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mods:note dates or sequential designation displayLabel Cf. Gregory, W. Amer. Newspapers, 1937. Ceased in 1917?
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 3, 1910)-
"In Dixieland I'll take my stand."
"If it's right, we are for it."
"Democratic."
Editors: Claude L'Engle, Dec. 3, 1910-<1913>; Robert McNamee, <1914-1917>.
funding Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
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mods:titleInfo
mods:title Sun (Jacksonville, Fla.)
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Dixie
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00048818/00002
 Material Information
Title: Dixie
Uniform Title: Dixie (Jacksonville, Fla.)
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Claude L'Engle
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: April 21, 1917
Publication Date: 1910-
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Ceased in 1917?
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 3, 1910)-
General Note: "In Dixieland I'll take my stand."
General Note: "If it's right, we are for it."
General Note: "Democratic."
General Note: Editors: Claude L'Engle, Dec. 3, 1910-<1913>; Robert McNamee, <1914-1917>.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002033830
oclc - 25595604
notis - AKM1543
lccn - sn 92060426
System ID: UF00048818:00002
 Related Items
Preceded by: Sun (Jacksonville, Fla.)

Full Text




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IF IT'S RIGHT WE ARE FOR IT.


BCHAS. E. JONES,
ROBERT MctAMEE., Managing Edr
Editor EDITH A. FOSTER,
General Manager Secretaryand Treasrr

-"'- IN DIXIELAND IFLL TAKE MY STAND"


VOL. VII. NO. 22. JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA, APRIL 21, 1917 $1.50 Per Year: c Fach


ARE CATTS' FRIENDS VIOLATING THE "BLUE SKY LAW"?


o


i The Sheriff Is Determined


I


IHonor to Whom Honor Is Due


0


EDWARD ANDERSON, REAL ESTATE,
House Phone 1997, Office Phone 2997. Jacksonville, Fla., March'14, 1917.
Mr. J. V. Burke, Tallahassee, Fla.
Dear Sir: Mr. Carghile was here Monday, went over everything with Dennis, Benedict and
myself, and then went back to Lake City Monday night without taking the papers and booksr-with
him. I suppose he wrote you after reaching Lake City.
Dennis read me over the phone Benedict's wire to you this morning and your reply. As I
told you and the Governor last Monday, we have done all we can do here;-it ils now up to
you people whether or not you continue the paper. I supposed that immediately after I left
you would have written to men on the list you made and asked for their contribution in money
and notes, so CUirghile would have something definite to organize on besides his plant.
I gave Carghile an application blank for himself and enclose one for you to send to Jerry
W. Carter. I also gave Carghile one for Mr. Hodges.
Yours, truly, EDWARD ANDERSON.


The "Free Press," which, under control of J. V. Burke, Governor Catts' private secretary, so
bitterly denounced the National Democratic Administration and which was edited at times by a
Republican, and also a: Socialist, has been removed to Lake City.
It endeavored to unload its indebtedness on Billy Parker, but Billy threw it up after denounc-
ing the directors in most emphatic language.. It is now endeavoring to continue publication and
the methods are clearly violative to "the,.Blue Sky Law" and needs the attention of the Comp-
troller and the Attorney-General of Florida, inasmuch as its agents are endeavoring to sell stock
in the concern.A
SThe following letter, written to J. V. Burke March 14, by Edward Anderson, of Jacksonville,
will be of interest. Mr. Anderson was one of the founders of the sheet; the Mr. Dennis re-
ferred to is Arthur Dennis, a local printer and stockholder in the publication, while the Hodges
is Jim Hodges, a lawyer of Lake City. I- _k
The Governor's office seems to have a "leak" that -allows the Democrats to know just what's
going on. Here is Ed. Anderson's pathetic letter to "General Manager" J. V. Burke:


What our people must realize is that
no calamity can be allowed to'touch
us AS A WHOLE. An army may be
mobilized, and the navy strengthened,
but affairs will move along in the same
grooves in all lines of industry. Hence,
with the increased demand for food
supplies that isg sure to come, the
FIRST THOUGHT of ALL the peo-
ple should be to see that every avail-
able foot of tillable soil is made to
produce a crop.
And this should not only apply to
farmers. Millions of people m the
cities and towns can contribute largely
to the result. Unused back yards, va-
cant lots, fallow fields, even railroad
rights of way can be -made to add
their quota. Every dweller in a city
or town who can by any means secure
a plot of ground should do so and de-
vote a portion of his or her time this
season to producing something to eat.
DUTY it is.
Let none delude themselves with the
belief that there will be any material
lowering of the prices of food stuffs
unless there is an INCREASE IN
PRODUCTION. The. demand is too
great .T erea. ax nig.marke-thk
world over for every bushel of wheat,
corn, potatoes, or any other article of
food that we can produce, and even
should we escape a long war, at least
as long as the conflict continues in
Europe that demand will be urgent.
We can, we should, we MUST make
of ourselves that which we glory in
proclaiming-a nation of farmers.-
Monticello News.


At last we are facing war, and there
seems no honorable way in which it
can be avoided. We, therefore, must
fight.
But with the conflict a realty, it will
be well if we as a people are disposed
to profit by the experience of the na-
tions, across the water.
It seems like a prosaic matter for
discussion but really one |of the great-
est factors that will enter into the
matter is our food supply. We are alt-
ready faced with prices as high as it
would seem we can possibly endure;
with a pronounced shortage in many
lines of products; and if a large army
and navy is to be recruited from our
industrial workers the situation is like-
ly to become serious.
It is,\ however, fortunate that the
crisis should come at this season of
the year, when the people can plan to
meet the situation. The farming sea-
son is just opening, and every man,
.woman and child in the United States
should be brought to feel that on his
or her shoulders rests a very tangible
portion of the responsibility that faces
the nation. ... ----
In an ordinary year this matter
would automatically take care of it-
self. But not so in this instance. Aside
from the fact that thousands and thou-
sands will be drawn from the ranks of
the workers, we will have also to rec-
kon with the restlessness and excite-
ment and will inevitably prevail thru-
out the country. This is not conducive
to successful work.


ing the idle lands in and around the
city.
Many in Jacksonville have already
realized the importance of food pro-
duction on a very large scale and they
realize that at best there can not and
will not be an oversupply.
The cheapest thing in the world,
even in war times, is talk, but this is
no time for discussing about how cer-
tain conditions will affect certain peo-
ple.
What is necessary is for an organi-
zation which will impress every man
and woman that it is imperative to be-
gin work at once looking to a cultiva-
tion of every vacant lot and back yard.
We will have not only our own
mouths to feed, but there will be wid-
ows and children who must be looked
after. There will be those called to
war who have heretofore been provid-
ers who will leave dependent ones be-
hind.
Millions who have been and who are
pacifists, may yet be called to war.
Their patriotism is not questioned by
any just men. In fact, the pacifists
are already, and will be, to the front-
eaery _aady to die for love of country.
The nation's most relentless pacifica-
tor, Henry Clay, was always a most
Sdangerousman when aroused.
In watching the violated laws by
England and by Germany, pacifists,
which means peace-makers, hoped for
a speedy settlement of the struggles,
but whatever may have been their
opinions in the bloody struggles for the
past three years, it is now their own
beloved country, and they stand up
nobly for its preservation.
In speaking of the pacifist, in a re-
cent issue;'Capper's Weekly said:
"Thirty years ago the teetotaler was
caricatured as a long-haired, spineless,
meek and lowly creature. Not the ef-
ficient, physically fit man he really is.
Then, the 'red-blooded,' big-fisted,.
manly men were supposed to be drink-
ers, and were proud of it. Today the
same caricatures are labeled 'pacifist,'
and the 'red-blooded,' two-fisted, big-
stomached man is the real patriot, im-
patient and scornful. e breathes fire
and slaughter, talks and acts first and
thinks and finds out afterwards. Yet,
it is the pacifically-minded man, slow
to anger or to fly off the handle, that
is the most dangerous adversary. When
he squares-off, look out. No one im-
Spugns the courage nor patriotism of
Davy Crockett, who said, "Look before
youi leap; be sure you're right before
you go ahead.' The pacifist sees no
glory in thousands of slain and a con-
.tinent laid waste. For him war is
what it IS! It is the pacifist's last re-
sort. He will wait awhile first, use
patience, try- comnimon sense. But if
fight he must, beware of the fighting
pacifist. Whether we have war or we
don't have war, the American nation
will have no need to apologize for its
pacifists. If war comes it will have
no truer, more determined, more ag-
gressive, more self-sacrificing defend-
ers. Only, war with them, is a last
resort. They consider it a senseless
and a criminal way to settle difficulties
between man and man and nation and
nation, and not to be undertaken un-
less all other means fail."
But war.is on. There will be suffer-
ing and the clouds will be crowned with
victory for the American people. Many
years ago Montesquieu, world-famous
in literature, proclaimed "IF EUROPE
IS EVER RUINED IT WILL BE BY
ITS WARRIORS."
His prophecy will come true.


