
(Continued on page six)









Florida Review 5





RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOR THE
YEARS 1925-1926
Inspection Division


Sale Fertilizer Stamps ..................... 1925
Sale Feed Stamps ......................... 1925
Sale C. S. M. Stamps .....................1925
Sale Citrus Fruit Stamps .................. .1925

Total for 1925 ............................
Sale Fertilizer Stamps .................... .1926
Sale Feed Stamps ........................1926
Sale C. S. M. Stamps ......................1926
Sale Citrus Fruit Stamps ................... 1926

Total for 1926 ...........................
Oil tax collected ..........................1925
Oil tax collected ..........................1926

Total oil tax, 1925-26 ......................
Total collections, 1925-6 ........................
Total operating expenses, both years ..............
Net Balance Inspection Division .................


$ 88,446.80
58,577.03
1,219.00
37,270.20


$ 98,892.58
66,689.97
727.50
35,413.41


$285,150.61
399,820.67


$ 185,513.03






$ 201,723.46




$ 684,971.28

$ 235,902.49
836,305.28

$1,072,207.77


$1,072,207.77




$1,072,207.77


Field Note division
Rece ipts.

Receipts January 1, 1925, to January 1, 1926 ..................... $ 3,139.82
Receipts January 1, 1926, to January 1, 1927 ................. .......... 2,878.00


Total Receipts, January 1, 1925, to January 1, 1927 .............


$ 6,017.82


Land Division
Receipts

Receipts January 1, 1925, to January 1, 1926 ....................... $ 1,288.25
Receipts January 1, 1926, to January 1, 1927 .......... .... ....... 1,103.00


Division of Agriculture and Immigration
Receipts

Receipts for sale of maps, 1925-26. ................................. $
Receipts for bird permits, 1925-20 ................................


$ 2,391.25


215.00
37.00


$ 252.00


From
From
From
From
From


Total Receipts Itemized
Inspection Division ......... .$1,072,207.77
Field Note Division ......... 6,017.82
Land Division ............. 2,391.25
sale of maps ............... 215.00
bird permits ............... 37.00


Total receipts from all sources ....$1,080,868.84
Net receipts-all divisions, 1925-26 ..$486,380.11
Included in the item of expenses for the "In-
spection Division" is the sum of $98,370.79, which
is the total deficit occasioned by the enforcement
of the Citrus Fruit Law during the years 1925 and
1926. Had the inspection tax of 1% cents per


Total Expenses Itemized
*Expense Inspection Division ....... $235,902.49
Expense Agricultural Division ....... 205,370.00
Expense Bureau of Immigration ..... 50,000.00
Expense Chemical Division ......... 40,466.24
Expense Marketing Bureau ......... 62,750.00

Total expense-all divisions, 1925-26 $594,488.73

box on citrus fruit been sufficiently large to cover
the inspection service, which is made mandatory
under the law, the net balance shown above would
have been nearly ONE HUNDRED THOUSAND
DOLLARS GREATER, or $584,750.90.


I I









6 Florida Review


PALM BEACH COUNTY DAIRY FARMS HEAVY
PRODUCERS

Report Shows Favorable Conditions for Dairies in This
County-Boynton District Largest Field
at Present

(Tropical Sun)
Palm Beach County has a daily production of more than
37 barrels a day. No, this is not an oil story. If it were,
37 barrels of daily production would not be considered
very much. In this instance, the barrels are quite valuable.
This is the milk production each day for Palm Beach
County.
Figures compiled by the county agent's office covering
21 of the 27 dairies show that 2,302 gallons of milk are
produced each day. One thousand one hundred thirty-
three cows are being milked. At the 21 dairies there are
1,721 cows. This is not inclusive of the Loxahatchee
Farms, where 84 of the 110 cows are being milked.
Dairy interests of the county are largely centered back
of Boynton, where there are a number of farms that are
devoted exclusively to the industry. Fifteen of the dairies
that are listed with the county farm agent's office are lo-
cated in the Boynton district.
Lake Wprth is next with four dairies, while Kelsey City,
Jupiter and Delray each have one. There may be others,
but they are not in the list covered by the county agent's
statistics.
Palm Beach County Dairy Report
No. No. Gallons
Cows Milking Produced
S. Stevens, Boynton ............................ 42 33 53
Mr. Snee, Boynton .............................. 55 49 100
Gus Hoefs, Delray ............................... 64 36 65
D. D. Lee, Boynton ............................ 125 80 160
A. E. Rousseau, Boynton .................. 50 32 65
Mr. Funk, Boynton .............................. 59 45 80
O. F. Knuth, Boynton .......................... 92 76 190
C. F. Knuth, Boynton .........-..-............. 56 46 120
Mr. Garrett, Boynton .......................... 70 21 38
Mr. Forrey, Boynton ....:...................... 40 32 70
Watson Dairy Co., Boynton.............. 139 90 165
C. C. Crumbliss, Boynton ................. 44 42 70
Mr. Muggleston, Boynton .................. 63 44 70
M r. Hills, Boynton ................................ 60 37 80
G. Fedeli, Boynton ............................... 60 37 80
J. E. Redifer, Lake Worth .---................ 27 22 65
Register & Owens, Lake Worth........ 80 31 76
O. B. Bevins .................. ............... ...... 9 8 15
H. S. Pennock, Jupiter ....................... 115 85 175
M. A. Weaver, Boynton ...................... 300 185 350
H. Kirk, Lake W orth .......................... 39 32 75
G. F. Johnson, Kelsey City................ 121 60 120
K. L. Hifner, Lake Worth ................. 11 10 20

SHIPS MILK TO MIAMI

(Continued from page four)
week and over 100 beeves were slaughtered for Palm
Beach and Miami markets. This shows that the farmers
in that section are enjoying prosperity and are finding a
ready market near home for their products. On the other
hand, fifteen carloads of lumber went out from Okeecho-
bee. Total shipments of vegetables from all communities
on the shores of Lake Okeechobee were in excess of 200
cars. Speaking of the fish industry, the News says over


800 barrels went out from that section in one week, valued
at $18 per barrel. According to Dr. Samuel Shepherd,
county agent, the number of farmers in Okeechobee County
has increased over 300 per cent in fifteen months, while
acreage under cultivation has increased over 400 per cent
in the past six months. That section needs more farmers
and newcomers are always welcomed. No better land can
be found in the world and ideal climatic conditions make
farming profitable twelve months in the year.

PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE OF DAIRYING
IN SUNSHINE STATE

(By John M. Scott, in Plant City Courier)
There is little to say about the past in the dairy business
of Florida. Ten years ago there were but few real good
dairy herds in the state. There was no surplus of milk
or cream in any of the Florida markets. The question
then was: How and where can good dairy cows be had?
It was not possible to ship in cows from above the quar-
antine line, as none of the state was tick-free.
Today it is different. Many changes have taken place
that ten years ago did not seem possible in so short a time.
Several counties are now tick-free. As a result, there is
a very marked difference in the number of good dairy cows
now In the state, and there is also a very marked increase
in the production of these cows, as compared with former
years. This increased production has come about in two
ways. In many cases better cows are now kept. Better
methods of feeding and caring for the herd have been put
into practice. These two improvements have increased
the milk production in Florida very materially.
At the present time we have production records on 172
purebred dairy cows in the state. In this list are included
Jersey, Guernsey, Ayrshire and Dutch Belted cows. These
records show that the production per cow varies from
4,564 pounds of milk (530 gallons) to 17,268 pounds of milk
(2,008 gallons) in one year or 365 days. Over one-half,
to be exact, 54 per cent., of the 172 cows mentioned above
produced 1,000 gallons of milk and above in 365 days.
Eleven of the above cows produced 1,400 gallons of milk
or more in 365 days. Yet some folks say Florida is not
a dairy country!
The facts in the case are that in the early development
of the dairy industry in Florida there were very few real
dairy cows and very few real dairymen. With this kind
of a combination it is next to impossible for any state
or community to build a prosperous dairy industry in a few
years. Florida is not only making good, but has made
good so far as dairying is concerned. Today we find Flor-
ida produced milk in all Florida milk markets. The truth
is that in many of the markets there is more Florida pro-
duced milk than the markets can well consume.