The patriotism of the people of the
United States is again being exempli-
fied, and a united nation stands behind
the Government to fight for American
rights, as interpreted by its constitut-
ed authorities.
Brave souls are enlisting, and the
fight in our country will be for De-
mocracy against Autocracy.
This is the greatest and best coun-
try in the world, and the best soldiers
in the world will win this victory for
the United States.
The conflict will bring hearts and
hands together in a common cause, and
will crush the sowers of hate and dis-
cord. '
The United States does not seek in-
demnity. It is not fighting for Japan,
England, Italy, Russia or the other na-
tions. Our cause is entirely different
from the others in conflict-our pur-
poses are more lofty. America, let it
be understood, does not make a fight
for foreign Kings.
Great Britain hides its navy behind
mines in British harbors.. This will
not be the case with Uncle Sam-who
Shares and does things. "
There propaganda of this Government
to construct a navy to lead the world
is wise. We want no second best. We
want a navy that will dominate both
the Atlantic and Pacific for ages to
come.
While fighting for our freedom of
the seas,, we must ever.remember the
importance of a navy powerful always
for the proper protection of our coun-
try.
With famous Pinckney, let it be al-
ways remembered that we "have mil-
lions for defense, but not one cent for
tribute."
Let it also be remembered what Uly-
sus S. Grant said: "In all wars the
producing classes are greatest suffer-
ers," and let us prepare to eliminate
this suffering.
Foreign countries are bidding
against our own people for products
raised in this country. Too much im-
portance can not be given to the-rais-
ing of food products. It is impossible
now to have an over-production.
Every vacant lot in Jacksonville
should be planted-every idle acre of
land that can be used in Duval county
should be cultivated.
There are people in modest homes
that are rented which have available
ground surrounding, but who are too
poor to hire a man to plow or to buy
fertilizer. There are hundreds of idle
negroes who should be put to work.
An organization should be formed
at once to, meet these problems.
Negroes willing to work cannot even
afford to buy hand plows, and arrange-
ments could be made upon proper m-
vestigation to supply honest, willing
negroes with these implements. The
city council, instead of wrangling and
playing politics, should do constructive
work. It should pass more strongest
ordinances governing vagrants. It
should urge a full enforcement of the
existing ordinances covering this mat-
ter.
There is no doubt but loyal negroes
will enlist and prove their patriotism,
but a majority of negroes will always
move along lines of least resistance.
There will be hundreds of idle negroes
--there are hundreds of them now in
,Jacksonville, and special provision
must be made whereby they will figure
in the propaganda of production.
In Reno, and other suburbs, where
negroes congregate, recruits by the
hundreds can be obtained for cultivat-


(From Manufacturers' Record)
JIn our issue of March 22 we published a few letters from Southern Gov-
ernors in response to a telegraphic inquiry as to what effort they were making
toward taking a military census of their States as to resources in men and ma-
terials. Commenting on some of the replies received, we said:
"From Governor Catts of. Florida there came a telegram as follows:
"'Telegram received in regard to showing military strength by the State
of Connecticut: Will say that we have not taken a census down here yet, as
we do not think that war is close enough to warrant it. In case we have war,
you can count on Florida doing her part.'"
"Practically this says that we propose to wait until the house has been
entered by the burglar, the goods stolen, and the people robbed, and then we
will look around and see what should have been done by the man who was killed
to protect his family and his goods. That indicates the appreciation that Gov-
ernor Catts shows of the situation. With the President of the United States
warning the country with all the power at his command as to the danger ahead
of us, and with every man of intelligence recognizing the situation, Governor
Catts does not think the war is close enough to justify any advance preparation
in order to guard against it, but he proposes to wait until war is upon us, and
after war has come, Florida can be counted upon to do its part. Poor Florida!"
In reply to that editorial, we have received from the Governor of Florida
the following letter, which merits publication only because it indicates a con-
dition politically greatly-to be regretted by all lovers _of that splendid .State .
"(State Seal, with motto: In God We Trust.)
"Sidney J. Catts, Governor. J. V. Burke, Secretary.
"State of Florida, Executive Chamber,
"Tallahassee, March 27th, 1917.
"Manufacturers' Record, Baltimore, Md.
"Dear Sirs:-I note your scurrilous article concerning the Governors of the
South and what you have to say especially in regard to the Governor (of Florida
'about a military census. I am also acquainted with the fact that you represent
the big interests and are very anxious for war, not because of any patriotic
sentiment but because it will BRING DOLLARS into your coffers and theirs.
If we had taken a military census I would not have been fool enough to have
told you anything about it. I have reports only to myself, and to the War De-
partment all matters of this kind and Florida may not be AS POOR as you
think in having the Governor that she has, If you Catholics of Maryland think
that you CAN RUN OVER us Floridians suppose you raise a regiment and
come down here and see how quick we will make you fellows hit it back to the
North from whence you came. If you have no better message than the one
that you had in your last Record you need never send me another copy. I am
able to attend to my business without any help from you or any of your pluto-
cratic kind. You will find that if we go to war Florida will do her part as I
told you. You need never send me any more telegrams to answer. You strictly
attend to your business from this and I will attend to mine and if you try to
attend to mine any more I will get me a good Lawyer and will sue you for
damages. "Respectfully, "SIDNEY J. CATTS, Governor."
Comment on such a letter is unnecessary, but again we say, Poor Florida!


The liquor interests have expected
protection from the Governor, but this
protection has certainly not been mani-
fested. It is true that 'the liquor in-
terests contributed large sums of mon-
ey to Catts' campaign-it is true that
the liquor interests expected much
from Catts, but they are not receiving
what they looked for-and many are
their loud lamentations.
The wonderfully strong sentiment in
this city against liquor hotels will
grow stronger. The liquor clubs, in-
stead of selling to Tom, Dick and Har-
ry, are now more careful to sell only to
members. Had these violators adhered
more strictly to the law they would not
have created so much antagonism
among the people generally and the
members of the Legislature in particu-
lar. It is only a few of the liquor men
who were active in politics that
brought about the conditions com-
plained of, and which, aroused public
sentiment against the interests.
The law-abiding people should aid
in every possible way the sheriff in the
rigid enforcement of the laws, as it
seems quite clear that the police of
the city have not been ordered to en-
force the liquor laws.
The sheriff by his orders has brought
about a much better condition in this
city. The end of the carousals in some
fashionable hotels is especially pleas-
ing..


The action of Sheriff W. H. Dowling
in closing-up the illegal cabarets meets
with the approbation of a majority of
the people of Duval county.
It is not generally customary for a
sheriff to look after the vices in a
city where there are about one hun-
dred and fifty police officers paid by
the municipality to look after such vio-
lations.
However the local authorities failed
to do their duty and the violations be-
came so flagrant that.it became neces-
sary for the sheriff to act.
There are many other violations not
usually looked after by the sheriff
which he will probably be compelled to
suppress. *
It is said that Mayor-elect John W.
Martin does not propose to allow Jack-
sonville to be so wide open. While he
often expressed himself as favorable
to a liberal government he also said
repeatedly in his campaign that he
would institute reforms against cer-
tain iniquities.
The sheriff of Duval county is a
hard worker and has much to look af-
ter, but if the police can't suppress the
liquor violations, the sheriff can, and
his orders are usually obeyed.
When the sheriff first arrested a
cabaret performer for selling liquor on
Sunday, leading friends of the Gover-
nor threatened his removal, but evi-
dently the Governor paid no attention
to his friends on this occasion.


serving people. He scattered sunshine
wherever he went. He has always been
loyal and true to friends. He is ever
on the square.
Florida is fortunate in having citi-
zens like Joe Earman, and had his
wise counsel prevailed there would not
have been any violations of the liquor
laws.
George Washington was a distiller
of liquors. Many of our greatest bene-
factors have engaged in the business
-many of them are now thus engaged.
The people who know Joe Earman
never for a moment will criticize him
because he once engaged in the liquor
trade. They knew him then and they
know, him now as a whole-souled, gen-
erous gentleman, honest, honorable
and always ready to make people hap-
py, and to alleviate the sufferings of
unfortunates.


M. F. Hetherington, the brilliant ed-
itor of the Lakeland News, has been
among the most conspicuous in de-
nouncing the. spirit of intolerance, and
it was a surprise that he sneeringly
referred to the fact that Joe Earman,
the editor of the Palm Beach Post, had
once been identified with the liquor in-
terests.
Joe Earman quit the liquor business
and is now conducting one of the
brightest and best newspapers in Flor-
ida. But when Joe Earman was in the
liquor business he was following a le-
galized business.
SThen, too, Joe Earman then, as now,
was big-hearted, a good, loyal citizen,
and he is a man who has done a great
deal of good. His heart and purse al-
ways went out to charity. No man, for
his means, gave more cheerfully to de-


the triumph,but those familiar with
Mr. Crooke's work will concede that no
man did more to stimulate the enthu-
siasm and bring about the result more
than he did.
Mr. Crooke is a most congenial, hon-
orable, Christian gentleman, who did
his work effectively, and no one dared
approach him with any proposed "com-
promise with dishonor."'
Men wh opposed Crooke readily ad-
mit his shrewd and unrelenting leader-
ship. He made his fight like a man,
and now that the forces have won, no
professional politician can rob him and
others so long in the fight of the
honors.


In all reform movements which tri-
umph there is always honor "sufficient
to go 'round," but in the prohibition
propaganda, while sco es did their
duty well, one man stands out promi-
nently whose organization and service
did more than any other source in
moulding the public sentiment so fav-
orable to the cause.
This man is none other than C. W.
Crooke who, as superintendent of the
Anti-Saloon League, had the victory
already won before he laid down those
duties, but who renewed those ener-
gies as the directing spirit of the Pro-
hibition League. Bandwagon riders and,
recent converts may claim credit for


I


IS FLORIDA'S GOVERNOR SUFFERING WITH "DEMENTIA AMERICANA?


we WANT NO INDEMNITY. State Bows in Shame ALL MUST DO THEIR DUTY.


Millions of People at Home Can Now 'Join the
Producing Class.


SNeither Must the Nation Make a Fight For Any .
foreign Kings. Another Letter, Showing Nation Assininity


In the Executive Chair.


GOOD-BYE, JOHN BARLEYCORN
(By Chas. E. Jones)
Now ring the bells of Heaven, for there is joy today-
The Hosts of right are marching proudly on their way.
Go shout the tidings loudly-go tell the gladsome news,
The death-knell has been sounded-the victim is old "Booze."
Proclaim the wholesome message, and sound the clarion cry,
That Florida's to be rescued-for the State is going dry.
Good-bye to all carousals-Good-bye, John Barleycorn,
Your revelry was ended on the Prohibition morn.
Good-bye to old "Three Feathers," Good-bye to "Echo Springs,"
We had you on our frolics, and other worldly things.
Good-bye to old "Black Label," Good-bye, "Old-Fashion Dark,"
We've played the game together in every noisy lark.
Good-bye, "Kentucky Bonrbon," Good-bye, "Kentucky Rye,"-
Your passports are now ready-for Florida's going dry.
Good-bye to "Pinkham's Compound," Good-bye, "Eudurance
Gin,"
Good-bye to your connections, Good-bye to all your kin.
Good-bye to famous "Harper's," Good-bye, "Jamaica Rum,"
We've struggled with you often-we've got you on the "bum."
Good-bye, Paducah whiskey, and good-bye to Sherry wine,
They'll miss you at the club house when the boys sit down to
dine.
Good-bye, Manhattan cocktail, Good-bye, "Mumm's Extra Dry,"
Your death will bring no weeping-it will not bring a sigh.
Good-bye to old Budweiser, Good-bye to foaming Schlitz,
We glory in your agony, as you play the game of "Quits."
Good-bye to "Free and Easy's," Good-bye to cabarets;
Good-bye to all the booze-fests that curse the nights and days.
Good-bye, Vermouth and Highballs, Good-bye to Pickwick Club,
You plunged us into misery, but we've got you on the "rub."
Good-bye, Gin-fizz and Wilson's, Good-bye to every beer,
The righteous are behind us-we have nothing now to fear.
Good-bye to old Milwaukee, Good-bye to Rose's brand,
And good-bye to Peruna, the substitute at hand.
Good-bye, Cocktail and'Tanlac-to Brookhill and Rum Punch,
Your easy chair'll be vacant when the thirsty go to lunch.
Now, ye hosts of love, get active to save our growing State,
For credit-marks await you from St. Peter at the gate.
Gird on the golden armor-be a soldier in the fight-
The cause is always worthy-it is ever just and right.
So rally in the faithful-you know the reason why-
The Lord of Hosts is with us while our State is going dry.






IWo IF IT'S RIGHT WE ARE FOR IT-APRIL 21, 1911.


L) rrrl


IF IrS RIGHT
WE ARN FOR IT


I -- I JI


Startling Figures Are Given


A W'axLY N'WaPAPam
Issued at No. 128 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
Subscription price one dollar and fifty cents a yeaf: single copy five cents.
Advertising rates on application.
Entered at Postoffice in Jacksonville as second-class mail matter.


THE LIMIT.

The Governor of Florida reminds me of the banks of the Missis-
sippi River at spring overflow time.
They are continually breaking and leaking in a new place.
The Governor has this spring 'busting" habit, and about every
fortnight, he has a "CREVASSE."
Just as fast as pen can be pushed, wedged in somewhere between
removals and prayer, our Chief Executive shoots his literary gun
into the human herd on the chance of winging a Catholic.
Guarded by a cordon of amateur and grotesque imitations of
Sherlock Holmes, protected by his zealous sword bearer-the
"majah," and isolated under the chilling eye of J. V., from the im-
portunities of the other 57 varieties of political starvelings, te
Governor valiantly, at long range, fires ink bullets at the Manufac-
turers Record of Baltimore.
The letter appears on another page, and it is redolent with the
"forget and forgive" spirit that is so characteristic of our preacher-
Governor.
The Governor's longest suit among his superior educational ad-
vantages, is his deep knowledge of military regimental formation
and maneuvers.
The Chief has simply got to have a regiment to lead so that he
can perforate his Baptist brother, Richard H. Edmonds, editor of
the Manufacturers Record, for having committed the treason of
publishing his paper in the same city in which Cardinal Gibbons re-
sides.
No regiment,-no perforation.
If the Legislature is remiss in, "preparedness" in this instance,
we may be invaded any day by Colonel Edmonds and his Catholic
cohorts.
The siege of Tallahassee is imminent.


r- ----


I


I BONE DRY

In Kansas they have passed a law- drink-four fingers, say, of old red
'the tightest thing you ever -saw- ink-is hunted down with horse and
which makes you felon if you try to hound, and locked up in the village
keep on hand a flask of rye. The joint- pound. And if your nose is red, dry
ist trembles in his shoes; if he is found man, you'd better bleach it while you
providing booze, he takes a journey to can; in Kansas noses must be pale, if
the pen, and never will get out again, people would stay out of jail. Oh,
The man who's found transposing gin where are our God-given rights, since
is by the bailiffs gathered in; the cadi we can't stew ourselves o'nights?
strips him of his kale, and ggves him Where was the sense in Bunker Hill,
fifty years in jail. An empty bottle in if we can't pull a cork at will ? And
your hall, a corkscrew hanging on the while for a reply I pause, the victims
wall, is proof that you've'defied the of these Kansas laws, seem prosperous
law-for you a cell, with moldy straw, and happy, too, and ask no sympathy
The man whose breath suggests a from you.-Walt Mason.


"AMERICA."
Our land, of every man the pride,
Beloved of heaven, o'er all the world
beside;
Where brighter suns dispense serener
light,
And milder moons imparadise the
night;
A land of beauty, virtue, valor, truth,
Time-tutored age, and love-exalted
youth;
The wandering mariner, whose eye ex-
plores
The wealthiest isles, the most enchant-
ing shores,; ,
Views not a realm so beautiful and
fair;,
Nor breathes the spirit of a purer air.
In every clime, the magnet of his soul,
Touched by remembrance, trembles to
the pole;
For in our land of heaven's peculiar
grace
Dwells the heritage of nature's noblest
race;
It is a spot of earth supremely blest,
A dearer, sweeter spot than all the
rest;
This is our land-this spot of earth we
found.
Are you a Man? A Patriot? LoLok
'round!
-Marion Austin Sumner.

CHURCH AND STATE.
The proposition that it shall not be
unlawful to read the Bible in public
schools is remarkable.
There are passages in the old.Bible
which, if some male teacher would
read to the female pupils, they would
be shot full of holes. Much of the old
Bible contains history of shameful im-
morality and words are used that can
never be uttered safely in the presence
of women and children.
The grandest, best book in all the
world is the New Testament, treating
principally of love and giving a his-
tory of the work of the best man that
ever lived and a man who, if his ek-
ample was emulated by half the peo-
ple, would eliminate hate and suffering
on earth.
There are passages in the old Bible
and whole chapters the reading of
which, if possible, should be illegal.
The legislators who agree that such
reading should not be illegal, would
be among the first to resent with force
or arms if certain passages were "le-
gally" read to their wives, daughters
or young sons.
There is always danger in mixing
State and Church affairs.

"OF COURSE NOT."
It seems that Governor Catts has
launched a campaign of unrestricted
submarine warfare against the unde-
sirable county officers of this state,
but if the supposition of some who
are believed to be on the inside is true
the campaign will gather much more
force when the next session of the
legislature is over. These undesirable
officers can only take the position of
armed neutrality and be perfectly neu-
tral, too. Of course these bad officers
were anti-Catts men and their places
are being filled by firm Catts' suppor-
ters. Nobody would hardly accuse Gov.
Catts, the great broad-minded states-
man, that he is, of using the high of-
fice of governor of the great state of
Florida, ,to punish his political enemies
and to satisfy his petty political
spites.-Mayo Free Press.
BILLY HAS THE "DOPE."
Billy Parker has fallen out with
what he calls "the bunch"'-that is to
say the men who put him in charge of
the Jacksonville Free Press-and has
launched a new organ, the "Search-
light." In the initial number, Billy
says he is going to show up a whole
lot of ugly things and alludes to his.
recent associates as "this most un-
scrupulous bunch of men I ever had
the dishonor of having done business
with in all my life." We don't know
just who Billy is talking about, but he
evidently has his opinion of them.--
Tampa Tribune.

IT IS HISTORY.
History informs us that the original
Red Cross nurses, who succored the
wounded and comforted the dying for
hundreds of years before Florence
Nightingale was born, were the Ro-
man Catholic Sisters of Charity.-
Ocala Star.

BILLY PARKER.


And now Billy Parker is out with
what he calls the "bunch," .those for
whom he helped to secure office, and
has launched a paper in Jacksonville
called the Searchlight, in which he
promises to do some roasting. It is.,
not our fight.-Ocala Banner.
Notice of Application for Tax Deed Un-
der Section 575 of the General Statutes.
Notice is hereby given that National
Holding Co., purchaser of Tax Certifi-
cate No. 1221, dated the 3rd day of Au-
gust, A. D. 1914, has filed said certificate
in my office and has made application
for tax deed to issue in accordance with
law. Said certificate embraces the fol-
lowing described property situated in
Duval County, Florida,-.to-wit: Lots 1
and 2, Blk. 5, Murray Hill Heights. The
said land being assessed at the date of
the issuance Qf such certificate in the
name of Unknown. Unless said cer-
tificate shall be redeemed according to
law, tax deed will issue thereon on the
31st day of May, A. D. 1917.
Witness my official signature and
seal this 19th day of April, A. D. 1917.
(Seal.) FRANK BROWN,
Clerk Circuit Court, Duval Co., Fla.
By C. H. SMITH, Deputy Clerk.
(apr21-mayl9)
Notice-of Application for Tax Deed Un-
der Section 575 of the General Statutes.
Notice is hereby g~ven that National
Holding Co., purchaser of Tax Certifi-
cate No. 1225, dated the 3rd day of Au-
gust, A. D. 1914, has filed said certificate
in my office -and has made application
for tax deed to issue in accordance with
law. Said certificate embraces the fol-
lowing described property situated in
Duval County, Florida, to-wit: Lots 8
and 9, Blk. 7, Murray Hill Heights. The
said land being assessed at the date of
the issuance of such certificate in the
name of L. L. Taylor. Unless said cer-
tficeate shall be redeemed according to
law, tax deed will issue thereon on the
31st day of May, A. D. 1917.
Witness my official signature and
seal this the 19th day of April, A. D.
1917.
(Seal.) FRANK BROWN,
Clerk Circuit Court, Duval Co., Fla.
By C. H. SMITH, Deputy Clerk.
(apr21-mayl9)


II I


FIRST DISPLAY OF FLAG.
The Metropolis, that great source
of information which scissors 'tele-
graph news, tells us something new
occasionally in its editorials. It says
that the first American flag was raised
at the battle of Ft. Schuyler at Rome,
N. Y. The Metropolis probably had in
mind the battle of Oriskany, many
miles distant, but it is just as wrong
about the battlefield as it is in the first
display of the flag.
The most correct history shows that
the first time the flag as now exists
was raised at Brandywine September
11, 1777.
But no one accepts Metropolis infor-
mation during these days on anything
without a "gain of salt," and some-
times several grains. There is prob-
ably not a newspaper published in the
United States that makes so many er-
rors.
It gets some of its legislative news
correct, because it has a perfectly good
pair of "Keen-Kutter" scissors and a
copy of the Times-Union always on
hand.