WORLD'S CHAMP LONG DISTANCE
EGG-LAYER

(National Farm News)
Lafayette, Ind.-Lady Purdue, world's champion long
distance egg layer, owned by the Purdue Experiment Sta-
tion poultry farm, died a few days ago from "the infirmi-
ties of old age." Over a ten-year period she produced 1,421
eggs.
This famous hen was hatched March 24, 1916, from an
incubator on the poultry farm, and laid her first egg in
October, 1916. She produced 217 eggs during her first
year, and 182, 150, 204, 187, 140, 163, 98, 65, respectively,









Florida Review 7


during the following eight years and completed her record
with 15 eggs produced during the last year of her life.
According to Prof. L. H. Schwartz of the poultry depart-
ment, the record of this hen is unequalled in egg produc-
tion annals.

LLOYD LINES SURVEY PORT FOR CONTACT

North-German Agency Sends Traffic Chief Here to Study
Connection

(Times-Union)
Jacksonville is one of the few ports in the United
States under survey for the establishment of direct ship
connection with Germany in the near future. This was
revealed last night by R. T. Kessemeier, acting passenger
traffic manager of the North German Lloyd lines for
the United States. Mr. Kessemeier was the guest here
over Thursday of Dr. E. G. Steinke, German consul, and
during his visit obtained information from the chamber
of commerce and from the consul's office which had been
collected on this city and port for the research work of
the German ship line in formulating its plans for the
expansion of service. Mr. Kessemeier left last night for
New Orleans.
A thorough reorganization of the North German-
Lloyd's American service was begun in 1923, according
to Mr. Kessemeier, when the line had available for trade
with America only 8,523 tons of shipping after depletion
of the line's tonnage through war losses and treaties
forcing the handing over of many vessels to the allies.
Tonnage Increased
At this time, after four years of reorganizing and re-
building, the line has in service between this country
and its home port of Bremen, 650,000 tons of shipping.
Seven new boats ply between New York and Bremen, the
largest and fastest of these being the Columbus. These
are of 32,500 tons, while there now is building two
other vessels for the trade which will be of 46,000 tons
each, and have speed of twenty-six knots. These vessels
will make the run from New York to England and France
in five days and to Bremen in six, carrying 700 first-class
passengers, 500 second-class, 500 third-class tourist and
500 third-class. They will be oil burners.
The line's present investigation, said Mr. Kessemeier,
has as its object the establishment of direct service to
Bremen from Jacksonville and Savannah. Upon leaving
here he will investigate the conditions in New Orleans,
Galveston, Tampa, San Francisco and Vancouver, return-
ing to New York, his home office, by way of Montreal.
Concentration Is Aim
The Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce and the Ger-
man consulate have been working together for the estab-
lishment of a through line from this port. The aim is
to concentrate the shipping of the area surrounding
Jacksonville at this port, instead of having it sent out
piecemeal from various centers, which wide distribution
is said to make for higher costs to consumers of goods
as well as greater expense at the point of origin. This
work of making Jacksonville a point of dispatch for the
wares of the countryside is being carried on through the
Jacksonville chamber and the consulate. The Lloyd
line at present does not feel that it has the extra shipping
necessary for the small trade volume presented. How-
ever, it is said that by the time the extra tonnage is
ready for service it is believed the situation of cargo
will have been worked out. An office of the line is to
be opened in Atlanta on October 1.


The German consulate at 625 Graham building is act-
ing as the present agent of the line, and is giving in-
formation on tourist trips to Germany. Mr. Steinke and
Mr. Kessemeier assert that Germany is prepared for any
amount of tourist travel, and that there need be little
fear of gouging, as has been the case in some of the other
foreign nations as regards the visitor. Germany was one
of the first nations to do away with the passport visa
charge, and the consulate here is prepared to visa pass-
ports without cost for persons wishing to make the trip.

CUBA IS SUGGESTED AS FLORIDA MARKET

Consul Says Many Opportunities There for Florida Ex-
porting Men

(Lake Worth Herald)
Cuba as a probable market for a large amount of
Florida exports is the suggestion contained in import
figures prepared by Domingo Milord, Cuban consul in
South Florida.
According to Milord, Cuba imports from other parts
of the United States and foreign countries quantities of
foodstuffs which might easily be grown in Florida. The
consul's suggestion is that Florida, with its proximity
to Cuba, and with its agricultural possibilities, would be
the most logical center from which to get foodstuffs.
According to figures prepared by Senor Milord for
June, 1926, the leading articles imported to Cuba and
their quantity were: 106,687 sacks of rice, 26,644 sacks
of beans, 1,547 sacks of chick peas, 48,600 sacks of
flour, 2,539 cases of food pastes, 142,637 sacks and
barrels of Irish potatoes, 49,120 bags and crates of
onions, 30,257 cases of eggs, 38,895 bags of yellow corn,
13,918 bags of oats, 369 bales of hay, 2,000 sacks of
bran, 9,401 cases of codfish, 8,826 cases of canned vege-
tables, 125 cases of canned fruit, 6,125 cases of canned
fish, 14,971 cases of olive oil, 27,615 kegs of cotton seed
oil, 205 barrels of soya oil, 12,496 sacks of coffee,
54,100 sacks of salt, 61,901 cases of condensed milk,
10,606 cases of cheese, 4,287 cases of butter, 68,847
slabs and 516 cases of -salted pork, 78,514 cases of
frozen pork, 13,400 tierces, 4,142 cases and 2,883,979
pounds of lard in bulk; 758 cases and 3,011 pieces of
ham, 26,592 bales of jerked beef, 150 barrels and 56
cases of shrimp, and 1,320 crates of garlic.
Only a small amount of these foodstuffs is coming
from Florida at present.

IRONWORK IS INDUSTRY HERE

Florida Has Eight Manufacturing Plants

(Times-Union)
Washington, Feb. 3 (AP).-Without considerable pro-
duction in the state of any of the necessary raw ma-
terials, Florida yet overtopped twenty-four states in the
number of establishments engaged in the manufacture
of structural and ornamental ironwork during 1925, ac-
cording to a report released today by the Department of
Commerce.
Eight establishments in Florida were engaged in the
work, according to data compiled in the biennial census
of manufactures in 1926.
For the United States total production rose 3.7 per
cent from 1923, last preceding census year, to 1925.
New York led in the number of plants reported, with
222 of the 1,136 total.









8 Florida Review


RHODE ISLAND RED IN COLLEGE FLOCK
LAYS 296 EGGS IN A YEAR

(Gainesville Sun)
Gainesville, Fla.-A Rhode Island Red hen in the
flock of the College of Agriculture has given the hens en-
tered in the first Florida National Egg-Laying Contest
something to think about. She has just finished a year's
record, in which she laid 296 eggs. This is believed to be
the highest record of any Red in the South, and is a good
record for a hen of any breed.
The hen making this record is No. 622. She is not a
prisoner, but has never been given a name. Her record
by months follows:
November 4-30, 1926, 23 eggs; December, 27; January,
26; February, 25; March, 28. April, 26; May, 26; June, 24;
July, 21; August, 23; September, 23; October, 22; No-
vember, 1-3, 1926, 2 eggs.
No. 622 was bred by Dr. N. W. Sanborn, professor of
poultry husbandry in the college, who has built up one of
the highest producing flocks of Rhode Island Reds in the
country. Last year a hen in the flock made a record of
269 eggs in a year, which was the high record for the flock
until it was broken by No. 622.
The flock has been built to a high state of production
largely through inbreeding and line breeding. By this
method Dr. Sanborn has been able to almost eliminate
broodiness from his best birds, only a few of them ever
going broody at all.
No. 622 has a daughter which was hatched on March 10
and started laying on September 10, exactly six months
later. From September 10-30, she laid 15 eggs. During
October she laid 28, and the first three days in November
she laid three eggs.
The college also has a 270-egg Leghorn this year. The
highest record before for a Leghorn in the college flock
was 237 eggs in a year.