DOTTING SOME I'S AND
CROSSING SOME T'S.
(Continued from page Four)
campaign pledged himself to woman
suffrage, says:
"Whatever else may be said of
Governor Catts's'message to the Leg-
islature, he showed a deplorable lack
of progressiveness when he failed to
urge the granting of the ballot to
women.
But regardless of the failure of the
Governor to rise to a great opportu-
nity, it is to be sincerely hoped the
Legislature will not fail in its duty
to grant equal rights to one-half of
our citizens. Even 'barbarous Russia'
has enfranchised her women. Will
the great State of Florida allow Rus-
sia to go a step beyond it in the es-
tablishment of equal rights and privi-
leges to her people?
"If the European war has justified
itself in any one way, it is in the refu-
tation of the arguments that women.
should not enjoy full citizenship privi-
leges because they cannot perform the
full duties of citizens. Premier As-
quith declared before parliamentV the
other day that the women of Great
Britain have 'worked out their own
salvation.' They have earned the right
to vote, if any body of citizens, male
or female, ever earned it. Mr. As-
quith told the literal truth when he
said that 'the war could not be carried
on without them"
"They have not only given the gov-
ernment their support and endured
uncomplainingly all the sorrowful
burdens that fall upon a nation's wo-
men in wartime. They have deliber-
ately, and gladly assumed heavy bur-
dens that are usually thought of as
belonging only to men. In all depart-
ments of the national life, in all
branches of industry, they have taken
men's places, releasing those men for
military service and thereby serving
their country as effectively as if they
had entered the army themselves.
"It should not be overlooked that
British women, great as their services
and sacrifices have been, have done no
more than the women of France, and
perhaps no more than those of Ger-
many, Austria and Belgium. Certain-
ly they have done no more than the
women of the United States and the
State of Florida will do in time of
national peril.
"If the present Florida Legislature
fails to enact legislation granting the
franchise to the women of this State,
their failure will rebound -to their ev-
erlasting discredit, and for two more
years will place Florida, in the rear
ranks of political progress and make
of this State a straggler in the onward
march of true Democracy."
A friend of mine who recently cut
his mustache insisted that in revolu-
tonary days and for fifty years after-
wards nearly all men wore a mustache,
but he is very much mistaken. From
George Washington down to Lincoln
the Presidents all had smooth faces.
Out of 28 Presidents only nine allowed
hair to grow on their faces--Lincoln,
Grant, Garfield, Arthur and Harrison
wore beards, and Cleveland, Taft and
Roosevelt adorned themselves with a
mustache.
Two new suburbs of Jacksonville
have made wonderful strides. These
are Brentwood and Murray Hill. Both
are peopled with a high class of citi-
zens and both easily accessible to the
heart of the city. In Brentwood thou-
sands of dollars were spent by the
company in splendid pavements of oc-


tagon cement blocks, but in some por-
tions they have been neglected and
grass and weeds are injuring the same.
Brentwood, already attractive and an
ideal location for a home, would be
greatly improved if proper care was
taken of the pavements that surround
the unoccupied property.


I


IP IT'S RIGHT
WE ARE FOR IT


L. S. Light, of Marion county, is
"Old Facts and Figures" of the State
Legislature. He is one of the hard-
est workers in the present session and
will be a factor in the passage of much
legislation.
i^ .x _j


He opposes increasing pensions, and
in doing so gives out some startling
figures in an article in the Ocala Ban-
. ner which, in part, is as follows:
"Look at these facts. We had on
the pension roll, January 1, 1917, five
thousand forty-nine pensioners; and
on January 1, 1907, we had about
thirty-two hundred pensioners. In the
last ten years the number of pension-
ers has increased 1,849. The'total
amount paid out for pensions last year
was $832,366.72, and the amount in
1907-ten years ago-was $357,010.47,
or an increase of $475,356.29.
"Alabama pays $80 per year; Ar-
kansas, $80; Florida, $163.20; Georgia,
$64.60; Louisiana, $96; Mississippi,
$54.32; Missouri, $120; South Caro-
lina, $96; Tennessee, .$118.90; Texas,
$100; Virginia, $39-and the Florida
Legislature wants to pay $360 per
year.
"A pension bill of $360 per year
means a tax of $1,817,640 per year,
against $832,366.72, an increase of
nearly $1,000,000 per year. It means
a six mills pension tax.
"The total State and county taxes
ten years ago was $4,600,000. In 1917
it will reach $14,000,000, an increase
of 300 per cent in ten years; popula-
tion increase, 42 per cent.
"Say, where are we drifting? What
of the future?"


L. S. LIGHT '


I


I


Governor Catts has, really declared
that he will be a candidate for Presi-
dent of the United States. He does
not say that he will be a candidate for
the Democratic nomination. He will
very likely aspire to be nominated by
the New American Party. There is
not the remotest danger of Catts being
seriously considered by a Democratic
National Conven'tion;, ,
Mr. Catts is clearly within his rights
to run for President. Belva Lockwood
and Eugene V. Debbs Were candidates
-even General Coxey, of Coxey's Ar-
my, and Dr. Mary Walker announced
that they were candidates for Presi-
dent.
Catts knows the value of advertis-
ing and he knows how to make money
through collections and charging ad-
mission to see and to hear him.
That Catts will run for President
means much for Florida. It will re-
quire his absence from the'State dur-
ing a large part of his administration.
However, it also means that he will
not be a candidate for United States


Senator against Senator Fletcher, who
will be a candidate for re-election in
the same campaign Catts is making
his tour'
This substantiates the statements
made by many of Catts' friends that
he will be a candidate of a new politi-
cal party for President and if defeated
will return to Florida and make a fight
as an independent candidate for Uni-
ted States Senator against Senator
Trammell.
If Catts will make his presidential
race, as he says he will, it .is quite
sure that; he will not carry a State in
the Union-it is quite sure that he
will therefore be a candidate against
Park Trammell for the Senate.
Buit let Mr. Catts say that he will
submit his claims to the Democratic
National Convention. He claimed he
was a Democrat during the campaign
and many of his followers believed he
was. There are men now claiming to
be Democrats, and others, licking salt
out of his hands, who are pulling
chestnuts out of the fire for Catts..


For God's sake!


Members of the Legislature:


Catch the Governor while the catching is good.
Lasso each "Gardeen" as they get to Tallahassee and '"bull-pen"
them before they absorb a State job, and get, disqualified.
This Governor's OWN regiment must be evolved, or papacy will
be enthroned on the old red hills of Leon.


FAMILY DESERTERS.

The Legislature is being asked by organized interests, for the
, protection of women and children, in placing a statute on the books
of Florida that should pass without a dissenting vote.
This law authorizes the earnings of criminals who'desert their
families to be partly applied to the maintenance of the deserted
family.
This is a good law bristling with horse-sense merit.
The habitual cry of "unconstitutionalism'" should have no weight
here.
The "General Welfare" clause of the Constitution, as well as
public policy is solidly behind this bill. ,
Laws to restrict the hours of labor in behalf of women and chil-
dren have been enacted in the legislation of today, in spite of the
cry that it impairs the rights of contract, and is therefore unconsti-
tutional.
But, the General Welfare clause an (] the principle of public policy
obtained. '' : : :
In the same degree, should this law male wife and family de-
serters help pay the upkeep of these unfortunate victims of society.
Jailing the criminal deserter may appease the wrath of the State,
but unless this bill becomes a law, the State has wreaked equal pun-
ishment on the guilty and innocent alike.
Pass it, and let the constitutional question be raised in the courts
and not in the Legislature.


APPROVED.

This is a bully Legislature.
It does things so very much right that it is composed of real
human beings and not empty theorists.-
Take for instance its attitude on the propositions that tend to
the genuine elevation of the entire plane of our people on certain
vexed questions.
The Legislature promptly passed the Constitutional Amendment
submitting the question of State-wide prohibition to the voters of
the State of Florida.
This was right.
The question will not down.
It should therefore go, as the greatest and most paramount issue
of the day, before the people for settlement
The Legislature is protecting dry counties. who have voted "dry"
under the provisions of the "Well's Bill."
This is right.
The Wet Counties have no right to run their pipe lines in dry
territory when its people has emphaticaiy spoken.
The Legislature is about to kill bills which are aimed at prohibit-
ing clean and instructive motion pictures being displayed on Sunday.
This is right.
The Legislature has the right sense of proportion on this propo-
sition.
A-proper screen subject on Sunday is no different logically than
an instructive and edifying lecture or sermon.
If they are wholesome in depicting life's episodes,-if refined,
patriotic and elevating, they do good instead of harm.
It is a step in the ,.right direction.
The Legislature can safely let regulation of this kind of public
entertainment and recreation in the hands of local environments
and ordinances.,


HANG OUT THE FLAG,
There is no flag so leautiful asthe
Stars and Stripes. Thereis Ipone that
has within its form and coeaifi'much
meaning. There is none whose sym-
bols signify so fully and completely
the aspirations of humanity in relation
to government. There is none that
speaks with voice so clear and a note
so sweet to the heart of the patriot.
There is none that stands for so much
in human advancement and human
sympathy. There is none whose his-
tory is more glorious, nor whose folds
are so stainless. It is the emblem not
merely of the American, government
and the American nation, but of the
principles upon which this nation and
this government are founded, i It is a
flag to love and to revere and when-
ever the great heart of the American
people swells with the emotion of pa-
triotism, whenever circumstances arise
to draw us from the contemplation of
our individual necessities and desires
to the consideration of emergencies in-
volving national rights and national
honor, it is through the flag that we
can give the best and quickest and
most inspiring expression fo the senti-


ments that every American holds with-
in him.
To "hang our banners on the outer
wallis" in these days that try men's
,soulhr is no proof of patriotism, nor
failure to do so an evidence of lack of
it, for the vilest traitor may wave a
flag and the sincerest patriot may be
least disposed to display his feelings,
But it is in the nature of the simple
and beautiful rite, an individual offer-
ing upon the altar of national life and
national conscience. When its glori-
ous symbols are repeated and again
reepated until every vista flames with
its colors, it needs then no words to
explain their meaninf, it needs then
no words to show that American hearts
are beating in unison to a tune that
ever falls upon the American ear as a
mandate to veneration and as an 'in-
spiration to action.
"Oh, say, can you see by the dawn's
early light
What so proudly we hailed at the twi-
light's last gleaming-
Whose broad stripes and bright stars
through the perilous fight
O'er the ramparts we watched were so
gallantly streaming."
-St. Louis Globe-Democrat.


J. E. WARD, Special Agent,
Lakeland, Florida.


E. HARE, Special Agent,
Jacksonville, Florida.


P


DIXIE


May Run Against Trammell


AGENTS IN EVERY TOWN IN FLORIDA

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GIRARD FIRE & MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY OF PHILADELPHIA
NORWICH UNION FIRE INSURANCE SOCIETY OF ENGLAND, LTD.
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PHOENIX INSURANCE CO., OF LONDON, MARINE DEPT.
NORD-DEUTSCHE INSURANCE CO., AUTOMOBILE DEPT.
NATIONAL FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY OF HARTFORD
STATE ASSURANCE COMPANY OF, LIVERPOOL, LTD.
LONDON ASSURANCE CORPORATION OF LONDON
BRITISH UNDERWRITERS AGENCY
THI LONDON UNDERWRITERS



H. C. HARE & CO., General Agents


Jacksonville, Fla. H.





2AM


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CALLING AT CHARLESTON, S. C.


THE FINKST COASTWISE VESSELS AFLOAT

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_


A Card to Owners

of Rural Telephone Lines


We are anxious to see that all lines owned by
other parties and connected with us are kept in such
condition as to furnish efficient service. Where the
owners of rural lines are responsible for their upkeep,


Covered in Paragraphs


THE BOND & BOURS CO.


HARDWARE


S. C. Johnsons & Son's
Wood Finishes and Wax


Special Sale Granite Ware


Box 226, Jacksonvlle, Fla.


I ., II -


---


21


5


A Truthful Presentation of the Plans of Some,- Which
Clearly Show the "Nigger in the Woodpile."


THE $500.00 THAT MISCARRIED


An Open Letter'Addressed to the Board as a Whole and
the Secretary in Particular.


A FEW PERTINENT QUESTIONS


On date of March 1, the press of
Florida gave much space to the an-
nouncement that the entire Board of
Eclectic Medical Examiners had been
removed by the Governor, the news
item being as follows:
"Tallahassee, March 1.-A genuine
stir was caused in official circles here
this morning when Governor Catts, in
a signed statement, declared vacant
the offices of the three members of the
State board of eclectical medical ex-
aminers, Dr. George L. Dickerson,
Jacksonville; Frank E. Gavals, Lake
Worth, and V. K. Jindra, Tampa,
charging the issuance of licenses for
$300 to $500, on diplomas from extinct
and dead colleges. The governor as-
serts that two or three deaths have
been caused by mal-practice of fake
doctors to whom false licenses were
issued:
"In his statement the governor de-
clares that it has come to his knowl-
edge that these men have been 'giving
fake doctors diplomas and licenses
from extinct and dead colleges for
from $300 to $500,' and also 'that these
fake doctors to whom were issued false
license and diplomas have practiced in
several communities in Florida and
have caused the, death of some two or
three people by their mal-practice and
lack of knowledge of medicine.' "
This is in substance the charge up-
on which I was arrested on Saturday,
Jacksonville; Frank, E. Gavlas, Lake
February 3rd, as I set forth in
another column, and with the re-
sult as stated to substantiate
which, I quote the following from
the Court Record of February 13th, be-
fore Judge DuBose of Jacksonville:
Mr. McNeil (attorney for Drs. Dick-
erson and Jindra)-If the court please,
before we proceed any further with
this hearing, on behalf of Dr. Dicker-
son-not on behalf of Dr. Jindra-I
want to object to all of this conversa-
tion between Dr. Lopez and Dr. Jin-
dra. It was not shown that Dr. Dick-
erson was present, and consequently it
could not affect him. I just want to
get this objection in the record, so the
court will have it in mind as we go
along.
The Court-Yes, proper objection,
the court rules.
Mr. Burton (attorney for State-We
don't insist upon the court holding Dr.
Dickerson under this charge. The
charge we shall insist upon will be
that we hold Dr. Jindra under this
charge.
Mr. McNeill-Do I understand that
you are going to dismiss as to Dr.
Dickerson ?
Mr. Burton-Well, that will be what
we will do. We will dismiss.
Mr. McNeill-You, then, dismiss as
to Dr. Dickerson?
Mr. Burton-As to Dr. Dickerson, if
the court will allow us to do it. We
will discharge the matter so far as Dr.
Dickerson is concerned.
The Court--Yes, it is agreeable to
the court, and the court so rules, UP-
ON REQUEST OF THE STATE.
This charge against Dr. Jindra was
dismissed at a later hearing, as it was
shown that he was not then, and never
had been a member of the Eclectic
Board of Medical Examiners for the
State of Florida.
Examiners on account of above
charges, which the State admitted
could not be substantiated, and was


dismissed ON REQUEST OF THE
STATE.
Dr. Gavlas was dismissed without
any charge of any character being
made against him, as far as I am able
to ascertain, other than the general
charge set forth above.
Dr. Jindra was dismissed FROM A
POSITION HE NEVER HELD, as Dr.
Jindra had never acted in any capacity
with the Board, and had never been
a part of it.
After these charges were dismissed
other charges were filed against both
Dr. Jindra and myself, virtually for
failure to do what these. charges said
we did do. (These charges still pend-
ing, we will not discuss them at this
time).
Why all this turmoil ? Why so anx-
ious to "TRAP" someone as the legis-
lative session draws near? Who is
paying the bills in all this. Five hun-
dred dollars in cash has been used to
bait the trap, and where does it come
from ?
READ FROM THE COURT RECORD.
Question to Lopez-Did you bring
that $200 from Arcadia with you ?
Answer-Yes, I brought the $200
from the DeSoto National Bank of Ar-
cadia, Fla., with me.
Question-Drew it out before you
left there?
Answer-Yes, I drew it out of MY
BANK ACCOUNT.
The Palatka News, under date of
March 9, through its editorial columns,
says:
"But the real credit for the work
must be handed to Dr. E. W. Warren
of Palatka, who as President of the
Florida State Medical Association, and
with the full authority of that associa-
tion, spent TIME and MONEY in se-
curing the evidence * It cost
Dr. Warren $600 to secure this evi-
dence."
DID THIS $500 GO TO BAIT THE
TRAP THAT THE ECLECTIC
BOARD OF MEDICAL EXAMINERS
WERE SUPPOSED TO NIBBLE?
$500 WAS THE "BAIT," the other
$100 would be barely sufficient to de-
fray other expense.
The whole thing to date sifted down
resolves itself to this plain fact. Dr.
Lopez employed Dr. Jindra to assist
him in securing duplicate of his diplo-
ma which Lopez swore under' oath, be-
fore notary public, that he had lost.
For this service Lopez was to pay Dr.
Jindra a specific sum of money, as is
evidenced by a contract properly ex-
ecuted. Is this unreasonable? Will
Dr. Lopez advise us as to the cost of
obtaining the credentials upon which
the Regular Board of Medical Exam-
iners issued him his temporary license
as set forth in the columns opposite?
Again I ask the question: WHY
THIS TURMOIL? IS IT A MOVE
TO DISCREDIT THE ECLECTIC
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE? SHOULD
THE ECLECTIC SCHOOL OF MEDI-
CINE BE DENOUNCED FOR
THINGS "SUPPOSED" TO HAVE
BEEN COMMITTED BY ITS BOARD
OF EXAMINERS? IF I, AS SEC-,
RETARY OF THAT BOARD HAVE
COMMITTED AN OFFENSE
AGAINST THE STATE OF FLOR-
IDA, I SHOULD BE MADE PAY
THE PENALTY, AND NOT THE
ECLECTIC SCHOOL AT LARGE.
DR. GEO. L. DICKERSON,
Ex-Secretary Florida Board of Eclec-
Medical Examiners. (Adv.)