CANADIANS WORLD'S LARGEST CONSUMERS
OF EGGS

(Wisconsin Farmer)
Per capital consumption of eggs in Canada has increased
50 per cent in the last six years. Canadians now eat more
eggs in proportion to population than do the people of any
other country. This has been brought about largely by the
improved quality of eggs that has resulted from the system
of grading and inspecting applied by the Canadian gov-
ernment.
In 1918, Canada adopted measures providing for the in-
spection of eggs for export. The immediate result was that
the best eggs were exported, and the home consumption
began to fall off. The Canadian government then took the
view that if eggs for export should be inspected and grad-
ed, eggs for home consumption should be similarly treated,
and in 1923 egg regulations for domestic trading became
effective. The result has been an increase in home con-
sumption so rapid that Canadian poultry raisers have been
unable to keep up with it, although the poultry production
has increased 30 per cent since 1921, and the production
per bird has increased 20 per cent.
In 1922, the average Canadian ate 289 eggs. In that
same year the average resident of the United States ate
212. Consumption in Canada increased to 337 eggs per
capital in 1926, but in the United States it has. fallen off
to 204 per capital.
Among the egg-eating nations of the world Canada takes


first place, with Belgium, United States, France, Germany,
Great Britain, Sweden, Denmark and Norway following in
the order stated. The holding of the World's Poultry Con-
gress in Canada this year is expected to give further im-
petus to the poultry industry on this continent.

MONEY SPENT ON LUXURIES

(The Pathfinder)
Americans spend more money on luxuries than they do
for religion or education. For every $1,000 spent in 1925,
it is estimated, $22 went for luxuries. Our education bill
costs us $1,500,000,000 a year. But this is dwarfed by such
annual sales as these:
A utos .................................... ... ............................$3,000,000,000
Tobacco ............................... ................ .......... 3,000,000,000
Electrical goods .......................... ..................... 2,000,000,000
Candy .......... ....... ...................................... ... 1,300,000,000
Soft Drinks ..................... ..... ....................... 1,000,000,000
M movies ............ ......................... ............................ 1,000,000,000
Furniture ........................... ......... ......... ........ 900,000,000
Cosm etics ................................ ..................... 800,000,000
R adio ..................... .... .. ........... ..................... 800,000,000
Electrical refrigerators ..........-............................ 500,000,000
Ice cream ................ ............. ............................ 300,000,000
Scented soaps ..... ........................................ 150,000,000
Jew elry ..... ....................................... ................... 125,000,000
Chewing gum ......................................................... 100,000,000
W ashing machines ....................... .................. 100,000,000
Vacuum cleaners ................................................. 75,000,000
Phonographs .......................................... .............. 70,000,000
Pianos ................... ................... ..................... 50,000,000

WOOL GROWERS OF SECTION TO HOLD
MEETING

Output This Year Will Total 125,000 Pounds

(Pensacola Journal)
Wool growers of Escambia county, Florida, and Es-
cambia and Baldwin counties, Alabama, together with
growers of adjacent territory, will hold a meeting in Bay
Minette Friday afternoon at 1 o'clock for the purpose of
setting a date for their annual wool sale.
Growers of the section pool the entire output of their
wool and sell as an individual, thereby demanding a better
price for the product. The sale is usually held during
July.
During the past several years wool growers of this dis-
trict secured the highest prices in the south and grow-
ers are of the opinion that equally as good price will be
secured this year. The output this year will total ap-
proximately 125,000 pounds.
The local association is one of the few associations ad-
vertising its wool among the northern mills and buyers.
This factor plays an important part in securing a good
price for the product, and-brings to the section buyers
from the north and east who have never before attended
similar sales. The wool of this section, according to the
buyers, is of a superior quality, there being little shrink-
age as compared to wool grown in other sections, and it
is comparatively free of burrs.
The sheep industry throughout this section is making
rapid strides due to the fact that wool gives a good re-
turn on the investment. Practically all of the large lum-
ber companies of the section have taken up the industry
as an experiment and are planning to do on a more ex-
tensive plane.









Florida Review 9


WOOL GROWERS MAKE BLANKETS

Sheep Men of Massachusetts Pleased With "Co-op" Plan

(Tampa Times)
Amherst, Mass, May 21.-Sheep raisers of Massachu-
setts who a year ago pooled their wool, had it made into
blankets and then sold the product, thus getting much
larger profits than if handled otherwise, are contemplating
a similar scheme this year.
The plan worked out so well a year ago that J. C. Cort,
head of the dairy and livestock division of the Massachu-
setts department of agriculture, is making plans for a con-
solidation of the farmer's product again.
The experience of the wool pool last year indicates many
profitable possibilities. By marketing their wool in this
way the growers received from 20 to 30 cents a pound more
than they would otherwise have received. Farmers who
sold their blankets at retail received 61 cents a pound for
their wool; those who sold at wholesale received 51 cents.
The general plan of the pool was worked out many years
ago by C. D. Richardson of West Brookfield, one of the
largest sheep raisers in New England. It takes about 101%
pounds of wool as clipped from the sheep to make a blan-
ket. Each farmer receives back from the mill as many
blankets as his wool would make, one blanket for every
10% pounds he put in.
The farmer also pays the cost of making the blankets
and the general expenses of the pooling plan. This amount-
ed to $2.90 last year.
Most of the farmers who have gone into the iool have
found a ready retail sale in their own communities for the
blankets which are of a high grade. They usually bring
about $9 each. Deducting the $2.90 cost he has $6.10 in-
stead of $3 which the country buyer would have given him.
The blankets find a ready wholesale market at $8 each.


TRENTON HOG SALES SHOW BIG INCREASE

(Gilchrist County News)
According to figures compiled by J. B. Stockman, local
livestock broker, approximately $80,000 in cash was paid
out at this market for hogs during the season just clos-
ing. This figure is just for Trenton, exclusive of hogs
loaded at Chiefland and Mayo by Mr. Stockman. He
gives $139,999 as his gross disbursements for hogs load-
ed at Trenton in this county, Chiefland in Levy county,
and Mayo in Lafayette county. Approximately $9,000
of this amount was paid out at Mayo, $50,000 at Chief-
land and the remaining $80,000 at Trenton. A total of
102 cars were shipped from the three places, averaging
nearly $1,400 to the car.
Mr. Stockman handles practically the entire output at
Trenton and the figures given by him are indicative of
the net value of the swine industry to this section. He
said that his figure did not cover the county as a whole
as several carloads were loaded at Bell by other parties
and that practically the entire production in the upper
end of the county was marketed at Ft. White in Colum-
bia county. He estimates $125,000 as a conservative
figure for the proceeds from the sale of hogs raised over
the entire county.
Mr. Stockman said that the past season's business
brought in more money than the previous season, al-
though not so many hogs were loaded. This is a result
of better prices. He predicted that the coming season
would find the market in good condition. He also said


that he had stopped loading until late summer although
he had a recent order for pigs from 40 to 75 pounds,
such that he could pay 10 cents for them. Mr. Stockman
did not attempt to load the car, feeling that pigs of this
size would bring more to the community if held and
marketed in late summer.


JEFFERSON TO EXHIBIT CATTLE

Entries at National Dairy Show at Memphis

(Times-Union)
Monticello, May 25.-Elgeria plantation will exhibit
some of the prize Holstein cattle that were brought here
from Canada, at the National Dairy Show to be held at
Memphis in September. W. J. Elgie has long been an ex-
hibitor both in Canada and the United States. He had the
finest show herd of Holsteins in all Canada which he
brought to Jefferson county last fall and says that the
calves he has raised here this winter are the finest he
has ever seen anywhere in all his long experience as a
breeder.
His bull, Sir Laura Segis, was the grand champion at
the Sesqui-Centennial. Mr. Elgie is considered one of the
greatest Holstein breeders in America. John A. Kelly, who
now has a magnificent herd of Jerseys on his 3,500-acre
plantation near Monticello, is also planning to exhibit
some of his prize cows that already hold gold and silver
medals. He has four cows imported from the Island of
Jersey. He also has some extraordinary Poland China
sows which he may show. The National Dairy Show has
heretofore never been held as far south as Memphis and
no cows from Florida have ever been exhibited at this
greatest of all dairy fairs.