The Medical Profession of the State
of Florida, including all Schools of
Medicine, are interested in the pro-
posed new legislation, as set forth in
a New Medical Practice Act liow in
the hands of the Legislative bodies.
It is a question in the minds of many
as to whether we need MORE legisla-
tion or a better enforcement of the
Acts now .on the Statute Books. The
Eclectic School has been severely criti-
cized on account of alleged irregulari-
ties on the part of its board, which
ALLEGED IRREGULARITIES re-
sulted in its dismissal.
A careful investigation of these "ir-
regularities" shows that but one mem-
ber was accused, and accusations were
withdrawn as far as they appertained
to him, at the preliminary hearing. In
brief, the following constitutes the en-
tire charge:
Dr. L. from Arcadia, Florida, ap-
plied to the Secretary of the Eclectic
Board for license to practice Medicine,
accompanying his application with a
membership certificate in some Asso-
ciation of a Northern city, which he al-
leged was an Eclectic Body. A Cer-
tificate was denied him on account of
the character of his credentials. He
then said he was a graduate of a Mex-

ican School of Eclectic Medicine, had
lost his diploma in a ship wreck, and
asked for a temporary on this creden-
tial, which was denied.
Prosecution was then instituted
against this Dr. L. at Arcadia for prac-
ticing without a license, and he was
arrested charged with this offense. At
this stage of the proceeding Dr. L. in-
terested another party in his behalf,
and offered to pay for his services in
attempting to get him (Lopez) a dutp-
licate of his lost credentials, and made
affidavit in writing before a notary
public, setting forth the Eclectic In-
stitutions he had attended. Armed
with this sworn statement another ap-
peal was made to the Secretary of the
Eclectic Board for a temporary, and
Dr. L. again refused.
HERE THE TRAP "SPRUNG."
It seemed to be the belief of the
Regular Board that with all these
facts set forth, and Dr. L. having paid
a fixed sum of money to the third par-
ty, that the Eclectic Board of.Medical
Examiners would waste no time in the
issuing of a ,license even without a
diploma or the formality of an exam-
ination, and in their certainty, a war-
rant was sworn out for the Secretary
of the Eclectic Board about eleven in
the morning, charging that he had ac-
cepted an unlawful sum of money for
the issuing of a license to L. and had
issued same without an examination,
when in reality not one cent had been
paid said Secretary, and no license had
been issued to L. either with or with-
out an examination. It was in this
connection that the charges against
the Secretary were withdrawn by the
State.
At the hearing on this case before
Hon. Judge DuBose, of Jacksonville,
Florida, on February 13th, the follow-
ing facts were brought out, and are a
part of the Court Record in said Case:
Burton, (Attorney for L.)-Now
Doctor, (meaning L), speak out loud-
ly and as plainly as possible. What is
your name ?
Lopez-Frank P. Lopez.
Burton-Where are you living, Doc-
tor?
Lopez---Arcadia, Florida.
Burton-What is your profession?
Lopez-A doctor.
Burton-State from what school ypu
graduated.
L.-National School of Medicine in
Mexico and the American College of
Mechanotherapy.
B.-Have you 'a diploma from the


University of Mexico?
L.-No, sir; it was lost.
B.-Under what circumstances, Doc-
tor, was your diploma from the Uni-
versity of Mexico lost ?
L.-Destroyed in, a ship wreck.
B.-Have you a license to practice
Medicine in this State?
L.-NO, I HAVE NOT.
B.-Was your diploma lost before
you came into this State?
L.-YES.
REMEMBER THE DATE OF THIS
HEARING, FEB. 13th, AND NOTE
THIS:
TEMPORARY LICENSE
TO PRACTICE MEDICINE IN
THE STATE OF FLORIDA,
WHEREAS, Dr. F. P. Lopez has
made application to the undersigned,
duly appointed members of the Regu-
lar Board of Medical Examiners, for
temporary License to practice medi-
cine, and having undergone a satisfac-
tory examination, License is hereby
granted to practice 'the above profes-
sion in the State of Florida until the
next semi-annual meeting of said
Board of Medical Examiners.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF we have
herewith set our hands this the 7th
DAY OF FEB., A. D. 1917.
A. R. BOND, M. D.
E. W. WARREN, M. D., Sec.
Members Regular Board of Medical
Examiners State of Florida.
(Seal) Expires June 18, 1917.
A true copy of the original filed
March 3, 1917.
A. L. DURRANCE, Clerk Ct. Ct.
By M. A. MOYE, D. C.
A LITTLE MORE "LIGHT."
Section 1165, Statutes State of Flor-
ida, reads:
"It shall be the duty of said board
of examiners (referring to all medical
boards) to examine thoroughly every
applicant for certificate of qualifica-
tion to practice medic ie in any of its
branches or departments, UPON PRO-
DUCTION OF-HIS MEDICAL DI-
PLOMA from a recognized College or
in event said applicant shall have lost
his diploma, or same shall have BEEN
DESTROYED PRIOR TO THE YEAR
1870, then upon satisfactory evidence
to such boards of such loss or destruc-
tion, etc.
HERE ARE THE QUESTIONS.
UPON WHAT AUTHORITY DID
THE REGULAR BOARD OF MEDI-
CAL EXAMINERS ISSUE A LI-
CENSE TO THIS DR. F. P. LOPEZ?
Was it not issued in open violation
of the laws of the State of Florida,
and did riot this Board violate the peace
and dignity of this great State in so
doing ?
These are questions we would like
answered. Lopez swore on Feb. 13th
that he did not have a license, and that
he had no diploma. The Public records
of DeSoto County show that he did
have a license on that date, that it was
issued six days previous, and MUST
HAVE BEEN ISSUED WITHOUT A
DIPLOMA, AND IN DIRECT VIO-
LATION OF ABOVE QUOTED SEC-
TION 1165.
Why was a License issued this Dr.
Lopez when he was still under prose-
cution for practicing without license?
The regular Board of Medical Ex-
aminers are crying for more power.
Would it not seem that they already
possess too much authority?
What Florida needs is an enforce-
ment of 'her existing Medical Laws,
and not the enacting of a law giving
more power to a class of physicians
that are either possessed of too much
power, or have little regard for the
Statutes of .the State.
DR. GEO. L. DICKERSON,
Ex-Secretary Eclectic Board of Medi-
cal Examiners.
111 West Forsyth St., Jacksonville.
(Adv.) *


artistic Ancient City.


Course thorough, 'em-


bracing all branches requisite for a solid and
refined education. Music, painting, lanMguages,
commercial course. Terms moderate.

For fall particulars write

SISTER SUPERIOR.


A. W. PYE, Passenger Traffic Manager
H. G. WENZEL, FlbOrida Passenger Agent


Pier 1, NJ R New York
Jacksonvile, Fla.


we want to co-operate with them.
All lines require a thorough overeauling
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If the owners of rural telephone lines in this sec-
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will appreciate their talking the matter over with our
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dition of your line.


SOUTHERN BELL TELEPHONE
AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY \L @ J


Governor Catts for President! Plat-
form-"The pardon of a convicted
criminal."
Even the Cattocratic Jacksonville
Metropolis was ashamed to publish
Catts' letter to Attorney-General
Gregory.
A lot of secrets leak out from Tal-
lahassee, these days.
Burke may be a good campaign
manager, but an awful poor censor. *
Of course the letter to the Attorney-
General was inspired-and came by
way of Tibet.
Hayes Lewis believes Florida Crack-
ers will indorse Catts' letter about
Woodrow Wilson.
Catts cries for his Blake CampbelJ.
Mr. Catts forgets that a banker who
steals is no better in law than a negro
who steals a chicken.
"I'm going to get this pardon for
Blake Campbell," is Catts' defiant
declaration to the powers in Washing-
ton.
Up to the present writing Catts has
not made good his promise to resign
and go to war.
The country calls to war-but Catts
calls for Blake Campbell's pardon.
Wonder what the Cattocratic legis-
lators think of the "brains" of the
"incarnation" now?
And think of it-some legislators
would create more jobs for the Gov-
ernor to fill by his personal friends.
Give to Catts the power to appoint
a board of medical examiners? God
forbid!


To the Cattocrats who were deceived
-"Laugh, dam you, laugh."
Governor Catts is a good witness-
he is proving all the charges made by
Dixie.
The Democrats have their inning
now. Just let the calf have more rope.
Too busy writing fool letters, to say
any prayers these. days.
We would like some satire fron,.
"Henry Clay," covering "Catts' epis-
tles to Gregory."
Nay, Nay, Pauline. Neither George
Powell nor Jim Hodgesh wrote that
epistle. It came "straight from the
shoulder."

The farm boy who yoked himself to
a fractious yearling, cried: "Here we
come-damn our fool souls-Head us,
somebody." This 'has no application,
of course, to a well-known lawyer who
yoked himself with Catts.
- If it's a good letter, go on and pub-
lish it, ye Cattocrats.
Catts' war on the Teutons is con-
fined to his vocal organs. He has not
yet resigned, as he promised.
"Worse men than Blake are out."
No doubt about it. Some haven't been
"cotched" yet.

Shame on any intelligent Floridian
that will indorse the letter to Gregory.
The Governor insists that he will
remove all officers whose books are not
straight. He feels different about one
former employee of a national bank
who was convicted of robbing the in-
stitution.
Poor Florida-Catts is making it the
laughing stock of the nation.


Notfee of Applieation for Tax Deed Un-
der Seetion 575 of the General Statutes.
Notice is hereby given that J. R. Don-
ohue, purchaser of Tax Certificate No.
1971, dated the Sd day of August. A. D.
1914, has filed said certificate in my of-
fice and has made application for tax
deed .to issue In accordance with law.
Said certificate embraces the following
described property situated In Duval
County, Florida, to-wit: Lot 8 Block 8,
Barbers subdiv. E. I. Hendricks Grant,
Sec. 40, T. 2, S. R. 26 E. The said land


being assessed at the date of the isu-
ance of such certificate in the name of
H. W. Barber. Unless said certificate
shall be redeemed according to law, tax
deed will Issue thereon on the 2d day
of May, A. D. 1917.
Witness my official signature and
seal this the 27th day of March, A. D.
1917.
(Seal.) PRANK BROWN.
Clerk Circuit Court, Duval C o, .
By C. H. SMITH, Deputy Clerk.
(mar31-ap28)


DIXIEm


IP ITS RIGHT WE ARE FOR IT-APRIL 21, 1917.


Inside Facts Regarding Attention! Regular Board


Charges Against Eclec- of Medical Examiners,


ST. JOSEPHi'S ACADEMY


St. Augustine, Fla.

(ESTABLISHED 1866)

High-class boarding school for young ladies in
charge of Sisters of St. Joseph. Patronized by
children of best Catholic and non-Catholic fam-
ilies of this and other States. Buildings splen-
didly equipped with all modern conveniences.
Delightful and healthy location in quaint and


tic Medical Board


State of Florida


10 WEST BAY STREET.


PHONE 26.


Plate Glass WindowsALetteredE





-


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M


DOTTING SOME PS AND CROSSING SOME T'S

(By Cha. B. Jonm)


The Bank of.