BEEF OUTRANKS PORK IN 1926
CONSUMPTION

(Times-Union)
Chicago, March 19 (AP).-More beef was placed on
American dining tables in 1926 than ever before, al-
though the average American ate during the year almost
a pound less of meat than during the preceding twelve
months, the national livestock and meat board was told
today by D. A. Millet, its chairman.
Of 17,245,000,000 pounds of meat consumed in 1926,
7,458,000,000 pounds were beef, according to figures of
the Federal government. The 1926 consumption of meat
was 240,000,000 pounds greater than that of the year
before.
For the first time in many years, cattle furnished more
meat than hogs. A partial reason for the decline of the
porker, Millet said, was the shortage of hogs which re-
sulted from the downward trend of the market, in the
wake of over-production of hogs in 1923 and 1924.
The strangest fact found in the government figures
was that although more pounds of beef were sold, fewer
cattle were slaughtered than in 1918, the year of great
war activity. The animals of 1926 average more in
weight, largely because of improved methods in cattle
raising.
The per capital consumption of meat in 1926 was
142.8 pounds, compared with 143.6 pounds in 1925.
Production and consumption of lamb continued in
1926 the growth it has shown for several years. Produc-
tion was greatest since 1914, and the average American
ate 5.5 pounds of lamb meat.










10 Florida Review


BLUEBERRIES ARE MOVING TO MARKET IN
LARGE QUANTITIES FROM OKALOOSA
PLANTATIONS

(Pensacola News)
Sapp and Shaw farms of Okaloosa county, with other
shippers of that section, are already moving blueberries
to market, 100 crates, representing 2,400 quarts, having
been shipped from the Sapp farm, shipment starting
about ten days ago.
Representatives of the Sapp Farm Blueberry Com-
pany stated this morning that the movement of blue-
berries from their farm will probably be made in pack-
age shipment, as the carload shipments did not prove
very satisfactory last year. The farm has already ar-
ranged for sale of all berries raised on the farm this
season.
The two biggest farms in this section of the state are
the Sapp and Shaw farms, but there is an active move-
ment in both Okaloosa and Santa Rosa counties.
The following notice in connection with the handling
of the blueberries of this section, was given out this
morning from the office of the American Riviera Asso-
ciation: Pioneer Berry Center
Crestview, the South's blueberry center, becomes the
pioneer of the American Riviera section in being the first
to ship fruit and produce to outside markets under the
distinctive title "Riviera Brand" blueberries, etc.
M. N. Melzer, who is connected with the Producers'
Association of Okaloosa County, reports that a portion
of the blueberry shipments of Okaloosa county will go
out in special packages marked plainly as the "Riviera"
brand.
Harry Kitt and H. A. Strand of Crestview, both active
members of. the American Riviera Association, are large-
ly responsible for this innovation, and already shippers in
Santa Rosa county are using similar "Riviera Brand"
labels.
With next season, it is hoped by the Producers' Asso-
ciation of Okaloosa County that every package of blue-
berries shipped will carry the "Riviera Brand" label and
that all other produce and fruit shipments will be simi-
larly labeled.
Santa Rosa and Walton counties are also taking up the
idea and before another shipping season arrives, "Rivi-
era Brand" fruits and produce will be a distinctive brand
in northern markets.

SIXTY-FIVE ACRES BLUEBERRY GROVE
BEAUTIFUL SIGHT

(Milton Gazette)
A sight that cannot fail to appeal to the horticulturist,
farmer or anyone interested in the growing of fruits, is
the sixty-five-acre blueberry grove owned by Messrs. Bry-
an and Howell, just north of Milton. This grove is
located on a fine level tract of land, formerly belonging
to Mr. S. G. Collins, and the greater part of the grove is
four years old, although some of it is younger. The
trees are accurately set and are showing a fine green,
as a result of the careful cultivation and proper applica-
tion of fertilizer that has been given them.
The owners of this grove shipped many hundred crates
from it last year, and so far as we have learned have the
record of having the first berries from it this season that
have been shipped from this section of the State, having
marketed several crates last week for which they re-
ceived the handsome price of $7.00 per crate net.


EXCELSIOR PLUM BRINGS ADVANCE ORDERS
FOR J. D. SMITH
More Than Two Weeks Ahead of California Crops
(Times-Courier)
With approximately one thousand crates already mar-
keted and another in prospect for market in the next few
days, the J. D. Smith farms report one of the best seasons
in marketing of plums they have yet experienced.
"Heretofore, the plums have come on the market at
about the same time as has the California crop, and the
demand was not as strong for the Florida fruit as the Cali-
fornia, but this year, probably due to the hot, dry weather,
our crop is at least two weeks in advance of theirs, and
will be marketed almost before theirs come on," said Mr.
Smith.
"Another thing, our plums are becoming better known
and are beginning to be recognized as one of the very best
on the market, and this year we are getting more unsolic-
ited orders than we have ever had before."
The variety which is proving so popular is known as the
Excelsior, a red plum, especially delicious in flavor and
easily marketed on account of its turning red several days
before it is really ripe.
Mr. Smith, who is one of the best farmers in Jackson
county, is also a member of the legislature, but he is get-
ting an SOS call from his son, Milton, about the plum and
oat crop both needing attention. He ran over from the
Capitol for a day to see how things were moving.

CELERY CROP STATISTICS
(Estimated)
(Sanford Herald)


Cost per acre


Freight, New York .......................
Freight, Chicago ..........-...-.. ..-
Total receipts ........... .. ................
Number acres ................- .......
Number cars shipped ..................
Crates per car ...........................
Minimum price per crate ............
Maximum price per crate..............
Average price ...........................
T otal cost ..... ..... .................
Net receipts ..........................


1926
$ 815.00
.95
.97
5,500,000.00
4,000
4,832
336
1.25
5.00
2.25
2,880,000.00
2,420,000.00


1927
S 825.00
.95
.97
3,500,000.00
4,500
6,000
336
.75
4.00
1.35
3,000,000.00
500,000.00


The above figures were compiled after consultation with
many recognized authorities, large and small growers,
heads of marketing agencies and railroad officials. The
Herald attempted to strike an average after receiving va-
rious estimates, all of which varied.

16,000 CASES FLORIDA GRAPEFRUIT SHIPPED
TO CALIFORNIA POINTS
(Pensacola News)
More than 16,000 cases of canned Florida grapefruit
were shipped to California recently from Jacksonville by
boat. The vessel, the steamer Laurel, will return here
after another cargo of the same produce.
More than 12,500 cases of the canned fruit, billed to Cal-
ifornia, have already been listed, according to officers of
the Southern Shipping Company, agents for the freighter.
In addition to the fruit she will carry rosin, charcoal and
clay, all Florida products.
Demand for Florida grapefruit is as brisk in California,
itself a producing state, as anywhere else, the shipping
agents declared.


.............................









Florida Review 11


GUAVA OPENS NEW INDUSTRY FOR FLORIDA
SAYS CAMPBELL

First Guava Products Factory Established at Palmetto
Already Has More Orders Than Can
Be Filled

(From Saturday's Daily)
Palmetto's new guava factory, recently established by
J. P. Ott, Jr., and Miss Mary Wright, has proven a suc-
cess from the start, and now, after a short time in oper-
ation, the factory is unable to supply all the demands. It
seems that the once despised and neglected guava, with its
pungent odor, so pleasant to some and so repulsive to
others, now stands on the threshold, ready to come for-
ward and assume its place among the really important
Florida products. At least, such is the opinion of R. S.
Campbell, secretary of the Palmetto Chamber of Com-
merce, who speaks of the possibilities of guava culture
for this section as follows:
"The once despised little guava, which has been shunned
by many ever since Florida became populated, is fast tak-
ing its place alongside the most sought after native fruits.
Since the establishment of the fact that guava jelly is in
a class all to itself, the lowly fruit has been climbing to
a position that other fruits will soon be looking to with
envy.
"All over the state small jelly factories have been op-
erating, the number being increased annually, but the
supply of guava jelly has never met the demands. Just
recently another factory was added to the list now in op-
eration, at Palmetto, which will be under the management
of J. P. Ott, Jr., and Miss Mary Wright. Miss Wright
states that since the establishment of their plant, they
have received inquiries from all parts of the country, espe-
cially the Eastern markets. According to the plans for
the new plant, they expect to expand as rapidly as the
business will permit, as they see a wonderful future await-
ing them in the sale of their products. The proceeds of
the local plant will be put back in the business as fast as
it is received, which means a rapid expansion, as orders are
now exceeding the output.
"The growing of guavas will no longer be looked upon
as a side issue but will soon rank among the important
industries of the state, caused by the urgent demands
and the satisfactory prices paid for them. A great many
who are not familiar with raising guavas do not know
that Florida is the only state that grows them, therefore
it can be classed as a very exclusive delicacy. With no
more expense and effort required to grow this fruit, much
interest is expected to be devoted to producing it in large
quantities. This will be governed by the local demand,
and also that it is a ready cash crop, as the grower receives
his money on delivery of the fruit.
"Coming at the time of the season they do places them
among the first cash crops to be marketed, thereby aiding
the grower in preparing for the other crops to follow. It
is estimated that three years after a year-old tree has been
set out it will be bearing prolifically, and yielding a hand-
some profit. An outstanding feature of the guava indus-
try is that they will thrive on almost every type of soil
and require no fertilizer, and up until now have never
been affected with any aphis or disease, causing them to
be sprayed.
"In going over the different sections of the country, one
only has to exhibit a few samples of the jellies and pastes,
and you will have dozens of brokers wanting to know


where and how they can secure the agency for some of
the products, and thousands of interested persons wanting
to know where they can go to a market and purchase
some. And you will be asked the question over and over
again: Why can't we buy this at our local stores? So it
is plain to be seen that over-production lies in the future.
"In order to give an idea of what is being planned along
the line of planting guava trees the owners of the new
local plant are at present looking for fifty acres of land
which they expect to set out. And this will be an incentive
for others to become interested in planting. So in a few
short years it will not be uncommon to drive out alongside
large guava groves, just as you do the citrus groves today.
Yet who would have admitted only a short time back that
anyone would be planting a guava tree, as plentiful as they
are, and regarded as almost useless except by a small
number who have always known the value of their ex-
clusive flavor, to say nothing of planting them in fifty-
acre fields.
"There are an endless number of varieties of guavas
and those who are best versed on them have their choice,
just as they do in citrus or deciduous fruits, and all of
them except the small Catlatt is used in making jelly and
pastes.
"Those who are engaged in the manufacture of guava
products state that they welcome all who care to enter
it as it will only aid in supplying the ever increasing de-
mand, and establishing the fact that only in Florida is it
to be found.
"Almost each year it is discovered that some commod-
ity that is raised elsewhere will thrive here in Florida, and
yield as well if not better than in its native state. But the
native products of this state are confined to its particular
climatic soil conditions, putting it in a class above most
of the other states in producing a large number of products
from the soil, which do not thrive so well in any other
location."

CITRUS FRUIT UNLOADING FROM FLORIDA
AND CALIFORNIA AT 36 LEADING
AMERICAN CITIES

September 1st, 1925, to July 1st, 1926
(Carlots, including boat receipts reduced to carlot equiva-


lents.)

(State Chamber of


Cities where unloaded-
A tlanta ...................... ..... .........
Baltim ore .............. .................
Birmingham ................-............-
Boston ............... .................
B uffalo ................ ......... ..........
Chicago ....................................
Cincinnati .................................
Cleveland ............... .................
Columbus ............ ..............
Dallas --.... ----..........- -......... .
D enver ........................ ...............
D etroit .................... ........ ........
Fort Worth ............... ..............
Indianapolis ................................
Kansas City ..........................
Los Angeles ................................
Louisville ................................
M em phis .................. ....................


Commerce)
Oranges
Fla. Cal.
341 37
796 243
261 50
1,418 1,845
187 548
855 2,285
516 219
513 834
149 279
16 193
1 288
276 1,324
6 105
203 226
8 359
72
164 172
287 124


Grapefruit
Fla. Cal.
203 2
270 -
66 -
705 30
228 4
1,588 3
275 -
493 -
176 -
56 2
136 1
584 -
32 -
213 11
231 -
136
77 -
131 2











12 Florida Review


Milwaukee .................................
M inneapolis ..............................
N ew ark ................. ..... .. ..........
N ew Orleans ..................................
New York ........................................
Om aha ......................... ............
Philadelphia ...........................
Pittsburgh ....................................
Portland, Ore. .............................
Providence ................... ...... .... ...
St. Louis .................................
St. Paul ...............................
Salt Lake City ...........................
San Francisco ......-.....................
Seattle .............. .-- ..............
Spokane ... .................... ....... ..
T oledo ............. ........................
Washington ...............- .........


Unloadings .......


4,6

1,8


2
3








3


........................14,169


43 525
5 697
40 1
61 59
625 4,747
1 229
835 1,037
637 795
- 375
!01 179
319 747
1 228
190
- 1,071
2 388
- 105
60 224
42 167


142
243
5
35
2,166
105
762
338
131
82
305
92
52

146
46
123
225


20,967 10,462


FLORIDA STATE FARM
RAIFORD
May 21st, 1927.
Mrs. Bessie Gibbs Porter,
Tallahassee, Fla.
Dear Mrs. Porter:
It will be recalled that last year, after the picking and
packing of our crop of "Cultivated Marvel Blackberries"
report was made to the board that we had harvested an
average of four quarts to the plant and estimated that
the yield for the present year would be approximately
ten quarts to the plant. We now find that we have
obtained an average yield of twelve quarts of merchant-
able berries to the plant for which we have received an
average of .17c per qt. and as there are 726 plants to
the acre planted in 10 foot rows with six foot drills of
a value of approximately $2.00 per plant we have a total
value of. approximately $1,452.00 per acre.
Very truly yours,


J. S. BLITCH,
Superintendent.


JSB-p.


CELERY OUTPUT BREAKS RECORD

Sanford District Shipping Number of Cars

(Times-Union)
Sanford, March 22.-Existing records for celery ship-
ments were broken in the Sanford district when 131 cars
were shipped in a single night during the past week with
a total shipment for the six days ending Friday, March
18, of 591 cars. In previous years the record for a single
day was 118 cars. This mark has been reached or
passed four times this season. The production of celery
this year has exceeded last year's mark up to date by
nearly 100 per cent as 3,560 cars had left Sanford up to
March 19, compared with 1,843 cars of the 1925-1926
season.
The Sanford section will produce an estimated crop
of over 6,000 cars this season, this being about 90 per
cent of Florida celery and over 30 per cent of the
nation's crop. Prices during the early part of the season
were comparatively low but have reached a profit-making
point and the market is continuing strong and steady.
The record shipment of March 18 meant a money return
of over $100,000 and the daily receipts are now from


$70,000 up. Excellent service by the Atlantic Coast
Line railroad has been responsible for the smooth handl-
ing of the great crop as cars and car service have been
always available together with splendid telegraph and
despatch service. Shipping organizations including Chase
and Company, American Fruit Growers, Sanford Oviedo
Truck Growers Association and the Florida Vegetable
Corporation, have given unexcelled marketing facilities.
The return to Seminole county on about 3,200 cars of
celery is estimated to reach $5,000,000 before the end of
the season. Total number of cars estimated for entire
season will exceed 6,300. With the lightening up of the
California shipments due to completing the celery sea-
son there gives Sanford a wider distribution.