South Jacksonville

SOUTH JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

'

STATE, COUNTY and
CITY DEPOSITORY







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Under-musAim
ASK YOUR STORE TO SHOW
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Burbridge & Higbee


INSURANCE
REAL STATE
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Bell Phone No. 1845


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Surface Griading.
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JOB PRINTING
BANDY PRINTING CO.
A Print Shop of Today
Both Phones. 128 W. Bay St.


CANEPA
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202 Florida Ave.
Phone 4287

SATISFACTION





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The ARAGON HOTEL
SAYS
Their Club Breakfast,25c. up,
Their Midday Lunch, 40c,
Their Evening Dinner, 75c,
Can't be surpassed anywhere.
"You'll feel at home here."
A. A. Langhorne, Manager
H. W. Johnson, Asst. Manager.




Gonzalez & Sanchez


A name known everywhere
among the discriminating
smokers, unexcelled-a de-
light to all who use cigars

ASK ANY DEALER


Blake Campbell Is "Located"
Scores of telephone messages to Dixie made the inquiry: "Who is
Blake Campbell that Catts wants out of the penitentiary in Atlanta?"
The answer comes from the Gainesville Sun, which contains the
following:
"A prominent citizen of Gainesville who resided in Alabama at the
time of Campbell's conviction, informs The Sun that he (Campbell) is
a BROTHER-IN-LAW of GOVERNOR CATTS; that he was a book-
keeper in the First National Bank of Montgomery, of which A. M. Bald-
win was president; THAT CAMPBELL WAS CONVICTED IN THE
FEDERAL COURT OF THE EMBEZZLEMENT OF SOME EIGHTEEN


T. C. Morris S. W. Allen
NEW SOUTH VULCANIZING
WORKS .
T. C. MORRIS, Manager
\
Agents For
SMICHELIN, GOODYEAR and
DAYTON AIRIESS TIRES
Phones: Bell 3761 Home M-2029

820 W. Adams St. Jacksonville, Fla.
/


T. Murphy


IRON WORKS

A GREAT MODERN PLANT,
WITH SKILL IN EVERY
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.$
610 E. Bay Street
JacksoaviUle, Fla.


I__, _


In Court of the County Judge, Dural
County, State of Florida.
In re Estate of Samuel P. Sligh, De-
ceased.
To all Creditors, Legatees, Distribu-
tees and all persons having Claims
or Demands against said state:
You, and each of you, are hereby no-
tified and required to present any
clais d e a present any
claims and demands which you, or
either of you, may have against the
estate of -Samuel P. Sligh, deceased,
late of Duval County, Florida, to the
undersigned Executrix of said estate,
within two years from the date hereof.
Dated February 28th, A. D. 1917.
SALLIE A. GAMBLE,
Executrix of Last Will and Testa-
ment of Samuel P. Sligh, Dee'd.
(mar8-apr28)
die in trenches, are calling Jeannette
Rankin a coward. Such men might
question the Nazarine tears and imply
'cowardice" when the shortest verse
in the Bible, "Jesus wept," is brought
to their attention.
The Daytona Journal, a strong par-
tisan of Governor Catts, who in the
(Continued on paqp Two)


Timber Lands


farming Lands


Trucking Lands


Colonization Tracts




ARTHUR T. WILLIAMS
JaduiivMe, ilk.
*



Forty yea in the Real Estate
Bubim In Thk Stat


Oh! say, can you see by the dawn's early light,
What so proudly we hail'd at the twilight's last gleaming,
Whose broad stripes and bright stars through the perilous
fight,
O'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly stream-
ing?
And the rocket's red glare, and bombs bursting in air,
Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there!
Oh! say, does the star-spangled banner yet wave
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave?


On the shore dimly seen through the mist of the deep,
Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes,
What is that which the breeze o'er the towering steep,
As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses ?
Now it catches the gleam of the morning's first beam,
In full glory reflected, now shines in the stream;
'Tis the star-spangled banner. Oh! long may it wave
O'er the land of the free aind the home of the brave.


And where is that band who so vauntingly swore,
'Mid the havoc of war and the battle's confusion,
A home and a country they'd leave us no more?
Their blood has washed out their foul footsteps' pollution;
No refuge could save the hireling and slave
From the terror of flight, or the gloom of the grave,
And the star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave.


Oh! thus be it ever, when freemen shall stand,
Between their loved home and war's desolation;
Blest with victory and peace, may the Heaven-rescued
land
Praise the Power that made and preserved us a
nation.
Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just,
And this be our motto, "In God is our trust."
And the star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave.


1917


I like to discuss things with my
friend Absalom Russell, of the Palmet-
to News, when he neglects, to dip his
pen in vitrolic ink. In reply to my
charge that Catts said there would be
no sumptuary laws in his administra-
tion, friend Russell says he does not
know whether Catts meant liquor leg-
islation or not, and that sumptuary
laws could apply to opium, and not
whiskey, and whiskey and not opium,.
Why of course it can, but Catts said
NO sumptuary laws. Sumptuary laws
derives the name from Sumptus, a Lat-
' in name, meaning "expense." Sump-
tuary laws has ever meant and means
today a restraint of excess in food,
dress or drink, or of any luxury. Lux-
ury means those things that excessive-
ly gratify an appetite and which are
not necessaries. Intoxicating liquors
are not and have never been necessi-
ties of life, but a shameful menace
which has fastened-a herculean grasp
on countless millions of men. Modern-
ly applied, sumptuary laws are pro-
hibition laws. It may be that Mr.
Catts did not know this, and not know-
ing the meaning of the word, he used
it because it sounded good.
Friend Russell charges that I have
never commented Catts for anything
he did. I stand ready to praise him
for the things he does worthy of
praise. I have praised him for telling
an Atlanta audience that he would re.-
sign as Governor at once and organize
a regiment and go to war. I stand
ready to give him more praise where
he resigns.
I believe his "Friend of Convict"
proposition is most meritorious. While
it did not originate with him, he is
championing it and is doing so in a
most commendable manner.
I cannot endorse his letter to the
Attorney-General of the United States
and a lot of other foolish things he
does which subject the whole State tc
ridicule.
I am more than pleased to have Mr.
Russell say that he stands ready tc
criticize Catts when Catts deserves it,.
Now, Mr. Jussell, you are a careful
reader of Jacksonville's daily news-
papers, .and you have proved that you
are a careful reader of Dixie. You
are therefore aware of the fact thai
every night in leading hotels in Jack-
sonville hundreds of men and women,
for three months under Catts' admin-
istration, gathered to drink intoxicat-
ing liquors around tables where
women dance and sing.
Mr. Russell, you are familiar with
the laws of Florida. You are there-
fore aware that this law was violated
by hundreds every day in Jacksonville.
You know that the attention of these
violations was repeatedly called to the
attention of Governor Catts. As you
are the Governor's friend and defender,
I ask you why he ignored for 3 months
these violations ? Is it because being
too busy to pray he was too busy to
give such "small matters" his consid-
eration? Among the prominent pro-
hibitionists of Florida is Editor Rus-
sell of Palmetto, and now, Mr. Russell,
I accept your proffer. Please tell me
what was Catts afraid of that he al-
lowed these violations?

There are ma ,y things that I think
of that would be of material aid in
this great world war. One thing that
has impressed me is the proper dis-
posal of the big army of men who are
prisoners. In this State hundreds are
in prison farms and in jails whose of-
fenses do not stamp them as hardened
criminals. There are at least one
thousand in Florida who are incarcer-
ated who are not criminals at heart.
To care for this thousand costs the tax-
payers at least 50 cents each per diem,
which aggregates $182,000 a year.
Most of these men would like to go to
war. They would love to fight for
their country. Victims of misfortune,
it is true, but not disloyal to country.
Accustomed to hardships, they could
could stand the hardships of the sol-
dier. Unless there is a speedy ter-
mination of the struggle, this is a
problem that must be considered. In
our city we have 10,000. arrests a year
for misdemeanors. Many of these are
sent to Jail. In the county we have a
large number every month who are ar-
rested on minor charges, and the ex-
pense is enormous. Not one-tenth of
the city prisoners are criminals. They
merely violate the ordinances. Can
we not find some way to secure the
services of these people?

By a sweeping majority both houses
of the Florida Legislature passed the
resolution calling for an amendment
to the constitution to prohibit the sale
and manufacture of intoxicating
liquors in the State.
For some time past it has been evi-


dent that the cause of prohibition
would win, and it is also very clear
that the people of Florida will vote
favorably to the amendment.
While the prohibition wave has been
sweeping the nation with a -mighty
force during the past few years, it has
received no greater stimulus anywhere
than in Florida. This is largely due
to the arrogance of the liquor interests,
the leaders of which have flagrantly
violated all laws passed for the pur-
pose of regulating the business.
The greatest curse of the world has
been the excessive use of intoxicants,
and Florida will join the prohi. forces
enthusiastically. Crime will be les-
sened and a greater and a better State


will result. Thousands of men who
have indulged in intoxicants will be
among the most active champions of
prohibition. Prohibition will save
thousands of our young men and re-
deem thousands of older men. It may
Sbe that the liquor interests will make
a fight and the prohibition leaders
must necessarily conduct a campaign.
While success for the drys seems as-
. sured by a very large majority, the
forces of prohibition must continue ac-
tive in order to carry every county in
the State.
Duval county has stood heretofore
with the wets, but with proper work
this county will join the other counties
of the State in making Florida dry.
I usually agree with my congenial
and talented friend, Marion B. Jen-
nings, but it occurs to me that he
should not have opposed a negro regi-
ment in Florida. Of course this war
is going to be fought by white men-
directed by white men,-and won by
white men. There will be a large num-
ber of negro regiments from various.
States in the Union. They will per-
form their part in the crisis. Enjoy-
ing the privileges of this country, they
should fight, too, for its preservation.
As a rule,-I have very little confidence
in the negro race because its advance-
ment has been slow and too large an
element of it is comprised of the ig-
norant and vicious.
We are going to have many negro
regiments and I can see no reason why
Florida should have them all at home
-many to feed-many to secure jobs
which should go to white men.
Jacksonville would be benefited in
a negro regiment being organized
among the idlers of Reno. It would
be better if a regiment of the better
class of negroes was formed right
here in Jacksonville.