JUICY FLORIDA CANTALOUPE COMES INTO
EARLY MARKET


(St. Petersburg Times)
The sweet and juicy cantaloupe has come into the
market in St. Petersburg and it has set up a new sign-
post pointing in two directions. It has brought a new
dish to the breakfast table far in advance of the season
when the melon is supposed to be available, and it has
shown that right in St. Petersburg and Pinellas county
there is ground and climate that will grow cantaloupes
which can be marketed in the first week of May.
The cantaloupes which sold here this week, according
to information given by W. S. Worley, buyer for the Man-
hattan Grocery, were grown on the Moser truck plot at
Maximo Point, the tip of Pinellas county and St. Peters-
burg's far southern extremity at the junction of Tampa
bay and Boca Ceiga bay. The melons were planted about
January, and the first were ready for cutting a few days
ago. Only a few hills were planted, but when Mr. Moser
cut 75 at one time from the patch he probably wished he
had planted an acre or two. The melons sold retail in
St. Petersburg from 25 cents each up to 75 cents. The
largest weighed about three and one-half pounds.
The melons grown at Maximo Point are not the far-
famed "Florida Educated Cantaloupe" known for its
huge size and firm rind, but the variety known familiar-
ly as the Georgia musk melon. They have spread their
vines and borne their fruit over that part of Maximo
Point almost over the ground on which oil seepage was
reported not so long ago.
Mr. Moser protected his young vines during the two
brief cold snaps of the past winter season, and the vines
apparently suffered no setback at that time.
Australian blackberries are in the market, and are
selling at 30 cents a quart. These come from Plant City.
The crop, it is said, will be very large this season and
the berries will probably be cheaper as the season ad-
vances. This type of blackberry is native in Florida, and
is far ahead of any other variety that is known as "The
Florida Marvel." It is extremely large, with jet black
sprays of fruit at every leaf base and is a tremendous
bearer. So prolific is the vine that growers pick the
same canes practically every day during the bearing
season. Strawberries were still in the market Monday,
continuing a season here which opened last Thanksgiv-
ing. Florida has had fresh strawberries from the grow-
ing fields, therefore for more than five months this sea-
son and shipments up to April 23 were 607 carloads,
compared with 304 carloads for the whole of last season.
The berries sold here Monday for 22 cents a box.









Florida Review 13


WHITE POTATO STATISTICS

(Palatka News)
White potatoes grown in Florida for the twelve months
ending October 21, 1926, were distributed to the follow-
ing cities:
Carloads Received


City
Providence ............
Boston ................
New York .............
Newark ...............
Philadelphia ...........
Baltimore .............
W ashington ...........
Buffalo ...............
Pittsburgh ............
Cleveland .............
Toledo ................
D etroit ..............
Columbus .............
Cincinnati .............
Louisville .............
Indianapolis ...........
Chicago ..............
Milwaukee ............
Kansas City ...........
St. Louis ..............
Birmingham ...........
Atlanta ...............


From
Florida
5
45
1,432
291
786
213
99
81
214
163
24
175
20
54
18
5
158
17
1
5
15
38


Totals ................ 3,859


From all
other sources
1,313
8,375
21,697
3,458
8,115
2,342
1,668
1,226
3,476
3,174
645
4,477
1,320
3,219
1,151
1,755
14,669
1,194
2,954
3,861
749
813

91,651


The total shipped was 111,178 carloads, of which 3,859
carloads or 3.47 per cent were from Florida. The total
shipped to the cities enumerated above was 91,651 car-
loads, of which 4.2 per cent were from Florida. Four-
teen cities, viz., St. Paul, Minneapolis, Omaha, Memphis,
New Orleans, Dallas, Ft. Worth, Denver, Salt Lake City,
Los Angeles, San Francisco, Portland, Seattle and Spo-
kane received no potatoes from Florida.

WATERMELONS

(Tampa Times)
Tuesday, April 26, 1927.
That is a date we would like to fix in the minds of a
nation. On that day W. H. Cralle and S. C. Kelly, who
operate the Cralle farm, near Fort Myers, shipped three
carloads of watermelons to market. Think of it, water-
melons !
On the same day Kane, Pa., reported eight inches of
snow. Just a few days previous frost and ice were re-
ported in north Georgia and South Carolina, doing much
damage to the apple crop in the Blue Ridge section of the
former state. And Florida is shipping watermelons!
Incidentally, Messrs. Cralle and Kelly received $4,000
in cash for these three cars of watermelons. That is a
fancy price. Probably no other melons shipped out of
Florida this year will bring so much. It is fairly certain
that none will. But other carloads of watermelons grown
in Florida, following along in close succession, will bring
healthy sums, while the entire melon crop produced in
Florida markets for $228 per thousand, as compared with
$185 per thousand received for those grown elsewhere
throughout the United States.


The difference comes because of the earlier time at
which Florida can get watermelons upon the market.
Here, again, enters in the value of Florida climate.
Florida last year furnished strawberries for Thanks-
giving dinners. On April 26, this year, she sends carload
lots of watermelons to market. -All in between she has
been shipping various kinds of fresh vegetables and citrus
fruits-thousands of cars of them. She is still forward-
ing these, and will be for some time, to the delight and
gastronomic satisfaction of the nation and to the profit
of those who have produced them. Still there are those
who say that Florida is not an agricultural state.
That those who have little or no knowledge of Florida
should so contend is not surprising. They merely speak
from the information which they have. That some Flor-
idans so say is not short of amazing-for they could know
better if they would but look about them a bit.
We have said it before, and shall keep on saying it-
Florida possesses agricultural advantages beyond those
held by any of the states. She can produce things that
most of them cannot produce at any time. A large num-
ber of things she can produce at a time when they cannot
be produced elsewhere.
Up-country, and not very far up-country at that, people
are looking for signs of spring and wondering if it will
do to put plow to ground, to be followed with seed. In
Florida people are shipping watermelons.
Watermelons!
Is there any other thing that is so universally liked as
are watermelons?
And Florida gets them to market first of all.
It will be difficult to get people who like watermelons-
and that is practically everybody-to agree that a state
that can furnish ripe, red watermelons in April is not a
wonder as an agricultural state. It is true that water-
melons at $1,333 1-3 the car are a little high. Personally,
we could not purchase more than 50 cars of them at the
price, but there are those who are able and willing to pay
so much for them-to which there is no sort of objection
by the men who grow them.
The combination of Florida climate and Florida soil and
industrious men working together is an unbeatable one.
Witness the shipping of three carloads of Florida water-
melons on April 26.


FLORIDA WATERMELONS BRING $1,000
PER CAR


First Sales in Chicago Range From $6 to $7 a Hundred
Pounds Wholesale

(Miami Herald)
Atlanta, Ga., May 17 (AP).-A freakish crop season
resulted in Florida watermelons commanding above
$1,000 a carload at Chicago, the United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture said today in its weekly review of
fruits and vegetables. First sales of Florida melons in
Northern markets ranged from $6 to $7 per 100 pounds,
wholesale.
The season, the department noted, is still a week or
two early in the South, but about as usual in the East
and rather late from the central region to the West
Coast. These conditions give a longer season in market-
ing the heavy Southern production, it was said.









14 Florida Review


CROP FIGURES BREAK RECORD

62,916 Carloads of Produce Shipped, Compared to 49,324
for 1926

(St. Petersburg Times)
Florida's production of soil crops from September 1 to
April 30 of this year totaled 62,916 carloads, compared with
only 49,324 for the same period last season, according to
figures supplied by the marketing agencies and compiled in
the Florida Grower for May.
Shipments of oranges were in this period 22,142 cars,
compared with 19,726 cars last season; grapefruit 15,883
cars, compared with 16,572 last season; tangerines 1,500,
compared with 1,227 last season; lettuce 932 cars, com-
pared with 747; mixed vegetables 1,363, compared with
1,405; peppers 896 cars, compared with 405 cars; tomatoes
5,534 cars, compared with 1,248 cars last season; cabbage
1,088 cars, compared with 1,689 cars; cucumbers 1,212
cars, compared with 301 cars last season; pineapples 4
cars this season and 5 cars a year ago; celery 6,687 cars,
compared with 4,121 cars last season; strawberries 608
cars, compared with 283 one year ago; potatoes 3,202
cars, compared with 1,054 cars last year; beans 1,790 cars,
compared with 541 cars a year ago.
It is this immense increase in the production of the state
that is helping to increase the interest of Northern finan-
ciers in Florida bonds and in development of many enter-
prises, according to many who have visited Northern
cities in recent days.
Florida's first big grape crop is now ripening and will
go into Northern and local markets this month. Water-
melons, ripening earlier than usual, are also going North
in carload lots at this time. Increased acreage in can-
taloupes is recorded, especially in Sumter county, which
will supply St. Petersburg markets. Florida for the first
time is making heavy shipments of sweet corn to Northern
markets and the quality is high.

EASTER LILY IS PROFITABLE FLORIDA HOR-
TICULTURAL CROP, SAYS GROWER
NURSERY STOCK

Past Year Sale for All that Could Be Produced, at Good
Prices-Chinese Sacred Lily and Gladioli Raised-
Number Shipped to Firms in Northern Markets

(Times-Union)
Daytona Beach, May 15.-Production of the Easter lily
as a profitable horticultural crop in Florida is no longer
an experiment, it was declared here by W. W. Sterling,
head of interests which own large plantings of flowering
bulbs and nursery stock at National Gardens, north of
this city, and which this year for the first time included
Easter lilies in their operations.
"Little had been done by Florida horticulturists before
this year with the Easter lily, and it was not known
whether its cultivation would be successful from the grow-
ing and marketing standpoint," said Mr. Sterling. "Our
experience, however, convinces us that its cultivation
will be profitable to Florida horticulturists and I am
pleased to note that concerns in other sections of the state
are preparing to devote acreage to this crop. This year
we were able to sell all that we produced at 20 cents per
blossom, wholesale, which means that we received from
$1.50 to $2.50 per stalk, as there were from seven to fif-
teen blossoms on every lily cut from the field. They


were splendidly developed and formed and were received
with complete approval by Northern buyers.
"There is no doubt that there is a good future for this
bulb flower in Florida and we have 150,000 Easter lily
bulbs for fall planting."
An indication of the vast possibilities of the bulb flower
industry in Florida since enforcement of a national em-
bargo on Dutch and French importations was contained
in Mr. Sterling's statement that from National Gardens
there have already been sold this spring 2,500,000 devel-
oped bulbs of the paper white narcissus to Northern buy-
ers at from $30 to $40 per thousand. These are the round
bulbs to be used by Northern hot house owners for forcing
winter blossoms and will be delivered chiefly to Chicago
and New York.
"These orders, however, do not begin to measure the
demand for these bulbs," Mr. Sterlin said, "for we are
not able to grow on our present planted acreage 10 per
cent. of the paper white narcissus for which we have a
demand."
Other Varieties.
There is an equal demand, he said, for Chinese sacred
lilies and gladioli. Laborers at National Gardens last week
began digging 2,500,000 of the later bulbs, the blooming
season being practically over. These bulbs, embracing
150 varieties of gladioli, are being stored in warehouses
recently built, for replanting and shipping January bulbs
are being shipped now to the North for summer outdoor
planting. Thousands of others are being placed in cold
storage for fall planting here and to be shipped North
later for forcing in the hot houses.
The Northern market for bulbs and the city flowers
from them can be greatly expanded by judicious adver-
tising within a few years as the output increases, in the
opinion of Mr. Sterling, who cited his experience at the
national flower show at Detroit this year, where Na-
tional Gardens had the only exhibit out of this state.
"Results obtained by National Gardens at this flower
show," he said, "served to convince me that next winter
Florida horticulturists should club together and exhibit
their products at the Detroit and other national flower
shows. National Gardens shipped to Detroit a carload of
flowers, bulbs, Florida moss and native coquina rock, the
latter being used to build a cave which was covered out-
side and inside with moss and flowers. That exhibit did
not cost as much as California's but it made a great im-
pression and resulted directly in many large orders for
bulbs.
"If all horticulturists of the state next winter com-
bined to prepare lavish exhibits for the national show it
would help to open the eyes of the North to what Florida
is doing and is able to do as a horticultural state," he
concluded.

YACHTSMAN HERE FOR SEA FISHING

Detroit Attorney and Sportsman Returns

(Daytona Beach News)
Daytona Beach has attracted another devotee of fishing.
Charles C. Murphy, Detroit attorney, and Mrs. Murphy,
tied their cruiser at the Daytona Beach Yacht Club dock
Tuesday after several weeks spent in warm southern seas
and intend to stay in this city for at least a month, while
Mr. Murphy tries the fishing.
Mr. and Mrs. Murphy are here because they stopped









Florida Review 15


on their way south last fall. The "Student Prince," their
60-foot cruiser, remained in the Halifax river several days
longer than they intended, because its master thought the
fishing here too good to miss. And when they reluctantly
moved on, it was with a promise to return this spring and
try the other forms of fishing that Mr. Murphy had not
been able to get around to. He is in communication with
local fishermen who are directing him to choice spots and
teaching him the tricks of deep-sea and salt river angling.
When he is not fishing, Mr. Murphy is known as an
able attorney and financier.
Local yachtsmen see in the summer visit of northerners
a larger future for development of the city. If sportsmen
can be taught the comfort and pleasure of Daytona Beach
life in the summer it will be a long step toward the sum-
mer resort development of the city. Every yacht that ties
at a Daytona Beach dock increases the business of the
-ity perceptibly, yachtsmen say.

BUILDING BIRD ROOSTS PROVIDES MAN
WITH PROFITABLE BUSINESS

New Port Richey-What are the racks used for, that can
be seen up and down the gulf coast?
Almost every person living in or around New Port
Richey and Elfers has been asked this question.
J. T. Hill of Elfers is the owner of all the racks between
the Anclote Key and Cedar Keys, and has been in the
fertilizer business for the past several years. He has
thirty racks between these two points, a distance of ap-
proximately one hundred miles. They are from one to
ten miles off shore and consist of piling being driven se-
curely and a flat floor space of from four to sixteen hun-
dred feet. The purpose of the rack is to give the sea bird
a place to roost, therefore causing the fertilizer to be as-
sembled, which is gathered and used by the hundreds of
farmers and grove owners over the state.
Mr. Hill makes a trip to them three times during the
year, fall, mid-winter and spring, and gathers approxi-
mately ninety tons of very valuable fertilizer, that will
test from 8 to 14 per cent. ammonia.
He uses a large motor boat, with a crew of three men
and as each rack is visited the fertilizer is bagged and
made ready for shipment to the various companies about
over the state, about thirty tons being gathered each trip.
This is certainly a very valuable as well as helpful in-
dustry, of which very few people have ever known.
The birds that use these racks as a roost are the gull,
pelican and cormorant. The cormorant is a very valuable
bird in China, it being used for the purpose of catching
fish and is known as the Chinese fish bird.

AN INDUSTRIAL LESSON

(St. Petersburg Times)
The Florida Casket Company, established in Jackson-
ville in 1920, has pointed the way to industrial develop-
ment of Florida home resources which brought the total
value of manufactured products in the state to $268,-
000,000 last year.
The company, which manufactures metal caskets,
burial vaults and other necessities of funeral obsequies
in bronze and other metals and materials, saw the oppor-
tunity for supplying the same commodities in materials
using largely the natural resources of Florida. It began
operation in an old hospital building in Jacksonville,
making wooden caskets, casket boxes and burial gar-
ments. The company won success. It used Florida
woods. It has expanded and now employs 50 people.
Its products cover the market in Florida, Georgia and


other territory. This success is probably due to the fact
that the company was content to begin operations on a
small scale. It avoided the heavy interest charges on a
primary debt. It has built on its own activities and
salesmanship, and it made use of home raw materials.
This line of progress stands wide open for a hundred
different kinds of manufacture in Florida. The founda-
tion for these diversified small industries is within the
grasp of Florida people. The state and its own capital
have in their power the opportunity to develop the re-
sources of the State without waiting to convince outside
money that the raw materials, the labor and the advan-
tageous climate are here for the making of wealth.