The declaration of war has been fol-
lowed by stamping lie upon the dec-
larations of Tom Watson, Joe Slattery
and others, who have charged the
Catholics with being enemies of this
country and by owing allegiance to a
foreign power could not be patriotic.
Since the declaration of war thousands
of Catholics have enlisted, exceeding


railroad interests of Florida. Even
the Times-Union, owned entirely by
the railroads, has been making goo-
goo eyes at the Governor, and dare not
criticize his freak acts which bring so
much ridicule on the State.
Everybody should talk planting and
do planting. In this crisis there must
be a community of interests. All hate
and discord must be buried and hu-
manity and love predominate. We
will all suffer together-we are all
Americans first.
Governor Catts may be unable to
have any of his pet measures seriously
considered by the Legislature, which
gives evidence of a session directed
by wisdom and justice. However, there
are some propositions he named in his
message that are meritorious and
should be enacted into law. But his
freak stuff should not even be serious-
ly considered. The indications are
that he will be unable to get the Leg-
islature to play his political game. If
every man of intelligence in Florida
should read Catts' letter to the Attor-
ney-General of the United States Flor-
ida will never hear of Catts after his
present term of office.
We want in every Southern town
especially strong organizations of
Home Guards. The people at home
willneed protection and the police au-
thorities are not sufficient to cope with
our needs.
The government of the United States
should at once regulate food prices in
this country. It is folly to wait until
forced to take this action. It will be
necessary.

The Salvation Army has been aided
for many years in this city. It has
performed good service, and now the
opportunity is offered for it to do the
greatest work yet. The Salvation
Army collects much money. It is a
rich institution. It has many indigent
men it can call into service. The Sal-
vation Army can and should at once
secure fifty acres of land near the city
and raise food products for the poor.
It should not sell a pound of anything.


community in Florida loves the flag
and it has marked the patriotism in ev-
ery exercise on Independence Day and
on every patriotic occasion.'
We want the flag to feature these
occasions in peace-in war we want
them everywhere. To compel, by law,
that the flag shall float from every
school seems to me to question the
patriotism of the young. Children
will know that it floats because the
law demands it. Much better, in my
opinion, would it be if used on special
occasions, backed by the patriotism of
both young and old. Never has there
been nor never will there be occasion
for compelling by law a respect of the
flag. The love for the stars and stripes
is deeply imbedded into the hearts of
all Americans, young and old.
While I commend the true patriotic
motives that prompt a desire for the
flag to float over every school, I fear
that it will not prove what is expected.
The jingoes rejoice to call the paci-
fists traitors, but the best of patriotic
blood runs through the veins of those
who want our young men for the fu-
ture glory of the country. While peace-
loving men and women everywhere do
not like war, they will stand true and
loyal against any enemy.
For many months Florida has been
invaded by a peculiar brand of patriots
who have not only urged war with a
foreign nation, but who have endeav-
ored to make ignorant people believe
that a certain church was an army of
traitors in this country. When war
clouds were thick we find the mem-
bers of the various organizations of
this country tender their services for
the nation-they stand ready to die
for love of country while the leaders
paid by some "patriotic" organization
have not even 'chirped." Any coward
can collectively attack any church, but
it takes a brave man who faces the
dangers of a cruel war.
The "Gardeens," organized as Cath-
olic haters and "nation savers," and
now is the time for them to practice
what they preach along lines of loving
their country.
/
At last, after a three months' fight
on the part of Dixie, the cabarets of
Jacksonville have been suppressed.
There is no question that Dixie
had aroused public sentiment here
against these flagrant violations
of the law--7there can be no doubt but
that this is another victory for Dixie.
Dixie made quite recently a vigorous
fight against several hundred gam-
bling punch boards operated in- this
city. This fight resulted in another
victory for Dixie, as they were sup-
pressed.
The cabarets were more difficult to
stop, but Dixie kept these violations
constantly before the people, who were
shocked at the extent of them.
Now there are other vices that need
attention. If the Davis package law
was rigidly enforced it would prove
more advantageous than any "dry"
measure the Legislature could pass.
Ninety per cent of the liquor clubs
were started 'for the sole purpose of
selling liquor. They could not stand
the legal test. Every one knows this
to be a fact. The Governor of Florida
-who for more than three months
permitted thousands to violate the
liquor laws-knows that these clubs
are illegal.
While the sheriff has ordered all
cabarets to stop operations, there will
be some who will try to violate the law,
but an eagle eye must be kept on them.
A sharp look-out alone will keep men
and women from drinking, singing and
dancing in places where liquor is sold.
The law is very plain. There can
be no music, singing and dancing in
any place where liquor is sold, served
or given away.
A committee of citizens should at
once be formed to aid the authorities
in the strict enforcement of all laws
regulating the sale of liquor. Some
men find many ways to conduct an il-
legal business, but with an organiza-
tion of determined men, great aid will
be given the authorities and much
crime will be suppressed in this city.
When called upon to vote on war and
peace, Congresswoman Jeannette Ran-
kin, with tears rolling down her
cheeks, said: "I want to stand by my
country, but I cannot vote for war."
From her heart's secret urn came
a feeling that she could not indorse a
resort to bloodshed.
Because she trembled and she wept,
some newspapers have ridiculed those
tears. Shame on any man who would
speak lightly of her and charge her
with weakness.


Back of those tears was every true
womanly instinct-the woman's hate
of war-a woman's love for peace.
The bravest women in all the world
-the Southern women-wept because
of war. The countless women of the
world today are the greatest sufferers
through the European conflict.
The tears of Jeannette Rankin was
no evidence of weakness. Washington
Irving never uttered truer words than
when he said that tear& were sacred
and not a mark of weakness, but of
power-that they spoke more elo-
quently than ten thousand tongues.
In fact, every tear of sorrow sown
brings forth a righteous pearl. Tears
have ever and always will humanize
the soul.
The jingoes, with no darling boys to


THOUSAND DOLLARS, for which
Federal prison."


he is now serving his sentence in a


that of any other denomination. W. T.
Clements, a recruiting officer for the
United States navy, says that in the
past year he has recruited 2,000 men
for the navy and forty-five per cent
were Catholics. This is a remarkably
good showing, and far exceeds the per-
centage of any three other denomina-
tions combined. The honest, truthful,
intelligent men of this whole country,
familiar with history, have never
doubted the loyalty of Catholics. In
order to prejudice ignorant ones in
communities where Catholics are few
in number politicians and paid hire-
lings have attacked them for political
purposes alone. The present war
promises to give the lie to these pro-
fessional politicians. Knights of Co-
lumbus everywhere have tendered their
services to this country. Whole coun-
cils of this organization have unani-
mously voted for resolutions pledging
their services for war. Up to this
writing the. "Gardeens," who have
been loudest in demands of patriotism,
have been somewhat quiet.
The effort to prevent innocent Sun-
day amusements has naught to com-
mend it. There is nothing that has
taken the people away from vices on
Sunday more than motion pictures.
The motion pictures have been the sa-
loon's worst enemy,
Then, again, there are thousands
who have no opportunity for rest and
recreation except on Sundays. Re-
move Sunday amusements and other
rates will be opened that are harmful.
The effort 'to legislate religion into
people never did and never will suc-
ceed.

Henry Clay Crawford's introduction
of Catts at the Leon Hotel banquet is
still discussed by people all over the
State, and now that Henry Clay has
got it out of his system will he please
tell us why he went to Tibet to find
an excuse for his eulogy?
Harry L. Brown is a congenial, clev-
er newspaper man, who, under the
chapronage of the East Coast Rail-
way, has taken an active interest in
political affairs. He has recently been
appointed a member of the school
board of St. Johns county. Mr. Catts
was fortunate in having the support of
so many men long identified with the


It has delivery wagons, and can afford
to feed a multitude. Unless the Sal-
vation Army now gets busy and pre-
pares to do something on a large scale
I would be in favor of an ordinance
denying them the privilege of collect-
ing money or goods in this city. Thou-
sands of dollars go into this army ev-
ery year, and now is the golden oppor-
tunity of feeding the unfortunates on
something besides salvation.
The Stuart Messenger takes excep-
tion to an article in Dixie calling atten-
tion to Catts' speech in Atlanta where-
by the Governor declared he would re-
sign and organize a regiment and go
to war. The Messenger says that the
Governor's patriotism was the subject
of ridicule. Mr. Catts has not yet re-
signed and has given us no opportunity
to observe his patriotism. I believe
Mr. Catts loves his country. I have
taken no stock in his patriotic speech-
es because he questioned the patriot-
ism of men just as loyal as he could
possibly be. I have iterated and I re-
iterate now that the men who in pub-
lic have boasted of their love for fight-
ing should not be deprived of the privi-
lege. Then, I believe Mr. Catts, for
the good of his country and for Flor-
ida, should resign and organize his
regiment. I have no doubt but that
he could be backed by a regiment just
as brave and just as loyal as he is.
The disposition on the part of the
city council to play politics in such
serious times as these is deplorable.
The council has many serious duties
to perform, and the sooner they buckle
down to constructive work the better
for the people of this city.
The prettiest flag in all the world is
the American flag. It represents more
than the flags of all other nations com-
bined. In times like this it should be
everywhere displayed. It is the dis-.
playing of these emblems on extraor-
dinary occasions that adds to the re-
spect of the same.
Some legislators favor a law pro-
viding that the flag should always
float from school houses. I question
the wisdom of this because it makes
the flag a matter of every-day view,
and through familiarity the proper re-
spect might be lessened. Every school
in Florida teaches patriotism. Every


IP IT'S RIGHT WE ARE FOR IT-APRIL 21, 1917.


DIXIB


0


A "THE STAR-SPANGI.ED BANNER" A9 Originally Written by FRANCIS SCOTT KEY, Sept. 14,1814


1870
J GUMBINGER CO.