TRADE BOARD TO GET LOCAL DATA FOR IN-
DUSTRIES

Manning Authorized to Name Committee of Five

(Bradenton Herald)
Steps toward securing definite information on Braden-
ton's possibilities as a manufacturing city, were taken last
night at a meeting of the Chamber of Commerce, held at
the Parish House of Christ Episcopal church.
A resolution was read by President William A. Manning
and credited to Major George R. Jones and adopted by the
board, giving the president authority to appoint a com-
mittee of five, with himself an ex-officio member, for the
pfirpose of studying local conditions and make recom-
mendations to the Chamber of Commerce at an early date
on the practicabilityy of inducing industries to locate in
Bradenton."
The resolution went a bit further and gave nine points
for the guidance of the committee in making its study and
recommendations. The nine points follow:
1. Factory sites and method of procurement.
2. Possible consideration with regard to taxation on
industrial plants.
3. Availability and cost of labor.
(a) Skilled labor, male and female.
(b) Unskilled labor, male and female.
4. Cost of electric power for manufacturing use.
5. Housing of industrial workers.
6. Markets for local production, taking into considera-
tion transportation by rail and water as compared with
other manufacturing centers in the South.
7. Methods by which other municipalities of the same
class have induced consideration for manufacturing pur-
poses.
8. The character of industries the community is best
adapted to serve.
9. Freight rates.

TOO MUCH INVESTED FOR FLORIDA TO LAG
BEHIND, MOORE SAYS

(Jacksonville Journal)
Too much money has been invested in Florida for it to
ever lag behind in its march to greater things, Wilmer
F. Moore, of Atlanta, president of the Southern States Life
Insurance Company, said here today.
Mr. Moore is in Jacksonville to attend removal of Jack-
sonville offices of his company into the Hildebrandt build-
ing. where a suite of rooms have been obtained on the
sixth floor. He arrived this morning and will return to
the Georgia metropolis tonight.
"Everyone is looking at Florida today and admiring it
because of its wonderful recovery from hurricanes, booms
and other things," Mr. Moore said. "The recovery has
been great. And it forecasts greater things for Florida.








16 Florida Review


"Millions have been invested in the state and these in-
vestors still believe in Florida. Our own company, for in-
stance, today is receiving more money from paid insur-
ance premiums out of Florida than from any other state.
Georgia once led our list, but Florida is now far ahead.
That indicates, we believe, the continued prosperity of the
Sunshine state.
"Climate, the best in the world, will be with Florida for-
ever. People will continue to come here. The state's
boom was an unusual one; everyone knows that. It ended
suddenly, but it took away none of the true value of
Florida.
"I predict a bigger, stronger, healthier Florida and have
great faith in the future of the state."

HIGHER PRICES FOR FLORIDA BONDS

(Ft. Lauderdale News)
The New York Times gives considerable space to an
interview from B. J. Van Ingen, head of a large munici-
pal bond house of New York and Chicago on the trend
of Florida bonds. Mr. Van Ingen sees higher prices for
Florida securities.
"With a decrease in offerngs of Florida bonds and
the return of the State to a sound, conservative basis,
we believe we are justified in expecting higher prices for
Florida securities," said Mr. Van Ingen.
"After every period of business depression and de-
flation, or whenever a municipality has suffered a dis-
aster of some sort, it is reflected in the prices of securi-
ties originating in the affected section. In 1920 and the
early part of 1921, when the entire country was in the
throes of business depression and deflation consequent
upon unusual conditions and excessive speculation after
the war, municipal bonds reflected that condition, as in-
dicated by the comparison of prices prevailing then and
now.
"Still fresh in our minds is the fact that obligations
of the United States Government sold as low as 83 in
1920.
"The history of municipal bonds verifies the fact that
despite business depressions, panics or disasters, Ameri-
can municipalities have seldom failed to meet their obli-
gations, maintaining the excellent credit which they
enjoy. Today Florida's securities reflect the aftermath
of the 1925 boom in real estate and are offered at prices
out of line with their intrinsic value, and with the
present general level of bond prices.
"During the last five years vast sums have been in-
vested in Florida in homes, business buildings, hotels,
railroads, electric light and gas plants, telephone sys-
tems and the development of agricultural resources.
These investments form the basis of increased taxable
wealth. Cities and towns throughout the State have
made extensive public improvements in the way of paved
streets, sewers, water systems and schools, and the coun-
ties have constructed many miles of hard surfaced roads.
These improvements have been financed and Florida's
physical condition today is such that public improve-
ments will require little financing compared with the
last two years, and the volume of bond issues should
show a marked decline."

WILL PERMIT PLANTING OF SCENIC ROUTE

$100,000 to Be Available for Scenic Highway All the Way
-Highlands Will Spend $50,000 on Its Section

(Highland News)
Beautification of State Road No. 8 through this county
is provided in the bills passed by the legislature which


authorize the county commissioners of Highlands and
Polk counties to respectively issue bonds in the sum of
$50,000 for each county.
These bills are practically the same as those drafted
by the committees of the Associated Boards of Trade and
which were approved by the Highlands commissioners.
The principal change was that the provision in the
original draft of $75,000 for Highlands county was re-
duced to $50,000.
The commissions or boards of beautification will spend
the money in conjunction with the county commissioners,
who will audit and pay the bills. They are expected to
hire a landscape architect to lay out a uniform scheme
that will provide trees every fifty feet with shrubs be-
tween.
The planting will begin at Haines City in Polk county
and follow the route of the state road to the Kissimmee
river.
Chairman Fons A. Hathaway, of the state road de-
partment, which keeps up the banks and shoulders of the
highway, has agreed that his department will maintain
the plantings, water them and see that they are kept up,
W. F. Coachman told the Highlands commissioners in
presenting the committee's proposed bill.
Mr. Coachman, representing Lake Placid; Senator E. J.
Etheredge, DeSoto City; J. H. Bright, Brighton; H. O.
Sebring, Sebring, and C. E. Lanier, Avon Park, make up
the beautification board for this county.

LAST DECADE SHOWS GREAT INCREASE IN
FRUIT CONSUMPTION

American People Are Eating. Twice as Many Perishable
Fruits and Vegetables

(Ocala Star)
Consumption of fruits and vegetables by the American
public is now almost twice what it was ten years ago.
This is shown by a study just completed by the bureau
of railway economics and made public today as to rail
shipments during the past ten years of the sixteen princi-
pal fruits and vegetables grown in this country.
During the years 1917 to 1919, the annual average
rail shipments of the sixteen principal fruits and vege-
tables amounted to 478,540 carloads. For the years
1924 to 1926, the annual average was 848,009 carloads,
which was an increase of 77 per cent compared with ten
years ago. In contrast with this increase, the total
population during that period increased only twelve per
cent.
"In general," according to the study, "the greatest in-
creases took place in those fruits and vegetables which,
because of their highly perishable nature, have hereto-
fore been regarded largely as luxuries, or delicacies, but
have now become items of common consumption.
"The increased amount of this type of agricultural
products raised by producers, brought to large markets
by the railroads, and offered to the general public at
prices within their reach, has caused a great increase in
their consumption by the American people. Only the
closest cooperation between producers, distributors, and
transportation agencies has made this growth possible.
"The bulletin also shows the wide rail distribution of
these 16 fruits and vegetables. The city of Chicago, for
instance, in 1925 was served with white potatoes shipped
by rail from 37 states, sweet potatoes from 16 states,
cabbage from 22 states, onions from 20 states, lettuce
from 13 states, tomatoes from 17 states, cantaloupes
from 14 states, apples from 25 states, peaches from 19
states and strawberries from 15 states.




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